While we may not have taken a biology or physics class in many years, chances are that 
at least some of our students have. We can acknowledge students’ interest and expertise 
in these areas and take advantage of their knowledge. For example, ask a student with a 
strong interest in biology to connect drug delivery mechanisms to their knowledge about 
cell regulatory processes. In this way, we share the responsibility for learning and 
emphasize the value of collaborative investigation. Furthermore, this helps engage 
students whose primary area of interest isn’t chemistry and gives them a chance to 
contribute to the class discussion. It also helps all students begin to integrate their 
knowledge from the different scientific disciplines and presents wonderful opportunities 
for them to see the how the different disciplines interact to explain real world 
phenomena. 
Final Words 
Nanoscience provides an exciting and challenging opportunity to engage our students in 
cutting edge science and help them see the dynamic and evolving nature of scientific 
knowledge. By embracing these challenges and using them to engage students in 
meaningful discussions about science in the making and how we know what we know, 
we are helping our students not only in their study of nanoscience, but in developing a 
more sophisticated understanding of the scientific process. 
References 
Luan, B., & Robbins, M. (2005, June). The breakdown of continuum models for 
mechanical contacts. Nature 435, 929-932. 
O-T5
Convert pdf into ppt online - C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
pdf to powerpoint converter online; picture from pdf to powerpoint
Convert pdf into ppt online - VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
convert pdf slides to powerpoint online; convert pdf document to powerpoint
Table 1. Challenges of teaching nanoscience and strategies for turning these 
challenges into learning opportunities. 
T
HE 
C
HALLENGE
… 
P
ROVIDES THE 
O
PPORTUNITY TO
… 
You will not be able 
to know all the 
answers to student 
(and possibly your 
own) questions ahead 
of time 
Model the process scientists use when confronted with new 
phenomena:  
Identify and isolate questions to answer 
Work collectively to search for information using available 
resources (textbooks, scientific journals, online resources, 
scientist interviews)  
Incorporate new information and revise previous 
understanding as necessary  
Generate further questions for investigation 
Traditional chemistry 
and physics concepts 
may not be applicable 
at the nanoscale level 
Address the use of models and concepts as scientific tools for 
describing and predicting chemical behavior: 
Identify simplifying assumptions of the model and situations 
for intended use 
Discuss the advantages and limitations of using conceptual 
models in science 
Integrate new concepts with previous understandings 
Some questions may 
go beyond the 
boundary of our 
current understanding 
as a scientific 
community 
Involve students in exploring the nature of knowing: 
How we know what we know 
The limitations and uncertainties of scientific explanation 
How science generates new information 
How we use new information to change our understandings 
Nanoscience is a 
multidisciplinary 
field and draws on 
areas outside of 
chemistry, such as 
biology and physics 
Engage and value our student knowledge beyond the area of 
chemistry: 
Help students create new connections to their existing 
knowledge from other disciplines 
Highlight the relationship of different kinds of individual 
contributions to our collective knowledge about science 
Explore how different disciplines interact to explain real 
world phenomena 
O-T6
Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button or drag-and-drop your pptx or ppt file into the drop area.
convert pdf to editable powerpoint online; how to convert pdf into powerpoint on
How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word
How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word. PDF, MS-Excel, MS-PPT to Word Conversion Overview. By integrating XDoc.Word SDK into your C#.NET project, PDF, MS
pdf to powerpoint slide; convert pdf to powerpoint using
Clean Energy: Overview, Learning Goals & Standards 
Type of Courses: Chemistry, Physics 
Grade Levels: 
10-12 
Topic Area: 
Clean, renewable energy sources; world energy demands; Solar energy 
conversion 
Key Words: 
Nanoscience, nanotechnology, energy, solar, alternative energy, renewable 
energy, chemical energy 
Time Frame: 
3 class periods (assuming 50-minutes classes) 
Overview 
Energy production is one of the most pressing global issues that humanity must address 
over the next few decades. Clean alternative technologies must be developed to provide 
sufficient energy to meet growing global demand. These energy solutions must be 
sustainable both environmentally (e.g., be nonpolluting) and economically (e.g., be 
efficient and scalable). Nanoscience could enable revolutionary and important 
breakthroughs in energy generation and conversion. In this unit, traditional and newer 
“nano” solar technologies are introduced and discussed. 
Enduring Understandings (EU) 
What enduring understandings are desired? Students will understand: 
1. Clean alternative energy technologies must be developed to provide sufficient 
energy to meet growing global demand, and must be sustainable both 
environmentally and economically. 
2. Nanoscience could enable important breakthroughs in solar energy technology 
through low cost, novel energy conversion mechanisms. 
3. Surface area to volume ratio is a function of particle size and shape. Increasing 
surface area normally increases the rate of reaction because there are more sites 
available for simultaneous reactions. 
4. Energy is neither created nor destroyed––it can only be converted into different 
forms. 
Essential Questions (EQ) 
What essential questions will guide this unit and focus teaching and learning? 
1. What are some clean and renewable energy sources? 
2. What are the main energy production mechanisms? 
3. What are current and projected global energy demands? 
4. How do newer, nanotechnology-influenced solar cells work, and how do they 
differ from traditional solar cells? 
O-T7
How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF
How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF. MS Office to PDF Conversion Overview. By integrating XDoc.PDF SDK into your C#.NET project, Microsoft Office
converting pdf to powerpoint slides; pdf into powerpoint
VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
directly encode converted image source into PDF document file converted image source to PDF format, RasterEdge VB other encoding APIs to convert rendered image
add pdf to powerpoint slide; table from pdf to powerpoint
Key Knowledge and Skills (KKS) 
What key knowledge and skills will students acquire as a result of this unit? Students will 
be able to: 
1. Describe the three main global energy issues (limited supply of hydrocarbon-
based resources, projected increase in global energy consumption, current lack of 
clean/renewable energy technologies). 
2. Explain what single-crystal solar cells are and how they function. 
3. Explain what nano-influenced dye-sensitized solar cells are, how they work, and 
the critical role surface area to volume ratio plays in their functioning. 
4. Compare the main advantages/disadvantages of single-crystal silicon solar cells 
and dye-sensitized solar cells. 
Prerequisite Knowledge 
This unit assumes that students are familiar with the following concepts or topics: 
1. Atoms, molecules, ions 
2. Bonding 
3. Energy, energy levels 
4. Current, circuit, electrolysis, electrical power 
NSES Content Standards Addressed 
K-12 Unifying Concepts and Process Standard  
As a result of activities in grades, K-12, all students should develop understanding and 
abilities aligned with the following concepts and processes:  (2 of the 5 categories apply) 
• Evidence, models and explanation 
• Form and function 
Grades 9-12 Content Standard A: Science as Inquiry 
Abilities Necessary to Do Scientific Inquiry  
• Formulate and revise scientific explanations and models using logic and 
evidence. Student inquiries should culminate in formulating an explanation or 
model. Models should be physical, conceptual, and mathematical. In the process 
of answering the questions, the students should engage in discussions and 
arguments that result in the revision of their explanations. These discussions 
should be based on scientific knowledge, the use of logic, and evidence from their 
investigation. (12ASI1.4.) 
• Formulate and analyze alternative explanations and models. This aspect of 
the standard emphasizes the critical abilities of analyzing an argument by 
reviewing current scientific understanding, weighing the evidence, and examining 
the logic so as to decide which explanations and models are best. In other words, 
although there may be several plausible explanations, they do not all have equal 
O-T8
C# TIFF: Learn to Convert MS Word, Excel, and PPT to TIFF Image
C# TIFF - Conversion from Word, Excel, PPT to TIFF. In order to convert Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint to quiet easy to integrate this SDK into your C#
convert pdf into powerpoint; changing pdf to powerpoint
VB.NET PowerPoint: Process & Manipulate PPT (.pptx) Slide(s)
to split one PPT (.pptx) document file into smaller sub control add-on can do PPT creating, loading powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
create powerpoint from pdf; how to change pdf to powerpoint
weight. Students should be able to use scientific criteria to find the preferred 
explanations. (12ASI1.5.) 
• Communicate and defend a scientific argument. Students in school science 
programs should develop the abilities associated with accurate and effective 
communication. These include writing and following procedures, expressing 
concepts, reviewing information, summarizing data, using language appropriately, 
developing diagrams and charts, explaining statistical analysis, speaking clearly 
and logically, constructing a reasoned argument, and responding appropriately to 
critical comments. (12ASI1.6.) 
Understandings about Scientific Inquiry 
• Scientific inquiry about system function
Scientists usually inquire about how 
physical, living, or designed systems function. Conceptual principles and 
knowledge guide scientific inquiries. Historical and current scientific knowledge 
influence the design and interpretation of investigations and the evaluation of 
proposed explanations made by other scientists
.
(12ASI2.1) 
• Scientific explanations
Scientific explanations must adhere to criteria such as: a 
proposed explanation must be logically consistent; it must abide by the rules of 
evidence; it must be open to questions and possible modification; and it must be 
based on historical and current scientific knowledge. (12ASI2.5) 
Grades 9-12 Content Standard B: Physical Science 
Structure of Atoms 
• Structure of atoms.
Matter is made of minute particles called atoms, and atoms 
are composed of even smaller components. These components have measurable 
properties, such as mass and electrical charge. Each atom has a positively charged 
nucleus surrounded by negatively charged electrons. The electric force between 
the nucleus and electrons holds the atom together. (12BPS1.1) 
Structure and Properties of Matter 
• Atomic interaction.
Atoms interact with one another by transferring or sharing 
electrons that are furthest from the nucleus. These outer electrons govern the 
chemical properties of the element. (12BPS2.1) 
Chemical Reactions 
• Energy and chemical reactions.
Chemical reactions may release or consume 
energy. Some reactions such as the burning of fossil fuels release large amounts 
of energy by losing heat and by emitting light. Light can initiate many chemical 
reactions such as photosynthesis and the evolution of urban smog. (12BPS3.2) 
• Reactions involve electron transfer.
A large number of important reactions 
involve the transfer of either electrons (oxidation/reduction reactions) or hydrogen 
ions (acid/base reactions) between reacting ions, molecules, or atoms. In other 
reactions, chemical bonds are broken by heat or light to form very reactive 
radicals with electrons ready to form new bonds. Radical reactions control many 
processes such as the presence of ozone and greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, 
O-T9
VB.NET PowerPoint: Read & Scan Barcode Image from PPT Slide
VB.NET PPT PDF-417 barcode scanning SDK to detect PDF-417 barcode Allow VB.NET developers to output PPT ISSN barcode scanning result into data string.
conversion of pdf into ppt; convert pdf to powerpoint
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document
VB.NET Read: PDF Text Extract; VB.NET Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document.
convert pdf to editable ppt; convert pdf to powerpoint slide
burning and processing of fossil fuels, the formation of polymers, and explosions. 
(12BPS3.3) 
• Catalysts accelerate chemical reactions.
Catalysts, such as metal surfaces, 
accelerate chemical reactions. Chemical reactions in living systems are catalyzed 
by protein molecules called enzymes. (12BPS3.5) 
Conservation of Energy and the Increase in Disorder 
• Total energy in universe is constant.
The total energy of the universe is 
constant. Energy can be transferred by collisions in chemical and nuclear 
reactions, by light waves and other radiations, and in many other ways. However, 
it can never be destroyed. As these transfers occur, the matter involved becomes 
steadily less ordered. (12BPS5.1) 
• All energy is either kinetic or potential. All energy can be considered to be 
either kinetic energy, which is the energy of motion; potential energy, which 
depends on relative position; or energy contained by a field, such as 
electromagnetic waves. (12BPS5.2) 
Interactions of Energy and Matter 
• Energy is quantized. Each kind of atom or molecule can gain or lose energy only 
in particular discrete amounts and thus can absorb and emit light only at 
wavelengths corresponding to these amounts. These wavelengths can be used to 
identify the substance. 
• Electron flow in materials In some materials, such as metals, electrons flow 
easily, whereas in insulating materials such as glass they can hardly flow at all. 
Semiconducting materials have intermediate behavior. At low temperatures some 
materials become superconductors and offer no resistance to the flow of electrons. 
(12BPS6.4) 
Grades 9-12 Content Standard E: Science and Technology 
Abilities of Technological Design 
• Identify a problem or design an opportunityStudents should be able to 
identify new problems or needs and to change and improve current technological 
designs. (12EST1.1) 
Understandings about Science and Technology 
• Science advances through new technologies. Science often advances with the 
introduction of new technologies. Solving technological problems often results in 
new scientific knowledge. New technologies often extend the current levels of 
scientific understanding and introduce new areas of research. (12EST2.2) 
• Creativity, knowledge, imagination. Creativity, imagination, and a good 
knowledge base are all required in the work of science and engineering. 
(12EST2.3) 
• The pursuit of science and technology. Science and technology are pursued for 
different purposes. Scientific inquiry is driven by the desire to understand the 
natural world, and technological design is driven by the need to meet human 
O-T10
needs and solve human problems. Technology, by its nature, has a more direct 
effect on society than science because its purpose is to solve human problems, 
help humans adapt, and fulfill human aspirations. Technological solutions may 
create new problems. Science, by its nature, answers questions that may or may 
not directly influence humans. Sometimes scientific advances challenge people's 
beliefs and practical explanations concerning various aspects of the world. 
(12EST2.4) 
Grades 9-12 Content Standard F: Science in Personal and Social 
Perspectives  
Natural Resources 
• Human populations use resources. Human populations use resources in the 
environment in order to maintain and improve their existence. Natural resources 
have been and will continue to be used to maintain human populations. 
(12FSPSP3.1) 
• Limited earth resources. The earth does not have infinite resources; increasing 
human consumption places severe stress on the natural processes that renew some 
resources, and it depletes those resources that cannot be renewed. (12FSPSP3.2) 
• Human use natural systems. Humans use many natural systems as resources. 
Natural systems have the capacity to reuse waste, but that capacity is limited. 
Natural systems can change to an extent that exceeds the limits of organisms to 
adapt naturally or humans to adapt technologically. (12FSPSP3.3) 
Environmental Quality 
• Many factors influence environmental quality. Many factors influence 
environmental quality. Factors that students might investigate include population 
growth, resource use, population distribution, overconsumption, the capacity of 
technology to solve problems, poverty, the role of economic, political, and 
religious views, and different ways humans view the earth. (12FSPSP4.3) 
Natural and Human-Induced Hazards 
• Assessment of potential danger and risk. Natural and human-induced hazards 
present the need for humans to assess potential danger and risk. Many changes in 
the environment designed by humans bring benefits to society, as well as cause 
risks. Students should understand the costs and trade-offs of various hazards--
ranging from those with minor risk to a few people to major catastrophes with 
major risk to many people. The scale of events and the accuracy with which 
scientists and engineers can (and cannot) predict events are important 
considerations. (12FSPSP5.4) 
Science and Technology in Local, National, and Global Challenges 
• Individuals and society must decide on proposals of new 
research/technologies. Individuals and society must decide on proposals 
involving new research and the introduction of new technologies into society. 
Decisions involve assessment of alternatives, risks, costs, and benefits and 
consideration of who benefits and who suffers, who pays and gains, and what the 
O-T11
risks are and who bears them. Students should understand the appropriateness and 
value of basic questions––What can happen? What are the odds? How do 
scientists and engineers know what will happen?" (12FSPSP6.4) 
Grades 9-12 Content Standard G: History and Nature of Science 
Nature of Scientific Knowledge 
• All scientific knowledge is subject to change as new evidence becomes 
available. Because all scientific ideas depend on experimental and observational 
confirmation, all scientific knowledge is, in principle, subject to change as new 
evidence becomes available. The core ideas of science such as the conservation of 
energy or the laws of motion have been subjected to a wide variety of 
confirmations and are therefore unlikely to change in the areas in which they have 
been tested. In areas where data or understanding are incomplete, such as the 
details of human evolution or questions surrounding global warming, new data 
may well lead to changes in current ideas or resolve current conflicts. In situations 
where information is still fragmentary, it is normal for scientific ideas to be 
incomplete, but this is also where the opportunity for making advances may be 
greatest. (12GHNS2.3) 
Historical Perspectives  
• Changes in science by small modifications of current knowledge. Usually, 
changes in science occur as small modifications in extant knowledge. The daily 
work of science and engineering results in incremental advances in our 
understanding of the world and our ability to meet human needs and aspirations. 
Much can be learned about the internal workings of science and the nature of 
science from study of individual scientists, their daily work, and their efforts to 
advance scientific knowledge in their area of study. (12GHNS3.2) 
• Scientific knowledge evolves over time, building on earlier knowledge. The 
historical perspective of scientific explanations demonstrates how scientific 
knowledge changes by evolving over time, almost always building on earlier 
knowledge. (12GHNS3.4) 
O-T12
Unit at a Glance 
Overview 
The Clean Energy Unit has been designed in a modular fashion to allow you maximum 
flexibility in adapting it to your student’s needs. Lesson 1 provides an overview of the 
current state of world energy consumption and production, and highlights the need for 
alternative energy sources. Lesson 2 is a two-day lesson that focuses on energy production 
using solar technologies and includes a hands-on student lab activity on nanocrystalline solar 
cells. You can use lessons 1 and 2 in sequence, or use them individually. The student 
nanocrystalline activity is a one-period activity, but can be extended into a two-period lab 
activity if you choose. 
Lesson 
Basic 
Sequence 
Lesson 1: Introduction and Initial Ideas 
√ 
Lesson 2: Solar Energy and Nanoscience 
√ 
The following page contains a suggested sequencing of activities for the unit, as well as a 
listing of the Enduring Understandings (EU’s), Essential Questions (EQ’s), and Key 
Knowledge and Skills (KKS). 
O-T13
S
u
g
g
e
s
t
e
d
S
e
q
u
e
n
c
i
n
g
o
f
A
c
t
i
v
i
t
i
e
s
f
o
r
B
a
s
i
c
U
n
i
t
T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g
L
e
a
r
n
i
n
g
L
e
s
s
o
n
D
a
y
s
M
a
i
n
A
c
t
i
v
i
t
i
e
s
a
n
d
M
a
t
e
r
i
a
l
s
G
o
a
l
s
A
s
s
e
s
s
m
e
n
t
H
o
m
e
w
o
r
k
L
e
s
s
o
n
1
:
I
n
t
r
o
d
u
c
t
i
o
n
a
n
d
I
n
i
t
i
a
l
I
d
e
a
s
1
d
a
y
:
C
l
e
a
n
E
n
e
r
g
y
-
T
h
e
P
o
t
e
n
t
i
a
l
o
f
N
a
n
o
s
c
i
e
n
c
e
f
o
r
E
n
e
r
g
y
P
r
o
d
u
c
t
i
o
n
a
n
d
U
s
e
:
P
o
w
e
r
P
o
i
n
t
a
n
d
D
i
s
c
u
s
s
o
n
I
n
i
t
i
a
l
I
d
e
a
s
:
T
e
a
c
h
e
r
N
o
t
e
s
E
U
:
1
K
K
S
:
1
I
n
i
t
i
a
l
I
d
e
a
s
W
o
r
k
s
h
e
e
t
R
e
a
d
H
y
b
r
i
d
C
a
r
s
,
S
o
l
a
r
C
e
l
l
s
,
a
n
d
N
a
n
o
s
c
i
e
n
c
e
C
o
m
p
l
e
t
e
S
t
u
d
e
n
t
R
e
a
d
i
n
g
W
o
r
k
s
h
e
e
t
2
d
a
y
s
:
D
a
y
1
C
l
e
a
n
S
o
l
a
r
E
n
e
r
g
y
-
T
h
e
I
m
p
a
c
t
o
f
N
a
n
o
s
c
a
l
e
S
c
i
e
n
c
e
o
n
S
o
l
a
r
E
n
e
r
g
y
P
r
o
d
u
c
t
i
o
n
:
P
o
w
e
r
P
o
i
n
t
a
n
d
D
i
s
c
u
s
s
i
o
n
S
o
l
a
r
C
e
l
l
A
n
i
m
a
t
i
o
n
A
c
t
i
v
i
t
y
R
e
f
l
e
c
t
i
o
n
o
n
G
u
i
d
i
n
g
Q
u
e
s
t
i
o
n
s
R
e
a
d
N
a
n
o
s
c
r
y
s
t
a
l
l
i
n
e
S
o
l
a
r
C
e
l
l
L
a
b
A
c
t
i
v
i
t
y
h
a
n
d
o
u
t
L
e
s
s
o
n
2
:
S
o
l
a
r
E
n
e
r
g
y
a
n
d
N
a
n
o
s
c
i
e
n
c
e
D
a
y
2
N
a
n
o
s
c
r
y
s
t
a
l
l
i
n
e
S
o
l
a
r
C
e
l
l
L
a
b
A
c
t
i
v
i
t
y
R
e
f
l
e
c
t
i
o
n
o
n
G
u
i
d
i
n
g
Q
u
e
s
t
i
o
n
s
E
U
:
2
,
3
,
4
K
K
S
:
2
,
3
,
4
,
5
N
a
n
o
s
c
r
y
s
t
a
l
l
i
n
e
S
o
l
a
r
C
e
l
l
L
a
b
W
o
r
k
s
h
e
e
t
E
n
d
u
r
i
n
g
u
n
d
e
r
s
t
a
n
d
i
n
g
s
(
E
U
s
)
:
1
.
C
l
e
a
n
a
l
t
e
r
n
a
t
i
v
e
e
n
e
r
g
y
t
e
c
h
n
o
l
o
g
i
e
s
m
u
s
t
b
e
d
e
v
e
l
o
p
e
d
t
o
p
r
o
v
i
d
e
s
u
f
f
i
c
i
e
n
t
e
n
e
r
g
y
t
o
m
e
e
t
g
r
o
w
i
n
g
g
l
o
b
a
l
d
e
m
a
n
d
,
a
n
d
m
u
s
t
b
e
s
u
s
t
a
i
n
a
b
l
e
b
o
t
h
e
n
v
i
r
o
n
m
e
n
t
a
l
l
y
a
n
d
e
c
o
n
o
m
i
c
a
l
l
y
.
2
.
N
a
n
o
s
c
i
e
n
c
e
c
o
u
l
d
e
n
a
b
l
e
i
m
p
o
r
t
a
n
t
b
r
e
a
k
t
h
r
o
u
g
h
s
i
n
s
o
l
a
r
e
n
e
r
g
y
t
e
c
h
n
o
l
o
g
y
t
h
r
o
u
g
h
l
o
w
c
o
s
t
,
n
o
v
e
l
e
n
e
r
g
y
c
o
n
v
e
r
s
i
o
n
m
e
c
h
a
n
i
s
m
s
.
3
.
S
u
r
f
a
c
e
a
r
e
a
t
o
v
o
l
u
m
e
r
a
t
i
o
i
s
a
f
u
n
c
t
i
o
n
o
f
p
a
r
t
i
c
l
e
s
i
z
e
a
n
d
s
h
a
p
e
.
I
n
c
r
e
a
s
i
n
g
s
u
r
f
a
c
e
a
r
e
a
n
o
r
m
a
l
l
y
i
n
c
r
e
a
s
e
s
t
h
e
r
a
t
e
o
f
r
e
a
c
t
i
o
n
b
e
c
a
u
s
e
t
h
e
r
e
a
r
e
m
o
r
e
s
i
t
e
s
a
v
a
i
l
a
b
l
e
f
o
r
s
i
m
u
l
t
a
n
e
o
u
s
r
e
a
c
t
i
o
n
s
.
4
.
E
n
e
r
g
y
i
s
n
e
i
t
h
e
r
c
r
e
a
t
e
d
n
o
r
d
e
s
t
r
o
y
e
d
i
t
c
a
n
o
n
l
y
b
e
c
o
n
v
e
r
t
e
d
i
n
t
o
d
i
f
f
e
r
e
n
t
f
o
r
m
s
.
E
s
s
e
n
t
i
a
l
q
u
e
s
t
i
o
n
s
(
E
Q
s
)
:
1
.
W
h
a
t
a
r
e
s
o
m
e
c
l
e
a
n
a
n
d
r
e
n
e
w
a
b
l
e
e
n
e
r
g
y
s
o
u
r
c
e
s
?
2
.
W
h
a
t
a
r
e
t
h
e
m
a
i
n
e
n
e
r
g
y
p
r
o
d
u
c
t
i
o
n
m
e
c
h
a
n
i
s
m
s
?
3
.
W
h
a
t
a
r
e
c
u
r
r
e
n
t
a
n
d
p
r
o
j
e
c
t
e
d
g
l
o
b
a
l
e
n
e
r
g
y
d
e
m
a
n
d
s
?
4
.
H
o
w
d
o
n
e
w
e
r
,
n
a
n
o
t
e
c
h
n
o
l
o
g
y
-
i
n
f
l
u
e
n
c
e
d
s
o
l
a
r
c
e
l
l
s
w
o
r
k
,
a
n
d
h
o
w
d
o
t
h
e
y
d
i
f
f
e
r
f
r
o
m
t
r
a
d
i
t
i
o
n
a
l
s
o
l
a
r
c
e
l
l
s
?
K
e
y
K
n
o
w
l
e
d
g
e
a
n
d
S
k
i
l
l
s
(
K
K
S
)
:
1
.
D
e
s
c
r
i
b
e
t
h
r
e
e
p
r
i
m
a
r
y
g
l
o
b
a
l
e
n
e
r
g
y
i
s
s
u
e
s
(
l
i
m
i
t
e
d
s
u
p
p
l
y
o
f
h
y
d
r
o
c
a
r
b
o
n
-
b
a
s
e
d
r
e
s
o
u
r
c
e
s
,
p
r
o
j
e
c
t
e
d
i
n
c
r
e
a
s
e
i
n
g
l
o
b
a
l
e
n
e
r
g
y
c
o
n
s
u
m
p
t
i
o
n
,
c
u
r
r
e
n
t
l
a
c
k
o
f
c
l
e
a
n
/
r
e
n
e
w
a
b
l
e
e
n
e
r
g
y
t
e
c
h
n
o
l
o
g
i
e
s
)
.
2
.
E
x
p
l
a
i
n
w
h
a
t
s
i
n
g
l
e
-
c
r
y
s
t
a
l
s
i
l
i
c
o
n
s
o
l
a
r
c
e
l
l
s
a
r
e
a
n
d
h
o
w
t
h
e
y
f
u
n
c
t
i
o
n
.
3
.
E
x
p
l
a
i
n
w
h
a
t
n
a
n
o
-
i
n
f
l
u
e
n
c
e
d
d
y
e
-
s
e
n
s
i
t
i
z
e
d
s
o
l
a
r
c
e
l
l
s
a
r
e
,
h
o
w
t
h
e
y
w
o
r
k
,
a
n
d
t
h
e
c
r
i
t
i
c
a
l
r
o
l
e
s
u
r
f
a
c
e
a
r
e
a
t
o
v
o
l
u
m
e
r
a
t
i
o
p
l
a
y
s
i
n
t
h
e
i
r
f
u
n
c
t
i
o
n
i
n
g
.
4
.
C
o
m
p
a
r
e
t
h
e
m
a
i
n
a
d
v
a
n
t
a
g
e
s
/
d
i
s
a
d
v
a
n
t
a
g
e
s
o
f
s
i
n
g
l
e
-
c
r
y
s
t
a
l
s
i
l
i
c
o
n
s
o
l
a
r
c
e
l
l
s
a
n
d
d
y
e
-
s
e
n
s
i
t
i
z
e
d
s
o
l
a
r
c
e
l
l
s
.
O-T14
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested