gnuplot 4.6
71
If-old
Through gnuplot version 4.4, the scope of the if/else commands was limited to a single input line. This has
been replaced by allowing a multi-line clause to be enclosed in curly brackets. The old syntax is still honored
by itself but cannot be used inside a bracketed clause.
If no opening "f" follows the if keyword, the command(s) in <command-line> will be executed if
<condition> is true (non-zero) or skipped if <condition> is false (zero). Either case will consume com-
mands on the input line until the end of the line or an occurrence of else. Note that use of ; to allow
multiple commands on the same line will not end the conditionalized commands.
Examples:
pi=3
if (pi!=acos(-1)) print "?Fixing pi!"; pi=acos(-1); print pi
will display:
?Fixing pi!
3.14159265358979
but
if (1==2) print "Never see this"; print "Or this either"
will not display anything.
else:
v=0
v=v+1; if (v%2) print "2" ; else if (v%3) print "3"; else print "fred"
(repeat the last line repeatedly!)
See reread (p.95) for an example of using if and reread together to perform a loop.
Iteration
The plot, splot, set and unset commands may optionally contain an iteration clause. This has the eect
of executing the basic command multiple times, each time re-evaluating any expressions that make use of
the iteration control variable. Iteration of arbitrary command sequences can be requested using the do
command. Two forms of iteration clause are currently supported:
for [intvar = start:end{:increment}]
for [stringvar in "A B C D"]
Examples:
plot for [filename in "A.dat B.dat C.dat"] filename using 1:2 with lines
plot for [basename in "A B C"] basename.".dat" using 1:2 with lines
set for [i = 1:10] style line i lc rgb "blue"
unset for [tag = 100:200] label tag
Nested iteration is supported:
set for [i=1:9] for [j=1:9] label i*10+j sprintf("%d",i*10+j) at i,j
See additional documentation for plot iteration (p.90), do (p.62).
Load
The load command executes each line of the specied input le as if it had been typed in interactively.
Files created by the save command can later be loaded. Any text le containing valid commands can
be created and then executed by the load command. Files being loaded may themselves contain load or
call commands. See comments (p. 22) for information about comments in commands. To load with
arguments, see call (p.61).
Syntax:
Conversion of pdf to ppt online - application control cloud:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Conversion of pdf to ppt online - application control cloud:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
72
gnuplot 4.6
load "<input-file>"
The name of the input le must be enclosed in quotes.
The special lename "-" may be used to load commands from standard input. This allows a gnuplot
command le to accept some commands from standard input. Please see help for batch/interactive
(p. 20) for more details.
On some systems which support a popen function (Unix), the load le can be read from a pipe by starting
the le name with a ’<’.
Examples:
load ’work.gnu’
load "func.dat"
load "< loadfile_generator.sh"
The load command is performed implicitly on any le names given as arguments to gnuplot. These are
loaded in the order specied, and then gnuplot exits.
Lower
Syntax:
lower {plot_window_nb}
The lower command lowers (opposite to raise) plot window(s) associated with the interactive terminal of
your gnuplot session, i.e. pm, win, wxt or x11. It puts the plot window to bottom in the z-order windows
stack of the window manager of your desktop.
As x11 and wxt support multiple plot windows, then by default they lower these windows in descending
order of most recently created on top to the least recently created on bottom. If a plot number is supplied
as an optional parameter, only the associated plot window will be lowered if it exists.
The optional parameter is ignored for single plot-window terminals, i.e. pm and win.
Pause
The pause command displays any text associated with the command and then waits a specied amount of
time or until the carriage return is pressed. pause is especially useful in conjunction with load les.
Syntax:
pause <time> {"<string>"}
pause mouse {<endcondition>}{, <endcondition>} {"<string>"}
<time> may be any constant or expression. Choosing -1 will wait until a carriage return is hit, zero (0)
won’t pause at all, and a positive number will wait the specied number of seconds. The time is rounded to
an integer number of seconds if subsecond time resolution is not supported by the given platform. pause 0
is synonymous with print.
If the current terminal supports mousing, then pause mouse will terminate on either a mouse click or on
ctrl-C. For all other terminals, or if mousing is not active, pause mouse is equivalent to pause -1.
If one or more end conditions are given after pause mouse, then any one of the conditions will terminate
the pause. The possible end conditions are keypress, button1, button2, button3, close, and any. If
the pause terminates on a keypress, then the ascii value of the key pressed is returned in MOUSE
KEY.
The character itself is returned as a one character string in MOUSE
CHAR. Hotkeys (bind command) are
disabled if keypress is one of the end conditions. Zooming is disabled if button3 is one of the end conditions.
In all cases the coordinates of the mouse are returned in variables MOUSE
X, MOUSE
Y, MOUSE
X2,
MOUSE
Y2. See mouse variables (p. 37).
Note: Since pause communicates with the operating system rather than the graphics, it may behave dier-
ently with dierent device drivers (depending upon how text and graphics are mixed).
Examples:
application control cloud:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
by clicking on the blue button or drag-and-drop your pptx or ppt file into Then just wait until the conversion from Powerpoint to PDF is complete
www.rasteredge.com
application control cloud:How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word
How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word. Online C# Tutorial for Converting PDF, MS-Excel, MS-PPT to Word. PDF, MS-Excel, MS-PPT to Word Conversion Overview.
www.rasteredge.com
gnuplot 4.6
73
pause -1
# Wait until a carriage return is hit
pause 3
# Wait three seconds
pause -1 "Hit return to continue"
pause 10 "Isn’t this pretty? It’s a cubic spline."
pause mouse "Click any mouse button on selected data point"
pause mouse keypress "Type a letter from A-F in the active window"
pause mouse button1,keypress
pause mouse any "Any key or button will terminate"
The variant "pause mouse key" will resume after any keypress in the active plot window. If you want to
wait for a particular key to be pressed, you can use a reread loop such as:
print "I will resume after you hit the Tab key in the plot window"
load "wait_for_tab"
File "wait
for
tab" contains the lines
pause mouse key
if (MOUSE_KEY != 9) reread
Plot
plot is the primary command for drawing plots with gnuplot. It creates plots of functions and data inmany,
many ways. plot is used to draw 2D functions and data; splot draws 2D projections of 3D surfaces and
data. plot and splot oer many features in common; see splot (p. 169) for dierences. Note specically
that although the binary <binary list> variation does work for both plot and splot, there are small
dierences between them.
Syntax:
plot {<ranges>}
{<iteration>}
{<function> | {"<datafile>" {datafile-modifiers}}}
{axes <axes>} {<title-spec>} {with <style>}
{, {definitions{,}} <function> ...}
where either a <function> or the name of a data le enclosed in quotes is supplied. A function is a
mathematical expression or a pair of mathematical expressions in parametric mode. Functions may be
builtin, user-dened, or provided in the plot command itself. Multiple datales and/or functions may be
plotted in a single command, separated by commas. See data (p. 78), functions (p. 88).
Examples:
plot sin(x)
plot sin(x), cos(x)
plot f(x) = sin(x*a), a = .2, f(x), a = .4, f(x)
plot "datafile.1" with lines, "datafile.2" with points
plot [t=1:10] [-pi:pi*2] tan(t), \
"data.1" using (tan($2)):($3/$4) smooth csplines \
axes x1y2 notitle with lines 5
plot for [datafile in "spinach.dat broccoli.dat"] datafile
See also show plot (p.135).
Axes
There are four possible sets of axes available; the keyword <axes> is used to select the axes for which a
particular line should be scaled. x1y1 refers to the axes on the bottom and left; x2y2 to those on the top
and right; x1y2 to those on the bottom and right; and x2y1 to those on the top and left. Ranges specied
on the plot command apply only to the rst set of axes (bottom left).
application control cloud:C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document
merge PDF files, VB.NET view PDF online, VB.NET PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe Provide Free Demo Code for PDF Conversion from Microsoft PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
application control cloud:C# Tiff Convert: How to Convert PDF, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Jpeg
can perform rapid and high quality file conversion between PPT and PDF PDF to Tiff Conversion. transform and convert Tiff image file to Adobe PDF document, then
www.rasteredge.com
74
gnuplot 4.6
Binary
BINARY DATA FILES:
Some earlier versions of gnuplot automatically detected binary data les. It is now necessary to provide
the keyword binary after the lename. Adequate details of the le format must be given on the command
line or extracted from the le itself for a supported binary letype. In particular, there are two structures
for binary les, binary matrix format and binary general format.
The binary matrix format contains a two dimensional array of 32 bit IEEE  oat values with an additional
columnand row of coordinate values. As with ASCII matrix, in the using list, enumeration of the coordinate
row constitutes column 1, enumeration of the coordinate columnconstitutes column 2, andthe array of values
constitutes column 3.
The binary general format contains anarbitrary number of columns for which informationmust be specied
at the command line. For example, array, record, format and using can indicate the size, format and
dimension of data. There are a variety of useful commands for skipping le headers and changing endianess.
There are a set of commands for positioning and translating data since often coordinates are not part of the
le when uniform sampling is inherent in the data. Dierent from matrix binary or ASCII, general binary
does not treat the generated columns as 1, 2 or 3 in the using list. Rather, column 1 begins with column 1
of the le, or as specied in the format list.
There are global default settings for the various binary options which may be set using the same syntax as the
options when used as part of the (s)plot <lename> binary ... command. This syntax is set datale
binary .... The general rule is that common command-line specied parameters override le-extracted
parameters which override default parameters.
Binary matrix is the default binary format when no keywords specic to binary general are given, i.e.,
array, record, format, letype.
General binary data can be entered at the command line via the special le name ’-’. However, this is
intended for use through a pipe where programs can exchange binary data, not for keyboards. There is
no "end of record" character for binary data. Gnuplot continues reading from a pipe until it has read the
number of points declared in the array qualier. See binary matrix (p.171) or binary general (p.74)
for more details.
The index keyword is not supported, since the le format allows only one surface per le. The every and
using lters are supported. using operates as if the data were read in the above triplet form.
Binary File Splot Demo.
General
General binary data in which format information is not necessarily part of the le can be read by giving
further details about the le format at the command line. Although the syntax is slightly arcane to the
casual user, general binary is particularly useful for application programs using gnuplot and sending large
amounts of data.
Syntax:
plot ’<file_name>’ {binary <binary list>} ...
splot ’<file_name>’ {binary <binary list>} ...
General binary format is activated by keywords in <binary list> pertaining to information about le struc-
ture, i.e., array, record, format or letype. Otherwise, matrix binary format is assumed. (See binary
matrix (p.171) for more details.)
There are some standard le types that may be read for which details about the binary format may be
extracted automatically. (Type show datale binary at the command line for a list.) Otherwise, details
must be specied at the command line or set in the defaults. Keywords are described below.
The keyword letype in <binary list> controls the routine used to read the le, i.e., the format of the data.
For a list of the supported le types, type show datale binary letypes. If no le type is given, the
rule is that traditional gnuplot binary is assumed for splot if the binary keyword stands alone. In all other
circumstances, for plot or when one of the <binary list> keywords appears, a raw binary le is assumed
application control cloud:How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF
to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF. Online C# Tutorial for Converting MS Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint to PDF. MS Office to PDF Conversion Overview.
www.rasteredge.com
application control cloud:C# TIFF: Learn to Convert MS Word, Excel, and PPT to TIFF Image
C# TIFF - Conversion from Word, Excel, PPT to TIFF. Learn How to Change MS Word, Excel, and PowerPoint to TIFF Image File in C#. Overview
www.rasteredge.com
gnuplot 4.6
75
whereby the keywords specify the binary format.
General binary data les fall into two basic classes, and some les may be of both classes depending upon
how they are treated. There is that class for which uniform sampling is assumed and point coordinates must
be generated. This is the class for which full control via the <binary list> keywords applies. For this class,
the settings precedence is that command line parameters override in-le parameters, which override default
settings. The other class is that set of les for which coordinate information is contained within the le or
there is possibly a non-uniform sampling such as gnuplot binary.
Other than for the unique data les such as gnuplot binary, one should think of binary data as conceptually
the same as ASCII data. Each point has columns of information which are selected via the <using list>
associated with using. When no format string is specied, gnuplot will retrieve a number of binary variables
equal to the largest column given in the <using list>. For example, using 1:3 will result in three columns
being read, of which the second will be ignored. There are default using lists based upon the typical number
of parameters associated with a certain plot type. For example, with image has a default of using 1,
while with rgbimage has a default of using 1:2:3. Note that the special characters for using representing
point/line/index generally should not be used for binary data. There are keywords in <binary list> that
control this.
Array
Describes the sampling array dimensions associated with the binary le. The coordinates will be generated
by gnuplot. A number must be specied for each dimension of the array. For example, array=(10,20)
means the underlying sampling structure is two-dimensional with 10 points along the rst (x) dimension and
20 points along the second (y) dimension. A negative number indicates that data should be read until the
end of le. If there is only one dimension, the parentheses may be omitted. A colon can be used to separate
the dimensions for multiple records. For example, array=25:35 indicates there are two one-dimensional
records in the le.
Note: Gnuplot version 4.2 used the syntax array=128x128 rather than
array=(128,128). The older syntax is now deprecated, but may
still work if your copy of gnuplot was built to support
backwards compatibility.
Record
This keyword serves the same function as array, having the same syntax. However, record causes gnuplot
to not generate coordinate information. This is for the case where such information may be included in one
of the columns of the binary data le.
Skip
This keyword allows you to skip sections of a binary le. For instance, if the le contains a 1024 byte header
before the start of the data region you would probably want to use
plot ’<file_name>’ binary skip=1024 ...
If there are multiple records in the le, you may specify a leading oset for each. For example, to skip 512
bytes before the 1st record and 256 bytes before the second and third records
plot ’<file_name> binary record=356:356:356 skip=512:256:256 ...
Format
The default binary format is a  oat. For more  exibility, the format can include details about variable sizes.
For example, format="%uchar%int% oat" associates an unsigned character with the rst using column,
an int with the second column and a  oat with the third column. If the number of size specications is less
than the greatest column number, the size is implicitly taken to be similar to the last given variable size.
application control cloud:VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
This VB.NET PowerPoint to PDF conversion tutorial will illustrate our effective PPT to PDF converting control SDK from following aspects.
www.rasteredge.com
application control cloud:VB.NET PowerPoint: Complete PowerPoint Document Conversion in VB.
to use our VB.NET PowerPoint Conversion Control to image or document formats, such as PDF, BMP, TIFF documents that can be converted from PPT document, please
www.rasteredge.com
76
gnuplot 4.6
Furthermore, similar to the using specication, the format caninclude discarded columns via the * character
and have implicit repetition via a numerical repeat-eld. For example, format="%*2int%3 oat" causes
gnuplot to discard two ints before reading three  oats. To list variable sizes, type show datale binary
datasizes. There are a group of names that are machine dependent along with their sizes in bytes for the
particular compilation. There is also a group of names which attempt to be machine independent.
Endian
Often the endianess of binary data inthe le does not agree with the endianess used by the platform on which
gnuplot is running. Several words can direct gnuplot how to arrange bytes. For example endian=little
means treat the binary le as having byte signicance from least to greatest. The options are
little: least significant to greatest significance
big: greatest significance to least significance
default: assume file endianess is the same as compiler
swap (swab): Interchange the significance. (If things
don’t look right, try this.)
Gnuplot can support "middle" ("pdp") endian if it is compiled with that option.
Filetype
For some standard binary le formats gnuplot can extract all the necessary information from the le in
question. As an example, "format=edf" will read ESRF Header File format les. For a list of the currently
supported le formats, type show datale binary letypes.
There is a special le type called auto for which gnuplot will check if the binary le’s extension is a quasi-
standard extension for a supported format.
Command line keywords may be used to override settings extracted from the le. The settings from the le
override any defaults. (See set datale binary (p.109) for details.)
Avs avs is one of the automatically recognized binary le types for images. AVS is an extremely simple
format, suitable mostly for streaming between applications. It consists of 2 longs (xwidth, ywidth) followed
by a stream of pixels, each with four bytes of information alpha/red/green/blue.
Edf edf is one of the automatically recognized binary le types for images. EDF stands for ESRF Data
Format, and it supports both edf and ehf formats (the latter means ESRF Header Format). More information
on specications can be found at
http://www.edfplus.info/specs
Png If gnuplot was congured to use the libgd library for png/gif/jpeg output, then it can also be used to
read these same image types as binary les. You can use an explicit command
plot ’file.png’ binary filetype=png
Or the le type will be recognized automatically from the extension if you have previously requested
set datafile binary filetype=auto
Keywords
The following keywords apply only when generating coordinates from binary data les. That is, the control
mapping the individual elements of a binary array, matrix, or image to specic x/y/z positions.
application control cloud:VB.NET PowerPoint: PPTX to SVG Conversion; Render PPT to Vector
add-on allows developers to perform high-quality PPT (.pptx) to svg conversion in both to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
www.rasteredge.com
gnuplot 4.6
77
Scan A great deal of confusioncan arise concerning the relationshipbetweenhow gnuplot scans a binary le
and the dimensions seen on the plot. To lessen the confusion, conceptually think of gnuplot always scanning
the binary le point/line/plane or fast/medium/slow. Then this keyword is used to tell gnuplot how to map
this scanning convention to the Cartesian convention shown in plots, i.e., x/y/z. The qualier for scan is a
two or three letter code representing where point is assigned (rst letter), line is assigned (second letter), and
plane is assigned (third letter). For example, scan=yx means the fastest, point-by-point, increment should
be mapped along the Cartesian y dimension and the middle, line-by-line, increment should be mapped along
the x dimension.
When the plotting mode is plot, the qualier code can include the two letters x and y. For splot, it can
include the three letters x, y and z.
There is nothing restricting the inherent mapping from point/line/plane to apply only to Cartesian coordi-
nates. For this reason there are cylindrical coordinate synonyms for the qualier codes where t (theta), r
and z are analogous to the x, y and z of Cartesian coordinates.
Transpose Shorthand notation for scan=yx or scan=yxz.
Dx, dy, dz When gnuplot generates coordinates, it uses the spacing described by these keywords. For
example dx=10 dy=20 would mean space samples along the x dimension by 10 and space samples along
the y dimension by 20. dy cannot appear if dx does not appear. Similarly, dz cannot appear if dy does
not appear. If the underlying dimensions are greater than the keywords specied, the spacing of the highest
dimension given is extended to the other dimensions. For example, if an image is being read from a le and
only dx=3.5 is given gnuplot uses a delta x and delta y of 3.5.
The following keywords also apply only when generating coordinates. However they may also be used with
matrix binary les.
Flipx,  ipy,  ipz Sometimes the scanning directions in a binary datale are not consistent with that
assumed by gnuplot. These keywords can  ip the scanning direction along dimensions x, y, z.
Origin When gnuplot generates coordinates based upon transposition and  ip, it attempts to always
position the lower left point in the array at the origin, i.e., the data lies in the rst quadrant of a Cartesian
system after transpose and  ip.
To position the array somewhere else on the graph, the origin keyword directs gnuplot to position the lower
left point of the array at a point specied by a tuple. The tuple should be a double for plot and a triple for
splot. For example, origin=(100,100):(100,200) is for two records in the le and intended for plotting
in two dimensions. A second example, origin=(0,0,3.5), is for plotting in three dimensions.
Center Similar to origin, this keyword will position the array such that its center lies at the point given
by the tuple. For example, center=(0,0). Center does not apply when the size of the array is Inf.
Rotate The transpose and  ip commands provide some  exibility in generating and orienting coordinates.
However, for full degrees of freedom, it is possible to apply a rotational vector described by a rotational
angle in two dimensions.
The rotate keyword applies to the two-dimensional plane, whether it be plot or splot. The rotation is done
with respect to the positive angle of the Cartesian plane.
The angle can be expressed in radians, radians as a multiple of pi, or degrees. For example, rotate=1.5708,
rotate=0.5pi and rotate=90deg are equivalent.
If origin is specied, the rotation is done about the lower left sample point before translation. Otherwise,
the rotation is done about the array center.
78
gnuplot 4.6
Perpendicular For splot, the concept of a rotational vector is implemented by a triple representing the
vector to be oriented normal to the two-dimensional x-y plane. Naturally, the default is (0,0,1). Thus
specifying both rotate and perpendicular together can orient data myriad ways in three-space.
The two-dimensional rotation is done rst, followed by the three-dimensional rotation. That is, if R’ is the
rotational 2 x 2 matrix described by an angle, and P is the 3 x 3 matrix projecting (0,0,1) to (xp,yp,zp),
let R be constructed from R’ at the upper left sub-matrix, 1 at element 3,3 and zeros elsewhere. Then the
matrix formula for translating data is v’ = P R v, where v is the 3 x 1 vector of data extracted from the
data le. In cases where the data of the le is inherently not three-dimensional, logical rules are used to
place the data in three-space. (E.g., usually setting the z-dimension value to zero and placing 2D data in
the x-y plane.)
Data
Discrete data contained in a le can be displayed by specifying the name of the data le (enclosed in single
or double quotes) on the plot command line.
Syntax:
plot ’<file_name>’ {binary <binary list>}
{{nonuniform} matrix}
{index <index list> | index "<name>"}
{every <every list>}
{thru <thru expression>}
{skip <number-of-lines>}
{using <using list>}
{smooth <option>}
{volatile} {noautoscale}
The modiers binary, index, every, skip, using, and smooth are discussed separately. In brief, binary
allows data entry from a binary le (default is ASCII), index selects which data sets in a multi-data-set le
are to be plotted, every species which points within a single data set are to be plotted, using determines
how the columns within a single record are to be interpreted (thru is a special case of using), and smooth
allows for simple interpolation and approximation. (splot has a similar syntax, but does not support the
smooth and thru options.)
The noautoscale keyword means that the points making up this plot will be ignored when automatically
determining axis range limits.
ASCII DATA FILES:
Data les should contain at least one data point per record (using can select one data point from the record).
Records beginning with # (and also with ! on VMS) will be treated as comments and ignored. Each data
point represents an (x,y) pair. For plots with error bars or error bars with lines (see set style errorbars
(p. 58) or set style errorlines (p. 60)), each data point is (x,y,ydelta), (x,y,ylow,yhigh), (x,y,xdelta),
(x,y,xlow,xhigh), or (x,y,xlow,xhigh,ylow,yhigh).
In all cases, the numbers of each record of a data le must be separated by white space (one or more blanks
or tabs) unless a format specier is provided by the using option. This white space divides each record
into columns. However, whitespace inside a pair of double quotes is ignored when counting columns, so the
following datale line has three columns:
1.0 "second column" 3.0
Data may be written in exponential format with the exponent preceded by the letter e or E. The fortran
exponential speciers d, D, q, and Q may also be used if the command set datale fortran is in eect.
Only one column (the y value) need be provided. If x is omitted, gnuplot provides integer values starting
at 0.
In datales, blank records (records with no characters other than blanks and a newline and/or carriage
return) are signicant.
Single blank records designate discontinuities in a plot; no line will join points separated by a blank records
(if they are plotted with a line style).
gnuplot 4.6
79
Two blank records in a row indicate a break between separate data sets. See index (p.80).
If autoscaling has been enabled (set autoscale), the axes are automatically extended to include all data-
points, with a whole number of tic marks if tics are being drawn. This has two consequences: i) For splot,
the corner of the surface may not coincide with the corner of the base. In this case, no vertical line is drawn.
ii) When plotting data with the same x range on a dual-axis graph, the x coordinates may not coincide if
the x2tics are not being drawn. This is because the x axis has been autoextended to a whole number of tics,
but the x2 axis has not. The following example illustrates the problem:
reset; plot ’-’, ’-’ axes x2y1
1 1
19 19
e
1 1
19 19
e
To avoid this, you can use the xmin/xmax feature of the set autoscale command, which turns o the
automatic extension of the axis range up to the next tic mark.
Label coordinates and text can also be read from a data le (see labels (p.55)).
Every
The every keyword allows a periodic sampling of a data set to be plotted.
In the discussion a "point" is a datum dened by a single record in the le; "block" here will mean the same
thing as "datablock" (see glossary (p. 33)).
Syntax:
plot ’file’ every {<point_incr>}
{:{<block_incr>}
{:{<start_point>}
{:{<start_block>}
{:{<end_point>}
{:<end_block>}}}}}
The data points to be plotted are selected according to a loop from <start
point> to <end
point> with
increment <point
incr> and the blocks according to a loop from <start
block> to <end
block> with
increment <block
incr>.
The rst datum in each block is numbered ’0’, as is the rst block in the le.
Note that records containing unplottable information are counted.
Any of the numbers can be omitted; the increments default to unity, the start values to the rst point or
block, and the end values to the last point or block. ’:’ at the end of the every option is not permitted. If
every is not specied, all points in all lines are plotted.
Examples:
every :::3::3
# selects just the fourth block (’0’ is first)
every :::::9
# selects the first 10 blocks
every 2:2
# selects every other point in every other block
every ::5::15
# selects points 5 through 15 in each block
See
simple plot demos (simple.dem)
,
Non-parametric splot demos
,and
Parametric splot demos
.
80
gnuplot 4.6
Example datale
This example plots the data in the le "population.dat" and a theoretical curve:
pop(x) = 103*exp((1965-x)/10)
set xrange [1960:1990]
plot ’population.dat’, pop(x)
The le "population.dat" might contain:
# Gnu population in Antarctica since 1965
1965
103
1970
55
1975
34
1980
24
1985
10
Binary examples:
# Selects two float values (second one implicit) with a float value
# discarded between them for an indefinite length of 1D data.
plot ’<file_name>’ binary format="%float%*float" using 1:2 with lines
# The data file header contains all details necessary for creating
# coordinates from an EDF file.
plot ’<file_name>’ binary filetype=edf with image
plot ’<file_name>.edf’ binary filetype=auto with image
# Selects three unsigned characters for components of a raw RGB image
# and flips the y-dimension so that typical image orientation (start
# at top left corner) translates to the Cartesian plane. Pixel
# spacing is given and there are two images in the file. One of them
# is translated via origin.
plot ’<file_name>’ binary array=(512,1024):(1024,512) format=’%uchar’ \
dx=2:1 dy=1:2 origin=(0,0):(1024,1024) flipy u 1:2:3 w rgbimage
# Four separate records in which the coordinates are part of the
# data file. The file was created with a endianess different from
# the system on which gnuplot is running.
splot ’<file_name>’ binary record=30:30:29:26 endian=swap u 1:2:3
# Same input file, but this time we skip the 1st and 3rd records
splot ’<file_name>’ binary record=30:26 skip=360:348 endian=swap u 1:2:3
See also binary matrix (p. 171).
Index
The index keyword allows you to select specic data sets in a multi-data-set le for plotting.
Syntax:
plot ’file’ index { <m>{:<n>{:<p>}} | "<name>" }
Data sets are separated by pairs of blank records. index <m> selects only set <m>; index <m>:<n>
selects sets in the range <m> to <n>; and index <m>:<n>:<p> selects indices <m>, <m>+<p>,
<m>+2<p>, etc., but stopping at <n>. Following C indexing, the index 0 is assigned to the rst data set
in the le. Specifying too large an index results in an error message. If <p> is specied but <n> is left
blank then every <p>-th dataset is read until the end of the le. If index is not specied, the entire le is
plotted as a single data set.
Example:
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested