gnuplot 4.6
211
Examples
set terminal png medium size 640,480 background ’#ffffff’
Use the medium size built-in non-scaleable, non-rotatable font. Use white (24-bit RGB in hexadecimal) for
the non-transparent background.
set terminal png font arial 14 size 800,600
Searches for a scalable font with face name ’arial’ and sets the font size to 14pt. Please see fonts (p. 31)
for details of how the font search is done.
set terminal png transparent truecolor enhanced
Use 24 bits of color information per pixel, with a transparent background. Use the enhanced text mode
to control the layout of strings to be printed.
Pngcairo
The pngcairo terminal device generates output in png. The actual drawing is done via cairo, a 2D graphics
library, and pango, a library for laying out and rendering text.
Syntax:
set term pngcairo
{{no}enhanced} {mono|color} {solid|dashed}
{{no}transparent} {{no}crop} {background <rgbcolor>
{font <font>} {fontscale <scale>}
{linewidth <lw>} {rounded|butt} {dashlength <dl>}
{size <XX>{unit},<YY>{unit}}
This terminal supports an enhanced text mode, which allows font and other formatting commands (sub-
scripts, superscripts, etc.) to be embedded in labels and other text strings. The enhanced text mode syntax
is shared with other gnuplot terminal types. See enhanced (p.23) for more details.
The width of all lines in the plot can be modied by the factor <lw>.
rounded sets line caps and line joins to be rounded; butt is the default, butt caps and mitered joins.
The default size for the output is 640 x 480 pixels. The size option changes this to whatever the user
requests. By default the X and Y sizes are taken to be in pixels, but other units are possible (currently cm
and inch). A size given in centimeters or inches will be converted into pixels assuming a resolution of 72 dpi.
Screen coordinates always run from 0.0 to 1.0 along the full length of the plot edges as specied by the size
option.
<font> is in the format "FontFace,FontSize", i.e. the face and the size comma-separated in a single string.
FontFace is a usual font face name, such as ’Arial’. If you do not provide FontFace, the pngcairo terminal
will use ’Sans’. FontSize is the font size, in points. If you do not provide it, the pngcairo terminal will use a
size of 12 points.
For example :
set term pngcairo font "Arial,12"
set term pngcairo font "Arial" # to change the font face only
set term pngcairo font ",12" # to change the font size only
set term pngcairo font "" # to reset the font name and size
The fonts are retrieved from the usual fonts subsystems. Under Windows, those fonts are to be found and
congured in the entry "Fonts" of the control panel. Under UNIX, they are handled by "fontcong".
Pango, the library used to layout the text, is based on utf-8. Thus, the pngcairo terminal has to convert
from your encoding to utf-8. The default input encoding is based on your ’locale’. If you want to use another
encoding, make sure gnuplot knows which one you are using. See encoding (p. 112) for more details.
Pango may give unexpected results with fonts that do not respect the unicode mapping. With the Symbol
font, for example, the pngcairo terminal will use the map provided by http://www.unicode.org/ to trans-
late character codes to unicode. Note that "the Symbol font" is to be understood as the Adobe Symbol
Convert pdf to powerpoint online - control application platform:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to powerpoint online - control application platform:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
212
gnuplot 4.6
font, distributed with Acrobat Reader as "SY
.PFB". Alternatively, the OpenSymbol font, distributed
with OpenOce.org as "opens
.ttf", oers the same characters. Microsoft has distributed a Symbol font
("symbol.ttf"), but it has a dierent character set with several missing or moved mathematic characters. If
you experience problems with your default setup (if the demo enhancedtext.dem is not displayed properly
for example), you probably have to install one of the Adobe or OpenOce Symbol fonts, and remove the
Microsoft one. Other non-conform fonts, such as "wingdings" have been observed working.
The rendering of the plot cannot be altered yet. To obtain the best output possible, the rendering involves two
mechanisms : antialiasing and oversampling. Antialiasing allows to display non-horizontal and non-vertical
lines smoother. Oversampling combined with antialiasing provides subpixel accuracy, so that gnuplot can
draw aline from non-integer coordinates. This avoids wobbling eects ondiagonal lines (’plot x’ for example).
Postscript
Several options may be set in the postscript driver.
Syntax:
set terminal postscript {default}
set terminal postscript {landscape | portrait | eps}
{enhanced | noenhanced}
{defaultplex | simplex | duplex}
{fontfile [add | delete] "<filename>"
| nofontfiles} {{no}adobeglyphnames}
{level1 | leveldefault}
{color | colour | monochrome}
{background <rgbcolor> | nobackground}
{solid | dashed}
{dashlength | dl <DL>}
{linewidth | lw <LW>}
{rounded | butt}
{clip | noclip}
{palfuncparam <samples>{,<maxdeviation>}}
{size <XX>{unit},<YY>{unit}}
{blacktext | colortext | colourtext}
{{font} "fontname{,fontsize}" {<fontsize>}}
{fontscale <scale>}
If you see the error message
"Can’t find PostScript prologue file ... "
Please see and follow the instructions in postscript prologue (p.215).
landscape and portrait choose the plot orientation. eps mode generates EPS (Encapsulated PostScript)
output, which is just regular PostScript with some additional lines that allow the le to be imported into a
variety of other applications. (The added lines are PostScript comment lines, so the le may still be printed
by itself.) To get EPS output, use the eps mode and make only one plot per le. In eps mode the whole
plot, including the fonts, is reduced to half of the default size.
enhanced enables enhanced text mode features (subscripts, superscripts and mixed fonts). See enhanced
(p. 23) for more information. blacktext forces all text to be written in black even in color mode;
Duplexing in PostScript is the ability of the printer to print on both sides of the same sheet of paper. With
defaultplex, the default setting of the printer is used; with simplex only one side is printed; duplex prints
on both sides (ignored if your printer can’t do it).
"<fontname>" is the name of a valid PostScript font; and <fontsize> is the size of the font in PostScript
points. In addition to the standard postscript fonts, an oblique version of the Symbol font, useful for
mathematics, is dened. It is called "Symbol-Oblique".
default sets all options to their defaults: landscape, monochrome, dashed, dl 1.0, lw 1.0, defaultplex,
noenhanced, "Helvetica" and 14pt. Default size of a PostScript plot is 10 inches wide and 7 inches high.
control application platform:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Online Powerpoint to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue
www.rasteredge.com
control application platform:VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF Word to PDF; Convert Excel to PDF; Convert PowerPoint to PDF; Convert Image
www.rasteredge.com
gnuplot 4.6
213
The option color enables color, while monochrome prefers black and white drawing elements. Further,
monochrome uses gray palette but it does not change color of objects specied withan explicit colorspec.
solid draws all plots with solid lines, overriding any dashed patterns. dashlength or dl scales the length of
the dashed-line segments by <DL>, which is a  oating-point number greater than zero. linewidth or lw
scales all linewidths by <LW>.
By default the generated PostScript code uses language features that were introduced in PostScript Level 2,
notably lters and pattern-ll of irregular objects such as lledcurves. PostScript Level 2 features are condi-
tionally protected so that PostScript Level 1 interpreters do not issue errors but, rather, display a message
or a PostScript Level 1 approximation. The level1 option substitutes PostScript Level 1 approximations
of these features and uses no PostScript Level 2 code. This may be required by some old printers and old
versions of Adobe Illustrator. The  ag level1 can be toggled later by editing a single line in the PostScript
output le to force PostScript Level 1 interpretation. In the case of les containing level 2 code, the above
features will not appear or will be replaced by a note when this  ag is set or when the interpreting program
does not indicate that it understands level 2 PostScript or higher.
rounded sets line caps and line joins to be rounded; butt is the default, butt caps and mitered joins.
clip tells PostScript to clip all output to the bounding box; noclip is the default.
palfuncparam controls how set palette functions are encoded as gradients in the output. Analytic
color component functions (set via set palette functions) are encoded as linear interpolated gradients
in the postscript output: The color component functions are sampled at <samples> points and all points
are removed from this gradient which can be removed without changing the resulting colors by more than
<maxdeviation>. For almost every useful palette you may safely leave the defaults of <samples>=2000 and
<maxdeviation>=0.003 untouched.
The default size for postscript output is 10 inches x 7 inches. The default for eps output is 5 x 3.5 inches.
The size option changes this to whatever the user requests. By default the X and Y sizes are taken to be in
inches, but other units are possibly (currently only cm). The BoundingBox of the plot is correctly adjusted
to contain the resized image. Screen coordinates always run from 0.0 to 1.0 along the full length of the
plot edges as specied by the size option. NB: this is a change from the previously recommended
method of using the set size command prior to setting the terminal type. The old method left
the BoundingBox unchanged and screen coordinates did not correspond to the actual limits of the plot.
Fonts listed by fontle or fontle add encapsulate the font denitions of the listed font from a postscript
Type 1 or TrueType font le directly into the gnuplot output postscript le. Thus, the enclosed font can
be used in labels, titles, etc. See the section postscript fontle (p.214) for more details. With fontle
delete, a fontle is deleted from the list of embedded les. nofontles cleans the list of embedded fonts.
Examples:
set terminal postscript default
# old postscript
set terminal postscript enhanced
# old enhpost
set terminal postscript landscape 22 # old psbig
set terminal postscript eps 14
# old epsf1
set terminal postscript eps 22
# old epsf2
set size 0.7,1.4; set term post portrait color "Times-Roman" 14
set term post "VAGRoundedBT_Regular" 14 fontfile "bvrr8a.pfa"
Linewidths and pointsizes may be changed with set style line.
The postscript driver supports about 70 distinct pointtypes, selectable through the pointtype option on
plot and set style line.
Several possibly useful les about gnuplot’s PostScript are included in the /docs/psdoc subdirectory of the
gnuplot distribution and at the distribution sites. These are "ps
symbols.gpi" (a gnuplot command le
that, when executed, creates the le "ps
symbols.ps" which shows all the symbols available through the
postscript terminal), "ps
guide.ps" (a PostScript le that contains a summary of the enhanced syntax and
apage showing what the octal codes produce with text and symbol fonts), "ps
le.doc" (a text le that
contains a discussion of the organization of a PostScript le written by gnuplot), and "ps
fontle
doc.tex"
(a LaTeX le which contains a short documentation concerning the encapsulation of LaTeX fonts with a
glyph table of the math fonts).
A PostScript le is editable, so once gnuplot has created one, you are free to modify it to your heart’s
control application platform:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF Word to PDF; Convert Excel to PDF; Convert PowerPoint to PDF; Convert Image
www.rasteredge.com
control application platform:XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, Zero Footprint AJAX Document Image
View, Convert, Edit, Sign Documents and Images. Online Demo See the HTML5 Viewer SDK for .NET in powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
www.rasteredge.com
214
gnuplot 4.6
desire. See the editing postscript (p. 214) section for some hints.
Editing postscript
The PostScript language is a very complex language | far too complex to describe in any detail in this
document. Nevertheless there are some things in a PostScript le written by gnuplot that can be changed
without risk of introducing fatal errors into the le.
For example, the PostScript statement "/Color true def" (written into the le in response to the command
set terminal postscript color), may be altered in an obvious way to generate a black-and-white version of
aplot. Similarly line colors, text colors, line weights and symbol sizes can also be altered in straight-forward
ways. Text (titles and labels) can be edited to correct misspellings or to change fonts. Anything can be
repositioned, and of course anything can be added or deleted, but modications such as these may require
deeper knowledge of the PostScript language.
The organization of a PostScript le written by gnuplot is discussed in the text le "ps
le.doc" in the
docs/ps subdirectory of the gnuplot source distribution.
Postscript fontle
The fontle or fontle add option takes one le name as argument and encapsulates this le into the
postscript output in order to make this font available for text elements (labels, tic marks, titles, etc.). The
fontle delete option also takes one le name as argument. It deletes this le name from the list of
encapsulated les.
The postscript terminal understands some font le formats: Type 1 fonts in ASCII le format (extension
".pfa"), Type 1 fonts in binary le format (extension ".pfb"), and TrueType fonts (extension ".ttf"). Pfa
les are understood directly, pfb and ttf les are converted on the  y if appropriate conversion tools are
installed (see below). You have to specify the full lename including the extension. Each fontle option
takes exact one font le name. This option can be used multiple times in order to include more than one
font le.
The font le is searched in the working directory and in all directories listed in the fontpath which is
determined by set fontpath. In addition, the fontpath can be set using the environment variable GNU-
PLOT
FONTPATH. If this is not set a system dependent default search list is used. See set fontpath
(p. 113) for more details.
For using the encapsulated font le you have to specify the font name (which normally is not the same as
the le name). When embedding a font le by using the fontle option in interactive mode, the font name
is printed on the screen. E.g.
Font file ’p052004l.pfb’ contains the font ’URWPalladioL-Bold’. Location:
/usr/lib/X11/fonts/URW/p052004l.pfb
When using pfa or pfb fonts, you can also nd it out by looking into the font le. There is a line similar
to "/FontName /URWPalladioL-Bold def". The middle string without the slash is the fontname, here
"URWPalladioL-Bold". For TrueType fonts, this is not so easy since the font name is stored in a binary
format. In addition, they often have spaces in the font names which is not supported by Type 1 fonts (in
which a TrueType is converted on the  y). The font names are changed in order to eliminate the spaces in
the fontnames. The easiest way to nd out which font name is generated for use with gnuplot, start gnuplot
in interactive mode and type in "set terminal postscript fontle ’<lename.ttf>’".
For converting font les (either ttf or pfb) to pfa format, the conversion tool has to read the font from a le
and write it to standard output. If the output cannot be written to standard output, on-the- y conversion
is not possible.
For pfb les "pfbtops" is a tool which can do this. If this program is installed on your system the on
the  y conversion should work. Just try to encapsulate a pfb le. If the compiled in program call does
not work correctly you can specify how this program is called by dening the environment variable GNU-
PLOT
PFBTOPFA e.g. to "pfbtops %s". The %s will be replaced by the font le name and thus has to
exist in the string.
control application platform:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
NET library to batch convert PDF files to jpg image files. Turn multiple pages PDF into single jpg files respectively online.
www.rasteredge.com
control application platform:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF Word to PDF; Convert Excel to PDF; Convert PowerPoint to PDF; Convert Image
www.rasteredge.com
gnuplot 4.6
215
If you don’t want to do the conversion on the  y but get a pfa le of the font you can use the tool "pfb2pfa"
which is written in simple c and should compile with any c compiler. It is available from many ftp servers,
e.g.
ftp://ftp.dante.de/tex-archive/fonts/utilities/ps2mf/
In fact, "pfbtopfa" and "pfb2ps" do the same job. "pfbtopfa" puts the resulting pfa code into a le, whereas
"pfbtops" writes it to standard output.
TrueType fonts are converted into Type 1 pfa format, e.g. by using the tool "ttf2pt1" which is available
from
http://ttf2pt1.sourceforge.net/
If the builtin conversion does not work, the conversion command can be changed by the environment variable
GNUPLOT
TTFTOPFA. For usage with ttf2pt1 it may be set to "ttf2pt1 -a -e -W 0 %s - ". Here again,
%s stands for the le name.
For special purposes you also can use a pipe (if available for your operating system). Therefore you start
the le name denition with the character "<" and append a program call. This program has to write pfa
data to standard output. Thus, a pfa le may be accessed by set fontle "< cat garamond.pfa".
For example, including Type 1 font les can be usedfor including the postscript output in LaTeX documents.
The "european computer modern" font (which is a variant of the "computer modern" font) is available in
pfb format from any CTAN server, e.g.
ftp://ftp.dante.de/tex-archive/fonts/ps-type1/cm-super/
For example, the le "sfrm1000.pfb" contains the normal upright fonts withserifs inthe designsize 10pt (font
name "SFRM1000"). The computer modern fonts, which are still necessary for mathematics, are available
from
ftp://ftp.dante.de/tex-archive/fonts/cm/ps-type1/bluesky
With these you can use any character available in TeX. However, the computer modern fonts have a strange
encoding. (This is why you should not use cmr10.pfb for text, but sfrm1000.pfb instead.) The usage of TeX
fonts is shown in one of the demos. The le "ps
fontle
doc.tex" in the /docs/psdoc subdirectory of the
gnuplot source distribution contains a table with glyphs of the TeX mathfonts.
If the font "CMEX10" is embedded (le "cmex10.pfb") gnuplot denes the additional font "CMEX10-
Baseline". It is shifted vertically in order to t better to the other glyphs (CMEX10 has its baseline at the
top of the symbols).
Postscript prologue
Each PostScript output le includes a %%Prolog section and possibly some additional user-dened sections
containing, for example, character encodings. These sections are copied from a set of PostScript prologue
les that are either compiled into the gnuplot executable or stored elsewhere on your computer. A default
directory where these les live is set at the time gnuplot is built. However, you can override this default
either by using the gnuplot command set psdir or by dening an environment variable GNUPLOT
PS
DIR.
See set psdir (p.145).
Postscript adobeglyphnames
This setting is only relevant to PostScript output with UTF-8 encoding. It controls the names used to
describe characters with Unicode entry points higher than 0x00FF. That is, all characters outside of the
Latin1 set. In general unicode characters do not have a unique name; they have only a unicode identication
code. However, Adobe have a recommended scheme for assigning names to certain ranges of characters
(extended Latin, Greek, etc). Some fonts use this scheme, others do not. By default, gnuplot will use
the Adobe glyph names. E.g. the lower case Greek letter alpha will be called /alpha. If you specic
noadobeglyphnames then instead gnuplot will use /uni03B1 to describe this character. If you get this
setting wrong, the character may not be found even if it is present in the font. It is probably always correct
to use the default for Adobe fonts, but for other fonts you may have to try both settings. See also fontle
(p. 214).
control application platform:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF Word to PDF; Convert Excel to PDF; Convert PowerPoint to PDF; Convert Image
www.rasteredge.com
control application platform:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Convert PDF to HTML. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to HTML in VB.NET Demo Code. Add necessary references:
www.rasteredge.com
216
gnuplot 4.6
Pslatex and pstex
The pslatex driver generates output for further processing by LaTeX, while the pstex driver generates
output for further processing by TeX. pslatex uses nspecials understandable by dvips and xdvi. Figures
generated by pstex can be included in any plain-based format (including LaTeX).
Syntax:
set terminal [pslatex | pstex] {default}
set terminal [pslatex | pstex]
{rotate | norotate}
{oldstyle | newstyle}
{auxfile | noauxfile}
{level1 | leveldefault}
{color | colour | monochrome}
{background <rgbcolor> | nobackground}
{solid | dashed}
{dashlength | dl <DL>}
{linewidth | lw <LW>}
{rounded | butt}
{clip | noclip}
{palfuncparam <samples>{,<maxdeviation>}}
{size <XX>{unit},<YY>{unit}}
{<font_size>}
If you see the error message
"Can’t find PostScript prologue file ... "
Please see and follow the instructions in postscript prologue (p.215).
The option color enables color, while monochrome prefers black and white drawing elements. Further,
monochrome uses gray palette but it does not change color of objects specied withan explicit colorspec.
solid draws all plots with solid lines, overriding any dashed patterns. dashlength or dl scales the length of
the dashed-line segments by <DL>, which is a  oating-point number greater than zero. linewidth or lw
scales all linewidths by <LW>.
By default the generated PostScript code uses language features that were introduced in PostScript Level 2,
notably lters and pattern-ll of irregular objects such as lledcurves. PostScript Level 2 features are condi-
tionally protected so that PostScript Level 1 interpreters do not issue errors but, rather, display a message
or a PostScript Level 1 approximation. The level1 option substitutes PostScript Level 1 approximations
of these features and uses no PostScript Level 2 code. This may be required by some old printers and old
versions of Adobe Illustrator. The  ag level1 can be toggled later by editing a single line in the PostScript
output le to force PostScript Level 1 interpretation. In the case of les containing level 2 code, the above
features will not appear or will be replaced by a note when this  ag is set or when the interpreting program
does not indicate that it understands level 2 PostScript or higher.
rounded sets line caps and line joins to be rounded; butt is the default, butt caps and mitered joins.
clip tells PostScript to clip all output to the bounding box; noclip is the default.
palfuncparam controls how set palette functions are encoded as gradients in the output. Analytic
color component functions (set via set palette functions) are encoded as linear interpolated gradients
in the postscript output: The color component functions are sampled at <samples> points and all points
are removed from this gradient which can be removed without changing the resulting colors by more than
<maxdeviation>. For almost every useful palette you may safely leave the defaults of <samples>=2000 and
<maxdeviation>=0.003 untouched.
The default size for postscript output is 10 inches x 7 inches. The default for eps output is 5 x 3.5 inches.
The size option changes this to whatever the user requests. By default the X and Y sizes are taken to be in
inches, but other units are possibly (currently only cm). The BoundingBox of the plot is correctly adjusted
to contain the resized image. Screen coordinates always run from 0.0 to 1.0 along the full length of the
plot edges as specied by the size option. NB: this is a change from the previously recommended
method of using the set size command prior to setting the terminal type. The old method left
the BoundingBox unchanged and screen coordinates did not correspond to the actual limits of the plot.
gnuplot 4.6
217
if rotate is specied, the y-axis label is rotated. <font
size> is the size (in pts) of the desired font.
If auxle is specied, it directs the driver to put the PostScript commands into an auxiliary le instead of
directly into the LaTeX le. This is useful if your pictures are large enough that dvips cannot handle them.
The name of the auxiliary PostScript le is derived from the name of the TeX le given on the set output
command; it is determined by replacing the trailing .tex (actually just the nal extent in the le name) with
.ps in the output le name, or, if the TeX le has no extension, .ps is appended. The .ps is included into
the .tex le by a nspecialfpsle=...g command. Remember to close the output le before next plot unless
in multiplot mode.
Gnuplot versions prior to version 4.2 generated plots of the size 5 x 3 inches using the ps(la)tex terminal
while the current version generates 5 x 3.5 inches to be consistent with the postscript eps terminal. In
addition, the character width is now estimated to be 60% of the font size while the old epslatex terminal
used 50%. To reach the old format specify the option oldstyle.
The pslatex driver oers a special way of controlling text positioning: (a) If any text string begins with ’f’,
you also need to include a ’g’ at the end of the text, and the whole text will be centered both horizontally
and vertically by LaTeX. (b) If the text string begins with ’[’, you need to continue it with: a position
specication (up to two out of t,b,l,r), ’]f’, the text itself, and nally, ’g’. The text itself may be anything
LaTeX can typeset as an LR-box. nrulefgfg’s may help for best positioning.
The options not described here are identical to the Postscript terminal. Look there if you want to know
what they do.
Examples:
set term pslatex monochrome dashed rotate
# set to defaults
To write the PostScript commands into the le "foo.ps":
set term pslatex auxfile
set output "foo.tex"; plot ...; set output
About label positioning: Use gnuplot defaults (mostly sensible, but sometimes not really best):
set title ’\LaTeX\ -- $ \gamma $’
Force centering both horizontally and vertically:
set label ’{\LaTeX\ -- $ \gamma $}’ at 0,0
Specify own positioning (top here):
set xlabel ’[t]{\LaTeX\ -- $ \gamma $}’
The other label { account for long ticlabels:
set ylabel ’[r]{\LaTeX\ -- $ \gamma $\rule{7mm}{0pt}}’
Linewidths and pointsizes may be changed with set style line.
Pstricks
The pstricks driver is intended for use with the "pstricks.sty" macro package for LaTeX. It is an alterna-
tive to the eepic and latex drivers. You need "pstricks.sty", and, of course, a printer that understands
PostScript, or a converter such as Ghostscript.
PSTricks is available via anonymous ftp from the /pub directory at Princeton.edu. This driver denitely
does not come close to using the full capability of the PSTricks package.
Syntax:
set terminal pstricks {hacktext | nohacktext} {unit | nounit}
The rst option invokes an ugly hack that gives nicer numbers; the second has to do with plot scaling. The
defaults are hacktext and nounit.
218
gnuplot 4.6
Qms
The qms terminal driver supports the QMS/QUIC Laser printer, the Talaris 1200 and others. It has no
options.
Qt
The qt terminal device generates output in a separate window with the Qt library. Syntax:
set term qt {<n>}
{size <width>,<height>}
{{no}enhanced}
{font <font>}
{title "title"}
{{no}persist}
{{no}raise}
{{no}ctrl}
{close}
{widget <id>}
Multiple plot windows are supported: set terminal qt <n> directs the output to plot window number n.
The default window title is based on the window number. This title can also be specied with the keyword
"title".
Plot windows remain open even when the gnuplot driver is changed to a dierent device. A plot window
can be closed by pressing the letter ’q’ while that window has input focus, by choosing close from a window
manager menu, or with set term qt <n> close.
The size of the plot area is given in pixels, it defaults to 640x480. In addition to that, the actual size of
the window also includes the space reserved for the toolbar and the status bar. When you resize a window,
the plot is immediately scaled to t in the new size of the window. The qt terminal scales the whole plot,
including fonts and linewidths, and keeps its global aspect ratio constant. If you type replot, click the
replot icon in the terminal toolbar or type a new plot command, the new plot will completely t in the
window and the font size and the linewidths will be reset to their defaults.
The active plot window (the one selected by set term qt <n>) is interactive. Its behaviour is shared with
other terminal types. See mouse (p.128) for details. It also has some extra icons, which are supposed to
be self-explanatory.
This terminal supports an enhanced text mode, which allows font and other formatting commands (sub-
scripts, superscripts, etc.) to be embedded in labels and other text strings. The enhanced text mode syntax
is shared with other gnuplot terminal types. See enhanced (p.23) for more details.
<font> is in the format "FontFace,FontSize", i.e. the face and the size comma-separated in a single string.
FontFace is a usual font face name, such as ’Arial’. If you do not provide FontFace, the qt terminal will use
’Sans’. FontSize is the font size, in points. If you do not provide it, the qt terminal will use a size of 9 points.
For example :
set term qt font "Arial,12"
set term qt font "Arial" # to change the font face only
set term qt font ",12" # to change the font size only
set term qt font "" # to reset the font name and size
The Qt rendering speed is aected strongly by the rendering mode used. In Qt version 4.7 or newer this can
be controlledby the environmental variable QT
GRAPHICSSYSTEM. The options are "native", "raster", or
"opengl" in order of increasing rendering speed. For earlier versions of Qt the terminal defaults to "raster".
To obtain the best output possible, the rendering involves three mechanisms : antialiasing, oversampling
and hinting. Oversampling combined with antialiasing provides subpixel accuracy, so that gnuplot can draw
aline from non-integer coordinates. This avoids wobbling eects on diagonal lines (’plot x’ for example).
Hinting avoids the blur on horizontal and vertical lines caused by oversampling. The terminal will snap these
lines to integer coordinates so that a one-pixel-wide line will actually be drawn on one and only one pixel.
gnuplot 4.6
219
By default, the window is raised to the top of your desktop when a plot is drawn. This can be controlled
with the keyword "raise". The keyword "persist" will prevent gnuplot from exiting before you explicitely
close all the plot windows. Finally, by default the key <space> raises the gnuplot console window, and ’q’
closes the plot window. The keyword "ctrl" allows you to replace those bindings by <ctrl>+<space> and
<ctrl>+’q’, respectively.
The gnuplot outboard driver, gnuplot
qt, is searched ina default place chosen when the program is compiled.
You can override that by dening the environment variable GNUPLOT
DRIVER
DIR to point to a dierent
location.
Regis
The regis terminal device generates output in the REGIS graphics language. It has the option of using 4
(the default) or 16 colors.
Syntax:
set terminal regis {4 | 16}
Sun
The sun terminal driver supports the SunView window system. It has no options.
Svg
This terminal produces les in the W3C Scalable Vector Graphics format.
Syntax:
set terminal svg {size <x>,<y> {|fixed|dynamic}}
{{no}enhanced}
{fname "<font>"} {fsize <fontsize>}
{mouse} {standalone | jsdir <dirname>}
{name <plotname>}
{font "<fontname>{,<fontsize>}"}
{fontfile <filename>}
{rounded|butt} {solid|dashed} {linewidth <lw>}
{background <rgb_color>}
where <x> and <y> are the size of the SVG plot to generate, dynamic allows a svg-viewer to resize plot,
whereas the default setting, xed, will request an absolute size.
linewidth <w> increases the width of all lines used in the gure by a factor of <w>.
<font> is the name of the default font to use (default Arial) and <fontsize> is the font size (in points,
default 12). SVG viewing programs may substitute other fonts when the le is displayed.
The svg terminal supports an enhanced text mode, which allows font and other formatting commands to
be embedded in labels and other text strings. The enhanced text mode syntax is shared with other gnuplot
terminal types. See enhanced (p.23) for more details.
The mouse option tells gnuplot to add support for mouse tracking and for toggling individual plots on/o
by clicking on the corresponding key entry. By default this is done by including a link that points to a script
in a local directory, usually /usr/local/share/gnuplot/<version>/js. You can change this by using the jsdir
option to specify either a dierent local directory or a general URL. The latter is usually appropriate if you
are embedding the svg into a web page. Alternatively, the standalone option embeds the mousing code in
the svg document itself rather than linking to an external resource.
When an SVG le will be used in conjunction with external les, e.g. if it embeds a PNG image or is
referenced by javascript code in a web page or embedding document, then a unique name is required to
avoid potential con icting references to other SVG plots. Use the name option to ensure uniqueness.
220
gnuplot 4.6
SVG allows you to embed fonts directly into an SVG document, or to provide a hypertext link to the desired
font. The fontle option species a local le which is copied into the <defs> section of the resulting SVG
output le. This le may either itself contain a font, or may contain the records necessary to create a
hypertext reference to the desired font. Gnuplot will look for the requested le using the directory list in
the GNUPLOT
FONTPATH environmental variable. NB: You must embed an svg font, not a TrueType or
PostScript font.
Svga
The svga terminal driver supports PCs with SVGA graphics. It can only be used if it is compiled with
DJGPP. Its only option is the font.
Syntax:
set terminal svga {"<fontname>"}
Tek40
This family of terminal drivers supports a variety of VT-like terminals. tek40xx supports Tektronix 4010
and others as well as most TEK emulators. vttek supports VT-like tek40xx terminal emulators. The fol-
lowing are present only if selected when gnuplot is built: kc-tek40xx supports MS-DOS Kermit Tek4010
terminal emulators in color; km-tek40xx supports them in monochrome. selanar supports Selanar graph-
ics. bitgraph supports BBN Bitgraph terminals. None have any options.
Tek410x
The tek410x terminal driver supports the 410x and 420x family of Tektronix terminals. It has no options.
Texdraw
The texdraw terminal driver supports the LaTeX texdraw environment. It is intended for use with "tex-
draw.sty" and "texdraw.tex" in the texdraw package.
Points, among other things, are drawn using the LaTeX commands "nDiamond" and "nBox". These com-
mands no longer belong to the LaTeX2e core; they are included in the latexsym package, which is part of
the base distribution and thus part of any LaTeX implementation. Please do not forget to use this package.
It has no options.
Tgif
Tgif is an X11-based drawing tool | it has nothing to do with GIF.
The tgif driver supports dierent pointsizes (with set pointsize), dierent label fonts and font sizes (e.g.
set label "Hallo" at x,y font "Helvetica,34") and multiple graphs on the page. The proportions of the
axes are not changed.
Syntax:
set terminal tgif {portrait | landscape | default} {<[x,y]>}
{monochrome | color}
{{linewidth | lw} <LW>}
{solid | dashed}
{font "<fontname>{,<fontsize>}"}
where <[x,y]> species the number of graphs in the x and y directions on the page, color enables color,
linewidth scales all linewidths by <LW>, "<fontname>" is the name of a valid PostScript font, and
<fontsize> species the size of the PostScript font. defaults sets all options to their defaults: portrait,
[1,1], color, linwidth 1.0, dashed, "Helvetica,18".
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested