NEWS
OCT OB ER— DECE E MB B ER , 2011 • VOLU U M M E 21: ISSU U E 4
Online Tips and Tools for Exercise
Professionals
page 3
High-Intensity Exercise and Immune
Function in Elite Athletes
page 6
Issues for Clinical Exercise Physiologists:
The 6-Minute Walk Test in Pulmonary
Rehabilitation
page 8
Resistance Exercise Protocols for Older
Adults
page 12
Online Tips and Tools for Exercise
Professionals
page 3
High-Intensity Exercise and Immune
Function in Elite Athletes
page 6
Issues for Clinical Exercise Physiologists:
The 6-Minute Walk Test in Pulmonary
Rehabilitation
page 8
Resistance Exercise Protocols for Older
Adults
page 12
Continuing Education
Self-Tests on page 15
Continuing Education
Self-Tests on page 15
OC TOB ER —DECEMB ER , 2011 • VOLU U ME 21: ISSU U E 4
Convert pdf back to powerpoint - C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
convert pdf to powerpoint using; create powerpoint from pdf
Convert pdf back to powerpoint - VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
and paste pdf into powerpoint; how to convert pdf into powerpoint presentation
2
ACSM’S CERTIFIED NEWS 
•OCTOBER–DECEMBER 2011 • VOLUME 21: ISSUE 4
ACSM’S CERTIFIED NEWS
October–December 2011 • Volume 21, Issue 4
In this Issue
Online Tips and Tools for Exercise
Professionals.......................................................... 3
Part 1: Aerobic Exercise During Pregnancy............ 4
High-Intensity Exercise and Immune Function
in Elite Athletes...................................................... 6
Issues for Clinical Exercise Physiologists:
The 6-Minute Walk Test in Pulmonary
Rehabilitation.......................................................... 8
Coaching News............................................................10
Resistance Exercise Protocols
for Older Adults.....................................................12
Self-Tests........................................................................15
Co-Editors
Peter Magyari, Ph.D.
Peter Ronai, M.S., FACSM
Committee on Certification
and Registry Boards Chair
Deborah Riebe, Ph.D., FACSM
CCRB Publications Subcommittee Chair
Paul Sorace, M.S.
ACSM National Center Certified News Staff
National Director of Certification
and Registry Programs
Richard Cotton
Assistant Director of Certification
Traci Sue Rush
Publications Manager
David Brewer
Editorial Services
Lori Tish
Angela Chastain
Editorial Board
Chris Berger, Ph.D., CSCS
Clinton Brawner, M.S., FACSM
Ted Dreisinger, Ph.D., FACSM
Avery Faigenbaum, Ed.D., FACSM
Riggs Klika, Ph.D., FACSM
Tom LaFontaine, Ed.D., FACSM
Thomas Mahady, M.S.
Paul Sorace, M.S.
Maria Urso, Ph.D.
David Verrill, M.S.
Stella Volpe, Ph.D., FACSM
Jan Wallace, Ph.D.
For More Certification Resources Contact the
ACSM Certification Resource Center:
1-800-486-5643
Information for Subscribers
Correspondence Regarding Editorial Content
Should be Addressed to:
Certification & Registry Department
E-mail: certification@acsm.org
Tel.: (317) 637-9200, ext. 115
For back issues and author guidelines visit:
http://certification.acsm.org/certified-news
Change of Address or Membership Inquiries:
Membership and Chapter Services
Tel.: (317) 637-9200, ext. 139 or ext. 136.
ACSM’s Certified News 
(ISSN# 1056-9677) is published
quarterly by the American College of Sports Medicine
Committee on Certification and Registry Boards (CCRB). All
issues are published electronically and in print. The articles
published in 
ACSM’s Certified News
have been carefully
reviewed, but have not been submitted for consideration as, and
therefore are not, official pronouncements, policies,
statements, or opinions of ACSM. Information published in
ACSM’s Certified News
is not necessarily the position of the
American College of Sports Medicine or the Committee on
Certification and Registry Boards. The purpose of this
publication is to provide continuing education materials to the
certified exercise and health professional and to inform these
individuals about activities of ACSM and their profession.
Information presented here is not intended to be information
supplemental to the ACSM’s Guidelines for Exercise Testing and
Prescription or the established positions of ACSM.
ACSM’s
Certified News 
is copyrighted by the American College of
Sports Medicine. No portion(s) of the work(s) may be
reproduced without written consent from the Publisher.
Permission to reproduce copies of articles for noncommercial
use may be obtained from the Certification Department.
ACSM National Center
401 West Michigan St., Indianapolis, IN 46202-3233.
Tel.: (317) 637-9200 • Fax: (317) 634-7817
© 2011 American College of Sports Medicine.
ISSN # 1056-9677
ACSM CERTIFIED GROUP
EXERCISE INSTRUCTOR
SM
LEADING THE WAY
FOR GEIs
Grace DeSimone, BA, CPT, GEI
The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) has developed a new certification for health
and fitness professionals who teach group exercise classes—ACSM Certified Group Exercise
Instructor
SM
(GEI). When many of us hear the term “group exercise,” our thoughts turn to visions
of bodies moving in synchronized step to the beat of loud pulsating music. Many of today’s group
exercise classes still reflect this style, once called “aerobic dance,” but group exercise class instruc-
tion has become more inclusive and less exclusive. Today’s GEIsare teaching boot camps, walk-
ing programs, outdoor programs, suspension training, cycling, strength training, muscle condition-
ing, and rhythmically-based exercise.  Qualified GEIs possess versatility and the demand for qual-
ified instructorsishigh. . Hybrid professionals (personal trainers who also serve as GEIs) are
becoming more and more prevalent. Once the need was identified, a GEI committee was creat-
ed in 2009 by ACSM’s Committee on Certification and Registry Boards (CCRB).  These experts
spent countless hours creating aJob Task Analysis (JTA), which helps identify and determine what
knowledge and which skills are most critical and necessary for a GEI to perform their job(s) pro-
ficiently and competently. The GEI JTA was developed over the course of a year and was written
carefully to elicit responses from GEIs that function both as independent contractors and employ-
ees since theirjob functions and responsibilities differrespectively.  The JTA also will serve as the
Exam Content Outline for certification preparation.    
ACSM’s GEI certification endeavors to lead the way for more professionals to teach more indi-
viduals in a group exercise class setting. Leading groups in organized physical activity is a unique
skill that requires leadership and presentation skills. Knowledge and skills (KSs) considered “criti-
cal” to function as a proficient and competent GEI appear in one of four (4)  “Performance
Domains.” The e performance domain for GEI receiving the highest criticality rating was
“Leadership” (at 55% compared to all other domains).
Eligibility requirements to take the GEI certification examination include a high school diploma
or equivalent and acurrent adult CPR certification (with practical skills component).  Candidates
must be 18 years of age or older.There are 100 examination questions.  The percentage of ques-
tions in each performance domain is:
• Domain I: Participant and Program Assessment—10%
• Domain II: Class Design—25%
• Domain III: Leadership and Instruction—55%
• Domain IV: Legal and Professional Responsibilities—10%
A total of 65 candidates took the examination in 2010 and approximately 65 more are expect-
ed to take it in 2011. 
ACSM’s Resources for the Group Exercise Instructor
1
is now available
(however not a requirement) along with a webinar series designed to assist candidates preparing
for the examination.  
I would like to acknowledge the GEI committee members (past and present) for pioneering the
JTAs, authoring and reviewing
ACSM’s Resources for the Group Exercise Instructor
chapters
and for their belief and support in raising the bar for our GEI profession:  Ken Alan,B.S.; Teri L.
Bladen, M.S.; Sabrina Fairchild, M.A.,and Leslie Stenger, Ph.D.
Reference
1. ACSM’s Resources for the Group Exercise Instructor. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams &
Wilkins; 2011.
How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
PDF, C#.NET convert PDF to svg, C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET Back Color.
chart from pdf to powerpoint; convert pdf pages to powerpoint slides
VB.NET Word: Word Conversion SDK for Changing Word Document into
completed. To convert PDF back to Word document in VB.NET, please refer to this page: VB.NET Imaging - Convert PDF to Word Using VB.
how to convert pdf to powerpoint slides; convert pdf to ppt online without email
ACSM’S CERTIFIED NEWS 
•OCTOBER–DECEMBER 2011 • VOLUME 21: ISSUE 4
3
ONLINE TIPS AND TOOLS FOR
EXERCISE PROFESSIONALS
By Peter Ronai, M.S., FACSM, RCEP, CES, PD, CSCS-D
Exercise practitioners interested in obtaining current health and med-
ical science information have a number of reputable and useful electron-
ic resources and tools available to them.
Understanding the steps involved with conducting physical examina-
tions and assessments and identifying the context of their findings and
results are important skills for clinical exercise physiologists and clinical
exercise specialists. Both designing safe and effective exercise interven-
tions and making appropriate exercise modifications are facilitated by
having this understanding.
The University of Florida College of Medicine’s Harrell Professional
Development and Assessment Center and the Office of Medical
Informatics developed the Online Physical Exam Teaching Assistant
(OPETA) to help provide medical students with supplementary informa-
tion on conducting physical examinations. This article will describe briefly
this learning tool and provide information on how to access it. 
The University of Florida OPETA page is a useful resource for profes-
sionals who must perform physiologic systems exams on their patients.
The developers of this service state that, “This program is designed as
an aid to demonstrate acceptable technique expected of the first year
medical student. This is only a foundation and may not fully encompass
the needs of your patients.”
2
Medical students who use this tool alsoare
urged to refer to their textbooks and a basic clinical skills Web site devel-
oped by the school for better explanations of the purpose and various
findings.
2
Viewers can access this page at:
http://medinfo.ufl.edu/other/opeta/index.html.
The University of Florida has developed a library of narrated instruc-
tional videos on conducting specific types of physical examinations.
Viewers can select the type of evaluation they wish to view. Evaluations
and tests are organized into tabs by anatomical regions and, in some
cases, by physiologic function(s). 
Viewer tabs include:
• Vital Signs
• Musculoskeletal Exam Chest Exam
• Cardiovascular Exam
• HEENT (Head, Eyes, Ears, Neck, and Throat) 
• Abdomen Exam
• Neurologic Exam
• Eye Exam
Narrated, instructional videos explain and demonstrate the key steps
and skills necessary for conducting effective physical examinations. The
content includes explanations of: the theoretical and scientific back-
ground behind each test, the purpose of each examination, and tips on
proper patient positioning, preparation, visualization, palpation, and aus-
cultation. Viewers are provided examples of normal and common
abnormal findings and signs to look for. Some abnormal signs are relat-
ed to potential physical problems related to the system being evaluated.
Although useful, these narrated videos are not meant to provide med-
ical advice, diagnoses, or opinions. Viewers should refer clients with sus-
pected medical conditions to their physician and/or health care provider
for consultation. This page is an educational tool. This tool was success-
fully reviewed by the Medical Education Portal, MedEdPORTAL
(MedEdPORTAL Publication Number: 203 on 10/28/05), which is a
service of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC;
https://www.aamc.org). According to the MedEdPORTAL Web site
(https://www.mededportal.org), “MedEdPORTAL is a free peer-
reviewed publication service and repository for medical and oral health
teaching materials, assessment tools, and faculty development
resources.”
1
The AAMC serves and leads the academic medicine community to
improve the health of all. Its initiatives include:
• Medical Education
• Medical Research
• Patient Care
The content provided within this Web site is commensurate with
knowledge required of many clinical exercise physiologists and exercise
specialists. Exercise professionals can better understand results of perti-
nent clinical evaluations and assessments provided to them by their
client’s physicians and henceforth design safe, individualized exercise pro-
grams within this context.
About the Author
Peter Ronai, M.S., FACSM, RCEP, CES, PD, CSCS-D, is
a clinical assistant professor in the Exercise Science
Department at Sacred Heart University in Fairfield
Connecticut. He is a clinical exercise physiologist and
previously was manager of Community Health at the
Ahlbin Rehabilitation Centers of Bridgeport Hospital
in Connecticut and an adjunct professor in the
Exercise Science Department at Southern Connecticut
State University. He is a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine
(ACSM). He is past-president of the New England Chapter of ACSM (NEAC-
SM), past member of the ACSM Registered Clinical Exercise Physiologist
(RCEP) Practice Board, Continuing Professional Education Committee, and
current member of the ACSM Publications sub-committee. He is also the
Special Populations column editor for the National Strength and
Conditioning Association's Strength and Conditioning Journal (SCJ) and
a co-editor of 
ACSM's Certified News.
References
1. Medical Education Portal (MedEdPORTAL) from the Association of
American Medical Colleges. (Cited August 22, 2011). Available From:
https://www.mededportal.org
2. Online Physical Exam Teaching Assistant (OPETA) from the University of
Florida College of Medicine. (Cited August 22, 2011). Available From
http://medinfo.ufl.edu/other/opeta/index.html
.
W
ELLNESS
A
RTICLE
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
control, RasterEdge XDoc.PDF, is a 100% clean .NET solution for C# developers to permanently rotate PDF document page and save rotated PDF document back or as
image from pdf to ppt; add pdf to powerpoint slide
C# Image: Tutorial for Collaborating, Marking & Annotating
Besides, more annotations can be drawn and saved back to the database We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
pdf to ppt; convert pdf to powerpoint slides
4
ACSM’S CERTIFIED NEWS 
•OCTOBER–DECEMBER 2011 • VOLUME 21: ISSUE 4
While the benefits of aerobic exercise are widely known, many
women are unsure if exercising while pregnant is feasible. Knowledge of
how exercise affects mother and child has increased greatly through the
inquiries of investigators. Through their efforts, researchers have deter-
mined the alterations normally associated with aerobic exercise are not
detrimental to pregnancy outcomes. Having answered the question of if
aerobic exercise during pregnancy is safe,the next step for academia has
been to establish guidelines for physical activity during gestation.
Since 1985, the American Congress of Obstetricians and
Gynecologists (ACOG) have updatedaerobic exercise and pregnancy
guidelines. All women should consult their physician to verify they are
able to participate in aerobic exercise while pregnant. Prior to initiating
an exercise program, pregnant clients should first complete a brief
screening questionnaire, such as the PARmed-X,which is a free down-
load (http://www.csep.ca/forms.asp). This documentation enables you
to determine your client’s health status. All exercise professionals should
know the absolute contraindications toexercise during pregnancy, listed
in ACOG Committee Opinion #267.
1
Additionally, exercise trainers
need to know relative contraindications to enable them to discuss ben-
efits to risks with their clients,and determine how exercise may influ-
ence pregnancy outcomes.
1
Lastly, all fitness instructors should know
when to terminate exercise immediately(
i.e.,
vaginal bleeding, difficulty
breathing, dizziness, headache, chest pain, calf pain/swelling, preterm
labor, amniotic fluid leakage).
1
Maintain a file for each pregnant client
that includes 1) signed physician approval note, 2) completed screening
questionnaire, 3) exercise program description, and 4) exercise
progress notes.
Acute Response to Aerobic Exercise
While Pregnant
It is important to understand the acutephysiological responses to
exercise when pregnant. Although utero-placental blood flowdecreas-
es slightly, the increased oxygen transport capacity
3,15
with increased
plasma and red cell volume maintains adequate nutrient and oxygento
the developing fetus.
3,4,10
Additionally, the hormone changes associated
with acute exerciseare not associated with fetal demise, premature
labor, or adverse pregnancy outcomes.
5
Although exercise alters
maternal blood glucose levels, glucose is maintained to the developing
fetus.
6
The normal hyperthermic response of exercise is not terato-
genic(leading to birth defects)since the mother has a lower body tem-
perature, increased skin blood flow, and a lower sweating threshold to
improve heat dissipation away from the fetus.
5
A woman’s altered cen-
ter of gravity and increased joint laxity is not associated with falls, or
injuries during exercise.
5
Lastly,stresses from high impact pounding as
in aerobics or running, does not cause adverse pregnancy outcomes
(
i.e.
,rupture membranes, preterm labor, fetal injury/demise, sponta-
neous abortion, malformations, placental complications, etc.).
5, 7
Therefore, acute physiological responses fromaerobic exercise are safe
while pregnant.
Benefits of Regular Aerobic Exercise
throughout Pregnancy
Current studies demonstrate regular participation in aerobic activity
throughout gestation is associated with improved outcomes for mother
and baby. The motherenjoys improved mood/self esteem, appropriate
weight gain (decreased fat deposition), improved cardiovascular system,
improved muscle tone, improved posture, and decreased aches of preg-
nancy.
1
Further, her continual activity can improve her “performance”
during labor and delivery. Studies show that regular aerobic exercise
increased the likelihood of delivery close to the estimated due date,
decreased labor and delivery time, and quicker recovery.
5
There are also
“training effects” for the baby. For example, regular maternal exercise at
or above ACOG minimum recommendations leads to improved fetal
cardiac autonomic control, similar to the lower resting heart rate seen
in an adult exercise trained response.
13
This improved control of the
fetal heart persists after birth.
14
Studies found offspring exposed to
maternal exercise in utero were leaner, with improved academic and
athletic performance as children and young adults compared to non-
exposed counterparts.
11
These findings must be interpreted with cau-
tion since outcomes can differ based on frequency, intensity, time, and
type of exercise.
Aerobic Exercise Guidelines
Whether women are exercise veterans or just getting started, the
same questions are asked: How often, how hard, and how long can one
exercise during pregnancy? What aerobic exercises are safe during preg-
nancy? Women are often likely to believe the outdated claims or myths
from magazines, family, and friends instead of their physicians or exer-
cise professional.
8
Due to the breadth of research in this area, current
federal, ACOG, and American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM)
guidelines recommend pregnant women to participate in 30 minutes or
more of moderate to vigorous aerobic exercise, 3or more days of the
week, in the absence of pregnancy complications. Women who were
previously active can continue an aerobic exercise regimen, even above
these minimum recommendations(
i.e.
,>30 min, 7daysper week, mod-
erate to vigorous activity). However, a large retrospective cohort study
of Danish women finds first trimester aerobic exercise of ≥75minutes
per week could beassociated with an increased risk of miscarriage.
12
The ideal exercise time range during the first trimester of pregnancy
seemed to be45to 74minutes per week; as a retrospective study, how-
ever, the authors cautioned that recall bias may have influenced these
values. In the second and third trimesters there were no associations
with miscarriages and amount of exercise.
12
Additionally, one study sug-
gests too much exercise (>5 times per week), similar to not enough (≤2
times per week), may be associated with an increased likelihood of deliv-
ering a small-for-gestational age baby.
2
Though these findings have not
been found in other studies, small-for-gestational age is considered a risk
factor for obesity and cardiovascular disease later in life, thus the safest
PART 1:
AEROBIC EXERCISE
DURING PREGNANCY
By Linda May, Ph.D.
H
EALTH
& F
ITNESS
F
EATURE
C# TIFF: Merge and Split TIFF File(s) with C# Programming
C#.NET Demo Code for Merging & Splitting TIFF File(s). // split TIFF document into 2 parts and save them back to disk TIFFDocument.SplitDocument(sourceFilePath
convert pdf to powerpoint online for; change pdf to ppt
RasterEdge Product Refund Policy
the first step for you is to sign and send back RasterEdge Software We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
convert pdf to powerpoint; change pdf to powerpoint
frequency of an exercise program should be 3 to 5 times per week.
2
Although competitive and highly trained athletes might safely train hard-
er than most womenduring pregnancy, for the average fit individuals a
rating of perceived exertion (RPE) of 12 to 14 (moderate) is suggested,
but this may decrease in late pregnancy.  For women who were seden-
tary prior to conceiving, it is suggested they begin with 5 minutes of
comfortable activity (
i.e.
,utilize the talk test, ≤12 RPE)for 3 days of the
week, and add 5minutes every week if she can talk comfortably while
exercising and has no pain or symptoms.Once she reaches the minimum
of 30 minute sessions, then an additional day can be added, if desired.
Always precede and succeed the aerobic session with a brief warm-
up/cool-down session (
i.e.
,light stretching, slow walk). Therefore, all
pregnant women can exercise most days of the week, at moderate to
vigorous intensity, and aim to achieve at least 30 minutes per session.
Once appropriate frequency, intensity, and time areestablished, the
mode(s) of aerobic exercise is chosen. Some exercises should be avoid-
ed while others only need modifications. As the pregnant abdomen
enlarges, it is advisable to avoid certain aerobic sports (
i.e.
,ice hockey,
ball sports, court sports,  gymnastics, horseback riding, water skiing, mar-
tial arts, etc.); though there are no findings of adverse pregnancy out-
comes
5
and the risk of abdominal injury is very low.
9
For modifications,
ACOG recommends snow skiing on safe slopes only. While outdoor ski-
ing can be switched to indoor cross country skiing. Other activities such
as road cycling should be modified to stationary cycling or spinning.
Typically, exercise veterans can continue their regular aerobic routine,
as long as there current aerobic activity is not one thatmay cause fetal
trauma. For beginners, choose a low risk, comfortable, enjoyable activi-
ty. Low risk aerobic activities include swimming, walking, jogging, spin-
ning/cycling, aerobics classes, most aerobic equipment (
i.e.
,stair climber,
elliptical, rowing). Avoid activities that may decrease maternal circulation
by compressing the inferior vena cava (
i.e.
,Crossrobics). Swimming is
shown to be the safest aerobic activity throughout pregnancy, due to the
low impact nature and improved thermoregulation.
12
The most common
aerobic activity during pregnancy is walking, as it involves little expense
andcan be done anywhere,at varying intensities. Late pregnancy hor-
monal changes causing joint laxity may necessitate further modification
of aerobic activity. Allow your pregnant clientele to choose one or more
safe aerobic exercises that she feels comfortable doing and enjoys.
As the pregnant body continues to change,other modifications must
be considered to ensure a woman’s participation in exercise is safe and
comfortable. In order to maintain a heat gradient away from the fetus,
women must exercise in anenvironment that is comfortable, and must
maintain fluid satiety. Women should not wear any restrictive clothing.
With the augmentation of breast tissue and the nature of aerobic activ-
ity, women should wear a supportive bra and not a sports bra. To sup-
port their growing belly, women may require a belly band or sling dur-
ing their exercise activity. Ideally, women should feel comfortable while
exercising.
Summary
Most importantly, exercise during a healthy, uncomplicated pregnan-
cy is safe,regardless of fitness level. Before beginning an exercise pro-
gram for any pregnant client, keep files containing obstetricianpermis-
sion, completed screening questionnaire, exercise program description,
and exercise progress notes. Make sure you and your client know when
to terminate an exercise session. Participation in consistent, aerobic
exercise throughout the pregnancy is beneficial for mother and baby.
These benefits can motivate women to maintain their program through-
out gestation. Additionally, make sure your client is comfortable and
hydrated during exercises. Also ensure the frequency, intensity, time,
and type of exercise is appropriate while allowingmaintenance/gains in
fitness. Ultimately, following a regular aerobic exercise program will pro-
vide benefits during and even after the pregnancy.
About the Author
Linda May, Ph.D., an assistant professor
at Kansas City University of Medicine
and Biosciences, teaches histology, gross
anatomy, and physiology to graduate and
medical students. Her research looks at
effects of exercise during pregnancy on
fetal/neonatal heart and autonomic
nervous system development. Away from
work, she enjoys time with her family,
exercising, gardening, cooking, and
baseball.
References
1. ACOG Committee opinion. Number 267, January 2002: exercise dur-
ing pregnancy and the postpartum period. Obstet Gynecol. 2002
Jan;99(1):171-3.
2. Campbell MK, Mottola MF. Recreational exercise and occupational
activity during pregnancy and birth weight: a case-control study. Am
J Obstet Gynecol. 2001 Feb;184(3):403-8.
3. Clapp JF, 3rd. The effects of maternal exercise on fetal oxygenation
and feto-placental growth. Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2003
Sep 22;110 Suppl 1:S80-5.
4. Clapp JF, 3rd, Little KD, Widness JA. Effect of maternal exercise and
fetoplacental growth rate on serum erythropoietin concentrations.
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2003 Apr;188(4):1021-5.
5. Clapp JF, 3rd. Exercise during pregnancy. A clinical update. Clin
Sports Med. 2000 Apr;19(2):273-86.
6. Clapp JF, 3rd, Capeless EL. The changing glycemic response to exer-
cise during pregnancy. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1991 Dec;165(6 Pt
1):1678-83.
7. Clapp JF, 3rd. The effects of maternal exercise on early pregnancy
outcome. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1989 Dec;161(6 Pt 1):1453-7.
8. Clarke PE, Gross H. Women’s behaviour, beliefs and information
sources about physical exercise in pregnancy. Midwifery. 2004
Jun;20(2):133-41.
9. Finch CF. The risk of abdominal injury to women during sport. J Sci
Med Sport. 2002 Mar;5(1):46-54.
10. Hart A, Morris N, Osborn SB, Wright HP. Effective uterine blood-
flow during exercise in normal and pre-eclamptic pregnancies.
Lancet. 1956 Sep 8;271(6941):481-4.
11. Impact of physical activity during pregnancy and postpartum on
chronic disease risk. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006 May;38(5):989-
1006.
12. Madsen M, Jorgensen T, Jensen ML, Juhl M, Olsen J, Andersen PK,
et al. Leisure time physical exercise during pregnancy and the risk
of miscarriage: a study within the Danish National Birth Cohort.
Bjog. 2007 Nov;114(11):1419-26.
13. May L, Glaros, AG, Yeh, H-W, Clapp, JF, Gustafson, KM. Aerobic
Exercise during Pregnancy Influences Fetal Cardiac Autonomic
Control of Heart Rate and Heart Rate Variability. Early Hum Dev.
[original research]. 2010;86(4):17.
14. May LE, Meacham CD, Gustafson KM, Glaros AG. Gestational
Exercise effects on the Infant Heart. The FASEB Journal. 2011
March 17, 2011;25(1_MeetingAbstracts):1108.5.
15. Weissgerber TL, Wolfe LA. Physiological adaptation in early human
pregnancy: adaptation to balance maternal-fetal demands. Appl
Physiol Nutr Metab. 2006 Feb;31(1):1-11.
ACSM’S CERTIFIED NEWS 
•OCTOBER–DECEMBER 2011 • VOLUME 21: ISSUE 4
5
C# PDF: Start to Create, Load and Save PDF Document
can use PDFDocument object to do bulk operations like load, save, convert images/document to page in the document), you can save it back to a PDF file or
how to convert pdf slides to powerpoint presentation; how to convert pdf into powerpoint
C# Imaging - Linear ITF-14 Barcode Generator
Y to control barcode image area on PDF, TIFF, Word 14 barcode image fore and back colors in BarcodeHeight = 200; barcode.AutoResize = true; //convert barcode to
changing pdf to powerpoint file; converting pdf to powerpoint slides
6
ACSM’S CERTIFIED NEWS 
•OCTOBER–DECEMBER 2011 • VOLUME 21: ISSUE 4
A review by Gleeson found that acute bouts of exercise lead to a tem-
porary depression effect of various aspects of the body’s immune func-
tion lasting 3 to 24 hours after exercise.
3
This  period, termed the “open
window” phenomenon, may increase the risk of developing upper respi-
ratory tract infections (URI) in athletes.
11
The greatest effect of post-
exercise immunosuppression seems to occur following exercise that is
continuous in nature at a moderate to high intensity (55% to 75%
.
VO
2
max) for prolonged periods (>1.5 h) without food intake.
3
This type
of overtraining is common practice in many elite athletes, which have
shown an increased incidence of URIs.
11,13,3,2
This review will evaluate
results from several studies of the acute effects of high intensity exercise
training and its possible link to increasing the susceptibility of elite ath-
letes to URIs. In addition, the effectiveness of selected nutritional supple-
ments on reducing an athlete’s susceptibility to URIs will be examined.
Defending our Bodies
Roughly speaking, the human immune system is comprised of two pri-
mary defense mechanisms: innate immunity (nonspecific resistance) and
adaptive immunity (specific resistance).
15
Innate immunity makes up the first line of defense and consists of
three levels.
3
The first involves physical barriers such as skin, mucosal
secretions, and epithelial linings that work to prevent foreign substances
from entering into the body.
3
For example tears from the eyes, urine
from the urinary tract, and saliva from the mouth all work to wash away
microorganisms before they can invade the body.
15
For foreign substances that make it past these barriers into the sec-
ond defense level, chemical barriers such as the pH of many bodily flu-
ids destroy several of these substances on contact.
3
Additionally, chem-
ical mediators such as complement proteins (interferons, interleukins,
and lymphokines) bind to foreign substances.
15
Complement proteins
are a group of 20 proteins that circulate in the blood stream in an inac-
tive form.
15
When they recognize a foreign substance they attach them-
selves to it, signaling the final immune response.
15
The last innate immunity defense against remaining foreign substances
consists of phagocytic and cytotoxic cells. Neutrophils, monocytes, lym-
phocytes, and macrophages comprise the body’s phagocytic cells while
natural killer (NK) cells are the primary cytotoxic cells.
3
These cells act to
destroy foreign particles that have been flagged by complement proteins
through phagocytosis.
15
Essentially innate immunity uses the same
response to attack foreign particles every time they invade the human
body.
Adaptive immunity works on the principles of specificity and memo-
ry. These abilities allow the immune system to remember and recognize
foreign substances that have previously invaded the body and launch a
specific immune response.
15
Adaptive immunity permits a much faster
and stronger response from macrophages, neutrophils, and NK cells.
15
Many times this response destroys foreign particles before any symp-
toms occur, in which case the individual is said to be “immune” to that
particular particle.
15
Adaptive immunity is a unique ability only possessed
by vertebrates.
15
URIs present a distinctive challenge for the immune system because
of the numerous forms and high degree of variations within that class of
infections.
URIs are defined as acute illnesses caused by microbial agents affect-
ing any part of the upper respiratory tract including the bronchi, trachea,
larynx, paranasal sinuses, and the nose.  Most commonly these infections
are caused by viruses such as the rhinovirus, coronavirus, and influenza
virus.  Transmission of these viruses occurs through droplet, aerosol, or
direct hand-to-hand contact with infected secretions.  Subsequently,
these viruses then pass through the nasal cavity or mucosa of the eyes
once the individual touches their face with their hands.  As such, URIs
most commonly are transmitted between individuals in crowded situa-
tions like buses full of traveling athletes.  Symptoms of these infections
generally occur within 1 to 3 days following infection and most common-
ly involve sore throat, nasal congestion, sneezing, and possible low-grade
fever.
8
The typical duration of illness is approximately 7 to 14 days.
5
Why Study URIs in Athletes?
URIs are the most common infections in the adult population.
13
Typically, during summer and winter Olympic Games, URIs are the most
common medical condition affecting athletes.
14
On average, an adult con-
tracts 2 to 5 URIs every year.
13
Ultimately, this results in approximate-
ly 200,000 hospitalizations and 36,000 deaths yearly.
5
Current epidemi-
ological studies have resulted in the hypothesis of a “J-shaped” curve rela-
tionship between the amount of exercise performed and the incidence
of URI symptoms.
13
The highest incidence of URI symptoms is seen in
athletes who perform prolonged duration, high intensity exercise.
13
Numerous studies have examined the acute and chronic effects of
exercise training on immune function.  In fact, between the years of
1993 to 2008 approximately 80% of all scientific literature attempted to
uncover the connections.
13,9
Currently, the most frequent arguments
revolve around the post-exercise immunosuppression effects of high
intensity exercise and whether it directly affects the susceptibly of ath-
letes to URIs.  An additional argument involves whether these athletes
are truly contracting URIs or rather just experiencing exercise-induced
symptoms similar to common URI symptoms.  If indeed elite athletes are
more susceptible to URIs, then there is means to use some sort of nutri-
tional supplement to counteract this without altering the athlete’s train-
BY ERIC CHRISTENSEN, B.S., NREMT-B
Regular, moderate intensity exercise may improve immune function and reduce susceptibility to infections such
as the common cold.
9
Specifically, regular exercise has been shown to reduce the release of stress hormones such
as cortisol, which can suppress the immune system when chronically circulating in the blood stream.
9
However,
research also has demonstrated a possible link between high intensity exercise and a post-exercise immunosuppres-
sant effect.
13
HIGH-INTENSITY EXERCISE AND
IMMUNE FUNCTION IN ELITE ATHLETES
W
ELLNESS
A
RTICLE
How to C#: Create a Winforms Control
pages, VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET convert PDF to SVG. VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET Back Color.
converting pdf to powerpoint online; pdf to ppt converter online
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Codes to Add Antique Effect to Image with .
a touch of history to the image which can help bring back the sweet We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
convert pdf file to powerpoint; how to add pdf to powerpoint slide
ing regime.  In the 1990s, vitamin C and carbohydrate supplementation
had been thought to be an effective means to reduce the incidence of
URIs and studies by Peters 
et al.
and Nieman 
et al.
, respectively, helped
to solidify these results.
12,10
Glutamine supplementation also was thought
to aid in the reduction of URI incidence as glutamine is an important fuel
for lymphocytes and macrophages.
11
However, to be explained later, a
study by Krzywkowski 
et al.
found that this may not be the case.
4
Therefore, further explanation of more current research is necessary.
When is it Too Much Exercise?
According to previous survey-based studies, elite athletes experience
a much higher degree of sore throats and flu-like symptoms when com-
pared to the general population.
3
This may be because elite athletes face
numerous immune challenges due to sport participation alone.  For
example, athletes confront environmental, physiological, and psycholog-
ical stresses.  In addition, elite athletes are often sleep-deprived and fol-
low poor dietary practices throughout the competitive season, all of
which tend to depress the immune system.
3
Likewise, through increased
ventilations, skin abrasions, and contact with large crowds and travel,
elite athletes also have increased exposure to pathogens.
3
With this
increased susceptibility to infection, more pressure is placed on the
immune system to prevent infection.
A study by Spence 
et al.
examined the incidence and etiology of URIs
in athletes during five months of the competitive season.
14
Thirty-two
elite male and female triathletes and cyclists, 31 male and female recre-
ationally competitive triathletes and cyclists, and 20 male and female
controls were included in the study.  During the study, subjects were
required to maintain their normal training regime.  In total, 28 subjects
reported URI symptoms with 7 subjects reporting multiple episodes.
Elite athletes made up 57% of the cases and the highest incidence of URI
symptoms occurred during the heaviest training periods.  Symptoms
generally lasted approximately one week.
14
This further validates the
argument that elite athletes are more susceptible to URIs, especially dur-
ing their heaviest training periods.
Exercise-induced immunosuppression appears to affect only the
innate immunity system, while leaving adaptive immunity completely
intact.
11,13
During high-intensity, long-duration exercise lymphocyte con-
centrations increase, but fall below pre-exercise levels following cessation
of exercise.
11
Additionally, NK cell cytotoxic activity is inhibited for at
least six hours post-exercise.
11,13
Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is an antibody
secreted in the mucous membranes designed to bind to foreign particles
and prevent their entry into the body.
5
IgA production also is reduced
following intense, long duration exercise.
11,5
Repeated exercise bouts
may result in cumulative reductions putting the athlete at greater risk.
13
Combined, this poses a serious threat to the body’s immune system.
Excessive exercise can induce an “overtraining” syndrome effect, in
which the individual becomes chronically fatigued and performance pro-
gressively diminishes.  This syndrome results in elevated concentrations
of catecholamines and glucocorticoids.
13
Elevated levels of these hor-
mones suppress the body’s cell-mediated immune response.
13
As such,
the excessive training regime of many elite athletes may make them
more susceptible to URIs.  The greatest effect of acute post-exercise
immunosuppression has been observed following exercise at intensities
equal to 55% to 75% of
.
VO
2
maxfor prolonged durations of  >1.5
hours without food intake.
3
In fact, it has been reported that in the
weeks following an ultra-endurance running event, athletes are 100% to
500% more likely to contract an infection than the general population.
3
Approximately 30% to 50% of athletes who participate in ultrama-
rathon events have consistently reported symptoms of URIs.
13
Athletes
with faster running times and higher training loads (>65 km·wk
-1
) are at
the greatest risk for developing symptoms.
13
Further examined in a
review by Martin 
et al.
, runners in the upper two quartiles of yearly
mileage (>866 miles) were found to be at a significantly higher risk for
developing URI symptoms.
5
However, an important question develops in light of these findings
because study results often suggest that symptoms were the result of
an infection.
13
However, in the studies included in the Martin 
et al.
review, only 30% of all URI cases were directly linked to a specific
pathogen.
5
Likewise, in the study of triathletes by Spence 
et al.
, only 11
of the 37 illness episodes (
~
30%) were linked to viral or bacterial infec-
tions.
14
Thus, it has been suggested that these symptoms are instead the
result of exposure to allergens and pollution since common URI symp-
toms like sore throat and coughing also are connected to aller-
gen/pollution exposure.
13,5
It may be the case that many elite athletes
are not actually contracting URIs following severe exercise.  Although, it
should be considered when training elite athletes that current research
still indicates an immunosuppression effect with excessive exercise.
Nutritional Supplements
Vitamin C supplementation, with regards to enhancing immune func-
tion, has been a topic of controversy for many years.  A study by Peters
et al.
examined the effects of daily vitamin C supplementation in ultra-
marathoners on the development of post-race URIs.
12
A total of 92 run-
ners were recruited and divided randomly into placebo and experimen-
tal groups.  The experimental group consumed daily doses of 600 mg
of vitamin C, while the placebo group consumed identical looking and
tasting placebos consisting of citric acid.  Following the completion of an
ultramarathon by all subjects, the development of URI symptoms were
monitored for 14 days.  In the placebo group, 68% of subjects reported
the development of URI symptoms following the race.
12
This finding was
significantly higher than the experimental group (P < 0.01), which
reported only 33% of subjects experience URI symptoms.
12
These
results represent a possible link between vitamin C supplementation
and a reduction in the incidence of URIs in elite athletes.
A more current study by Davison 
et al.
examined the effects of
antioxidant supplementation on preventing the immunosuppression
seen with prolonged duration exercise and blunting the release of corti-
sol.
1
One of the major problems with the release of cortisol is its effect
on increasing neutrophilia.  Neutrophilia is when immature neutrophils
are released into the blood stream.  These immature neutrophils have
a lower functional capacity.  As such a depression in neutrophil function
may lead to subsequent depressions in immune function.  Twenty recre-
ationally active males were randomly assigned to placebo and antioxi-
dant supplement groups, which involved consumption of 1,000 mg of
vitamin C and 400 IU of vitamin E for four weeks.
1
As a reference point,
it is generally recommended that the average adult female and male con-
sume 75 and 90 mg/day of vitamin C, respectively.
6
The supplements
consumed during this trial are well over 10 times those values.  The sub-
jects completed a 2.5 hour cycling bout at an intensity equal to 60% of 
.
VO
2
max.  The results of this study found that supplementing with high
doses of vitamin C inhibited blood cortisol levels.  This however did not
lead to a reduction in exercise-induced neutrophilia.
1
Therefore, the
effectiveness of vitamin C supplementation in preventing immunosup-
High-Intensity 
(continued on page 14)
ACSM’S CERTIFIED NEWS 
•OCTOBER–DECEMBER 2011 • VOLUME 21: ISSUE 4
7
David E. Verrill, MS, RCEP, CES, FAACVPR
ISSUES FOR CLINICAL EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGISTS: 
C
LINICAL
F
EATURE
The 6-minute walk test (6MWT) has gained widespread use in car-
diopulmonary rehabilitation programs as one measure of fitness. This
test assists the clinical exercise physiologist (CEP) in assessing: 1) sub-
maximal functional capability, 2) need for supplemental oxygen or oxy-
gen titration, 3) exercise prescription from peak heart rate,rating of per-
ceived dyspnea/exertion, and estimated METS, 4) physiological respons-
es to exertion, and 5)the physiological response to medical interven-
tions. While this test is used routinely in cardiac rehabilitation programs
to assess those with heart disease
11
or congestive heart failure,
3,10
this
article will focus on testing patients of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) pro-
grams.
1,4,13,20
This article is not intended to describe how to fully admin-
ister the 6MWT as there are guidelines available for this.
1,20
Rather, areas
of this test that remain ambiguousto some practitioners will be dis-
cussed to help provide guidance in these areas.
The definitive source of practical guidelines for the 6MWTin PR is
the 
American Thoracic Society (ATS) Statement: Guidelines for
the Six-Minute Walk Test.”
1
This document has helpedguide PR prac-
titioners in propertest administration since 2002. Other forms of clinical
exercise testing includestair climbing, the incremental shuttle-walk test,
19
the graded exercise test (with or without radionuclide imaging), and the
cardiopulmonary exercise test with metabolic analysis. While each of
these tests has advantages and disadvantages, the 6MWT is the most
commonly used test today in PR programs,as it is one of the simplest to
administer and is both reliable and valid in pulmonary populations.
1,13,20
A number of issues have arisen over the years with regard to proper
administration of the 6MWT in pulmonary populations. There are
numerous sources of variability that must be considered that may either
increase (Table1) or decrease (Table2) 6MWT performance. This article
will address some of these issues with questions that CEPs (and others)
have raised to help provide insight in administration of this popular test.
1. If we have an indoor or outdoor oval track, can we per-
form the 6MWT on the track?
The ATS Guidelines state: 
“The 6MWT should be performed
indoors, along a long, flat, straight enclosed corridor with a hard
surface that is seldom traveled. If the weather is comfortable,
the test may be performed outdoors. The walking course must be
30 meters in length. A 100-foot hallway is, therefore, required”
1
(page113). One reason for thisstipulation is that many facilities lack an
indoor/outdoor track or an extended hallway, particularlypulmonolo-
gist practiceswhere the 6MWT is routinely performed to assess pul-
monary function and oxygen titration issues. Thus, a shorter hallway is
often the onlyarea to perform this test.
While there remains considerable variability in 6MWT performance
across different clinical settings due to test location,
6,17,18
this source of
variability can be controlled.It would seem logical that if an oval track is
available, the 6MWT can be performed on the track by the CEP. This is
recommended for a number of reasons: 1) 6MWT performance is
improved by 92.2 feet in patients who walk around an oval track vs.
walking on a straight (out and back) course,
17
2) an oval track allows for
continuous walking, whereas a 100-foot indoor hallway necessitates that
the patient make turns at both ends around cones which may decrease
the number of feet walked and increase fatigue, 3) many pulmonary
patients are quite frail and making turns during a walking test is difficult
due to balance issues, and 4) it is hard to maneuver a rollator (if used)
in a hallway around turns and corners.
The ideal 6MWT locations may very well be oval indoor (climate con-
trolled) or outdoor tracks or extended straight hallways. Unfortunately,
the ATS cannot recommend these locations,as many facilities do not have
such amenities. Since 6MWT performance varies by the location of the
test,
17  
the CEP should administer all tests in the same location that affords
the best opportunity for peak functional performance. Future6MWT
investigations should examine the benefits of oval or continuous track
walking for the pulmonary patient and, if favorable, incorporate the
option of using an ovalor extended track intofuture updated guidelines.
2. Do words of encouragement matter during the 6MWT? 
Words of encouragement can increase the distance walked during
the 6MWT.
9
Thus, the CEP should give standardized words of encour-
THE 6-MINUTE WALK TEST IN
PULMONARY REHABILITATION
Table 1. Factors That May Increase 6MWT
Performance*
1. Taller height (longer legs)
2. Male sex
3. Walking on an oval indoor track
4. Walking on an extended straight
hallway (< 100 feet)
5. High motivation
6. Words of encouragement,
coaching effects, or positive
gestures
7. Having performed the test
previously (
e.g.,
learning effect)
8. Medication administration
immediately prior to the test (
e.g.,
pulmonary inhalers)
9. Oxygen supplementation in
patients with exercise-induced
hypoxemia
10. Exercise training
*Adapted from references1, 4, 11, 13, 20 
Table 2. Factors That May Decrease 6MWT
Performance*
1. Shorter height (shorter legs)
2. Older age
3. Female sex
4. A shorter distance testing area
(more turns)
5. Walking longer distances (
e.g.,
6-
minute vs. 12-minute test)
6. Having chronic pulmonary disease
(
e.g.,
COPD, asthma, cystic
fibrosis, interstitial lung disease)
7. Having musculoskeletal disorders
(
e.g.,
arthritis, joint injury,
osteoporosis)
8. Having cardiovascular disease (
e.g.,
congestive heart failure, stroke,
angina)
9. Higher ambient temperature,
humidity, pollen count and/or air
pollution
10. Walking on a self-paced treadmill
for testing 
11. Number of rest periods and time
spent during rest periods
*Adapted from references1, 4, 11, 13, 20 
8
ACSM’S CERTIFIED NEWS 
•OCTOBER–DECEMBER 2011 • VOLUME 21: ISSUE 4
agement (in even tones) in accordance with the ATS guidelines:
1
1. After the 1
st
minute: 
“You are doing well. You have 5 minutes
to go.”
2. With 4 minutes remaining: 
“Keep up the good work. You have
4 minutes to go.”
3. With 3 minutes remaining: 
“You are doing well. You are
halfway done.”
4. With 2 minutes remaining: 
“Keep up the good work. You only
have 2 minutes left.”
5. With 1 minute remaining: 
“You are doing well. You have only 1
minute to go.”
6. At 15 seconds from completion: 
“In a moment I’m going to tell
you to stop. When I do, just stop right where you are and I
will come to you.”
With standardized words of encouragement, there is less chance of
some patients walkingfurther distances due toenthusiastic words or
gestures from the tester.
3. Can we perform the 6MWT for our PR patients on a
treadmill? 
While treadmill utilization would seem to be a great solution for per-
forming a 6MWT  in facilities with limited space requirements due to the
availability of continuous monitoring, standardized speedsand a climate
controlled temperature, it is currently not advisable.
1
Timed treadmill
distance testing, where the patient is free to alter the speed of the tread-
mill, has been shown to result in shorter distances walked due to the dif-
ficulty in pacing accurately during walking.
2, 21
Moreover, pulmonary
patients likely are unable to pace themselves properly on a treadmill as
it involves a different skill set,which may be totally unfamiliar to the
patient.
1,21 
Finally, deconditioned patients may not be able to walk even
the lowest speed on the treadmill. Thus, performing the 6MWT on a
treadmill is discouraged at this time.
4. Should I walk with the patient to monitor his/her SpO
2
or
to pull their oxygen tank?
While it is tempting to walk with the patient to pull their oxygen tank
or to monitor their SpO
2
frequently, this is discouraged. Any interaction
between the CEP and the patient during the test mayaffect test results.
If exertional hypoxemia is a concern, light-weight pulse oximeters are
available that can be worn on the wrist or held in place around the waist.
Units also are available that transmit SpO
2
and heart rate data to a base
unit for continuous monitoring. Be aware that motion artifact and
patient contact affect even the best oximeters and can prevent accurate
readings taken during the walk.
5. Should we have the patient perform a “warm-up” period prior
to the test?
A warm-up period should not be performed before the 6MWT.
1
The
patient should sit quietly in a chair for at least 10 minutes in order to
accurately assess resting heart rate, blood pressure, and SpO
2
levels.
6. Should we perform a practice test or conduct more than
one 6MWT on the same day or over different days and take
the best result?
The ATS suggests that a practice test is not needed in most clinical
settings, but may be considered.
Considering that 6MWT distance is
only slightly improved (0%-17%) when performed a day apart,
13,14,16,25
it
is likely that the effort involved to re-test the patient, particularly in a
cost-effective and time-restrained PR environment, is unnecessary. Valid
test results may be obtained if the patient performs just one 6MWT
during their initial visit. If a practice 6MWT is performed, the tester
should wait at least one hour before the second test and then report
the greatest distance walked as the patient’s baseline measure.
However, waiting an hour between tests may be inconvenient for both
the patient and staff due to time spent in the facility. Moreover, the
longer a patient stays for their initial testing, the more likely fatigue will
play a role which may shorten the walking distance on the second test.
7. If a patient uses oxygen at a rate of 4 liters/minute with
nasal cannula (for example) on their initial 6MWT,
performs 12-weeks of PR intervention, and subsequently has
their oxygen flow redu   ced to 2 liters/minute with exercise,
should I use their entry or current liter flow for their
follow-up test?
The ATS states the following:
1
1. “If a patient is on chronic oxygen therapy, oxygen should be given
at their standard rate or as directed by a physician or a protocol.”
(page 112)
2. “If oxygen supplementation is needed during the walks and serial
tests are planned (after an intervention other than oxygen thera-
py), then during all walks by that patient oxygen should be deliv-
ered in the same way with the same flow.” (page 115)
If a patient needs to have an increased oxygen liter flow due to wors-
ening lung disease or gas exchange on their follow-up test, the ATS
acknowledges this and recommendsnoting this on the worksheet to
help with interpretation of the 6MWT results. If the patient requires
less 
oxygen liter flow due to a positive exercise training effect, the
above should apply as well. If a patient was using oxygen at PR entry and
discontinues supplemental oxygen altogether by physician order, the fol-
low-up test should be performed without oxygen as well.
8. Are 6MWT normative values available for pulmonary
patients?
Currently,6MWT normative data exist for adults aged 20 to 40,
8
healthy adults,
7
and healthy middle-aged and elderly subjects.
12,22
It is not
valid to compare 6MWT results of PR participants to normative data of
apparently healthy subjects. However, between 2001 and 2008, 6MWT
data was obtained from 1,971 men and 1,652 women from 19North
Carolina PR programs at PR entry and following 12 weeks of PR partic-
ipation.
15
Mean 6MW scores were determined for men and women in
four age categories: ≤50, 51-60, 61-70, and ≥71 years. Normative val-
ues and regression equations have been developed for both men and
women from this cohort of patients.
15,24
While these equations have not
yet been validated for validity and reliability (in progress), we have found
these equations to be useful in North Carolina PR programs to help
show both the physician and patient at what percentage they are of
their age predicted 6MWT distance.
Conclusion
The 6MWT is avaluable testing toolto help assess entry physical sta-
tus and monitor progress throughout PR participation for outcomes
assessment.
23
This test also helps the CEP in assessing the BODE Index,
5
ACSM’S CERTIFIED NEWS 
•OCTOBER–DECEMBER 2011 • VOLUME 21: ISSUE 4
9
Walk Test
(continued on page 11)
In the new book 
Organize Your Mind,
Organize Your Life,
to be launched January
2012 by Harvard Health Books and Harlequin,
I team up with Harvard psychiatrist and
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
(ADHD) expert Paul Hammerness, M.D., to
describe six rules of order for using “top
down” organization, or brain science, to move
from a state of frenzy to get to the big picture
around the small and large domains of life.
1
While you may sometimes be disorganized,
your brain is not. The brain is a jewel of organ-
ization and structure, of different components
working harmoniously together. 
Other models of “getting organized” begin
with organizing your priorities, time, and sur-
roundings—your desk, your household, rather
than organizing your mind. The Organize
Your Mind rules relate to brain or “cognitive”
abilities that are embedded features in our
brains, waiting to be switched on. Here’s a
brief preview of the six rules and how you can
use them to improve your energy, creativity,
and productivity.
Rule 1: Tame the Frenzy.Before you can
get focused, you need to get into control, or at
least have a handle on your emotional frenzy,
various negative thoughts and emotions that
are buzzing around you. This frenzy impairs
and overwhelms the prefrontal cortex, the
brain’s CEO region, so that you can’t “think
straight.” While an optimal dose of stress is a
valuable state for stretching you to learn, too
much negativity rapidly depletes your brain.
Recovery is stress’s best friend, allowing you to
rest and recharge so that you are ready to
resume an intense and productive focus.
Exercise your body, do a mindfulness practice,
or choose the slow lane from time to time.
These activities will help tame your frenzy,
allow space for productive thinking and reflect-
ing so that you can calmly regain your focus
and perspective. 
Rule 2: Sustain Attention. Sustained focus
is now possible in your calm, grounded state.
Stay connected to your intention: what is the
goal of the moment, closely watching a client’s
muscle alignment in a training session, or con-
necting with a loved one—what are you calling
your attention to focus on? Keep your thinking
on-track and your plans in place before engag-
ing with distractions around you. Begin to
maintain your uni-focus, one task or client at a
time, and set aside all other distractions for a
precious period.
Rule 3: Apply the Brakes. Your focused
brain also needs to be able to stop, just as sure-
ly as a good pair of brakes brings your car to a
halt at a red light. From time to time, move the
spotlight of your attention on asking whether
you should continue to focus on the task at
hand. When a new piece of information comes
to you in the midst of an important task, stop
and consider whether this new data point now
trumps what just was priority #1. To be able
to stop is vital—a thoughtful application of the
brakes, not simply succumbing mindlessly to
either hyper-focus or distraction.
Rule 4: Mold Information.Your brain has
the remarkable ability to hold various pieces of
information it has intently focused upon, ana-
lyzed, and processed, and then use this infor-
mation to guide future action—even after the
information is completely out of visual sight.
This brain skill of gathering and holding your
“working memory,” allows you to simultane-
ously concentrate on the larger important
task, while accumulating the data needed to
better inform what you decide to do next. For
example, you may think to yourself: “I asked
my client to do x, then noticed y, and remem-
bered z from a prior session, so I decide to
switch to a new approach.” Be intentional in
your self-talk to draw on your working memo-
ry so you can quickly run different scenarios
through in your head. Think beyond one
moment in time, asking: how has my client
responded in the past, and how did that work
or not work?
Rule 5: Shift Sets. The combination of a
well functioning working memory with the abil-
ity to shift your full attention quickly from task
to task, a state of mental agility, leads to cre-
ative leaps in thinking. Rather than rigidly fol-
lowing a linear path, of say writing an article or
designing a new exercise program without
stop, allow your mind to jump, even leap, by
welcoming the input of distractions or seeking
out distractions (searching the web, reading a
new article, having a conversation with a col-
league) to generate new insights and ideas.
Cultivate lightness in thought, be flexible and
nimble, and be ready to move your full atten-
tion completely from one activity to another in
the service of making new connections. 
We are not talking about multi-tasking here.
The brain is designed to focus only on one
thing at a time. Multi-tasking leads you to an
incomplete focus on all of the tasks, so that at
the end of the day you feel you didn’t do any-
thing beautifully. Shifting sets is about shifting
your full attention completely from one task to
the next, shining all of your brain’s resources
on one activity at a time. Amazingly the task
left completely behind benefits from the incu-
bation period and when you return to it fully,
new ideas will likely emerge.  
Rule 6: Connect the Dots.Putting all of
these “rules” together helps you stay on task in
the moment, not succumb to distraction, and
have creative ideas. It also moves you in the
direction of connecting the dots, revealing a big
picture and an organized mind in small or large
COACHING NEWS:
ORGANIZE YOUR MIND TO ADDRESS
THE EPIDEMIC OF DISTRACTION
By Margaret Moore (Coach Meg), M.B.A.
THE HUMAN RACE HAS REACHED A POINT OF INFORMATION OVERLOAD, OR AT LEAST A POINT WHERE PEOPLE OFTEN FEEL SO
OVERWHELMED BY DAILY DEMANDS THAT THEY RISK THEIR LIVES WHILE DRIVING FOR ONE MORE TEXT OR PHONE CALL. SOME PEOPLE
CONSIDER THE DISTRACTION EPIDEMIC THE PSYCHOLOGICAL EQUIVALENT OF THE OBESITY EPIDEMIC. FITNESS PROFESSIONALS ARE
NOT IMMUNE TO OVERLOAD, PERHAPS AT TIMES YOU FEEL DISTRACTED, STRESSED, OR DISORGANIZED. YOU MAY FIND IT HARD TO
BRING YOUR FULL ATTENTION TO CLIENT AFTER CLIENT, OR SHIFT YOUR WHOLE, UNDIVIDED ATTENTION TO FAMILY AND FRIENDS
WHEN YOU ARE NOT WORKING.
10
ACSM’S CERTIFIED NEWS 
•OCTOBER–DECEMBER 2011 • VOLUME 21: ISSUE 4
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested