29
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
Table 24. Outlook for SEN Required Investment 2005-2014 (US$ Millions)
Investment Type
Total 2004-2013
Percent of Total Investment
Generation
22,297
38
IPP: Combined Cycle Gas-Fired & Wind
3,884
32
7
Private Investment-OPF
33
7,626
13
CFE & LFC
2,212
4
Private, to be defined
8,574
14
Transmission
12,274
21
Private-OPF
5,985
10
CFE & LFC
6,289
11
Distribution
13,845
24
Private-OPF
1,021
2
CFE & LFC
12,823
22
Maintenance
8,268
14
IPP Generation
1,374
2
CFE & LFC Generation
6,782
12
Other CFE & LFC
1,243
2
Total
57,927
100
Source: SENER 2006
31  Gas-fired combined cycle plants represent 80 percent of the total.
32  OPF is public works financed by private investment.
supply are impacting foreign investment 
decisions in the industrial sectors.[53]
Subsidies of 
Electricity Prices
Mexico has long had “administered” 
prices for electric power: electricity prices 
have traditionally been established via 
a committee including the office of the 
president, Mexico’s treasury (“Hacienda”), 
the energy ministry, the sovereign companies 
and the ministry of commerce.[19] As a 
result of this pricing scheme, the clearing 
of supply-demand imbalances is done 
through quantity. Thus, even during the 
worst of economic times, electric power 
consumption is resilient and even increases.
Concerns about the maintenance of social 
and political stability have led Mexican 
governments to subsidize the electricity 
consumption of a very large proportion of 
the population in an effort to maintain their 
purchasing power.[53] Tariffs have been held 
below the cost of service, preventing the 
sector from recovering costs of operations 
and investment. The average tariff charged  
to residential customers in 2000 covered  
just 43 percent of costs, and the average 
tariff for agricultural use covered 31 percent  
of costs. Industry and services paid 
almost 95 percent of costs.[53] 
While the electric sector has been generally 
successful in providing electricity to meet 
current needs, its ability to make adequate 
provision for investment levels in the future 
could be impaired by the price subsidies. If 
subsidized electric prices continue to prevent 
cost recovery, the capacity of CFE and LFC to 
“pay their way” will continue to deteriorate, 
placing a growing burden on the public purse, 
as well as on PEMEX reinvestment. This is 
because PEMEX is the single largest generator 
of hard currency through petroleum exports 
and the single largest contributor to Hacienda 
finances. As a consequence, management 
of the electric power system in Mexico 
bears implications for the overall health and 
welfare of the energy sector in general.
In its Prospectiva del Sector Eléctrico 
2005-2014 SENER addresses the problem 
of electricity subsidies by assuming that 
almost half of the required electric sector 
investment will come from private investors. 
However, the market distortions resulting 
from subsidized electricity prices make it 
difficult to attract private investment and 
competition into the sector. If CFE and 
LFC buy power from private generators at 
market prices, they incur losses when they 
resell the power in the retail markets. These 
losses further erode the creditworthiness 
of the state-owned companies making it 
more difficult for private generators to 
obtain financing based on long-term sales 
contracts with the state-owned companies. 
Even if allowed, private generators cannot 
compete directly with CFE and LFC in the 
retail markets because their prices are at a 
competitive disadvantage with respect to the 
subsidized prices. The lack of predictability 
and transparency in electric price setting 
is a major concern to current and potential 
private investors in the sector. The electricity 
business, like other subsectors that comprise 
the energy sector, is characterized by 
large sunk investments with long payback 
periods. As a result, financing for these 
investments requires a high degree of 
predictability with respect to future revenues.
Labor Unions
The electric sector hosts two of Mexico’s 
strongest unions which historically have 
been key elements of the PRI’s power base. 
The CFE-related union is the Sindicato Único 
de Trabajadores Eléctricos de la República 
Mexicana (SUTERM); the LFC-related union 
is the Sindicato Mexicano de Electricistas 
(SME). These unions have contributed to 
the debate surrounding the electric sector 
and electric tariffs reforms. The employment 
status of electric sector workers was an 
issue in Zedillo’s proposed 1999 reforms. 
Although the SUTERM supported the 1999 
initiatives, the sharpest protests against 
them were led by the SME which succeeded 
in rallying a large number of intellectuals, 
academics and opinion leaders, as well 
Embed pdf into powerpoint - SDK Library API:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Embed pdf into powerpoint - SDK Library API:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
30 
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
as a sizeable segment of the PRD, around 
the rejection of the proposal. The SME 
feared that electric sector restructuring 
would lead to massive layoffs as had 
occurred in other countries like Argentina. 
However, in July 2000, the government and 
SUTERM signed an employment security 
and stability agreement which asserted 
that if control of the CFE or LFC changed, 
labor rights would not be affected.[3]
With respect to electric tariff reform, 
especially increasing residential and 
agricultural tariffs, the SME and SUTERM 
created alliances with the PRD, the leftist 
wing of the PRI and some other social 
organizations to block modification of the 
electricity subsidy policies. Since the SME 
and SUTERM are well-organized groups 
with the capacity to mobilize votes, electric 
tariff reform remains politically risky.[5]
PEMEX Dominance 
in Natural Gas 
Transmission 
and Marketing 
On February 23, 2000 the CRE issued the 
Directive on First Hand Sales of Natural Gas 
because the vertical integration of PEMEX  
in natural gas production, transmission  
and marketing was hindering competition  
in gas marketing.[55] Basically this  
directive posits that PEMEX retains a  
de facto monopoly in gas marketing and 
thus, this activity must be regulated. 
The directive requires PEMEX to unbundle 
its production, transmission and marketing 
activities. PEMEX may negotiate long-term 
contracts at prices below the maximum 
allowed by regulation provided there are 
no cross-subsidies between marketing and 
first hand sales. However, regulation of 
PEMEX’s discretionary discounts on domestic 
gas and transport services is easier said 
than done given the company’s monopoly 
in gas production, its dominant position 
in gas transmission and asymmetry of 
information between PEMEX and CRE. This 
lack of clarity with regard to contracts for 
the purchase of natural gas from PEMEX is 
a concern of private investors developing 
natural gas-fired generation projects.
Future Natural 
Gas Supplies
As mentioned previously, natural gas 
consumption in Mexico grew by 77 percent 
between 1994 and 2004. Going forward, all 
expectations are that natural gas demand 
will continue to increase before eventually 
leveling out or decreasing with improved 
energy efficiencies (see later section on 
FUTURE TRENDS). The primary driver for 
this growth in natural gas consumption is 
consumption by the electric power sector.
From 1994 to 2004, PEMEX’s natural gas 
production grew at an average annual rate 
of 4 percent compared to a 5.9 percent 
average annual rate of growth in natural 
gas demand.[43] The gap between demand 
and supply was made up by imports 
which grew at an average annual rate 
of 25 percent. However, dry gas proven 
reserves in Mexico have declined steadily 
in all production regions since 1998, 
decreasing from 31 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) 
in 1998 to 14.8 Tcf at year end 2005.
In its Prospectiva del Mercado de Gas 
Natural 2004-2013 prepared in 2004, SENER 
estimated that PEMEX natural gas production 
would grow at an average annual rate of  
2.5 percent compared to a 5.7 percent annual 
growth rate in demand. As a result, SENER 
projected that Mexico may need to increase 
its imports of natural gas (both pipeline gas 
from the US and LNG) over the period by 
an average annual rate of 14.4 percent.
However, in its Prospectiva del Mercado de 
Gas Natural 2005-2014 prepared in 2005, 
SENER sharply revised upwards its estimate 
of PEMEX natural gas production which 
is now expected to grow at 5.2 percent 
annually. The demand forecast for 2013 is 
virtually unchanged: 9,303 MMcf/day (2004 
publication) compared to 9,110 MMcf/day 
(2005publication).
34
 As a result, gas 
imports are now projected to grow at a 
slower rate of 9.5 percent annually. Gas 
exports increase significantly over the 
forecast period compared with the 2004 
estimates. Clearly, there are substantial 
differences of opinion regarding extent of 
use of natural gas in Mexico overall and in 
Mexico’s electric power generation segment. 
These differences are due to recent trends 
with respect to higher natural gas prices 
in North America and attractiveness of 
competing fuels for power generation.
In order to meet the 2005 production 
forecast, PEMEX would have to see production 
from new fields as early as 2007. By 2014, 
52 percent of forecast production will have 
to come from new fields to be discovered.43] 
From 1975 until 2003 PEMEX had not made 
significant investments in exploration; future 
exploratory success is always uncertain.
Another issue associated with future natural 
gas supplies is PEMEX’s ability to fund 
the estimated $104 billion of investment 
required to generate the gas production 
growth forecast by SENER for the period 
2005-2014. An estimated $10 billion 
per year is the required investment in 
exploration and production (PEP); $4 billion 
over the projection period is the estimated 
investment requirement by PGBP for gas 
transmission and associated infrastructure.[43]
PEMEX’s annual capital budget is part of 
the federal budget and as such must be 
approved by the Mexican Congress. As a 
result, PEMEX faces competition from other 
government programs for capital and the 
capital allocation is subject to politics. In 
other words, it is not certain that PEMEX 
will be able to obtain the capital it needs 
to implement the investment program 
embodied in these gas production forecasts.
In December 2001 PEMEX attempted 
to improve its investment dilemma by 
announcing the Multiple Services Contracts 
(MSC) scheme which was designed to 
attract private companies to develop non-
associated natural gas fields pursuant 
to a contractual fee-based arrangement 
in which PEMEX retains the rights to all 
extracted hydrocarbons. SENER expects MSC 
production to contribute about 14 percent 
of total natural gas production by 2014.
In addition, the tax burden on PEMEX 
continues to be high with income taxed at 
approximately 63 percent. Taxes paid by 
PEMEX continue to represent the largest 
funding source for the federal government 
accounting for nearly 40 percent of 
federal fiscal tax revenues as a result of 
recent years of high oil prices. This high 
tax burden on PEMEX reduces the cash 
flow from operations that the company 
can retain for re-investment purposes.
In November 2005, the Mexican Congress 
approved a bill to reduce PEMEX’s tax bill 
by about $2 billion per year beginning in 
2006. Although the new tax regime is a 
positive step, it does not resolve PEMEX’s 
capital dilemma. Credit ratings for PEMEX 
remained unchanged with credit rating 
agencies stating that “the bill will not make 
a significant impact on PEMEX’s short-
term financial and operating performance.” 
[www.latinpetroleum.com, 7/6/05]
Also in the fall of 2005, in response to 
Hurricane Katrina’s impact on North American 
natural gas supplies and prices, President 
Fox proposed to Congress a change in 
Mexico’s Constitution to allow private 
34 Both the 2004 and 2005 forecasts discussed here are the base demand/medium supply cases.
SDK Library API:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links. also makes PDF document visible and searchable on the Internet by converting PDF document file into HTML webpage.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library API:C# TIFF: How to Embed, Remove, Add and Update TIFF Color Profile
On the whole, our SDK supports the following manipulations. Empower C# programmers to embed, remove, add and update ICCProfile. Support
www.rasteredge.com
31
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
companies to explore for and produce 
non-associated natural gas in Mexico. In 
addition, he also proposed changing laws 
to permit private investment in PEMEX’s 
pipeline network which has suffered 
numerous leaks and deadly explosions. 
However, there has not been positive action 
on these proposals by Congress to date.
In the fall of 2005 in response to the 
same weather phenomenon, President 
Fox set temporary limits on the price of 
natural gas in Mexico (a cap of $7.65/
mmBtu) in order to keep natural gas 
and electricity prices down for Mexican 
citizens. This price cap is expected to cost 
the government about $850 million by 
the end of 2005. As a result, demand for 
natural gas will not decrease as much as 
higher prices would predict, exacerbating 
the current natural gas import situation.
In Calderón campaign materials, the 
privatization of PEMEX is not advocated but 
support is expressed for private investment 
in refining, natural gas, and petrochemicals 
to supplement public sector investment. 
The materials also include a proposed 
change PEMEX’s tax regime to increase 
its investment resources and support 
for PEMEX to form strategic alliances.
Natural Gas Imports
Imports of natural gas from the United 
States rose from 125 MMcf/d in 1994 to 
1,124 MMcf/d in 2004. SENER expects 
natural gas imports to grow to fill the gap 
between domestic PEMEX gas production 
and domestic gas demand; LNG from 
non-US sources is expected to account 
for most imported natural gas. CFE is 
taking an active role in directly contracting 
for the natural gas imports needed for 
future generation including providing 
guarantees for LNG projects and potentially 
participating in natural gas projects 
directly, as is typical for integrated electric 
power companies in other countries.
Relying on imports of natural gas from the 
United States is problematic for Mexico for 
several reasons. First, natural gas demand 
in both the United States and Canada 
relative to available supply has contributed 
to a tight balance leading to concerns about 
reliability. Secondly, natural gas imports are 
a drain on Mexico’s hard currency reserves, 
costing the country approximately $2 billion 
in 2003 and representing 35 percent of 
the country’s balance of trade deficit.[35]
Natural Gas Vs. Fuel Oil
The issues surrounding future natural 
gas supplies for electric generation lead 
to the following question: Why not fuel 
future electric generation with fuel oil? 
Mexico has an abundant supply of this 
commodity. Historically, high sulfur fuel 
oil has fueled the largest percentage 
of Mexico’s electric generation.
There are significant environmental  
problems associated with using high sulfur 
(>4 percent) fuel oil for electric generation. 
Upon combustion, this fuel oil releases 
relatively high quantities of sulfur dioxides, 
nitrogen oxides and carbon dioxides which 
contribute to air pollution, ozone formation, 
acid rain and global warming. Usage of 
natural gas for electric generation, on the 
other hand, results in substantially lower 
emissions of sulfur dioxides and nitrogen 
oxides. In addition, combined-cycle natural 
gas generation plants are much more 
thermally efficient (in terms of heat rate) 
than fuel oil fired generation plants. 
As a result, the Mexican Congress enacted 
environmental norms 085 and 086 which 
began to be enforced in 2004 and should 
reach full enforcement in 2006. These norms 
mandate that natural gas be substituted for 
fuel oil in electric generation and industrial 
applications in environmentally sensitive 
areas. SENER believes that enforcement of 
these environmental norms accounts for 
about 6 percent of the growth in natural 
gas demand between 2002 and 2006. 
However, as concerns about natural gas 
supplies and price levels have grown in North 
America, more attention is being devoted to 
improving the environmental impact of coal 
and fuel oil-fired generation. Technologies 
are being developed to “capture” carbon 
dioxide before it is emitted from electric 
generation plants and “sequester” or 
store it in safe receptacles below ground 
such as depleted oil and gas reservoirs. If 
cost competitive carbon dioxide capture 
technologies could be developed and cost 
effective “safe” sequestration is proved, the 
environmental impact of fuel oil and coal 
fired generation plants could be improved.
Renewable/
Alternative Fuels 
As described earlier, alternatives for power 
generation include hydroelectric power, solar 
electricity, wind energy, biomass energy and 
geothermal power. The fuels for each of these 
are available at little or no cost; they are 
often renewable fuels; and they may produce 
little if any direct emissions. Proponents argue 
that the environmental costs of conventional 
electric power are not reflected in the 
cost of electricity produced. If these costs 
(externalities) were included, alternative 
fuel electricity could be very competitive. 
While the benefits of cleaner, alternative 
energy sources for electricity are appealing, 
they do pose operational considerations for 
the management of electricity services. For 
one thing, they are “intermittent” power 
sources (the sun does not shine at night, 
the wind is variable), and peak availability of 
alternative energy sources does not always 
coincide with peak demand. Options like 
solar and wind cannot provide consistent 
power production, in contrast to the coal and 
nuclear facilities that are usually used for 
“base load” (the units operate continuously 
providing a consistent power base). Many 
solar technologies tend to be implemented 
in conjunction with natural gas turbines. In 
addition, both solar and wind require large 
amounts of acreage when deployed for large-
scale power generation and extensive use 
of materials (steel and other products) that 
require considerable energy to produce. 
Technological advances are such that some 
success in integrating wind-generated 
electricity has been achieved. Likewise, 
hydro facilities provide a readily available 
power reserve (interrupted only by periods 
of extreme drought). Solar poses more of 
a problem, because some form of storage 
is required. Scientists are experimenting 
with a variety of storage solutions, like 
letting daytime heat accumulate in fluids like 
molten salt so that turbines can continue to 
operate after sunset. However, it will be some 
time before the economics of utility-scale 
renewable technologies become favorable. 
What many renewable technologies (and 
some small scale technologies like natural 
gas microturbines and fuel cells) do offer 
are options for users in remote locations or 
localized solutions for energy demand. An 
isolated community can distribute electricity 
to its residents “off-grid” (meaning that 
there does not have to be a connection to 
a transmission system). Or, excess power 
from location-specific generation, including 
cogeneration, can be distributed “on grid.” 
Distributed and off-grid generation bear 
significant implications for the future, 
particularly for rural Mexican populations 
without reliable electricity service. 
SDK Library API:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Turn PDF images to HTML images in VB.NET. Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links in VB.NET. Available zoom setting (fit page, fit width).
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library API:VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Embed PDF to image converter in viewer. Quick evaluation source codes for VB.NET class. Sometimes, to convert PDF document into BMP, GIF, JPEG and PNG
www.rasteredge.com
32 
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
Cross-Border 
Electricity Trade
Cross-border electricity trade can offer a 
number of options for meeting both demand 
for electricity in North America and flexible 
and reliable management of North American 
electric power transmission grids. Mexico’s 
electricity grid connects to the United States 
on its northern border in several places. 
There are two connections between Baja 
California and California which were used 
for exports from CFE to San Diego Gas and 
Electric and Southern California Edison in 
the 1980’s. There are seven connections 
between Mexico and the Electric Reliability 
Council of Texas [ERCOT], six of which are 
used exclusively for emergency purposes.
Currently, ERCOT is working closely 
with CFE in an attempt to increase the 
interconnectedness of their grids, both 
for economic and reliability reasons. 
With the technology currently available, 
interconnections between the close 
geographic regions yet isolated transmission 
systems of CFE and ERCOT can uniquely 
and cost effectively displace inefficient 
units and provide economic reliability 
enhancements to meet local load growth 
needs. It is these border regions of Mexico 
that have experienced the most accelerated 
growth in electric demand in recent years. 
Asynchronous interconnections between 
CFE and ERCOT could reduce generation 
costs, provide mutual emergency support 
and allow for economic transactions.
In December, 2003 CFE and ERCOT released 
a midpoint report on their interconnection 
studies. With respect to short term 
alternatives that could leverage existing 
interconnections and infrastructure and 
do not require lengthy regulatory review, 
the study found that opportunities exist 
at the Matamoros/Brownsville, Reynosa/
McAllen, Nuevo Laredo/Laredo, and 
Acuña/Del Rio areas to provide support 
between the electrical grids. Both CFE and 
ERCOT will follow through with proposals 
to facilitate these interconnections 
that, once reviewed by the appropriate 
government, regulatory, and stakeholder 
organizations, could be implemented 
over the next one to three years.[25]
The second phase of the study has begun 
and will evaluate opportunities for long-term 
interconnections that can support additional 
economic transactions and emergency 
assistance between CFE and ERCOT. Because 
of the broad policy and economic impacts that 
larger bulk transmission interconnections will 
have on the CFE and ERCOT power systems, 
the report recommends the involvement 
by the Public Utilities Commission of 
Texas and SENER in phase two. 
The North American Free Trade Agreement 
(NAFTA) instituted specific concessions for 
electricity services as well as other energy 
services. However, it did not provide any 
resolution on government monopolies, 
formalize arrangements for energy regulatory 
harmonization or extend the energy crisis 
provisions from the Canada-US Free Trade 
Agreement to Mexico. As a result, the 
NAFTA provides only a weak framework for 
North American electricity integration.[22]
For a robust border electricity trade to take 
hold and flourish, harmonization of energy 
policies and regulatory frameworks between 
the United States and Mexico needs to take 
place. This is difficult to achieve because it 
requires resolution of fundamental differences 
of opinion between the two countries, and 
their sub-jurisdictions, regarding reliance  
on markets and the role of government.  
At any point in time, commitment to either 
philosophy can be influenced by economic, 
political and social conditions outside of 
the control of policy makers, regulators, 
firms or consumers, and long-term 
patterns can revert or become cyclical.[9] 
In recognition of the need to harmonize 
energy policies and regulatory frameworks, 
the North American Energy Working Group 
(NAEWG) was established in the spring of 
2001 by the Canadian Minister of Natural 
Resources, the Mexican Secretary of Energy 
and the US Secretary of Energy, to enhance 
North American energy cooperation. 
The goals of the NAEWG are to foster 
communication and cooperation among 
the governments and energy sectors of 
the three countries on energy-related 
matters of common interest, and to 
enhance North American energy trade 
and interconnections consistent with the 
goal of sustainable development, for the 
benefit of all. This cooperative process fully 
respects the domestic policies, divisions 
of jurisdictional authority and existing 
trade obligations of each country.
In June, 2002, NAEWG released North 
America-The Energy Picture. This report 
presents a range of energy information 
for the three countries, including an 
economic overview, energy data, supply 
and demand trends, energy projections 
and descriptions of infrastructure, laws and 
regulations.
35
 NAEWG also has issued two 
working papers: “Regulation of International 
Electricity Trade” (which deals with exports 
and imports as well as interconnection 
transmission lines) and “Energy Efficiency.”
In addition to NAEWG, the regulatory 
commissions of the US, Canada and 
Mexico meet at least three times annually 
to review their regulatory agendas, 
strengthen relationships and exchange 
information. Some of the topics covered 
include: Electricity interconnection 
projects, LNG projects, possible natural gas 
interconnections, regional supply/demand 
topics and regulatory coordination.[36]
Since 1994, the Texas General Land Office 
has worked with a wide variety of partner 
agencies in the United States and Mexico, 
including representatives of local, state 
and federal governments, the private 
sector, universities and non-governmental 
organizations, to organize the annual 
Border Energy Forum. Composed of about 
200 participants annually, the Forum is 
a conference designed to improve the 
exchange of information regarding energy, 
including electricity, and its relationship to the 
environment throughout the border region. 
35 The NAEWG report is available at http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/northamerica/index.htm.
SDK Library API:C# Raster - Image Save Options in C#.NET
NET Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB a zone bit of whether it's need to embed Color profile
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library API:C# TIFF: How to Insert & Burn Picture/Image into TIFF Document
Entire C# Code to Embed and Burn Image to TIFF GetPage(0); // load an PNG logo into REImage REImage powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
www.rasteredge.com
33
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
FUTURE TRENDS
Outlook for Electric 
System Growth
SENER projects demand for electricity to 
increase at an average annual rate of  
5.2 percent, including self-generation,  
during the period 2005-2014. The main 
drivers of increased electricity demand are 
the medium and large industrial users. 
Forecasting energy demand in general is 
fraught with difficulty. For electricity, a great 
number of unknowns exist with respect to 
how electricity is used, how sensitive users 
are to price, costs of providing electricity, and 
underlying economics and other issues with 
respect to generation technologies and fuels 
for generation, among other things. Each 
generation fuel constitutes a discrete market 
with supply-demand balances, competing 
uses, potential for substitution, environmental 
considerations, and a host of other issues. 
Consequently, all forecasts are subject to 
considerable uncertainty and revision.
In order to meet this potential demand 
growth while accommodating planned 
generation capacity retirements of 5,108 MW, 
the SEN companies would have to add 
22,574 MW in generation capacity over the 
period 2005-2014. The total investment 
(generation, transmission, distribution) 
required to meet this demand growth would 
total about $58 billion with 48 percent 
expected to come from the private sector.
The forecast growth rate in electricity 
demand of 5.2 percent per year is high by 
historical standards; by comparison, from 
1994-2004 the annual average growth 
rate was 4.1 percent. The historical record 
includes two economic contractions in 
1995 and 2001 when electricity demand 
actually declined. The future outlook 
for Mexico’s economy is thus integral 
to forecasted demand for electricity.
Outlook for Electric 
Sector Natural Gas 
Consumption
Electric sector consumption of natural 
gas represented 36 percent of total gas 
consumption in 2004 and is expected 
to increase to 51 percent of total gas 
consumption in 2013. The most striking 
change is the expected shift between 
public and private gas consumption for 
generation. In 2004, gas demand by CFE 
and LFC accounted for 40 percent of total 
gas consumption for electric generation; 
this is expected to decrease to 18 percent 
by 2014. On the other hand, gas consumed 
Table 25. Electricity Demand-Projected 
Average Annual Growth Rates
Period/Sector
2005-2014
Self-Supply
2.0%
Residential
5.1%
Commercial
5.3%
Services
3.2%
Agriculture
3.1%
Medium Industry
5.7%
Large Industry
6.4%
Total Industry
6.0%
Total National
5.2%
Source: SENER, 2006.
by private generators was 60 percent of 
total gas consumption for electric generation 
in 2004 and is expected to increase to 
82 percent by 2014. The vast majority 
of this growth is expected to occur in 
the IPP sector for electric generation.
The forecasted increase in natural gas 
consumption for electric generation is directly 
related to the forecasted 5.2 percent per year 
growth in electricity demand. The SENER 
outlook assumes that much of the new 
generation capacity added over the period 
is gas-fired for efficiency and environmental 
reasons; that fuel oil-fired generation capacity 
will continue to diminish, and that renewable/
alternative fuels and other competing 
generation fuels like coal will play a fairly 
minor role in Mexico’s generation profile.
New Generation 
Technologies 
In addition to the advances in natural 
gas turbine design, there are new ways 
to achieve clean combustion of coal and 
fuel oil and improvements in alternative 
Table 26. Electric Sector Natural Gas Consumption (MMcf/day)
Year
2004
Percent in 2004
2014
Percent in 2014
CFE
814
39
795
18
LFC
29
1
2
NM
Sub-Total
843
40
797
18
IPPs
896
44
3,159
74
Self-gen.
229
11
238
5
Export
89
5
112
3
Sub-Total
1,214
60
3,509
82
TOTAL
2,506
100
4,306
100
Source: Natural Gas Market Outlook, SENER, 2005.
energy technologies. In Mexico, the Centro 
de Investigación en Energia (CIE) at the 
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México 
(UNAM) is actively involved in researching 
and developing new generation technologies. 
Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) 
is a power generation process that integrates 
a gasification system with a conventional 
combustion turbine combined cycle power 
block. The gasification system converts coal 
(or other solid or liquid feedstocks such as 
petroleum coke, biomass or heavy oils) into 
a gaseous synthetic gas (“syngas”) made 
predominantly of hydrogen and carbon 
monoxide. The syngas is used to fuel a 
combustion turbine to generate electricity. 
IGCC is an advanced technology that can 
substantially reduce air emissions, water 
consumption, and solid waste production 
from coal and heavy fuel oil-fired power 
plants. In addition, IGCC technology offers 
the potential for separating and capturing 
carbon dioxide emissions (and producing 
pure hydrogen) by adding water-gas shift 
reactors to the syngas treatment system 
and physical absorption processes to remove 
carbon dioxide.[38] The captured carbon 
dioxide could then be stored or “sequestered,” 
(depending on the carbon dioxide 
sequestration technologies discussed below). 
Because many experts believe that IGCC 
power plants have uncertain cost and 
performance characteristics, the US 
Department of Energy’s Office of Fossil Energy 
is currently sponsoring an IGCC test project 
(FutureGen) to integrate testing of emerging 
energy supply and utilization technologies as 
well as advanced carbon capture and geologic 
sequestration systems (www.doe.gov).
In addition, there are technologies on the 
horizon that may completely change the 
industry. Often discussed are fuel cells, 
which use electrochemical reactions-like 
automotive batteries-to produce electricity. 
SDK Library API:VB.NET TIFF: Rotate TIFF Page by Using RaterEdge .NET TIFF
formats are: JPEG, PNG, GIF, BMP, PDF, Word (Docx Visual Basic .NET class, and then embed "RasterEdge.Imaging splitting huge target TIFF file into multiple and
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library API:VB.NET Image: How to Draw and Cutomize Text Annotation on Image
NET text annotation add-on tutorial can be divided into a few on document files in VB.NET, including PDF, TIFF & license and at last you can embed the required
www.rasteredge.com
34 
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
Most promising are fuel cells that can use 
natural gas as a feed stock for producing 
hydrogen. Fuel cells are smaller and modular 
and could be used to power individual 
buildings or neighborhoods with none of 
the noise and unsightliness of traditional 
generating stations. Fuel cells, improved solar 
technologies and other developments may 
lead to a “decentralizing” of electric power 
systems, allowing small scale applications 
and resolving many of the potential reliability 
problems that customers fear. These types 
of decentralized power systems could make 
a significant contribution to the provision of 
clean, efficient energy delivery systems in 
rural Mexico where much of the population 
lives without reliable electricity service. 
Further into the future, economic nuclear 
fusion technologies may finally be achieved. 
Unlike nuclear fission, fusion is the 
combination of atoms to produce heat. 
Fusion is a long sought technology that holds 
tremendous promise of clean, renewable 
energy, if it can be achieved. Pebble-bed 
modular reactor (PBMR) technology (still 
based on fission), on the other hand, may 
yield its first commercial reactor by 2007. 
PBMR reactors are fuelled by several hundred 
thousand tennis-ball-sized spheres, know as 
pebbles, each of which contains thousands 
of tiny “kernels” the size of poppy seeds. As 
compared to pressurized-water reactor (PWR) 
technology used in more than half of the 
world’s existing reactors, PBMR reactors are 
smaller and can be built faster. Proponents 
also argue that they are safer and cheaper. 
Both claims are challenged by critics.
Microturbines, solar power (either as 
large collector farms or photovoltaic 
cells on buildings), ocean power (using 
either the tidal currents or waves) are 
other technologies that are being closely 
watched by the investor community.
Many of these technologies discussed 
here are not new. All are being pursued at 
various universities and research institutes 
in Mexico including, but not limited to, CIE; 
Instituto de Investigaciones en Electricas 
(IIE); UNAM; Instituto Politecnico Nacional 
and the Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y 
Tecnologia. All are dependent on favorable 
economic and market conditions. A benefit 
of competition is that it will accelerate 
introduction of new technologies.
Carbon Dioxide 
Sequestration
Carbon dioxide sequestration refers to 
technologies being developed to “capture” 
carbon dioxide from potential emitting 
sources such as electric generation plants 
before it is emitted and to “sequester” or 
store it in a variety of places including: 
geologic formations such as oil and gas 
reservoirs, unmineable coal seams, and 
deep saline reservoirs; the deep ocean, 
and terrestrial ecosystems through the 
protection of ecosystems that store 
carbon so that carbon stores can be 
maintained or increased, and manipulation 
of ecosystems to increase carbon 
sequestration beyond current conditions.
Successful development and 
commercialization of such technologies 
could greatly improve the greenhouse 
gas impact of fossil fuel-fired electric 
generation plants, especially coal-fired 
and heavy fuel-oil fired plants. 
The aim of current research is to provide 
a science-based assessment of the 
prospects and costs of CO2 sequestration. 
To be successful, the techniques and 
practices to sequester carbon must 
meet the following requirements:
• 
be effective and cost-competitive, 
• 
provide stable, long term storage, and 
• 
be environmentally benign. 
Using present technology, estimates of 
sequestration costs are in the range of $100 
to $300/ton of carbon emissions avoided. 
Research is being done to reduce the cost of 
carbon sequestration to $10 or less per net 
ton of carbon emissions avoided by 2015. 
In the mid-term, sequestration pilot testing 
will develop options for direct and indirect 
sequestration. The direct options involve 
the capture of CO2 at the power plant 
before it enters the atmosphere coupled 
with “value-added” sequestration, such as 
using CO2 in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) 
operation and in methane production from 
deep unmineable coal seams. “Indirect” 
sequestration involves research on means 
of integrating fossil fuel production and 
use with terrestrial sequestration and 
enhanced ocean storage of carbon.
In the long term, the technology products 
will be more revolutionary and rely less 
on site-specific or application-specific 
factors to ensure economic viability.
36
In addition to technology development, a 
commercial value chain must be created 
from capture to end use to make large scale 
carbon dioxide sequestration feasible. CO2 
value chain development and expansion 
will require new policies, regulations and 
market design. Work is underway in this 
regard at the Bureau of Economic Geology, 
University of Texas and the Gulf Coast Carbon 
Center and Center for Energy Economics.
Source: Rosenberg, et.al., 2005.
Figure 13. Typical IGCC Power Plant
36  For additional information, please visit http://fossil.energy.gov/programs/sequestration/
��������
�������
������������
�����
����������
��������
�����������
������
����
����������
������������
�������
����������
���
���������
������
���
���
����������
���
�����������
�������
���
�������
������
����������
�����
�������
�������������
����������
�����
���
���������
������
�������
�������������
���������
���
�������
����
�����
���
�������������
���������������
��������
��������
�����
��������
�����
��������
�����
�����
���������
���������
�����
�����
�����
�������
��������
����������
SDK Library API:VB.NET Image: VB.NET Code to Add Rubber Stamp Annotation to Image
Suitable for VB.NET PDF, Word & TIFF document managing & editing project. VB Can be implemented into both Windows and web VB.NET applications; Support single or
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library API:VB.NET Image: Creating Hotspot Annotation for Visual Basic .NET
the configuration environment to integrate RasterEdge Visual Basic .NET into your imaging to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
www.rasteredge.com
35
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
Transmission, 
Distribution and 
Storage Technologies
Improving the existing capacity of 
transmission and distribution grid systems 
and transmitting electricity more efficiently 
are key stepping stones to facilitating a 
transition to alternative sources of energy 
and small-scale, decentralized distributed 
energy systems. An improved grid could 
revolutionize the ways in which we supply and 
use electricity. In Mexico, new transmission, 
distribution and storage technologies 
are being researched and developed 
by the organizations mentioned in New 
Generation Technologies above as well as 
by SENER’s Committee of Technology and 
Development in association with UNAM.
As electricity travels over the transmission 
grid, much of it is lost (sometimes upwards 
of 10 percent). This is because the materials 
typically used in transmission wires can 
only withstand a certain amount of heat. 
New, superconducting materials may 
change that. At research centers around 
the world, including the Texas Center for 
Superconductivity at the University of 
Houston, scientists are developing new 
materials that can withstand levels of heat 
and stress beyond anything achievable 
with traditional metals. These materials, 
if they can be economically developed for 
applications like electricity transmission, will 
dramatically reduce the amount of electricity 
that must be generated and allow electricity 
to be efficiently transported over long 
distances. Experiments with short-distance 
high voltage lines that use superconducting 
materials have produced encouraging results. 
For electricity to be more easily managed, 
new ways of handling electricity are needed 
that take advantage of superconducting 
materials and devices. One such technology 
is the use of superconducting devices for 
instantaneous management of electric 
power. Researchers at the Houston Advanced 
Research Center (HARC) have studied small 
superconducting switches and much larger 
superconducting energy storage devices 
for transmission enhancement applications. 
HARC (with a private and public sector 
consortium and the State of Texas) has 
examined the technical and economic 
feasibility of applying these technologies 
to constraints in the Texas transmission 
system. Such devices would enable various 
power management services such as stability 
enhancement, increased transmission 
capacity, voltage and frequency control and 
other quality enhancements for transmission.
Programs are also underway to study the 
implications of nanotechnology for energy. 
At Rice University in Houston, Texas, 
methods are being developed which would 
permit electricity to be carried over long 
distances economically via high-voltage 
carbon nanotube wires with little or no 
loss of supply, and facilitate the access of 
remote energy sources, such as solar power 
farms. Coupled with the development of 
enhanced battery storage, this technology 
could promote distributed energy.
Electric storage technologies are often 
viewed as the “holy grail” of all energy 
technologies. In particular, flywheel 
technology seems to be the most advanced. 
A Texas company, Active Power, developed 
the first commercially viable flywheel energy 
storage system and has distribution deals 
with companies such as Caterpillar, GE 
and Invensys. Other storage technologies 
include pumped hydropower, compressed air 
energy storage, superconducting magnetic 
energy storage, and ultracapacitors.
Information 
Technologies
The sophistication of electronic information 
systems is one of the most important 
factors for the effective functioning 
of efficient and competitive electricity 
markets. These information systems have 
removed many of the barriers to common 
carriage transmission by allowing real-time 
management of energy flows and exchanges.
In the United States, electronic bulletin 
boards and software systems for electricity 
transmission include information on 
capacities, prices, transactions and other 
variables. This information is necessary to 
facilitate a properly functioning marketplace. 
It also facilitates the development of 
“secondary” markets so that holders of excess 
capacity on transmission grids can release or 
resell that capacity. This prevents many of 
the kinds of disruptions and shortages that 
have posed serious problems in the past. 
Finally, the advent of information systems 
for electricity has supported the growth and 
effectiveness of new businesses, independent 
third party marketers of power. These 
entities act as intermediaries in a complex 
marketplace. Using electronic information, 
they are able to package services and build 
flexible arrangements and contractual terms 
between suppliers of electricity and end users.
The development of electronic information 
systems has been one of the most important 
factors in the re-conceptualization of what 
constitutes monopoly in electricity service. 
These tools have enabled the separation of 
the commodity, electricity, from the physical 
systems used to deliver them to customers. 
The result is that the scope of regulation 
can be narrowed to the physical delivery 
systems, where before it applied to both 
the system and the commodity. This has 
been a critical step in the evolution of the 
electricity industry in the United States.
Technology Transfer 
in North America
Technology transfer – how it takes place, 
how the process can be improved and the 
notion that there is a “soft” technology 
associated with endeavors such as 
regulatory oversight – is an important issue 
for Mexico. With respect of the transfer 
of “hard” electricity technologies, one of 
the most important questions is whether 
Mexico will generate incentives, in the form 
of sufficient commercial opportunities, 
for foreign companies to share their 
proprietary technologies. In addition, 
Mexico’s national electric companies must 
provide incentives for their own managers 
to adopt and implement new technologies 
and knowledge. A considerable transfer 
of knowledge with respect to policy and 
regulatory approaches has taken place in 
North American, primarily through informal 
channels, but implementation is key. 
It is to the benefit of all stakeholders within 
the North American electricity market to be 
as well informed as possible of all options. 
Markets cannot function properly unless 
information is accessible. National energy 
policy bodies may have a role to play in this 
regard. Regulators as market facilitators play 
a role in reducing information asymmetries 
(recognizing, however, that information 
represents competitive advantage). 
Consumers in the United States and Canada 
have become much more astute with 
regard to what the market can offer them. 
Experience in the United States and Canada 
suggests that consumer education can be an 
effective agent of change and once consumers 
detect that choices exist it is difficult to 
return to the status quo. Experience in these 
markets also suggests that there are real 
limits to what private firms will share if they 
do not have profit incentives. Some years 
ago it was suggested that “technology dyads” 
between the United States and Mexico could 
go a long way toward resolving issues and 
ensure long-term electric security for both.
36 
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
Risk Management
When electricity becomes a commodity, 
as it has in the United States, it becomes 
subject to considerable volatility in pricing. 
This is complicated by the diurnal or daily 
patterns of electricity use and the need for 
pricing to reflect fluctuations in demand and 
supply. Risk management has emerged as a 
powerful, though often not well understood, 
mechanism for managing volatility.
Risk management encompasses the array 
of financial instruments and the strategies 
used to implement them. Futures contracts, 
options, derivatives and swaps are some 
of the instruments that risk managers 
use. The basic principle is to separate 
the sources of risk in order to deal with 
them in a systematic way. One important 
source of risk in the electric sector is price 
volatility. Risk management instruments 
allow stakeholders to add varying degrees 
of certainty to future electricity prices. 
Risk management is not new. Ancient 
civilizations used futures contracts for grains 
and other traded goods. The United States 
has long had futures markets for agricultural 
commodities, minerals like copper and, 
since the early 1980’s, oil. Electricity is a 
relative newcomer. As risk management 
instruments have become both more 
sophisticated and more complex, problems 
have arisen in recent years for both suppliers 
and customers, some so serious that firms 
experienced liquidity crises or bankruptcy. 
The issues, however, do not lie with the 
instruments themselves but in their use 
for speculative purposes. Speculative use 
occurs when firms use risk management 
instruments to supplement income generation 
rather than reducing the firm’s exposure to 
particular risk. For example, Enron’s collapse 
is usually associated with the company’s 
aggressive use of these instruments in 
their flagship trading operation and the 
aggressive accounting practices employed 
in recording the value of these trades.
When risk management instruments are 
used correctly, however, they are a powerful 
and important tool for both suppliers and 
customers in more competitive energy 
markets. For example, the inability of 
California electric utilities to engage in 
long-term contracts forced them to buy 
continuously from the more price volatile 
spot market in order to comply with their 
“obligation to serve.” Combined with the retail 
rate freeze and hence the inability to pass 
on wholesale price fluctuations to customers, 
Pacific Gas & Electric had to file for 
bankruptcy and a state bail-out was needed 
to prevent Southern California Edison from 
doing the same. If the utilities were allowed 
to manage their price risk through long-term 
contracts (which is what the Department of 
Water Resources did for the state), these 
problems could have been avoided.
During the incredible summer 1998 heat 
wave in the United States, some electric 
power contracts soared to thousands of 
dollars per megawatt hour. This event 
triggered a surge in defaults among 
independent power marketers, shut downs 
of trading risk management operations 
(including at least one large utility), and 
a great deal of worry among consumers, 
regulators, policy makers and some suppliers 
that this was a portent of what competitive 
markets would be like. However, after 
extensive investigations, it appears that a 
root cause was lack of transmission access 
that caused capacity shortages in key 
regions, especially the Midwest. The lesson – 
risk management practices for electric power 
need work, but resolving non-competitive 
bottlenecks is an even greater task.
Global Electricity 
Trends 
Around the world, reliance on markets to 
provide electric services has been a growing 
trend. With respect to Canada and the 
United States, there is already an active 
electricity trade between the two countries 
and there are possibilities for this activity 
to increase. Canadians, watching electric 
power restructuring in the United States, 
began to mimic and in some cases lead the 
process. Alberta and Ontario have been the 
two most active provinces. Although Alberta 
appeared prone to experiencing problems 
similar to those of California in the early days 
of reform, its market is now fully functional.
Western Europe is moving in a similar 
direction taken by the United States and 
Canada. Britain actually has been much more 
aggressive in restructuring its electricity 
sector than the United States. But state 
ownership of electric utilities was common 
practice in Europe. This system had to be 
dismantled before other steps could be taken 
to introduce competition. The European 
Community (EC) has formulated directives to 
liberalize member country electricity markets, 
with a goal of achieving 30 percent of the 
market open to competition by independent 
power suppliers in ten years. On November 
25, 2002, energy ministers from member 
countries announced that retail markets 
for electricity will open by July 2007.
The issues in Western Europe include 
sensitivities to sovereign preferences 
(countries in which state-owned 
monopolies dominate electricity service 
are trying to protect these enterprises) 
and concerns about energy security. Many 
of the same consumer, environmental 
and financial issues that are seen in the 
United States prevail in Europe as well.
In emerging markets, the commitment to 
free market electricity is much more variable 
and the results will be much more difficult to 
predict. In Latin America, Chile and Argentina 
have been the leaders in encouraging 
privatization and private investment in 
electricity and natural gas (as well as other 
economic sectors). In Argentina, however, 
the government continues to expand its role 
in the electric and natural gas sectors in the 
wake of shortages in 2004. Electricity prices 
were frozen in 2002 and the artificially low 
prices spurred demand increases. Electricity 
tariffs cannot be increased until the licenses 
for electricity transmission and distribution 
are renegotiated. Natural gas supply 
shortages, also a function of price freezes 
and consequent underinvestment, caused 
generation problems in the electric sector in 
2004.
37
 Electricity rationing measures were 
implemented, power exports to Uruguay 
were suspended and emergency power 
was imported from Brazil. The Argentine 
government established in 2004 a new 
state-owned company, Enarsa, which will 
buy natural gas and gas transportation for 
power generators. It is uncertain whether 
this new state intervention will contribute 
positively to the development of robust and 
competitive electricity markets in the country.
Brazil’s experience of inadequate electric 
power supplies in 2001, triggered by drought-
constrained hydropower production and 
complicated by weak and confusing market 
rules for new investment in both gas and 
power, demonstrated the extent of work 
yet to be done. Concerned about the lack 
of diversification in Brazil’s generation,
38
the government in 1997 provided incentives 
(eventually translated into law as the 
Programa Prioritário de Termelectricidade-
PPT) for gas-fired generation including: a 
regulated, favorable price for gas supply 
which was less than the price payable by 
Petrobras for Bolivian gas; availability of 
36 Electric power generation accounts for about 30 percent of total gas demand in Argentina.
37 In Brazil hydropower accounts for 83 percent of all generation.
37
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
long-term power purchase contracts from 
state-owned Electrobras, and favorable 
development loans from the state-owned 
national development bank BNDES.[27] 
Petrobras was also called upon to finance 
the projects, and later to assume the foreign 
exchange risk embedded in the different 
gas price adjustments in the Bolivian gas 
supply contract and the gas sales contracts 
with the power plants. Nevertheless, in 
2001, Brazil experienced a critical electricity 
shortage due to drought conditions. Not a 
single PPT gas-fired power plant was ready, 
and work had just started on five. Power 
rationing was implemented which resulted 
in a permanent electric demand reduction 
of about 7 percent and this, combined with 
above-average rainfall in 2002, caused 
overcapacity in electric generation.
The role of natural gas in Brazil’s electric 
generation mix remains unclear: permanent 
base-load diversification or back-up for 
low hydropower years? New power sector 
legislation enacted in 2004 requires that 
cheaper hydroelectricity generation be pooled 
with more expensive thermoelectric plants 
to determine a single national electricity 
price. By pooling the various sources, the 
government hopes to reduce electricity 
tariffs and to ensure that power is purchased 
from the newly constructed, predominantly 
gas-fired, thermal plants. However, with 
the new rules only recently issued and not 
yet tested in practice, it remains unclear 
whether investors will continue to build new 
gas-fired power plants in the country. Many 
investors see the new 2004 legislation as a 
means of increasing government influence 
on the electricity sector and enhancing 
the role of the state-owned companies.
In other countries where hydropower 
is predominant like Colombia, Ecuador, 
Peru and Venezuela, viable commercial 
frameworks to introduce thermal 
generation into their electric systems 
have not been developed, leaving them 
vulnerable to drought-induced shortages. 
Issues surrounding regulatory independence, 
transparency and relevant commercial 
experience continue to exist in many Latin 
American and other emerging economies. 
With respect to foreign investment in the 
electric sector, many US companies recently 
have shut down their operations overseas and 
focused back on US markets, in part because 
they did not realize the gains they expected 
in the restructured markets of Latin America 
and Europe. In part, this is because these 
markets have become quite competitive, 
which put pressure on prices, and hence 
on returns, and this competition especially 
penalized those that overpaid for assets. 
Another, larger factor, has been the difficulty 
of building sustainable markets in countries 
where governments still retain heavy 
influence in their electric sectors and/or 
market pricing of electricity is not permitted.
The story is similar in Asia, South Africa, 
Central and Eastern Europe and the 
Former Soviet Union. In all cases, much 
of the impetus for restructuring markets 
comes from general economic reforms 
and the need for private investment to 
build infrastructure and create jobs.
All emerging markets face similar constraints. 
Their economies traditionally have been 
highly centralized and dominated by 
government intervention and ownership. 
Corruption and poverty are pervasive. A 
specific political issue in many countries is 
the degree to which customers should be, 
or can be, exposed to energy price volatility. 
Energy prices, including electricity prices, 
tend to be controlled by the governments 
so that distortions and inefficient use of 
energy are rampant. Political and financial 
stability remain problems. Social backlash 
to reform initiatives is always a possibility 
as witnessed in Argentina and the myriad of 
market issues faced in the United States in 
recent years have had global repercussions. 
Nevertheless, in spite of these enormous 
constraints, even the most disadvantaged 
nations seem at least interested in trying 
to adapt to the prevailing trends. Many 
countries from Eastern Europe to Southeast 
Asia continue with their electric sector 
restructuring efforts based on these trends.
38 
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
Btu (British Thermal Unit): A standard 
unit for measuring the quantity of heat 
energy equal to the quantity of heat 
required to raise the temperature of 
1 pound of water by 1 degree Fahrenheit.
Capacity: The amount of electric 
power delivered or required for which 
a generator, turbine, transformer, 
transmission circuit, station, or system 
is rated by the manufacturer.
Cogenerator: A generating facility that 
produces electricity and another form of 
useful thermal energy (such as heat or 
steam) used for industrial, commercial, 
heating, or cooling purposes.
Combined Cycle: An electric generating 
technology in which electricity is produced 
from otherwise lost waste heat exiting 
from one or more gas (combustion) 
turbines. The exiting heat is routed 
to a conventional boiler or to a heat 
recovery steam generator for utilization 
by a steam turbine in the production of 
electricity. This process increases the 
efficiency of the electric generating unit. 
Distribution System: That portion of 
an electric delivery system operating 
at under 60 kilovolts (kV) that provides 
electric service to customers.
Futures Market: Arrangement through a 
contract for the delivery of a commodity at 
a future time and at a price specified at the 
time of purchase. The price is based on an 
auction or market basis. In the United States, 
this is a standardized, exchange-traded, and 
government regulated hedging mechanism.
Gross Generation: Electricity produced by 
generators, measured at the generating plant. 
Independent Power Producers: Entities 
that are non-CFE and non-LFC power 
generators. Independent power producers 
do not possess transmission or distribution 
facilities and sell electricity solely to the CFE.
Load: The amount of electric power delivered 
at any specified point or points on a system.
Load Profile: A representation of the 
energy usage of a group of customers, 
showing the demand variation on 
an hourly or sub-hourly basis.
Market-Based Pricing: Electric service 
prices determined in an open market system 
of supply and demand under which the price 
is set solely by agreement as to what a buyer 
will pay and a seller will accept. Such prices 
could recover less or more than full costs, 
depending upon what the buyer and seller 
see as their relevant opportunities and risks.
Net Generation: The electricity delivered 
to the SEN transmission grid. Net generation 
is usually equal to gross generation less the 
electricity used in the generation operations.
Open Access: A regulatory mandate to 
allow others to use gas transmission and 
distribution facilities to move gas from one 
point to another on a nondiscriminatory 
basis for a cost-based fee.
Outage: Removal of a facility from service 
to perform maintenance, construction or 
repair on the facility for a specified duration.
GLOSSARY
Parallel Path Flow: Electricity flows over 
transmission lines according to the laws of 
physics. As such, the power generated in one 
region may flow over the transmission lines 
of another region, inadvertently affecting the 
ability of the other region to move power. 
Reactive Power: The product of voltage 
and the out-of-phase component of 
alternating current. Reactive power, usually 
measured in megavolt-amperes reactive, 
is produced by capacitors, overexcited 
generators and other capacitive devices 
and is absorbed by reactors, underexcited 
generators and other inductive devices.
Spinning Reserve: That reserve 
generating capacity running at zero load 
and synchronized to the electric system.
Transmission Losses: Difference 
between energy input into the SEN 
transmission grid and the energy taken 
out of the SEN transmission grid.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested