gnuplot 4.6
221
The solid option is usually prefered if lines are colored, as they often are in the editor. Hardcopy will be
black-and-white, so dashed should be chosen for that.
Multiplot is implemented in two dierent ways.
The rst multiplot implementation is the standard gnuplot multiplot feature:
set terminal tgif
set output "file.obj"
set multiplot
set origin x01,y01
set size xs,ys
plot ...
...
set origin x02,y02
plot ...
unset multiplot
See set multiplot (p.129) for further information.
The second version is the [x,y] option for the driver itself. The advantage of this implementation is that
everything is scaled and placed automatically without the need for setting origins and sizes; the graphs keep
their natural x/y proportions of 3/2 (or whatever is xed by set size).
If both multiplot methods are selected, the standard method is chosen and a warning message is given.
Examples of single plots (or standard multiplot):
set terminal tgif
# defaults
set terminal tgif "Times-Roman,24"
set terminal tgif landscape
set terminal tgif landscape solid
Examples using the built-in multiplot mechanism:
set terminal tgif portrait [2,4] # portrait; 2 plots in the x-
# and 4 in the y-direction
set terminal tgif [1,2]
# portrait; 1 plot in the x-
# and 2 in the y-direction
set terminal tgif landscape [3,3] # landscape; 3 plots in both
# directions
Tikz
This driver creates output for use with the TikZ package of graphics macros in TeX. It is currently imple-
mented via an external lua script, and set term tikz is a short form of the command set term lua tikz.
See term lua (p. 200) for more information. Use the command set term tikz help to print terminal
options.
Tkcanvas
This terminal driver generates Tk canvas widget commands based on Tcl/Tk (default) or Perl. To use it,
rebuild gnuplot (after uncommenting or inserting the appropriate line in "term.h"), then
gnuplot> set term tkcanvas {perltk} {interactive}
gnuplot> set output ’plot.file’
After invoking "wish", execute the following sequence of Tcl/Tk commands:
% source plot.file
% canvas .c
% pack .c
% gnuplot .c
How to convert pdf file to powerpoint presentation - application software utility:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
How to convert pdf file to powerpoint presentation - application software utility:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
222
gnuplot 4.6
Or, for Perl/Tk use a program like this:
use Tk;
my $top = MainWindow->new;
my $c = $top->Canvas->pack;
my $gnuplot = do "plot.pl";
$gnuplot->($c);
MainLoop;
The code generated by gnuplot creates a procedure called "gnuplot" that takes the name of a canvas as its
argument. When the procedure is called, it clears the canvas, nds the size of the canvas and draws the plot
in it, scaled to t.
For 2-dimensional plotting (plot) two additional procedures are dened: "gnuplot
plotarea" will return a
list containing the borders of the plotting area "xleft, xright, ytop, ybot" in canvas screen coordinates, while
the ranges of the two axes "x1min, x1max, y1min, y1max, x2min, x2max, y2min, y2max" inplot coordinates
can be obtained calling "gnuplot
axisranges". If the "interactive" option is specied, mouse clicking on a
line segment will print the coordinates of its midpoint to stdout. Advanced actions can happen instead if the
user supplies a procedure named "user
gnuplot
coordinates", which takes the following arguments: "win id
x1s y1s x2s y2s x1e y1e x2e y2e x1m y1m x2m y2m", the name of the canvas and the id of the line segment
followed by the coordinates of its start and end point in the two possible axis ranges; the coordinates of the
midpoint are only lled for logarithmic axes.
The current version of tkcanvas supports neither multiplot nor replot.
Tpic
The tpic terminal driver supports the LaTeX picture environment with tpic nspecials. It is an alternative
to the latex and eepic terminal drivers. Options are the point size, line width, and dot-dash interval.
Syntax:
set terminal tpic <pointsize> <linewidth> <interval>
where pointsize andlinewidth are integers inmilli-inches and interval is a  oat in inches. If a non-positive
value is specied, the default is chosen: pointsize = 40, linewidth = 6, interval = 0.1.
All drivers for LaTeX oer a special way of controlling text positioning: If any text string begins with ’f’,
you also need to include a ’g’ at the end of the text, and the whole text will be centered both horizontally and
vertically by LaTeX. | If the text string begins with ’[’, you need to continue it with: a position specication
(up to two out of t,b,l,r), ’]f’, the text itself, and nally, ’g’. The text itself may be anything LaTeX can
typeset as an LR-box. nrulefgfg’s may help for best positioning.
Examples: About label positioning: Use gnuplot defaults (mostly sensible, but sometimes not really best):
set title ’\LaTeX\ -- $ \gamma $’
Force centering both horizontally and vertically:
set label ’{\LaTeX\ -- $ \gamma $}’ at 0,0
Specify own positioning (top here):
set xlabel ’[t]{\LaTeX\ -- $ \gamma $}’
The other label { account for long ticlabels:
set ylabel ’[r]{\LaTeX\ -- $ \gamma $\rule{7mm}{0pt}}’
Vgagl
The vgagl driver is a fast linux console driver with full mouse and pm3dsupport. It looks at the environment
variable SVGALIB
DEFAULT
MODE for the default mode; if not set, it uses a 256 color mode with the
highest available resolution.
Syntax:
application software utility:VB.NET PowerPoint: Use PowerPoint SDK to Create, Load and Save PPT
NET method and sample code in this part will teach you how to create a fully customized blank PowerPoint file by using the smart PowerPoint presentation control
www.rasteredge.com
application software utility:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
But sometimes, we need to extract or fetch text content from source PDF document file for word processing, presentation and desktop publishing applications.
www.rasteredge.com
gnuplot 4.6
223
set terminal vgagl \
background [red] [[green] [blue]] \
[uniform | interpolate] \
[mode]
The color mode can also be given with the mode option. Both Symbolic names as G1024x768x256 and
integers are allowed. The background option takes either one or three integers in the range [0, 255]. If
only one integers is supplied, it is taken as gray value for the background. If three integers are present,
the background gets the corresponding color. The (mutually exclusive) options interpolate and uniform
control if color interpolation is done while drawing triangles (on by default).
To get high resolution modes, you will probably have to modify the conguration le of libvga, usually
/etc/vga/libvga.conf. Using the VESA fb is a good choice, but this needs to be compiled in the kernel.
The vgagl driver uses the rst *available* vga mode from the following list:
- the driver which was supplied when setting vgagl, e.g. ‘set term vgagl
G1024x768x256‘ would first check, if the G1024x768x256 mode is available.
- the environment variable SVGALIB_DEFAULT_MODE
- G1024x768x256
- G800x600x256
- G640x480x256
- G320x200x256
- G1280x1024x256
- G1152x864x256
- G1360x768x256
- G1600x1200x256
VWS
The VWS terminal driver supports the VAX Windowing System. It has no options. It will sense the display
type (monochrome, gray scale, or color.) All line styles are plotted as solid lines.
Vx384
The vx384 terminal driver supports the Vectrix 384 and Tandy color printers. It has no options.
Windows
The windows terminal is a fast interactive terminal driver that uses the Windows GDI to draw and write
text. The cross-platform terminal wxt is also supported on Windows.
Syntax:
set terminal windows {<n>}
{color | monochrome}
{solid | dashed}
{enhanced | noenhanced}
{font <fontspec>}
{fontscale <scale>}
{linewdith <scale>}
{background <rgb color>}
{title "Plot Window Title"}
{size <width>,<height>}
{position <x>,<y>}
{close}
Multiple plot windows are supported: set terminal win <n> directs the output to plot window number
n.
application software utility:C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
Note: When you get the error "Could not load file or assembly 'RasterEdge.Imaging. Basic' or any How to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert ODT to PDF in C#.NET
www.rasteredge.com
application software utility:VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
you can choose to show your PPT presentation in inverted clip art or screenshot to PowerPoint document slide & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
224
gnuplot 4.6
color and monochrome select colored or mono output, dashed and solid select dashed or solid lines. Note
that color defaults to solid, whereas monochrome defaults to dashed. enhanced enables enhanced text
mode features (subscripts, superscripts and mixed fonts, see enhanced text (p.23) for more information).
<fontspec> is in the format "<fontface>,<fontsize>", where "<fontface>" is the name of a valid Windows
font, and <fontsize> is the size of the font in points and both components are optional. Note that in previous
versions of gnuplot the font statement could be left out and <fontsize> could be given as a number without
double quotes. This is no longer supported. linewidth and fontscale can be used to scale the width of
lines and the size of text. title changes the title of the graph window. size denes the width and height
of the window in pixel and position the origin of the window i.e. the position of the top left corner on the
screen (again in pixel). These options override any default settings from the wgnuplot.ini le.
Other options may be changed using the graph-menu or the initialization le wgnuplot.ini.
The Windows version normally terminates immediately as soon as the end of any les given as command
line arguments is reached (i.e. in non-interactive mode), unless you specify - as the last command line
option. It will also not show the text-window at all, in this mode, only the plot. By giving the optional
argument -persist (same as for gnuplot under x11; former Windows-only options /noend or -noend are
still accepted as well), will not close gnuplot. Contrary to gnuplot on other operating systems, gnuplot’s
interactive command line is accessible after the -persist option.
The plot window remains open when the gnuplot terminal is changed with a set term command. The plot
window can be closed with set term windows close.
gnuplot supports dierent methods to create printed output on Windows, see windows printing (p.224).
The windows terminal supports data exchange with other programs via clipboard and EMF les, see graph-
menu (p.224). You can also use the terminal emf to create EMF les.
Graph-menu
The gnuplot graph window has the following options on a pop-up menu accessed by pressing the right
mouse button(*) or selecting Options from the system menu:
Copy to Clipboard copies a bitmap and an enhanced Metale picture.
Save as EMF... allows the user to save the current graph window as enhanced metale
Print... prints the graphics windows using a Windows printer driver and allows selection of the printer and
scaling of the output. The output produced by Print is not as good as that from gnuplot’s own printer
drivers. See also windows printing (p.224).
Bring to Top when checked brings the graph window to the top after every plot.
Color when checked enables color linestyles. When unchecked it forces monochrome linestyles.
Double buer activates drawing into a memory buer before copying the graph to the screen. This avoids
ickering e.g. during animation and rotation of 3d graphs. See mouse (p.128) and scrolling (p.129).
Oversampling doubles the size of the virtual canvas. It is scaled down again for drawing to the screen.
This gives smoother graphics but requires more memory and computing time. It requires double buer.
Antialiasing selects smoothing of lines and edges. Note that this slows down drawing.
Background... sets the window background color.
Choose Font... selects the font used in the graphics window.
Line Styles... allows customization of the line colors and styles.
Update wgnuplot.ini saves the current window locations, window sizes, text window font, text window
font size, graph window font, graph window font size, background color and linestyles to the initialization
le wgnuplot.ini.
(*) Note that this menu is only available by pressing the right mouse button with unset mouse.
Printing
In order of preference, graphs may be printed in the following ways:
application software utility:VB.NET PowerPoint: Merge and Split PowerPoint Document(s) with PPT
documents and save the created new file in the sample code in VB.NET to finish PowerPoint document splitting If you want to see more PDF processing functions
www.rasteredge.com
application software utility:VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF
1odt.pdf"). How to VB.NET: Convert ODP to PDF. This code sample is able to convert ODP file to PDF document. ' odp convert
www.rasteredge.com
gnuplot 4.6
225
1. Use the gnuplot command set terminal to select a printer and set output to redirect output to a le.
2. Select the Print... command from the gnuplot graph window. An extra command screendump does
this from the text window.
3. If set output "PRN" is used, output will go to a temporary le. When you exit from gnuplot or
when you change the output with another set output command, a dialog box will appear for you to select a
printer port. If you choose OK, the output will be printed on the selected port, passing unmodied through
the print manager. It is possible to accidentally (or deliberately) send printer output meant for one printer
to an incompatible printer.
Text-menu
The gnuplot text window has the following options on a pop-up menu accessed by pressing the right mouse
button or selecting Options from the system menu:
Copy to Clipboard copies marked text to the clipboard.
Paste copies text from the clipboard as if typed by the user.
Choose Font... selects the font used in the text window.
System Colors when selected makes the text window honor the System Colors set using the Control Panel.
When unselected, text is black or blue on a white background.
Wrap long lines when selected lines longer than the current window width are wrapped.
Update wgnuplot.ini saves the current settings to the initialisation le wgnuplot.ini, which is located in
the user’s application data directory.
Wgnuplot.mnu
If the menu le wgnuplot.mnu is found in the same directory as gnuplot, then the menu specied in
wgnuplot.mnu will be loaded. Menu commands:
[Menu]
starts a new menu with the name on the following line.
[EndMenu]
ends the current menu.
[--]
inserts a horizontal menu separator.
[|]
inserts a vertical menu separator.
[Button]
puts the next macro on a push button instead of a menu.
Macros take two lines with the macro name (menu entry) on the rst line and the macro on the second line.
Leading spaces are ignored. Macro commands:
[INPUT]
Input string with prompt terminated by [EOS] or {ENTER}
[EOS]
End Of String terminator. Generates no output.
[OPEN]
Get name of a file to open, with the title of the dialog
terminated by [EOS], followed by a default filename terminated
by [EOS] or {ENTER}.
[SAVE]
Get name of a file to save. Parameters like [OPEN]
[DIRECTORY] Get name of a directory, with the title of the dialog
terminated by [EOS] or {ENTER}
Macro character substitutions:
{ENTER}
Carriage Return ’\r’
{TAB}
Tab ’\011’
{ESC}
Escape ’\033’
{^A}
’\001’
...
{^_}
’\031’
Macros are limited to 256 characters after expansion.
application software utility:VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Codes to Create Linear and 2D Barcodes on
PowerPoint PDF 417 barcode library is a mature and Install and integrate our PowerPoint PLANET barcode creating to achieve PLANET barcode drawing on PPT file.
www.rasteredge.com
application software utility:How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.Windows Viewer
Generally speaking, you can use this .NET document imaging SDK to load, markup, convert, print, scan image and document. Support File Types. PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
226
gnuplot 4.6
Wgnuplot.ini
The Windows text window and the windows terminal will read some of their options from the [WGNU-
PLOT] section of wgnuplot.ini. This le is located in the user’s application data directory. Here’s a
sample wgnuplot.ini le:
[WGNUPLOT]
TextOrigin=0 0
TextSize=640 150
TextFont=Terminal,9
TextWrap=1
TextLines=400
SysColors=0
GraphOrigin=0 150
GraphSize=640 330
GraphFont=Arial,10
GraphColor=1
GraphToTop=1
GraphDoublebuffer=1
GraphOversampling=0
GraphAntialiasing=1
GraphBackground=255 255 255
Border=0 0 0 0 0
Axis=192 192 192 2 2
Line1=0 0 255 0 0
Line2=0 255 0 0 1
Line3=255 0 0 0 2
Line4=255 0 255 0 3
Line5=0 0 128 0 4
These settings apply to the wgnuplot text-window only. The TextOrigin and TextSize entries specify the
location and size of the text window.
The TextFont entry species the text window font and size.
The TextWrap entry selects wrapping of long text lines.
The TextLines entry species the number of (unwrapped) lines the internal buer of the text window can
hold. This value currently cannot be changed from within wgnuplot.
See text-menu (p. 225).
The GraphFont entry species the font name and size in points.
The ve numbers given in the Border, Axis and Line entries are the Red intensity (0{255), Green
intensity, Blue intensity, Color Linestyle and Mono Linestyle. Linestyles are 0=SOLID, 1=DASH,
2=DOT, 3=DASHDOT, 4=DASHDOTDOT. In the sample wgnuplot.ini le above, Line 2 is a green solid
line in color mode, or a dashed line in monochrome mode. The default line width is 1 pixel. If Linestyle is
negative, it species the width of a SOLID line in pixels. Line1 and any linestyle used with the points style
must be SOLID with unit width.
See graph-menu (p.224).
Wxt
The wxt terminal device generates output in a separate window. The window is created by the wxWidgets
library, where the ’wxt’ comes from. The actual drawing is done via cairo, a 2D graphics library, and pango,
alibrary for laying out and rendering text.
Syntax:
set term wxt {<n>}
{size <width>,<height>} {background <rgb_color>}
gnuplot 4.6
227
{{no}enhanced}
{font <font>} {fontscale <scale>}
{title "title"}
{dashed|solid} {dashlength <dl>}
{{no}persist}
{{no}raise}
{{no}ctrl}
{close}
Multiple plot windows are supported: set terminal wxt <n> directs the output to plot window number
n.
The default window title is based on the window number. This title can also be specied with the keyword
"title".
Plot windows remain open even when the gnuplot driver is changed to a dierent device. A plot window
can be closed by pressing the letter ’q’ while that window has input focus, by choosing close from a window
manager menu, or with set term wxt <n> close.
The size of the plot area is given in pixels, it defaults to 640x384. In addition to that, the actual size of the
window also includes the space reserved for the toolbar and the status bar. When you resize a window, the
plot is immediately scaled to t in the new size of the window. Unlike other interactive terminals, the wxt
terminal scales the whole plot, including fonts and linewidths, and keeps its global aspect ratio constant,
leaving an empty space painted in gray. If you type replot, click the replot icon in the terminal toolbar
or type a new plot command, the new plot will completely t in the window and the font size and the
linewidths will be reset to their defaults.
The active plot window (the one selected by set term wxt <n>) is interactive. Its behaviour is shared
with other terminal types. See mouse (p.128) for details. It also has some extra icons, which are supposed
to be self-explanatory.
This terminal supports an enhanced text mode, which allows font and other formatting commands (sub-
scripts, superscripts, etc.) to be embedded in labels and other text strings. The enhanced text mode syntax
is shared with other gnuplot terminal types. See enhanced (p.23) for more details.
<font> is in the format "FontFace,FontSize", i.e. the face and the size comma-separated in a single string.
FontFace is a usual font face name, such as ’Arial’. If you do not provide FontFace, the wxt terminal will
use ’Sans’. FontSize is the font size, in points. If you do not provide it, the wxt terminal will use a size of
10 points.
For example :
set term wxt font "Arial,12"
set term wxt font "Arial" # to change the font face only
set term wxt font ",12" # to change the font size only
set term wxt font "" # to reset the font name and size
The fonts are retrieved from the usual fonts subsystems. Under Windows, those fonts are to be found and
congured in the entry "Fonts" of the control panel. Under UNIX, they are handled by "fontcong".
Pango, the library used to layout the text, is based on utf-8. Thus, the wxt terminal has to convert from
your encoding to utf-8. The default input encoding is based on your ’locale’. If you want to use another
encoding, make sure gnuplot knows which one you are using. See encoding (p. 112) for more details.
Pango may give unexpected results with fonts that do not respect the unicode mapping. With the Symbol
font, for example, the wxt terminal will use the map provided by http://www.unicode.org/ to translate
character codes to unicode. Pango will do its best to nd a font containing this character, looking for your
Symbol font, or other fonts with a broad unicode coverage, like the DejaVu fonts. Note that "the Symbol
font" is to be understood as the Adobe Symbol font, distributed with Acrobat Reader as "SY
.PFB".
Alternatively, the OpenSymbol font, distributed with OpenOce.org as "opens
.ttf", oers the same char-
acters. Microsoft has distributed a Symbol font ("symbol.ttf"), but it has a dierent character set with
several missing or moved mathematic characters. If you experience problems with your default setup (if
the demo enhancedtext.dem is not displayed properly for example), you probably have to install one of
the Adobe or OpenOce Symbol fonts, and remove the Microsoft one. Other non-conform fonts, such as
"wingdings" have been observed working.
228
gnuplot 4.6
The rendering of the plot can be altered with a dialog available from the toolbar. To obtain the best output
possible, the rendering involves three mechanisms : antialiasing, oversampling and hinting. Antialiasing
allows to display non-horizontal and non-vertical lines smoother. Oversampling combined with antialiasing
provides subpixel accuracy, so that gnuplot can draw a line from non-integer coordinates. This avoids
wobbling eects on diagonal lines (’plot x’ for example). Hinting avoids the blur on horizontal and vertical
lines caused by oversampling. The terminal will snap these lines to integer coordinates so that a one-pixel-
wide line will actually be drawn on one and only one pixel.
By default, the window is raised to the top of your desktop when a plot is drawn. This can be controlled
with the keyword "raise". The keyword "persist" will prevent gnuplot from exiting before you explicitely
close all the plot windows. Finally, by default the key <space> raises the gnuplot console window, and ’q’
closes the plot window. The keyword "ctrl" allows you to replace those bindings by <ctrl>+<space> and
<ctrl>+’q’, respectively. These three keywords (raise, persist and ctrl) can also be set and remembered
between sessions through the conguration dialog.
X11
Syntax:
set terminal x11 {<n> | window "<string>"}
{title "<string>"}
{{no}enhanced} {font <fontspec>}
{linewidth LW} {solid|dashed}
{{no}persist} {{no}raise} {{no}ctrlq}
{close}
{size XX,YY} {position XX,YY}
set terminal x11 {reset}
Multiple plot windows are supported: set terminal x11 <n> directs the output to plot window number
n. If n is not 0, the terminal number will be appended to the window title (unless a title has been supplied
manually) and the icon will be labeled Gnuplot <n>. The active window may be distinguished by a change
in cursor (from default to crosshair).
The x11 terminal can connect to X windows previously created by an outside application via the option
window followed by a string containing the X ID for the window in hexadecimal format. Gnuplot uses that
external X window as a container since X does not allow for multiple clients selecting the ButtonPress event.
In this way, gnuplot’s mouse features work within the contained plot window.
set term x11 window "220001e"
The x11 terminal supports enhanced text mode (see enhanced (p.23)), subject to the available fonts. In
order for font size commands embedded in text to have any eect, the default x11 font must be scalable.
Thus the rst example below will work as expected, but the second will not.
set term x11 enhanced font "arial,15"
set title ’{/=20 Big} Medium {/=5 Small}’
set term x11 enhanced font "terminal-14"
set title ’{/=20 Big} Medium {/=5 Small}’
Plot windows remain open even when the gnuplot driver is changed to a dierent device. A plot window
can be closed by pressing the letter q while that window has input focus, or by choosing close from a
window manager menu. All plot windows can be closed by specifying reset, which actually terminates the
subprocess which maintains the windows (unless -persist was specied). The close command can be used
to close individual plot windows by number. However, after a reset, those plot windows left due to persist
cannot be closed with the command close. A close without a number closes the current active plot window.
The gnuplot outboarddriver, gnuplot
x11, is searched in adefault place chosenwhenthe program is compiled.
You can override that by dening the environment variable GNUPLOT
DRIVER
DIR to point to a dierent
location.
Plot windows will automatically be closed at the end of the session unless the -persist option was given.
gnuplot 4.6
229
The options persist and raise are unset by default, which means that the defaults (persist == no and raise
== yes) or the command line options -persist / -raise or the Xresources are taken. If [no]persist or [no]raise
are specied, they will override command line options and Xresources. Setting one of these options takes
place immediately, so the behaviour of an already running driver can be modied. If the window does not
get raised, see discussion in raise (p.94).
The option title "<title name>" will supply the title name of the window for the current plot window or
plot window <n> if a number is given. Where (or if) this title is shown depends on your X window manager.
The size option can be used to set the size of the plot window. The size option will only apply to newly
created windows.
The position option can be used to set the position of the plot window. The position option will only apply
to newly created windows.
The size or aspect ratio of a plot may be changed by resizing the gnuplot window.
Linewidths and pointsizes may be changed from within gnuplot with set linestyle.
For terminal type x11, gnuplot accepts (when initialized) the standard X Toolkit options and resources
such as geometry, font, and name from the command line arguments or a conguration le. See the X(1)
man page (or its equivalent) for a description of such options.
Anumber of other gnuplot options are available for the x11 terminal. These may be specied either as
command-line options when gnuplot is invoked or as resources in the conguration le ".Xdefaults". They
are set upon initialization and cannot be altered during a gnuplot session. (except persist and raise)
X11
fonts
Upon initial startup, the default font is taken from the X11 resources as set in the system or user .Xdefaults
le or on the command line.
Example:
gnuplot*font: lucidasans-bold-12
Anew default font may be specied to the x11 driver from inside gnuplot using
‘set term x11 font "<fontspec>"‘
The driver rst queries the X-server for a font of the exact name given. If this query fails, then it tries to
interpret <fontspec> as "<font>,<size>,<slant>,<weight>" and to construct a full X11 font name of the
form
-*-<font>-<weight>-<s>-*-*-<size>-*-*-*-*-*-<encoding>
<font> is the base name of the font (e.g. Times or Symbol)
<size> is the point size (defaults to 12 if not specified)
<s> is ‘i‘ if <slant>=="italic" ‘o‘ if <slant>=="oblique" ‘r‘ otherwise
<weight> is ‘medium‘ or ‘bold‘ if explicitly requested, otherwise ‘*‘
<encoding> is set based on the current character set (see ‘set encoding‘).
So set term x11 font "arial,15,italic" will be translated to -*-arial-*-i-*-*-15-*-*-*-*-*-iso8859-1 (assum-
ing default encoding). The <size>, <slant>, and <weight> specications are all optional. If you do not
specify <slant> or <weight> then you will get whatever font variant the font server oers rst. You may
set a default enconding via the corresponding X11 resource. E.g.
gnuplot*encoding: iso8859-15
The driver also recognizes some common PostScript font names and replaces them with possible X11 or
TrueType equivalents. This same sequence is used to process font requests from set label.
If your gnuplot was built with conguration option {enable-x11-mbfonts, you can specify multi-byte fonts
by using the prex "mbfont:" on the font name. An additional font may be given, separated by a semicolon.
Since multi-byte font encodings are interpreted according to the locale setting, you must make sure that the
environmental variable LC
CTYPE is set to some appropriate locale value such as ja
JP.eucJP, ko
KR.EUC,
or zh
CN.EUC.
Example:
230
gnuplot 4.6
set term x11 font ’mbfont:kana14;k14’
# ’kana14’ and ’k14’ are Japanese X11 font aliases, and ’;’
# is the separator of font names.
set term x11 font ’mbfont:fixed,16,r,medium’
# <font>,<size>,<slant>,<weight> form is also usable.
set title ’(mb strings)’ font ’mbfont:*-fixed-medium-r-normal--14-*’
The same syntax applies to the default font in Xresources settings, for example,
gnuplot*font: \
mbfont:-misc-fixed-medium-r-normal--14-*-*-*-c-*-jisx0208.1983-0
If gnuplot is built with {enable-x11-mbfonts, you canuse two special PostScript font names ’Ryumin-Light-*’
and ’GothicBBB-Medium-*’ (standard Japanese PS fonts) without the prex "mbfont:".
Command-line
options
In addition to the X Toolkit options, the following options may be specied on the command line when
starting gnuplot or as resources in your ".Xdefaults" le (note that raise and persist can be overridden
later by set term x11 [no]raise [no]persist):
‘-mono‘
forces monochrome rendering on color displays.
‘-gray‘
requests grayscale rendering on grayscale or color displays.
(Grayscale displays receive monochrome rendering by default.)
‘-clear‘
requests that the window be cleared momentarily before a
new plot is displayed.
‘-tvtwm‘
requests that geometry specications for position of the
window be made relative to the currently displayed portion
of the virtual root.
‘-raise‘
raises plot window after each plot.
‘-noraise‘
does not raise plot window after each plot.
‘-noevents‘ does not process mouse and key events.
‘-persist‘
plot windows survive after main gnuplot program exits.
The options are shown above in their command-line syntax. When entered as resources in ".Xdefaults",
they require a dierent syntax.
Example:
gnuplot*gray: on
gnuplot*ctrlq: on
gnuplot also provides a command line option(-pointsize <v>) and a resource, gnuplot*pointsize: <v>,
to control the size of points plotted with the points plotting style. The value v is a real number (greater
than 0 and less than or equal to ten) used as a scaling factor for point sizes. For example, -pointsize 2 uses
points twice the default size, and -pointsize 0.5 uses points half the normal size.
The -noevents switch disables all mouse and key event processing (except for q and <space> for closing
the window). This is useful for programs which use the x11 driver independent of the gnuplot main program.
The -ctrlq switchchanges the hot-key that closes a plot window from q to <ctrl>q. This is useful is you are
using the keystroke-capture feature pause mouse keystroke, since it allows the character q to be captured
just as all other alphanumeric characters. The -ctrlq switch similarly replaces the <space> hot-key with
<ctrl><space> for the same reason.
Monochrome
options
For monochrome displays, gnuplot does not honor foreground or background colors. The default is black-
on-white. -rv or gnuplot*reverseVideo: on requests white-on-black.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested