gnuplot 4.6
91
This example steps through a list and plots once per item. Because the items are retrieved dynamically, you
can change the list and then replot.
Example:
list = "apple banana cabbage daikon eggplant"
plot for [i in list] i.".dat" title i
list = "new stuff"
replot
This is example does exactly the same thing as the previous example, but uses the string iterator form of
the command rather than an integer iterator.
Title
By default each plot is listed in the key by the corresponding function or le name. You can give an explicit
plot title instead using the title option.
Syntax:
title <text> | notitle [<ignored text>]
title columnheader | title columnheader(N)
where <text> is a quoted string or an expression that evaluates to a string. The quotes will not be shown
in the key.
There is also an option that will interpret the rst entry in a column of input data (i.e. the column header)
as a text eld, and use it as the key title. See datastrings (p. 23). This can be made the default by
specifying set key autotitle columnhead.
The line title and sample can be omitted from the key by using the keyword notitle. A null title (title
’’) is equivalent to notitle. If only the sample is wanted, use one or more blanks (title ’ ’). If notitle is
followed by a string this string is ignored.
If key autotitles is set (which is the default) and neither title nor notitle are specied the line title is the
function name or the le name as it appears on the plot command. If it is a le name, any datale modiers
specied will be included in the default title.
The layout of the key itself (position, title justication, etc.) can be controlled by set key. Please see set
key (p. 120) for details.
Examples:
This plots y=x with the title ’x’:
plot x
This plots x squared with title "x^2" and le "data.1" with title "measured data":
plot x**2 title "x^2", ’data.1’ t "measured data"
This puts an untitled circular border around a polar graph:
set polar; plot my_function(t), 1 notitle
Plot multiple columns of data, each of which contains its own title in the le
plot for [i=1:4] ’data’ using i title columnhead
With
Functions and data may be displayed in one of a large number of styles. The with keyword provides the
means of selection.
Syntax:
with <style> { {linestyle | ls <line_style>}
| {{linetype | lt <line_type>}
Convert pdf file to ppt online - software Library dll:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf file to ppt online - software Library dll:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
92
gnuplot 4.6
{linewidth | lw <line_width>}
{linecolor | lc <colorspec>}
{pointtype | pt <point_type>}
{pointsize | ps <point_size>}
{fill | fs <fillstyle>}
{nohidden3d} {nocontours} {nosurface}
{palette}}
}
where <style> is one of
lines
dots
steps
errorbars
xerrorbar
xyerrorlines
points
impulses
fsteps
errorlines
xerrorlines yerrorbars
linespoints labels
histeps
financebars
xyerrorbars yerrorlines
vectors
or
boxes
candlesticks
image
circles
boxerrorbars
filledcurves
rgbimage
ellipses
boxxyerrorbars
histograms
rgbalpha
pm3d
boxplot
The rst group of styles have associated line, point, and text properties. The second group of styles also have
ll properties. See llstyle (p.150). Some styles have further sub-styles. See plotting styles (p. 43) for
details of each.
Adefault style may be chosen by set style function and set style data.
By default, each function and data le will use a dierent line type and point type, up to the maximum
number of available types. All terminal drivers support at least six dierent point types, and re-use them, in
order, if more are required. To see the complete set of line and point types available for the current terminal,
type test (p. 174).
If youwish to choose the line or point type for a single plot, <line
type> and <point
type> may be specied.
These are positive integer constants (or expressions) that specify the line type and point type to be used for
the plot. Use test to display the types available for your terminal.
You may also scale the line width and point size for a plot by using <line
width> and <point
size>, which
are specied relative to the default values for each terminal. The pointsize may also be altered globally |
see set pointsize (p. 144) for details. But note that both <point
size> as set here and as set by set
pointsize multiply the default point size | their eects are not cumulative. That is, set pointsize 2; plot
xw p ps 3 will use points three times default size, not six.
It is also possible to specify pointsize variable either as part of a line style or for an individual plot. In
this case one extra column of input is required, i.e. 3 columns for a 2D plot and 4 columns for a 3D splot.
The size of each individual point is determined by multiplying the global pointsize by the value read from
the data le.
If you have dened specic line type/width and point type/size combinations with set style line, one of
these may be selected by setting <line
style> to the index of the desired style.
If gnuplot was built with pm3d support, the special keyword palette is allowed for smooth color change of
lines, points and dots in splots. The color is chosen from a smooth palette which was set previously with the
command set palette. The color value corresponds to the z-value of the point coordinates or to the color
coordinate if specied by the 4th parameter in using. Both 2D and 3D plots (plot and splot commands)
can use palette colors as specied by either their fractional value or the corresponding value mapped to the
colorbox range. A palette color value can also be read from an explicitly specied input column in the using
specier. See colors (p. 33), set palette (p.139), linetype (p.125).
The keyword nohidden3d applies only to plots made with the splot command. Normally the global option
set hidden3d applies to all plots in the graph. You can attach the nohidden3d option to any individual
plots that you want to exclude from the hidden3d processing. The individual elements other than surfaces
(i.e. lines, dots, labels, ...) of a plot marked nohidden3d will all be drawn, even if they would normally be
obscured by other plot elements.
software Library dll:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Online Powerpoint to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue
www.rasteredge.com
software Library dll:How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word
Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.docx"; // Load a PDF document How to C#: Convert Excel to Word. RootPath + "\\" Output.docx"; // Load an Excel (.xlsx) file.
www.rasteredge.com
gnuplot 4.6
93
Similarly, the keyword nocontours will turn o contouring for an individual plot even if the global property
set contour is active.
Similarly, the keyword nosurface will turn o the 3D surface for an individual plot even if the global
property set surface is active.
The keywords may be abbreviated as indicated.
Note that the linewidth, pointsize and palette options are not supported by all terminals.
Examples:
This plots sin(x) with impulses:
plot sin(x) with impulses
This plots x with points, x**2 with the default:
plot x w points, x**2
This plots tan(x) with the default function style, le "data.1" with lines:
plot [ ] [-2:5] tan(x), ’data.1’ with l
This plots "leastsq.dat" with impulses:
plot ’leastsq.dat’ w i
This plots the data le "population" with boxes:
plot ’population’ with boxes
This plots "exper.dat" with errorbars and lines connecting the points (errorbars require three or four
columns):
plot ’exper.dat’ w lines, ’exper.dat’ notitle w errorbars
Another way to plot "exper.dat" with errorlines (errorbars require three or four columns):
plot ’exper.dat’ w errorlines
This plots sin(x) and cos(x) with linespoints, using the same line type but dierent point types:
plot sin(x) with linesp lt 1 pt 3, cos(x) with linesp lt 1 pt 4
This plots le "data" with points of type 3 and twice usual size:
plot ’data’ with points pointtype 3 pointsize 2
This plots le "data" with variable pointsize read from column 4
plot ’data’ using 1:2:4 with points pt 5 pointsize variable
This plots two data sets with lines diering only by weight:
plot ’d1’ t "good" w l lt 2 lw 3, ’d2’ t "bad" w l lt 2 lw 1
This plots lled curve of x*x and a color stripe:
plot x*x with filledcurve closed, 40 with filledcurve y1=10
This plots x*x and a color box:
plot x*x, (x>=-5 && x<=5 ? 40 : 1/0) with filledcurve y1=10 lt 8
This plots a surface with color lines:
splot x*x-y*y with line palette
This plots two color surfaces at dierent altitudes:
splot x*x-y*y with pm3d, x*x+y*y with pm3d at t
software Library dll:How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF
Online C# Tutorial for Converting MS Office Word, Excel and How to C#: Convert PPT to PDF. sample code may help you with converting PowerPoint to PDF file.
www.rasteredge.com
software Library dll:C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document
performance PDF conversion from Microsoft PowerPoint (.ppt and .pptx FILE_TYPE_UNSUPPORT: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport
www.rasteredge.com
94
gnuplot 4.6
Print
The print command prints the value of <expression> to the screen. It is synonymous with pause 0.
<expression> may be anything that gnuplot can evaluate that produces a number, or it can be a string.
Syntax:
print <expression> {, <expression>, ...}
See expressions (p. 25). The output le can be set with set print.
Pwd
The pwd command prints the name of the working directory to the screen.
Note that if you wish to store the current directory into a string variable or use it in string expressions, then
you can use variable GPVAL
PWD, see show variables all (p. 158).
Quit
The exit and quit commands and END-OF-FILE character will exit gnuplot. Each of these commands
will clear the output device (as does the clear command) before exiting.
Raise
Syntax:
raise {plot_window_nb}
The raise command raises (opposite to lower) plot window(s) associated with the interactive terminal of
your gnuplot session, i.e. pm, win, wxt or x11. It puts the plot window to front (top) in the z-order
windows stack of the window manager of your desktop.
As x11 and wxt support multiple plot windows, then by default they raise these windows in descending
order of most recently created on top to the least recently created on bottom. If a plot number is supplied
as an optional parameter, only the associated plot window will be raised if it exists.
The optional parameter is ignored for single plot-windows terminal, i.e. pm and win.
If the window is not raised under X11, then perhaps the plot window is running in a dierent X11 session
(telnet or ssh session, for example), or perhaps raising is blocked by your window manager policy setting.
Refresh
The refresh command is similar to replot, with two major dierences. refresh reformats and redraws the
current plot using the data already read in. This means that you can use refresh for plots with in-line
data (pseudo-device ’-’) and for plots from datales whose contents are volatile. You cannot use the refresh
command to add new data to an existing plot.
Mousing operations, in particular zoom and unzoom, will use refresh rather than replot if appropriate.
Example:
plot ’datafile’ volatile with lines, ’-’ with labels
100 200 "Special point"
e
# Various mousing operations go here
set title "Zoomed in view"
set term post
set output ’zoom.ps’
refresh
software Library dll:C# TIFF: Learn to Convert MS Word, Excel, and PPT to TIFF Image
Excel, PPT to TIFF. Learn How to Change MS Word, Excel, and PowerPoint to TIFF Image File in C#. Overview for MS Office to TIFF Conversion. In order to convert
www.rasteredge.com
software Library dll:VB.NET PowerPoint: Process & Manipulate PPT (.pptx) Slide(s)
slide, extract slides and merge/split PPT file without depending control add-on can do PPT creating, loading & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
gnuplot 4.6
95
Replot
The replot command without arguments repeats the last plot or splot command. This can be useful for
viewing a plot with dierent set options, or when generating the same plot for several devices.
Arguments specied after a replot command will be added onto the last plot or splot command (with
an implied ’,’ separator) before it is repeated. replot accepts the same arguments as the plot and splot
commands except that ranges cannot be specied. Thus you can use replot to plot a function against the
second axes if the previous command was plot but not if it was splot.
N.B. | use of
plot ’-’ ; ... ; replot
is not recommended, because it will require that you type in the data all over again. In most cases you can
use the refresh command instead, which will redraw the plot using the data previously read in.
Note that replot does not work in multiplot mode, since it reproduces only the last plot rather than the
entire screen.
See also command-line-editing (p.21) for ways to edit the last plot (p.73) (splot (p.169)) command.
See also show plot (p. 135) to show the whole current plotting command, and the possibility to copy it
into the history (p.70).
Reread
The reread command causes the current gnuplot command le, as specied by a load command or on the
command line, to be reset to its starting point before further commands are read from it. This essentially
implements anendless loop of the commands from the beginning of the commandle to the rereadcommand.
(But this is not necessarily a disaster | reread can be very useful when used in conjunction with if.) The
reread command has no eect if input from standard input.
Examples:
Suppose the le "looper" contains the commands
a=a+1
plot sin(x*a)
pause -1
if(a<5) reread
and from within gnuplot you submit the commands
a=0
load ’looper’
The result will be ve plots (separated by the pause message).
Suppose the le "data" contains six columns of numbers with a total yrange from 0 to 10; the rst is x and
the next are ve dierent functions of x. Suppose also that the le "plotter" contains the commands
c_p = c_p+1
plot "$0" using 1:c_p with lines linetype c_p
if(c_p < n_p) reread
and from within gnuplot you submit the commands
n_p=6
c_p=1
unset key
set yrange [0:10]
set multiplot
call ’plotter’ ’data’
unset multiplot
software Library dll:Online Convert PDF file to Word. Best free online PDF Conversion
Online PDF to Word Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to Word. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button
www.rasteredge.com
software Library dll:VB.NET PowerPoint: Use PowerPoint SDK to Create, Load and Save PPT
Save PPT File. Contrary to PowerPoint document inputting and loading, users can certainly export and save the PPT file after the creating or editing.
www.rasteredge.com
96
gnuplot 4.6
The result is a single graph consisting of ve plots. The yrange must be set explicitly to guarantee that the
ve separate graphs (drawn on top of each other in multiplot mode) will have exactly the same axes. The
linetype must be specied; otherwise all the plots would be drawn with the same type. See animate.dem in
demo directory for an animated example.
Reset
The reset command causes all graph-related options that can be set with the set command to take on their
default values. This command is useful, e.g., to restore the default graph settings at the end of a command
le, or to return to a dened state after lots of settings have been changed within a command le. Please
refer to the set command to see the default values that the various options take.
The following are not aected by reset.
‘set term‘ ‘set output‘ ‘set loadpath‘ ‘set fontpath‘ ‘set linetype‘
‘set encoding‘ ‘set decimalsign‘ ‘set locale‘ ‘set psdir‘
reset errors clears only the error state variables GPVAL
ERRNO and GPVAL
ERRMSG.
reset bind restores all hotkey bindings to their default state.
Save
The save command saves user-dened functions, variables, the set term status, all set options, or all of
these, plus the last plot (splot) command to the specied le.
Syntax:
save {<option>} ’<filename>’
where <option> is functions, variables, terminal or set. If no option is used, gnuplot saves functions,
variables, set options and the last plot (splot) command.
saved les are written in text format and may be read by the load command. For save with the set option
or without any option, the terminal choice and the output lename are written out as a comment, to get
an output le that works in other installations of gnuplot, without changes and without risk of unwillingly
overwriting les.
save terminal will write out just the terminal status, without the comment marker in front of it. This is
mainly useful for switching the terminal setting for a short while, and getting back to the previously set
terminal, afterwards, by loading the saved terminal status. Note that for a single gnuplot session you may
rather use the other method of saving and restoring current terminal by the commands set term push and
set term pop, see set term (p. 154).
The lename must be enclosed in quotes.
The special lename "-" may be used to save commands to standard output. On systems which support
a popen function (Unix), the output of save can be piped through an external program by starting the
le name with a ’j’. This provides a consistent interface to gnuplot’s internal settings to programs which
communicate with gnuplot througha pipe. Please see help for batch/interactive (p.20) for more details.
Examples:
save ’work.gnu’
save functions ’func.dat’
save var ’var.dat’
save set ’options.dat’
save term ’myterm.gnu’
save ’-’
save ’|grep title >t.gp’
gnuplot 4.6
97
Set-show
The set command can be used to set lots of options. No screen is drawn, however, until a plot, splot, or
replot command is given.
The show command shows their settings; show all shows all the settings.
Options changed using set canbe returned to the default state by giving the corresponding unset command.
See also the reset (p.96) command, which returns all settable parameters to default values.
If a variable contains time/date data, show will display it according to the format currently dened by
set timefmt, even if that was not in eect when the variable was initially dened. The set and unset
commands may optionally contain an iteration clause. See iteration (p.71).
Angles
By default, gnuplot assumes the independent variable in polar graphs is in units of radians. If set angles
degrees is specied before set polar, then the default range is [0:360] and the independent variable has
units of degrees. This is particularly useful for plots of data les. The angle setting also applies to 3D
mapping as set via the set mapping command.
Syntax:
set angles {degrees | radians}
show angles
The angle specied in set grid polar is also read and displayed in the units specied by set angles.
set angles also aects the arguments of the machine-dened functions sin(x), cos(x) and tan(x), and the
outputs of asin(x), acos(x), atan(x), atan2(x), and arg(x). It has no eect on the arguments of hyperbolic
functions or Bessel functions. However, the output arguments of inverse hyperbolic functions of complex
arguments are aected; if these functions are used, set angles radians must be in eect to maintain
consistency between input and output arguments.
x={1.0,0.1}
set angles radians
y=sinh(x)
print y
#prints {1.16933, 0.154051}
print asinh(y) #prints {1.0, 0.1}
but
set angles degrees
y=sinh(x)
print y
#prints {1.16933, 0.154051}
print asinh(y) #prints {57.29578, 5.729578}
See also
poldat.dem: polar plot using set angles demo.
Arrow
Arbitrary arrows can be placed on a plot using the set arrow command.
Syntax:
set arrow {<tag>} {from <position>} {to|rto <position>}
{ {arrowstyle | as <arrow_style>}
| { {nohead | head | backhead | heads}
{size <length>,<angle>{,<backangle>}}
{filled | empty | nofilled}
{front | back}
{ {linestyle | ls <line_style>}
| {linetype | lt <line_type>}
{linewidth | lw <line_width} } } }
98
gnuplot 4.6
unset arrow {<tag>}
show arrow {<tag>}
<tag> is an integer that identies the arrow. If no tag is given, the lowest unused tag value is assigned
automatically. The tag can be used to delete or change a specic arrow. To change any attribute of an
existing arrow, use the set arrow command with the appropriate tag and specify the parts of the arrow to
be changed.
The <position>s are specied by either x,y or x,y,z, and may be preceded by rst, second, graph, screen,
or character to select the coordinate system. Unspecied coordinates default to 0. The end points can
be specied in one of ve coordinate systems | rst or second axes, graph, screen, or character. See
coordinates (p.22) for details. A coordinate system specier does not carry over from the "from" position
to the "to" position. Arrows outside the screen boundaries are permitted but may cause device errors. If the
end point is specied by "rto" instead of "to" it is drawn relatively to the start point. For linear axes, graph
and screen coordinates, the distance between the start and the end point corresponds to the given relative
coordinate. For logarithmic axes, the relative given coordinate corresponds to the factor of the coordinate
between start and end point. Thus, a negative relative value or zero are not allowed for logarithmic axes.
Specifying nohead produces an arrow drawn without a head | a line segment. This gives you yet another
way to draw a line segment on the plot. By default, an arrow has a head at its end. Specifying backhead
draws an arrow head at the start point of the arrow while heads draws arrow heads on both ends of the
line. Not all terminal types support double-ended arrows.
Headsize canbe controlled by size <length>,<angle>or size <length>,<angle>,<backangle>, where
<length> denes length of each branch of the arrow head and <angle> the angle (in degrees) they make
with the arrow. <Length> is in x-axis units; this can be changed by rst, second, graph, screen, or
character before the <length>; see coordinates (p.22) for details. <Backangle> only takes eect when
lled or empty is also used. Then, <backangle> is the angle (in degrees) the back branches make with the
arrow (in the same direction as <angle>). The g terminal has a restricted backangle function. It supports
three dierent angles. There are two thresholds: Below 70 degrees, the arrow head gets an indented back
angle. Above 110 degrees, the arrow head has an acute back angle. Between these thresholds, the back line
is straight.
Specifying lled produces lled arrow heads (if heads are used). Filling is supported on lled-polygon
capable terminals, see help of pm3d (p. 136) for their list, otherwise the arrow heads are closed but not
lled. The same result (closed but not lled arrow head) is reached by specifying empty. Further, lling and
outline is obviously not supported on terminals drawing arrows by their own specic routines, like metafont,
metapost, latex or tgif.
The line style may be selected from a user-dened list of line styles (see set style line (p. 151)) or
may be dened here by providing values for <line
type> (an index from the default list of styles) and/or
<line
width> (which is a multiplier for the default width).
Note, however, that if a user-dened line style has been selected, its properties (type and width) cannot be
altered merely by issuing another set arrow command with the appropriate index and lt or lw.
If front is given, the arrow is written on top of the graphed data. If back is given (the default), the arrow
is written underneath the graphed data. Using front will prevent an arrow from being obscured by dense
data.
Examples:
To set an arrow pointing from the origin to (1,2) with user-dened style 5, use:
set arrow to 1,2 ls 5
To set an arrow from bottom left of plotting area to (-5,5,3), and tag the arrow number 3, use:
set arrow 3 from graph 0,0 to -5,5,3
To change the preceding arrow to end at 1,1,1, without an arrow head and double its width, use:
set arrow 3 to 1,1,1 nohead lw 2
To draw a vertical line from the bottom to the top of the graph at x=3, use:
set arrow from 3, graph 0 to 3, graph 1 nohead
gnuplot 4.6
99
To draw a vertical arrow with T-shape ends, use:
set arrow 3 from 0,-5 to 0,5 heads size screen 0.1,90
To draw an arrow relatively to the start point, where the relative distances are given in graph coordinates,
use:
set arrow from 0,-5 rto graph 0.1,0.1
To draw an arrow with relative end point in logarithmic x axis, use:
set logscale x
set arrow from 100,-5 rto 10,10
This draws an arrow from 100,-5 to 1000,5. For the logarithmic x axis, the relative coordinate 10 means
"factor 10" while for the linear y axis, the relative coordinate 10 means "dierence 10".
To delete arrow number 2, use:
unset arrow 2
To delete all arrows, use:
unset arrow
To show all arrows (in tag order), use:
show arrow
arrows demos.
Autoscale
Autoscaling may be set individually on the x, y or z axis or globally on all axes. The default is to autoscale
all axes. If you want to autoscale based on a subset of the plots in the gure, you can mark the other ones
with the  ag noautoscale. See datale (p.78).
Syntax:
set autoscale {<axes>{|min|max|fixmin|fixmax|fix} | fix | keepfix}
unset autoscale {<axes>}
show autoscale
where <axes> is either x, y, z, cb, x2, y2 or xy. A keyword with min or max appended (this cannot
be done with xy) tells gnuplot to autoscale just the minimum or maximum of that axis. If no keyword is
given, all axes are autoscaled.
Akeyword with xmin, xmax or x appended tells gnuplot to disable extension of the axis range to the
next tic mark position, for autoscaled axes using equidistant tics; set autoscale x sets this for all axes.
Command set autoscale keepx autoscales all axes while keeping the x settings.
When autoscaling, the axis range is automatically computed and the dependent axis (y for a plot and z for
splot) is scaled to include the range of the function or data being plotted.
If autoscaling of the dependent axis (y or z) is not set, the current y or z range is used.
Autoscaling the independent variables (x for plot and x,y for splot) is a request to set the domain to match
any data le being plotted. If there are no data les, autoscaling an independent variable has no eect. In
other words, in the absence of a data le, functions alone do not aect the x range (or the y range if plotting
z= f(x,y)).
Please see set xrange (p.161) for additional information about ranges.
The behavior of autoscaling remains consistent in parametric mode, (see set parametric (p.135)). How-
ever, there are more dependent variables and hence more control over x, y, and z axis scales. In parametric
mode, the independent or dummy variable is t for plots and u,v for splots. autoscale in parametric mode,
then, controls all ranges (t, u, v, x, y, and z) and allows x, y, and z to be fully autoscaled.
Autoscaling works the same way for polar mode as it does for parametric mode for plot, with the extension
that in polar mode set dummy can be used to change the independent variable from t (see set dummy
(p. 111)).
100
gnuplot 4.6
When tics are displayed on second axes but no plot has been specied for those axes, x2range and y2range
are inherited from xrange and yrange. This is done before xrange and yrange are autoextended to a whole
number of tics, which can cause unexpected results. You can use the xmin or xmax options to avoid
this.
Examples:
This sets autoscaling of the y axis (other axes are not aected):
set autoscale y
This sets autoscaling only for the minimum of the y axis (the maximum of the y axis and the other axes are
not aected):
set autoscale ymin
This disables extension of the x2 axis tics to the next tic mark, thus keeping the exact range as found in the
plotted data and functions:
set autoscale x2fixmin
set autoscale x2fixmax
This sets autoscaling of the x and y axes:
set autoscale xy
This sets autoscaling of the x, y, z, x2 and y2 axes:
set autoscale
This disables autoscaling of the x, y, z, x2 and y2 axes:
unset autoscale
This disables autoscaling of the z axis only:
unset autoscale z
Parametric mode
When in parametric mode (set parametric), the xrange is as fully scalable as the y range. In other words,
in parametric mode the x axis can be automatically scaled to t the range of the parametric function that
is being plotted. Of course, the y axis can also be automatically scaled just as in the non-parametric case.
If autoscaling on the x axis is not set, the current x range is used.
Data les are plotted the same in parametric and non-parametric mode. However, there is a dierence
in mixed function and data plots: in non-parametric mode with autoscaled x, the x range of the datale
controls the x range of the functions; in parametric mode it has no in uence.
For completeness a last command set autoscale t is accepted. However, the eect of this "scaling" is
very minor. When gnuplot determines that the t range would be empty, it makes a small adjustment if
autoscaling is true. Otherwise, gnuplot gives an error. Such behavior may, in fact, not be very useful and
the command set autoscale t is certainly questionable.
splot extends the above ideas as you would expect. If autoscaling is set, thenx, y, and z ranges are computed
and each axis scaled to t the resulting data.
Polar mode
When in polar mode (set polar), the xrange and the yrange may be left in autoscale mode. If set rrange
is used to limit the extent of the polar axis, then xrange and yrange will adjust to match this automatically.
However, explicit xrange and yrange commands can later be used to make further adjustments. See set
rrange (p. 146). The trange may also be autoscaled. Note that if the trange is contained within one
quadrant, autoscaling will produce a polar plot of only that single quadrant.
Explicitly setting one or two ranges but not others may lead to unexpected results. See also
polar demos.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested