ACSM’S CERTIFIED NEWS 
•APRIL–JUNE 2010 • VOLUME 20:2
1
ACSM’S CERTIFIED NEWS 
•JANUARY-MARCH 2010 • VOLUME 20:1
1
NEWS
ACSM’S CERTIFIED
Continuing Education
Self-Tests
page 15
Piriformis
Syndrome
A Real Pain in the Butt
page 5
APRIL – – JUNE, 2010 • VOLUME 20; ISSUE 2
Resistance
Training Intensity:
Research and
Rationale
page 3
Exercise as
AdjuvantTherapy
for Cancer
page 7
How Often Should
Clients Perform 
Strength
Training?
page 10 
Training for Alpine Activities 
at High Altitude
page 12
Training for Alpine Activities 
at High Altitude
page 12
How to convert pdf to ppt for - C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
online pdf converter to powerpoint; how to convert pdf into powerpoint presentation
How to convert pdf to ppt for - VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
how to convert pdf into powerpoint on; convert pdf to powerpoint online
2
ACSM’S CERTIFIED NEWS 
•APRIL–JUNE 2010 • VOLUME 20:2
AACCSSMM’’SS  CCEERRTTIIFFIIEEDD  NNEEWWSS
AApprriill––JJuunnee  22001100  ••  VVOOLLUUMMEE  2200,,  IISSSSUUEE  22
IInn  tthhiiss  IIssssuuee
Resistance Training Intensity:
Research and Rationale.............................................3
Piriformis Syndrome: A Real Pain in the Butt...........5
Exercise as Adjuvant Therapy for Cancer..................7
Coaching News.............................................................9
How Often Should Clients Perform
Strength Training?....................................................10
Training for Alpine Activities at High Altitude.......12
Self-Tests........................................................................15
CCoo--EEddiittoorrss
Paul Sorace, M.S.; James R. Churilla, Ph.D., M.P.H.
CCoommmmiitttteeee  oonn  CCeerrttiiffiiccaattiioonn
aanndd  RReeggiissttrryy  BBooaarrddss  CChhaaiirr
Madeline Bayles, Ph.D., FACSM
CCCCRRBB  PPuubblliiccaattiioonnss  SSuubbccoommmmiitttteeee  CChhaaiirr
Paul Sorace, M.S.
AACCSSMM  NNaattiioonnaall  CCeenntteerr  CCeerrttiiffiieedd  NNeewwss  SSttaaffff
National Director of Certification
and Registry Programs
Richard Cotton
Assistant Director of Certification
Traci Sue Rush
Professional Education Coordinator
Shaina Loveless
Publications Manager
David Brewer
EEddiittoorriiaall  BBooaarrdd
Chris Berger, Ph.D.
Clinton Brawner, M.S., FACSM
Brian Coyne, M.Ed.
Avery Faigenbaum, Ed.D., FACSM
Yuri Feito, M.S., M.P.H.
Tom LaFontaine, Ph.D., FACSM
Peter Magyari, Ph.D.
Thomas Mahady, M.S.
Jacalyn McComb, Ph.D., FACSM
Peter Ronai, M.S.
Larry Verity, Ph.D., FACSM
Stella Volpe, Ph.D., FACSM
Jan Wallace, Ph.D., FACSM
For More Certification Resources Contact the
ACSM Certification Resource Center:
1-800-486-5643
IInnffoorrmmaattiioonn  ffoorr  SSuubbssccrriibbeerrss
Correspondence Regarding Editorial Content
Should Be Addressed to:
Certification & Registry Department
E-mail: certification@acsm.org
Tel.: (317) 637-9200, ext. 115
For back issues and author guidelines visit:
www.acsm.org/certifiednews
Change of Address or Membership Inquiries:
Membership and Chapter Services
Tel.: (317) 637-9200, ext. 139 or ext. 136.
ACSM’s Certified News 
(ISSN# 1056-9677) is published
quarterly by the American College of Sports Medicine
Committee on Certification and Registry Boards (CCRB). All
issues are published electronically and in print. The articles
published in 
ACSM’s Certified News
have been carefully
reviewed, but have not been submitted for consideration as, and
therefore are not, official pronouncements, policies,
statements, or opinions of ACSM. Information published in
ACSM’s Certified News
is not necessarily the position of the
American College of Sports Medicine or the Committee on
Certification and Registry Boards. The purpose of this
publication is to provide continuing education materials to the
certified exercise and health professional and to inform these
individuals about activities of ACSM and their profession.
Information presented here is not intended to be information
supplemental to the ACSM’s Guidelines for Exercise Testing and
Prescription or the established positions of ACSM.
ACSM’s
Certified News 
is copyrighted by the American College of
Sports Medicine. No portion(s) of the work(s) may be
reproduced without written consent from the Publisher.
Permission to reproduce copies of articles for noncommercial
use may be obtained from the Rights and Permissions editor.
ACSM National Center
401 West Michigan St., Indianapolis, IN 46202-3233.
Tel.: (317) 637-9200 • Fax: (317) 634-7817
© 2010 American College of Sports Medicine.
ISSN # 1056-9677
MOVING TOWARD
THE FUTURE
By Deborah Riebe, Ph.D., FACSM
Department of Kinesiology 
University of Rhode Island
Over the past two years, there have been
significant changes made to the ACSM Health
Fitness Specialist (HFS) certification.
These changes are important in professionalizing the field of exercise science and confirming
that individuals with HFS certification are qualified to prescribe exercise to healthy populations,
those with controlled disease, and other special populations. The certification committee has been
guided by ACSM HFS certified professionals in making these changes. Many of you participated in
focus groups or online surveys that helped inform the committee as to which new directions to
pursue. In fact, the response to our online surveys was overwhelming and far exceeded our expec-
tations. The committee would like to sincerely thank those who helped us move the certification
in a new exciting direction.
So, what’s new? As most of you know, the name of the certification was changed from Health
Fitness Instructor to Health Fitness Specialist. Your feedback made it clear that the word “instruc-
tor” no longer reflected your job responsibilities. The HFS Committee and the Committee for
Certification and Registry Boards (CCRB) spend countless hours considering and debating the
merits of various potential new names. Input was provided from various stakeholders in the fit-
ness industry and by the surveys that were completed by ACSM certified individuals. The word
“specialist” was overwhelmingly recommended to us by both groups, and we proceeded with the
formal procedure required to change the name of the certification.
On July 1, 2011, the eligibility requirements for becoming HFS certified will change. Starting on
that date, an individual will need a bachelor’s degree in an exercise-based program to be eligible
to take the exam. Currently, the eligibility requirements are an associate’s degree in a health relat-
ed program. After consideration of the scope of practice of the HFS, careful deliberation, and
feedback from surveys and a public comment period, the change was recommended and ultimate-
ly approved by the ACSM CCRB. Those of you who are already certified but do not meet the
new eligibility criteria will retain your certification.
Individuals wishing to take this certification after July 1, 2011 will need to have a bachelor’s
degree in Kinesiology, Exercise Science or other exercise-based degree. Certification candidates
must have course work in anatomy, physiology, and a minimum of 18 credits in exercise science
course work including courses in exercise physiology, biomechanics (kinesiology), exercise pre-
scription, and fitness testing.
Finally, the HFS Committee has spent the last year and a half completing a job task analysis and
rewriting and redesigning the current knowledge, skills and abilities (KSAs). The KSAs will become
knowledge and skills (KSs). The new task statements will better reflect the duties and responsibil-
ities that most HFS perform on a regular basis.
Members of the HFS Committee are excited about the future of the certification. We hope
these changes will help the profession continue to grow and mature and that HFS certified indi-
viduals remain at the forefront of the profession.
Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Download Free Trial. Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Easy converting! We try to make it as easy as possible to convert your PPTX/PPT files to PDF.
convert pdf to powerpoint using; and paste pdf to powerpoint
How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word
How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word. Online C# Tutorial for Converting PDF, MS-Excel, MS-PPT to Word. PDF, MS-Excel, MS-PPT to Word Conversion Overview.
table from pdf to powerpoint; image from pdf to powerpoint
ACSM’S CERTIFIED NEWS 
•APRIL–JUNE 2010 • VOLUME 20:2
3
Therefore, RT activities are being incorporated in nearly all com-
prehensive exercise programs. While most health and fitness profes-
sionals recognize the acute program variables utilized in RT activities
(sets, reps, intensity/load, volume, rest, exercise selection, exercise
order, etc.), the rationale behind proper implementation of these
variables is sometimes clouded by exposure to articles published in
the popular press and online media. It is paramount that exercise pro-
fessionals utilize evidence based practice in the design of their clients’
exercise programs. This article will give the reader a more compre-
hensive background of one of the most important and often misun-
derstood RT variables, intensity.
The amount of resistance or load utilized in RT program design
has traditionally been referred to as training “intensity.” In keeping
with the terminology used for aerobic exercise where intensity was
defined as a percentage of a person’s maximal oxygen uptake or max-
imal heart rate, intensity in RT exercise was often defined as a per-
centage of a person’s one repetition maximum (1RM). A 1RM is
defined as “the maximal amount of weight that can be lifted through
the full range of motion, for one repetition, with proper form.” For
example, if the maximal weight that a client can lift on the bench
press (through the full range of motion, with proper form) is 220 lbs,
then this is the client’s 1RM for the bench press. The client might then
be given an exercise program that recommends one or more sets
with intensity or load set at 80% of the client’s 1RM. In this example,
the load would be calculated by multiplying the 1RM (220 lbs) by the
prescribed intensity 80% (0.80) with the resulting product being ≈
175 lbs.
Intensity is alternately defined in RT as a targeted repetition num-
ber or repetition range per set. For example, the client may be given
an exercise program that recommends an intensity or load whereby
substantial effort is needed to complete 10 repetitions per set. There
is an inverse relationship between the number of repetitions that can
be performed and the percent 1RM that is assigned. While several
tables have been published that estimate the number of repetitions
which can be completed at a given percent of 1RM, the exercise pro-
fessional should be aware that these estimates are impacted by sub-
ject age, sex, training status, size of the muscle group, genetics,
machine or free weight, and movement biomechanics.
2, 6, 7, 8
Therefore, a standard intensity of 80% 1RM (which typically yields 8-
12 RM on the bench press) may produce as few as 5 RM in the leg
curl exercise and as many as 20RM in the leg press exercise.
6
Table1 summarizes the differences in the number of maximal repeti-
tions which were performed by either trained or untrained men and
women on two upper and two lower body machine exercises.
5
This
information highlights a common misconception among exercise pro-
fessionals that subjects should be able to complete a standard num-
ber of repetitions, across a variety of exercises, if a specific % 1RM is
T
HEUSEOFRESISTANCE TRAINING
(RT) 
ACTIVITIESTOADDRESSPARAMETERSOF
HEALTH
FITNESS
ANDPERFORMANCEHASBEEN ENDORSEDBYMANYMAJOR
HEALTHORGANIZATIONS
.
3
H
EALTH
& F
ITNESS
F
EATURE
Resistance
Training Intensity
BY PETER MAGYARI, PH.D., HFS, CSCS
Table 1. The maximal number of repetitions
achieved at 80% of 1RM on select exercises of
machine weightlifting (Universal Gym).
Bench
Arm
Leg
Leg
Press
Curl
Press
Curl
Men Trained
12.2
11.4
19.4
7.2
Men Untrained
9.8
7.5
15.2
6.3
Women Trained
14.3
6.9
22.4
5.3
Women Untrained
10.3
5.9
11.9
5.9
Adapted from reference 5.
Research and Rationale
How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF
How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF. Online C# Tutorial for Converting MS Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint to PDF. How to C#: Convert PPT to PDF.
pdf to ppt converter online; changing pdf to powerpoint
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document. Provide Free Demo Code for PDF Conversion from Microsoft PowerPoint in C# Program.
picture from pdf to powerpoint; convert pdf to powerpoint with
4
ACSM’S CERTIFIED NEWS 
•APRIL–JUNE 2010 • VOLUME 20:2
prescribed. Therefore, if a percent of 1RM is utilized to prescribe
intensity, one should not expect a constant number of repetitions per
set for all exercises and if a specific repetition range is prescribed per
set, then one should not assume that this represents a constant per-
cent of 1RM.
It is important that exercise professionals recognize the interac-
tion between intensity and volume when determining the number of
sets of each exercise to be performed. Exercise intensities set at a
high percentage of 1RM result in fewer repetitions and, therefore,
lower volume of work per set. Exercise intensities set at a low per-
centage of 1 RM result in higher repetitions and higher volume of
work per set. To illustrate this point let’s look at three different 1RM
exercise intensities (93%, 83%, and 65%) and their resulting volume-
load (weight lifted multiplied by the number of repetitions complet-
ed) when performed to volitional fatigue. Using a standard repetition
chart for the bench press exercise for trained men we can estimate
corresponding repetitions to be (3, 7, and 15 respectively)
2
Table 2
displays the resulting volume-load at these three intensities and the
number of sets required, at each intensity, to reach a volume-load of
2,000 lbs.
A review of Table 2 illustrates that to obtain a volume-load similar
to that obtained with one set of low intensity RT (65% 1RM),  three
or more sets of high intensity RT (93% 1RM) must be completed.
Therefore, intensity should always be considered when determining
the number of sets prescribed per exercise with higher intensity pro-
grams always requiring multiple sets. 
Traditional RT intensity paradigms for muscular strength, hyper-
trophy, and endurance place muscular strength at high intensity (≥
85% 1RM) and low repetitions (≤ 6 RM) and muscular endurance at
low intensity (≤ 65% 1RM) and high repetitions (≥ 15 RM) with mus-
cle hypertrophy spanning the intensity range from low to high (65%-
85% 1RM) and the repetition range from 6 to 15.
4
The latest ACSM
RT Position Stand offers some evidenced based recommendations for
prescribing RT intensity for novice, intermediate, and advanced lifters
seeking to improve muscular strength, hypertrophy, or endurance.
1
These recommendations are summarized below:
Strength
• Novice and Intermediate: 60%-70% 1RM for 8-12 repetitions
• Novice: 1-3 sets per exercise
• Advanced: 80%-100% 1RM
Hypertrophy
•Novice and Intermediate: 70%-85% 1RM for 8-12 repetitions
for 1-3 sets per exercise
† Advanced: 70%-100% 1RM for 1-12 repetitions for 3-6 sets per
exercise with the majority of training devoted to 6-12 RM
Endurance
• Novice and Intermediate: Relatively light loads (10-15 repeti-
tions)
† Advanced: various loading strategies 10-25 repetitions or more
for multiple sets
_____________________
• National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute evidence category A.
Evidence is from outcomes of random controlled trials with rich
body of evidence.
† National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute evidence category C.
Evidence is from outcomes of uncontrolled trials or observations.
Based on the above recommendations, a strong body of evidence
suggests that RT prescriptions for novice and intermediate lifters
should focus on 1-3 sets of 8-12 repetitions for each major muscle
group. This prescription should provide a positive adaptive response
in regard to muscular strength, hypertrophy, and to a lesser extent
endurance. There is a strong body of evidence that suggests higher
RT intensities (80%-100% 1RM) should be prescribed to elicit
strength adaptations in advanced strength athletes. There also is sup-
port for using a variety of training loads to maximize muscular
strength.
1
It has been demonstrated that adding a high volume, low
intensity set to several low volume, high intensity sets increases both
size and strength gains when compared to low volume, high intensi-
ty training alone.
5
Other recommendations made in the latest ACSM
RT Position Stand (marked with a † above) are not supported by a
rich body of scientific data and should be viewed in this context.
1
About the Author
Peter M Magyari, PhD, HFS, CSCS is the Exercise
Science Program Director in the Brooks College
of Health at the University of North Florida. He
earned a PhD in Exercise Physiology from
University of Florida working under the direction
of Dr Michael Pollock and Dr Randy Braith. His
primary research interests are in the application of
resistance training programs in health, disease,
and sport.
References
1. ACSM Position Stand. Progression Models in Resistance Training
for Healthy Adults. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009;41(3):687-708.
2. Baechle TR and Earle RW. Eds. Essentials of Strength Training
and Conditioning (3rd ed.). 2008:397-8.
3. Braith RW and Beck DT. Resistance Exercise: Training Adaptations and
Developing a Safe Exercise Prescription. Heart Fail Rev. 2008;13:69-79.
4. Chandler TJ and Brown LE. Eds. Conditioning for Strength and
Human Performance. Baltimore MD. 2008:276.
5. Goto K, Nagasawa M, Yanagisawa O, et al. Muscular adaptations
to combinations of high- and low-intensity resistance exercises. J
Strength Cond Res. 2004;18:730–7.
6. Hoeger WK, Hopkins DR, Barette, SL, Hale DF. Relationship
Between Repetitions and Selected Percentages of One Repetition
Maximum. J Strength Cond Res. 1990;4(2):47-54.
7. Mayhew JL, Ball TE, Arnold MD, and Bowen JC. Relative Muscular
Endurance Performance as a Predictor of Bench Press Strength in
College Men and Women. J Strength Cond Res. 1992;6(4):200-206.
8. Morales J and Sabonya S. Use of Submaximal Repetition Tests for
Predicting 1-RM Strength in Class Athletes. J Strength Cond Res.
1996;10(3):186-189.
Table 2. Number of sets required at different RT
intensities based on an arbitrary volume-load of
2,000 lbs.
Intensity Load
Estimated Volume-load (lbs)
sets
(%1RM) (lbs) ) repetitions s (load X repetitions)
93
205
3
615
>3
83
183
7
1281
2
65
143
15
2145
1
C# TIFF: Learn to Convert MS Word, Excel, and PPT to TIFF Image
PPTXDocument doc = new PPTXDocument(@"demo.pptx"); if (null == doc) throw new Exception("Fail to load PowerPoint Document"); // Convert PPT to Tiff.
adding pdf to powerpoint slide; converting pdf to ppt
VB.NET PowerPoint: Process & Manipulate PPT (.pptx) Slide(s)
VB.NET PowerPoint processing control add-on can do PPT creating, loading We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
adding pdf to powerpoint; how to convert pdf to powerpoint in
ACSM’S CERTIFIED NEWS 
•APRIL–JUNE 2010 • VOLUME 20:2
5
Anatomy
The piriformis muscle (Figure 1) is a flat, oblique shaped muscle
that lies deep to the gluteal muscles. It originates from the sacral
spine and attaches to the greater trochanter of the femur, function-
ing as both an external rotator and abductor of the thigh. Piriformis
syndrome is characterized by a localized spasming and tightening of
the piriformis muscle, sometimes causing symptoms associated with
sciatica due to the fact that the sciatic nerve runs proximally and in
some individuals, through the piriformis muscle.
Diagnosis
Often mistaken or confused with sciatica,
piriformis syndrome has been a controversial
diagnosis since its initial description in 1928.
5
Even today, piriformis syndrome remains con-
troversial because, in most cases the diagno-
sis is purely clinical, and there is no test spe-
cific to piriformis syndrome to support the
clinical findings. Given the lack of agreement
on exactly how to diagnose piriformis syn-
drome, estimates of the frequency of sciatica
caused by piriformis syndrome vary from
rare to approximately 6% of sciatica cases
seen in a general family practice.
6
The condition occurs when the piriformis
muscle becomes tight or spasms which can
sometimes compress or irritate the sciatic
nerve. Clients who suffer from piriformis syn-
drome generally complain of a deep, tooth-ache like — pain or numb-
ness in the buttocks. It also can cause a tingling in the lower back and
a radiating sensation down the back of the hamstring. Functional bio-
mechanical deficits associated with piriformis syndrome may include
the following:
• Tight piriformis muscle 
• Tight hip external rotators and adductors 
• Hip abductor weakness 
• Decreased lower lumbar spine mobility
• Sacroiliac joint inflammation
• Anatomic variations in either piriformis muscle or sciatic
nerve anatomy
In the real world, the condition is general-
ly the result of excessive sitting, poor gait
mechanics, poor posture, sedentary lifestyle,
and standing with one’s weight primarily dis-
tributed on one leg. In the gym or sports set-
ting, piriformis syndrome is often the result
of exercising on hard surfaces or on uneven
ground; exercising in worn out or ill fitting
shoes; increasing exercise intensity or dura-
tion too quickly; walking or running with the
toes pointed out; excessive or improperly
executed squat and stair climbing techniques;
sports that require change of direction; and
excessive hill running. Furthermore, the inci-
dence of piriformis syndrome has been
reported to be six times more prevalent in
females than males.
4
It is estimated that 15% to 20% of the U.S. population experiences low back pain annually, and
that at any given time, 2% of the population is disabled because of back problems.
1
Historically,
low back symptoms have been the second leading cause of office visits to primary care physi-
cians and the most common reason for visits to osteopathic physicians.
2
However, back pain
is not always a result of a weak or deconditioned low back. Tight hamstrings, an anterior pelvic
tilt, and weak abdominals can all contribute to low back discomfort oftentimes mistaken for
low back pain. With a sedentary society that spends countless hours sitting at their desks, driv-
ing their cars, or lounging on the couch, a posterior discomfort known as piriformis syndrome
can appear and is a real pain in the butt.
PIRIFORMIS
SYNDROME
BY JEFFREY S. HARRISON, CSCS, NSCA-CPT
W
ELLNESS
A
RTICLE
Figure 1
A Real Pain
in the Butt
VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
VB.NET PowerPoint - Render PPT to PDF in VB.NET. How to Convert PowerPoint Slide to PDF Using VB.NET Code in .NET. Visual C#. VB.NET. Home > .NET Imaging SDK >
conversion of pdf to ppt online; convert pdf into powerpoint
VB.NET PowerPoint: Read & Scan Barcode Image from PPT Slide
VB.NET PPT PDF-417 barcode scanning SDK to detect PDF-417 barcode image from PowerPoint slide. VB.NET APIs to detect and decode
conversion of pdf into ppt; pdf to powerpoint converter online
6
ACSM’S CERTIFIED NEWS 
•APRIL–JUNE 2010 • VOLUME 20:2
Treatment
Piriformis syndrome is diagnosed primarily on the basis of symp-
toms or a physical exam, and although there are no tests that accu-
rately confirm the diagnosis, X-rays, MRI, and nerve conduction tests
may be necessary to exclude other causes. In most circumstances of
piriformis syndrome, an inflammatory response is suspected in the
muscle and/or sciatic nerve. Therefore, the treatment goals are
directed initially toward decreasing inflammation, associated pain, and
spasm, if present. Treatment options may include rest, cryotherapy,
gentle pain-free stretching exercises, and electrical modalities.
3
Despite this fact, there are numerous, non-surgical, non-pharmacolog-
ical, treatment strategies that exist for clients with this condition, with
stretching and massage being the most common. Below are a few
stretches that most people with piriformis syndrome can do at home,
at the gym, or even at work. Individuals whose pain worsens with any
of these exercises should stop them immediately. Those that may be
unsure whether these stretches are safe for their particular situation
should check with their physician or therapist before attempting
these movements. Furthermore, exercise professionals should refer
their clients whose symptoms are refractory to all previous manage-
ment and treatment options to their physician for follow-up care.
Piriformis Stretch – Seated
1. Sitting on a chair, cross leg of affected side across top of oppo-
site leg at a 90° angle
2. Lean forward at the waist, bringing the chest towards the
crossed leg
3. Hold stretch for 15 sec up to 1 min
Piriformis Stretch – Supine (Figure 2)
1. Lying on back with both knees
bent, cross affected leg at a
90° angle across opposite
knee
2. Grasp the "under" leg with
both hands and pull the knee
towards the chest until the
stretch is felt in the buttocks
and hips.
3. Hold stretch for 15 sec up to
1 min
Piriformis Pigeon Pose Stretch (Figure 3)
1. Lie face down and
bend affected leg
under stomach at
a 90° angle and
opposite leg
straight back
2.Lean towards the
ground and allow
body weight to add
pressure to stretch
3. Hold stretch for 15 sec up to 1 min
Prevention
There is no definitive way to prevent piriformis syndrome from
occurring, but much can be done to reduce its likelihood. These
include but are not limited to:
• Teaching the benefits of sitting less or how to sit properly.
• Reinforcing correct posture with weight evenly distributed
between both feet.
• Educating clients on the importance of wearing properly fitted
shoes for exercise and/or athletics.
• Stressing the importance of proper warm-up before any sus-
tained physical activity.
• Strengthening and conditioning the muscles of the hips, glutes,
low back, and upper thighs with exercises such as supine
glute/hip raises, side lying clam shells, or stability ball wall
squats.
The damaging effects of a sedentary lifestyle cannot be empha-
sized enough. An active lifestyle while beneficial can have negative
ramifications, as well. Piriformis syndrome can affect an individual’s
lifestyle, as well as their activity level. Through proper diagnosis,
treatment and prevention, it can be remedied and kicked in the butt.
About the Author
Jeffrey S. Harrison has been a fitness profession-
al for more than 15 years, working with hun-
dreds of clients from all walks of life. He also is
a published writer with articles appearing in fit-
ness journals and local publications. Jeff earned
his degree in Exercise and Sport Science from
Penn State University and is nationally certified
through the NSCA and ACE.
References 
1. Andersson, GBJ. The epidemiology of spinal disorders. In: Frymoyer
JW, ed. The Adult Spine: Principles and Practice. 2nd ed. Philadelphia:
Lippincott-Raven: 93-141 1997. 
2. Cypress, BK. Characteristics of physician visits for back symptoms: a
national perspective. American Journal of Public Health; 73: 389-95
1983.
3. Keskula DR, Tamburello M. Conservative management of piriformis
syndrome. Journal of Athletic Training. 27 (2): 106, 1992. 
4. Keskula, DR, Tamburello, M. Conservative management of piriformis
syndrome. Journal of Athletic Training. 27 (2): 102, 1992.
5. Yeoman W. The relation of arthritis of the sacroiliac joint to sciati-
ca. Lancet; ii:1119-22, 1928. 
6. Yoshimoto M, Kawaguchi S, Takebayashi T, et al. Diagnostic features
of sciatica without lumbar nerve root compression. 
Journal of
Spinal Disorders and Techniques;
22(5):328-33. 2009 (2)
Additional Resource
Boyajian-O'Neil LA, McClain RL, Coleman MK and Thomas PP.
Diagnosis and management of piriformis syndrome: An osteopathic
approach. Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.
108(11):657-664, 2008.
Figure 2
Figure 3
ACSM’S CERTIFIED NEWS 
•APRIL–JUNE 2010 • VOLUME 20:2
7
Evidence regarding the benefits of exercise training in reduc-
ing the risk of primary development of cancer is now well
established. However, there are over 11 million people in the
U.S. who have undergone or are undergoing treatment for
cancer.
1
We are just beginning to scratch the surface on the
role exercise might play in individuals with cancer with
respect to effect on treatment and secondary prevention.
Today it is recognized that for many individuals cancer is a
chronic disease, and often these people continue the “treat-
ment” or management of their cancer throughout their life-
time. With this there is an evolving focus on the cancer sur-
vivorship period with respect to: 1) living cancer free, 2)
managing ongoing cancer treatment, 3) reducing the risk
of developing other diseases secondary to cancer treat-
ment, and 4) optimizing quality of life.
BY JONATHAN K. EHRMAN, PH.D., FACSM
THERAPY FOR
CANCER
EXERCISE AS ADJUVANT 
C
LINICAL
F
EATURE
Exercise and physical activity are being rapidly incorporated into
the core of cancer survivorship programs. In response to this trend,
the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) teamed with the
American Cancer Society to develop the Cancer Exercise Trainer cer-
tification (www.acsm.org/cet). ACSM provides exercise information
for the patient with cancer in chapter 27 of ACSM’s Exercise
Management for Persons with Chronic Diseases and Disabilities,
third edition. Also, ACSM recently published a Roundtable Consensus
Statement on exercise guidelines for cancer survivors. In addition to
the positive effects exercise training has on quality of life measures in
patients with cancer, there is an accumulating foundation of research
describing the positive effects of exercise training on a variety of relat-
ed clinical conditions. Many of these are listed in the table.
Currently lacking is an in-depth understanding of the effect of exer-
cise training in those in the survivorship stage on 1) the effectiveness of
cancer treatment, 2) the likelihood of cancer remission, and 3) the
impact on risk factors of other chronic conditions/diseases (e.g.,cardio-
vascular disease, diabetes, hypertension, obesity, etc.) that may result
from cancer treatment. The following is a brief comment on what we
know about exercise training and each of these topics.
Exercise and Cancer Treatment Effectiveness
Much of the research on exercise training performed during cancer
treatment comes from single-site studies.
10
And much of this research
has been conducted in patients with breast cancer. Other than improve-
ments in fitness and psychological factors, which can help to alleviate
symptoms during cancer treatment, little else is known about the effect
of exercise training on cancer treatment.
10
For instance, does exercise
affect the efficacy of cancer treatment? In the only study we know of
addressing exercise effects on treatment, Cournyea, et al.
5
reported that
breast cancer patients completed more of their planned chemotherapy
regimen if they performed resistance training than if they performed
aerobic exercise or usual care. Although yet to be replicated, this data
suggests that more research is warranted to assess the role that exer-
cise may play in improving chemotherapy completion rates. Depending
on future findings, this has the potential to positively affect treatment
outcome.
Variables that may interact with exercise and cancer treatment effec-
tiveness include the stage and type of cancer and the type of treatment.
Table: Common Conditions Associated with
Cancer and the Response to Exercise Training
CLINICAL CONDITIONS
• Reduced functional
capacity
• Fatigue
• Nausea 
• Obesity
• Loss of muscle
• Compromised immunity
• Increased risk of
lymphedema
RESPONSE TO
EXERCISE TRAINING
• Improvements in
cardiorespiratory
endurance5
• Less reported fatigue
7
• Reduced nausea13
• Better weight control6
• Preserved muscle mass6
• Increased number of
natural killer cells
14
• Reduced symptoms of
lymphedema15
Used with permission: photo by Cynthia Jasper-Parisey
8
ACSM’S CERTIFIED NEWS 
•APRIL–JUNE 2010 • VOLUME 20:2
Another potential aspect is the acute effect on immune function. Studies
with small numbers of subjects demonstrate either no change, or an
improvement in biomarkers of immune function in those who perform
low to moderate intensity aerobic and/or resistance exercise.
8
These
types of responses may result in more beneficial decisions about
whether to administer chemotherapy on a given day versus holding
treatment until conditions are more favorable. In addition to immune
response, chronic fatigue also may affect cancer treatment administra-
tion decisions. The latter stages of a radiation therapy regimen and the
period immediately following each chemotherapy treatment are typical-
ly when fatigue peaks. The level of fatigue experienced will vary based
on factors such as the type of treatment, and the age and general health
of the individual. Careful monitoring of daily fatigue and maintaining or
reducing, versus increasing, exercise intensity may be necessary to avoid
excessive fatigue. 
Exercise and Cancer Remission
Since physical activity is strongly related to the primary prevention of
breast and colon cancer, and evidence is accumulating strength for other
types of cancer,
9
it is reasonable to suggest that exercise may play a role
in prolonging the remission stage. However, little data is available. Irwin
et al.
11
reported findings from a prospective observational study in
women previously diagnosed and treated for breast cancer and found a
positive relationship between moderate-intensity physical activity levels
(
~
9 MET-hours/week) performed up to two years after diagnosis, and
prognosis. This was observed in both women who were active before
their cancer diagnosis and in those who began regular exercise only
after their diagnosis. Others report a 60% lower risk of death following
a colon cancer diagnosis in those who were moderately active.
12
Clearly
much more work needs to be performed before this question is fully
answered, but the early data appears promising.
Exercise and Cancer Treatment Related
Chronic Conditions
Various cancer treatment regimens increase the risk of non-cancer
related chronic diseases. For instance, up to 60% of women with breast
cancer gain weight during adjuvant treatment.
6
And more than 50% of
men undergoing long-term androgen deprivation therapy for prostate
cancer will develop metabolic syndrome or increase the number of 
cardio-metabolic risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome.
3
Also,
it is suggested that if body mass index (BMI) is >30 kg/m
2
there is a two-
fold greater risk for cancer recurrence.
2, 4
In each of these examples, the
risk of cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes and hypertension are
increased. Exercise may play a role in combating these changes; but to
date prospective randomized trials have not been conducted.
The accumulating evidence is that patients diagnosed with cancer can
benefit in many ways beyond typical quality of life improvements when
they perform regular exercise training. More evidence is needed to
assess the mechanisms involved and if the improvements cited extend to
all types of patients and cancers. Currently, when prescribing exercise
for patients with cancer, the texts ACSM’s Exercise Management for
Persons with Chronic Diseases and Disabilities(3rd ed.), ACSM’s
Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription(8th ed.), and ACSM’s
Resources for Clinical Exercise Physiology (2nd ed.) are adequate
resources to address topics such as when in the course of diagnosis and
treatment to begin exercise, what the exercise intensity should be, and
what clinical issues are relevant to evaluate during exercise.
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Jonathan K. Ehrman, Ph.D., FACSM, PD, CES is the
associate program director of preventive cardiolo-
gy at Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit MI. He also is
the director of the hospital’s Clinical Weight
Management Program. He has served on ACSM’s
Committee of Certification and Registry Board
since 2000 and was chair of the Clinical Exercise
Specialist Committee. He also is the senior editor of the 6th edition of
ACSM’s Resource Manual for Guidelines for Exercise Testing and
Prescription
and is the umbrella editor for the next editions (2013
release date) of the ACSM certification texts.
REFERENCES
1. American College of Sports Medicine. ACSM’s Guidelines for Exe1.
Altekruse SF, Kosary CL, Krapcho M, Neyman N, Aminou R, Waldron
W, Ruhl J, Howlader N, Tatalovich Z, Cho H, Mariotto A, Eisner MP,
Lewis DR, Cronin K, Chen HS, Feuer EJ, Stinchcomb DG, Edwards BK
(eds). 
SEER Cancer Statistics Review,
1975-2007, National Cancer
Institute. Bethesda, MD, http://seer.cancer.gov/csr/1975_2007/,
based on November 2009 SEER data submission, posted to the SEER
web site, 2010. Last accessed: 5/17/2010
2. Ballard-Barbash R, Hunsberger S, Alciati MH, et al. Physical activity,
weight control, and breast cancer risk and survival: clinical trial
rationale and design considerations. 
J Natl Cancer Inst.
101:630-
43, 2009
3. Braga-Basaria M, Dobs AS, Muller DC, et al. Metabolic syndrome in
men with prostate cancer undergoing long-term androgen-depriva-
tion therapy. 
J Clin Oncol.
2006;24:3979-3983.
4. Cheblowski R, Aiello E, McTiernan A. Weight loss in breast cancer
patient management. 
J Clin Oncol.
20: 1128-43, 2002
5. Courneya KS, Segal RJ, Mackey JR, et al. Effects of aerobic and
resistance exercise in breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant
chemotherapy: a multicenter randomized controlled trial. 
J Clin
Oncol.
2007;25:4396-4404.
6. Denmark-Wahnefried W, Peterson BL, Winer EP, et al. Changes in
weight, bodycomposition, and factors influencing energy balance
among premenopausal breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant
chemotherapy. 
J Clin Oncol.
2001;12:2381-9.
7. Dimeo F, Fetscher S, Lange W, Mertelsmann R, Keul J. Effects of aer-
obic exercise on the physical performance and incidence of treat-
ment-related complications after high-dose chemotherapy. 
Blood.
1997;90:3390-3394.
8. Fairly AS, Courneya KS, Field CJ, et al. Physical exercise and immune
system function in cancer survivors. 
Cancer.
2002;94:539-551.
9. Friedenreich CM. Physical activity and cancer prevention: from
observational to intervention research. 
Cancer Epidemiol Biomark
Prev.
2001;10:287-301.
10. Galvao DA, Newton RU. Review of Exercise Intervention Studies in
Cancer Patients. 
J Clin Oncol.
2005;4:899-909.
11. Irwin ML, Smith AW, McTiernan A, et al. Mortality in breast cancer
survivors: the health, eating, activity and lifestyle study. 
J Clin
Oncol.
2008;26:3958-3964.
12. Meyerhardt JA, Heseltine D, Niedzwiecki D, et al: Impact of physical
activity on cancer recurrence and survival in patients with stage III
colon cancer: Findings from CALGB 89803. 
J Clin Oncol.
2006;24:3535-354.
13. Mock V BM, Sheehan P, Creaton EM, et al: A nursing rehabilitation
program for women with breast cancer receiving adjuvant
chemotherapy. 
Oncol Nursg Forum.
1994;21:899-907.
14. Na YM, Kim MY, Kim YK, et al. Exercise therapy effect on natural
killer cell cytotoxic activity in stomach cancer patients after curative
surgery. 
Arch Phys Med Rehabil.
2000;81:777-779
15. Schmitz KH, Ahmed RL, Troxel A, et al. Weight lifting in women with
breast-cancer-related lymphedema. 
N Engl J Med.
2009;36:664-673.
ACSM’S CERTIFIED NEWS 
•APRIL–JUNE 2010 • VOLUME 20:2
9
The results our clients get from fitness
training or wellness coaching are not just a
higher level of health, fitness, and well-being.
They also include change: change in behavior,
thinking, and feeling. Yet, change is not
always easy. A critical ingredient is potent
and lasting motivation that comes from with-
in and is based on immediate benefits or
long-term rewards.
To be human is to be ambivalent about
changing something that one has struggled
with for years or even decades, whether it is
learning how to fully relax, loving to exercise
regularly, enjoying veggies as much as ice
cream, or listening to someone you care
about with undistracted, mindful presence.
The amount of energy consumed by this
state of chronic contemplative struggle
would fuel a small car. Do I or don’t I? Why
can’t I just get it done? Surely someone will
invent THE quick fix if I wait long enough.
What a loser I am for being unable to stay
motivated. How come I am not driven to be
fit and well?
Clients choose a “change supporter” in
hiring a trainer or wellness coach in hopes of
getting beyond the struggle. The rationale
for this choice includes “I need someone to
motivate me. I need help in staying motivat-
ed.” Yet as helping professionals we need to
be careful to not take on ownership and
responsibility for our client’s motivation. It is
not our job to motivate our clients. Instead,
it is our job to help our clients identify and
sustain their own motivation.
In Dan Pink’s new book Drive,
3
he talks
about the importance of internal or intrinsic
motivation as what truly drives or motivates
us to choose to change and act on it. When
the motivation to change comes from within,
based on heartfelt desires, rather than via
external sources, like a financial incentive or
urging by one’s spouse or parent, the likeli-
hood of sustained success is dramatically
improved.
“Some doors open only from the
inside.” — An ancient Sufi saying
There is a wonderful story in the best-
selling book on flow titled Flow: The
Psychology of Optimal Experience,written
by Mihaly Czikszentmihalyi,
1
(say Cheek-sent-
me-hi a few times to get it down) about a
woman with severe schizophrenia in a men-
tal hospital. Her medical team had failed to
help her improve. The team decided to fol-
low Czikszentmihalyi’s protocol to identify
activities in which she was motivated,
engaged, and felt better. A timer went off
throughout her day signaling her to complete
a mini-survey on her mood, energy, engage-
ment, etc. Her report showed that her best
experience was manicuring her fingernails.
So the medical team arranged for her to be
trained as a manicurist. She began to offer
manicures at the hospital and eventually
became well enough to be discharged. She
went on to live an independent life as a man-
icurist. 
For this woman, tending to fingernails and
toenails drove her well. This is an amazing
story exemplifying the power of motivation
when it is intrinsic. The schizophrenic woman
found the task of doing manicures to be
enjoyable for its own sake, with the immedi-
ate reward of a pretty result and a happy cus-
tomer. It is also likely that manicuring was
something she was naturally good at, tending
with care to the myriad details of shaping,
polishing, and painting nails. By repeating this
engaging and enjoyable task over and over
again, her motivation and confidence grew
by leaps and bounds, allowing her to leave
the protective cage of the hospital and
embark upon an independent life. 
The easiest way to help clients drive
themselves well is to help them find activities
they love to do, which use their strengths
and are reinforcing, allowing them to feel bet-
ter immediately or soon afterward. For
example, helping a client find a way to move
her body vigorously that she does not want
to miss. Or supporting her efforts to discov-
er healthy recipes that she has fun cooking.
Or engage in mindfulness practices or
before-bed relaxation techniques that she is
good at and quickly lift the weight of the day. 
Unfortunately for most of us, the activi-
ties that drive us to wellness are not intrinsi-
cally rewarding. We may never learn to love
to cook healthful dinners or work out in a
gym or stick to sparkling water and crudités
without dip at a party. 
The second most powerful source of
motivation that drives human behavior is
what Deci and Ryan, developers of self-deter-
mination theory, call “integrated regulation.”
2
This type of motivation also comes from
within, but relates to doing something
because you desire its longer-term outcome,
not immediate enjoyment and gratification.
For example, your client gets his workouts
done because they help him avoid gaining
more weight. He goes to the extra effort to
cook a healthful dinner to be a role model
for his kids. He drinks less wine so that he
feels more energetic in the morning. He lifts
weights in order to build stronger bones to
avoid the osteoporosis that led his grandfa-
ther to stoop.
This second-best form of motivation
requires more diligent attention. Your client
needs to make a mindful, conscious choice to
take the more difficult path at a given
moment for a payoff that is not immediate.
The easy choice is beyond tempting.
Warming up a pizza rather than cooking a
stir-fry from scratch. Skipping the trip to the
gym, even if it is in the basement, in favor of
sleeping longer. Answering a few more
emails even though they are not life threaten-
ing and ignoring the dumbbells next to the
desk ready for a set of bicep curls or dead-
lifts. Your client needs to shake her brain out
COACHING NEWS:
WHAT DRIVES YOUR
CLIENTS TO BE WELL
CCooaacchhiinngg  NNeewwss
(continued on page 11)
By Margaret Moore
(Coach Meg), MBA
10
ACSM’S CERTIFIED NEWS 
•APRIL–JUNE 2010 • VOLUME 20:2
A recent research study conducted with previously
sedentary subjects examined the effects of three dif-
ferent strength training frequencies on lean weight in
1725 men and women.
5
All of the program partici-
pants performed approximately 20 min of strength
training and 20 min of aerobic activity, one, two, or
three days a week for a period of 10 wk. The strength
training protocol consisted of 10 standard weight
stack exercises performed for one set of 8 to 12 rep-
etitions each using a controlled movement speed and
full movement range.
1
The one day a week trainees added 0.7 pounds of
lean weight, whereas both the two days a week and
three days a week exercisers added 3.1 pounds of lean
weight. Based on these findings, it would appear that
strength training only one day a week is less effective
for muscle development than performing two or three
weekly resistance workouts. Another study comparing
different strength training frequencies on torso rota-
tion muscle strength had similar results.
3
The group
that trained one day a week did not differ from the
control subjects, whereas the groups that trained two
days a week or three days a week experienced similar
and significant strength gains.
3
Research by Candow
and Burke also revealed similar and significant increas-
es in both muscle strength and lean mass for exercis-
ers who trained two or three days a week.
2
While these findings make it tempting to conclude
that two days a week and three days a week strength
training programs are equally effective, it should be
noted that these studies involved previously sedentary
participants. In fact, a well-designed study with fit
young men who regularly performed resistance exer-
cise resulted in different outcomes.
4
McLester and associates had the study subjects per-
form maximum effort strength training sessions (three
sets of 10 repetitions each of eight standard weight-
stack machine exercises) with varying recovery peri-
ods (24, 48, 72 or 96 hours).
4
After a one-day recov-
ery period, strength levels were significantly below
baseline. Following a two-day recovery period,
strength levels were similar to (but still slightly below)
baseline. After a three-day recovery period, strength
levels were significantly above baseline, and remained
at the same elevated level following a four-day recov-
ery period.
These findings indicated that for advanced exercis-
ers a one-day recovery period is clearly inadequate.
Although training every other day (48 hrs rest) provid-
ed sufficient recovery time to essentially regain base-
BY WAYNE L. WESTCOTT, Ph.D. 
The standard recommendation for strength training frequency is to
perform resistance exercise every other day or two to three
nonconsecutive days per week. It has long been recognized that
everyday resistance exercise is counter-productive due to insufficient
recovery time to remodel the muscle tissue that experienced
microtrauma during the strength training session. While there is
essentially complete consensus that clients should not strength train
more often than every other day, it is not clear whether less frequent
training sessions could elicit equal or even better results.
STRENGTH
TRAINING?
HOW OFTEN SHOULD CLIENTS PERFORM
H
EALTH
& F
ITNESS
C
OLUMN
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested