About this Document 
EMC CLARiiON Best Practices for Performance and Availability: Release 30.0 Firmware Update Applied Best Practices    
11
EMC CLARiiON High Availability (HA) 
Best Practices Planning 
EMC CLARiiON MetaLUNs 
A Detailed Review 
EMC CLARiiON Virtual Provisioning 
Applied Technology 
EMC CLARiiON Storage Solutions: Microsoft Exchange 2007 
Best Practices Planning 
EMC CLARiiON Storage System Fundamentals for Performance and Availability 
EMC FAST for CLARiiON 
A Detailed Review 
Introduction to the EMC CLARiiON CX4 Series Featuring UltraFlex Technology 
Using diskpar and diskpart to Align Partitions on Windows Basic and Dynamic Disks 
The following product documentation can be found on Powerlink: 
EMC Navisphere Analyzer Administrator’s Guide
(release 19 only, see Navisphere Help for newer 
releases) 
EMC Networked Storage Topology Guide  
EMC PowerPath Version 5.3 Product Guide 
Installation Roadmap for CLARiiON Storage Systems 
Native Multipath Failover Based on DM-MPIO for v2.6.x Linux Kernel and EMC Storage Arrays 
Navisphere Command Line Interface (CLI) Reference 
Navisphere Manager version 6.29 online help 
Unified Flash Drive Technology Technical Notes 
Using EMC CLARiiON Storage with VMware vSphere and VMware Infrastructure TechBook 
CX4 Model 960 Systems Hardware and Operational Overview 
Convert pdf file into ppt - application control tool:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf file into ppt - application control tool:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
About this Document 
12
EMC CLARiiON Best Practices for Performance and Availability: Release 30.0 Firmware Update Applied Best Practices 
application control tool:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button or drag-and-drop your pptx or ppt file into the drop area.
www.rasteredge.com
application control tool:How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word
Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.docx"; // Load a PDF document How to C#: Convert Excel to Word. RootPath + "\\" Output.docx"; // Load an Excel (.xlsx) file.
www.rasteredge.com
EMC CLARiiON Best Practices for Performance and Availability: Release 30.0 Firmware Update Applied Best Practices    
13
Chapter 1  General Best 
Practices 
There are rarely simple answers on how to design, configure, and tune large, complex, computer-based 
systems.  However, the following are general best practices for getting optimal performance and availability 
from the storage system: 
Read the manual. 
Install the latest firmware. 
Know the workload. 
Resolve problems quickly. 
Use the default settings. 
Read the manual
: Become familiar with CLARiiON‘s hardware by reading the 
Introduction to the EMC 
CLARiiON CX4 Series Featuring UltraFlex Technology white paper, and the Hardware and Operational 
Overview for your model CX4.  (For example, the overview for the CLARiiON CX4-960 is the CX4 Model 
960 Systems Hardware and Operational Overview.)  
In addition, familiarize yourself with CLARiiON‘s 
software by browsing the Navisphere Manager version 6.29 online help.  Many answers to questions can be 
found there.  The help information is directly available on the CLARiiON storage system and is 
downloadable from Powerlink
.  The EMC CLARiiON Storage System Fundamentals for Performance and 
Availability also provides helpful background on how the CLARiiON works.  
Install the latest firmware: Maintain the highest firmware release and patch level practical.  Stay current 
with the regularly published release notes for CLARiiON.  They provide the most recent information on 
hardware and software revisions and their effects.  This ensures the highest level of performance and 
availability known to EMC.  Have a prudent upgrade policy and use the CLARiiON‘s Non
-disruptive 
Update (NDU) to upgrade, and maintain the highest patch level available without adversely affecting the 
workload.  Follow the procedure for CLARiiON Software Update (Standard) available on Powerlink
to 
update CLARi
iON‘s firmware to the latest revision.
Know the workload
: To implement best practices, you should understand a storage system‘s workload(s).  
This includes knowledge of the host applications.  Please remember that when the workload‘s demands 
exceed the sto
rage system‘s performance capabilities, applying performance best practices has little effect.  
Also, it is important to maintain historical records of system performance.  Having performance metrics 
before applying any best practices to evaluate results saves considerable time and labor.  Finally, be aware 
of any changes in the workload or overall system configuration so that you can understand the change‘s 
effect on overall performance.  EMC recommends using Unisphere
Analyzer to monitor and analyze 
performance.  Monitoring with Analyzer provides the baseline performance metrics for historical 
comparison.  This information can give early warning to unplanned changes in performance.   
application control tool:How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF
Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; // Load an Excel (.xlsx) file. XLSXDocument doc = new XLSXDocument(inputFilePath); // Convert Excel to PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
application control tool:C# TIFF: Learn to Convert MS Word, Excel, and PPT to TIFF Image
In order to convert Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint to Tiff image file Visual C#.NET It is quiet easy to integrate this SDK into your C# program, by
www.rasteredge.com
General Best Practices 
14
EMC CLARiiON Best Practices for Performance and Availability: Release 30.0 Firmware Update Applied Best Practices  
Resolve problems quickly: The storage system continuously monitors itself and can be configured to 
generate alerts, warnings, and centralized, comprehensive logs and reports.  Be proactive, and practice 
handling common problems, like failed drive replacement.  To avoid a more serious problem later, you 
should periodically review the logs and generate and review system reports.  Also, know how to quickly 
respond to alerts and warnings, such as a failed drive with the appropriate action.   
Use the default settings: Not all workloads require tuning to make the best use of the CLARiiON storage 
system.  The CLARiiON default configuration settings provide a high level of performance and availability 
for the largest number of workloads and storage system configurations.  When in doubt, accept the defaults. 
In addition, use conservative estimates with configuration settings and provisioning when making changes.   
application control tool:VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
image source into PDF document file which may be to save converted image source to PDF format, RasterEdge offers other encoding APIs to convert rendered image
www.rasteredge.com
application control tool:VB.NET PowerPoint: Process & Manipulate PPT (.pptx) Slide(s)
how to split one PPT (.pptx) document file into smaller sub slides and merge/split PPT file without depending & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
Performance    
15
Chapter 2  Host Best Practices 
Host best practices advise on the software and hardware configurations of the server-class computers 
attached to the storage systems, and the effect they have on overall storage system performance and 
availability. 
Performance 
Application design 
The host application‘s design, configuration, and execution determine the behavior of the overall system.  
Many important applications, such as Microsoft Exchange and Oracle, have integrated performance and 
availability features.  In many cases, proper application configuration or application tuning yields greater 
performance increases than either network or storage system tuning. 
I/O types 
The operational design of the system‘s applications—
how they are used, and when they are used
affects 
the storage system load.  Being able to characterize the I/O is important in knowing which best practices to 
apply.  The I/O produced by application workloads has the following characteristics: 
Sequential versus random 
Writes versus reads 
Large-block size versus small-block size 
Steady versus bursty 
Multiple threaded versus single threaded  
Sequential versus random I/O 
An application can have three types of I/O: 
Sequential 
Random 
Mixed  
How well the CLARiiON handles writes and reads depends on whether the workload is mainly sequential or 
random I/O.  Random refers to successive reads or writes from or to non-contiguous storage locations.  
Small random I/Os use more storage system resources than large sequential I/Os.  Random I/O is 
characterized by throughput.  Applications that only perform sequential I/O have better bandwidth than 
applications performing random or mixed I/O.  Working with workloads with both I/O types requires 
analysis and tradeoffs to ensure both bandwidth and throughput can be optimized.   
application control tool:C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document
VB.NET Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; FILE_TYPE_UNSUPPORT: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport
www.rasteredge.com
application control tool:VB.NET PowerPoint: Read & Scan Barcode Image from PPT Slide
barcode scanning SDK to detect PDF-417 barcode advanced Codabar barcode scanning function into PPT processing projects that is contained in .pptx document file.
www.rasteredge.com
Host Best Practices 
16
EMC CLARiiON Best Practices for Performance and Availability: Release 30.0 Firmware Update Applied Best Practices  
The type of I/O an application performs needs to be known and quantified.  The best practices for either 
sequential I/O or random I/O are well understood.  Knowing the I/O type will determine which best 
practices to apply to your workload.   
Writes versus reads I/O 
Writes consume more CLARiiON resources than reads. Writes to the write cache are mirrored to both 
storage processors (SPs).  Whe
n writing to a RAID group with parity, the SP‘s CPU must calculate the 
parity, which is redundancy information that is written to disks. Writes to mirrored RAID groups (RAID 1 
and 1/0) create redundancy by writing two copies of the same data instead of using parity data protection 
techniques.     
Reads generally consume fewer CLARiiON resources. Reads that find their data in cache (a cache hit
consume the least amount of resources and can have the highest throughput.  However, reads not found in 
cache (a cache miss) have much higher response times because the data has to be retrieved from drives.  
Workloads characterized by random I/O have the highest percentage of cache misses.  Whether a read 
operation is a cache hit or miss affects the overall throughput of read operations. 
Generally, workloads characterized by sequential I/O have the highest bandwidth.  Sequential writes have 
lower SP and drive overhead than random writes.  Sequential reads using read-ahead techniques (called 
prefetching) have a greater likelihood of a cache hit than do random reads. 
The ratio of writes to reads being performed by the application needs to be known and quantified. Knowing 
the ratio of writes to reads being performed by the application determines which best practices to apply to 
your workload.   
Large block size versus small I/O 
Every I/O has a fixed and a variable resource cost that chiefly depends on the I/O size.  For the purposes of 
this paper, up to and including 16 KB I/Os are considered small, and greater than 64 KB I/Os are large. 
Doing large I/Os on a CLARiiON delivers better bandwidth than doing small I/Os.  If a large RAID group 
or a large metaLUN is the destination of large I/Os, the back-end bus speed may become the limiting 
performance factor. 
Small-block random access applications such as on-line transaction processing (OLTP) typically have much 
higher access times than sequential I/O.  This type of I/O is constrained by maximum drive operations per 
second (IOPS).  When designing for high throughput workloads, like OLTP, it is important to use drive-
based IOPS ratings, not bus-based bandwidth ratings from the recommendations found in this document. 
On a CLARiiON storage system, both write caching and prefetching are bypassed when I/O reaches a 
certain size.  By default, the value of this parameter (the Write Aside size) is 2048 blocks.  The prefetch 
value (the Prefetch Disable size) is 4097 blocks.  These values are changeable through Unisphere Secure 
CLI.  Caching and prefetching for Virtual Provisioning-based storage cannot be changed.  The decision to 
use a large request or break it into smaller sequential requests depends on the application and its interaction 
with the cache.  
It is important to know the I/O size, or the distribution of sizes, performed by the applications.  This 
determines which best practices to apply to your workload.   
Steady versus bursty I/O 
I/O traffic to the storage system can be steady (with high regularity) or bursty (sporadic).  The traffic pattern 
can also change over time, being sporadic for long periods, and then becoming steady.  It is not uncommon 
Host Best Practices 
Performance     
17
for storage systems configured for a random-
access application during ―business hours‖ to require good 
sequential performance during backups and batch processes after hours.  An example is an OLTP system, 
whose behavior is bursty during normal operation and becomes steady during the nightly backup.   
Bursts, sometimes called spikes, require a margin of storage system performance to be held in reserve.  This 
reserve, especially of write ca
che, is needed to handle the ―worst case‖ demand of the burst.  Otherwise, 
user response times may suffer if spikes occur during busy periods. 
The type of I/O performed by the application needs to be known and quantified.  Knowing the I/O pattern, 
when the I/O pattern changes, and how long the I/O pattern is in effect will determine which best practices 
to apply to your workload. 
Multiple threads versus single thread 
The degree of concurrency of a workload is the average number of outstanding I/O requests made to the 
storage system at any time. Concurrency is a way to achieve high performance by engaging multiple service 
centers, such as drives, on the storage system. However, when there are more I/O requests the service 
centers become busy and I/O starts to queue, which can increase response time.  However, applications can 
achieve their highest throughput when their I/O queues provide a constant stream of I/Os. 
The way those I/O requests are dispatched to the storage system depends on the threading model. 
thread  is a sequence of commands in a software program that perform a certain function.   Host-based 
applications create processes, which contain threads. Threads can be synchronous or asynchronous.  A 
synchronous thread waits for its I/O to complete before continuing its execution.  This wait is sometimes 
called pending.  Asynchronous threads do not pend.  They continue executing, and may issue additional I/O 
requests, handling each request as they complete, which may not be the order in which they were issued. 
Single-threaded access means only one thread can perform I/O to storage (such as a LUN) at a time.  
Historically, many large-block sequential workloads were single threaded and synchronous.  Asynchronous 
single threads can still achieve high rates of aggregate performance as the multiple I/Os in their queues 
achieve concurrency. Multithreaded access means two or more threads perform I/O to storage at the same 
time.  I/O from the application becomes parallelized.  This results in a higher level of throughput. In the 
past, small-block random workloads were multithreaded.  However, it is now common to find large-block 
sequential workloads that are multithreaded. 
It is important to know which I/O threading model is used for your storage system‘s LUNs.  Th
is determines 
which best practices to apply to your workload.   
Application buffering, and concurrency 
Many applications perform their own I/O buffering to coalesce file updates. Some mature products such as 
Microsoft Exchange, Microsoft SQL Server, and Oracle use application buffering to intelligently manage 
I/O and provide low response times.  For example, some databases periodically re-index themselves to 
ensure low response times.   
Detailed information on buffer configuration (also referred to as cache configuration) for many specific 
applications is available on Powerlink.  For example, the white paper EMC CLARiiON Storage Solutions: 
Microsoft Exchange 2007 - Best Practices Planning specifically advises on cache configuration for the 
application. 
Application concurrency (or parallelism) in an application allows the host to keep a number of drives busy 
at the same time.  This utilizes the storage system most efficiently, whether for the random I/O of multiple 
Host Best Practices 
18
EMC CLARiiON Best Practices for Performance and Availability: Release 30.0 Firmware Update Applied Best Practices  
Microsoft Exchange databases, or in high-bandwidth applications that are benefited by the distribution of a 
large I/Os across multiple RAID groups. Application concurrency addresses the conflicting requirements for 
simultaneous reads and updates within the application to a single object or table row.  It attempts to avoid 
overwriting, non-repeatable reading (reading a previously changed value), and blocking.  The higher the I/O 
concurrency is, then the better the system‘s performance is.  Applications can be configured to adjust 
concurrency internally
.  Review the workload application‘s configuration documentation for their best 
practices on concurrency configuration. 
Volume managers 
The greatest effect that host volume managers have on performance has to do with the way they stripe 
CLARiiON LUNs. The technique used is also known as a plaid or stripe on stripe.  There are three different 
plaid techniques: 
Dedicated RAID group 
Multisystem 
Cross 
The following figure shows the three plaid techniques. 
RAID 
Group 10 
RAID 
Group 11 
A. Plaid with Dedicated  
RAID Groups 
SP A                    SP B 
Host Volume C 
RAID 
Group 10 
RAID 
Group 11 
C. Cross Plaid 
SP A                    SP B 
Host Volume A 
Host Volume D 
Host Volume B 
B. Multisystem Plaid 
SP A         SP B 
SP A         SP B 
Figure 1  
Plaid types 
Dedicated RAID group 
Only one storage processor can service a single LUN or metaLUN at a time.  Configuration A in Figure 1 
shows a plaid that allows distribution of a high-bandwidth load across both SPs.  
Note that to fully drive each active path to a CLARiiON SP, a Fibre Channel host bus adapter (HBA) on the 
host for each SP is needed. For example, when planning to drive I/O simultaneously through two ports on 
SP A and two ports on SP B, at least four single-port Fibre Channel HBAs are needed on the host to achieve 
maximum bandwidth.  
An iSCSI SAN requires a different configuration; it is best to use a TCP/IP-Offload-Engine (TOE) NIC or 
an iSCSI HBA.  Otherwise, the combined traffic may overload either the host NIC or the host when the host 
CPU is handling the iSCSI-to-SCSI conversion. 
Multisystem 
Spanning storage systems is shown in configuration B in Figure 1.  This configuration is suggested only 
when file-system sizes and bandwidth requirements warrant such a design. Note a software upgrade or any 
Host Best Practices 
Performance     
19
storage system fault
such as deactivation of the write cache due to a component failure on one storage 
system
may adversely affect the entire file system.  A good example of a candidate for multisystem plaid  
is a 30 TB information system database that requires a bandwidth exceeding the write-bandwidth limits of 
one storage system.  
The cross plaid 
It is not uncommon for more than one host volume to be built from the same CLARiiON RAID groups (a 
cross plaid
see configuration C in Figure 1). The rationale for this design is a burst of random activity to 
any one volume group is distributed over many drives. The downside is determining interactions between 
volumes is extremely difficult. However, a cross plaid may be effective when: 
I/O sizes are small in size (8 KB or less) and randomly accessed. 
The volumes are subjected to bursts at different times of the day, not at the same time. 
Plaid do’s
Set the host manager stripe depth (stripe element) equal to the CLARiiON LUN stripe size. Use an 
integer multiple of the stripe size, but it is best to keep the stripe element at 1 MB or lower. For example, 
if the CLARiiON stripe size is 512 KB, make the host stripe element 512 KB or 1 MB. 
For simplicity, build host manager stripes from CLARiiON base LUNs.  Do not build them from 
metaLUNs. 
Use LUNs from separate RAID groups; the groups should all have the same configuration (stripe size, 
drive count, RAID type, drive type, and so forth).  
Plaid don’ts
Avoid using host-based RAID implementations requiring parity (for example, RAID 3, 5, or 6). This 
consumes host resources for parity protection better handled by the storage system. 
Don‘t stripe multiple LUNs from the same RAID group tog
ether. This causes large drive seeks. When 
combining multiple LUNs from one RAID group, concatenate contiguous LUNs
do not use striping. 
Don‘t make the host stripe element less than the CLARiiON RAID stripe size.
Don‘t plaid together LUNs from RAID groups 
with differing RAID types, stripe sizes, or radically 
different drive counts. The result is not catastrophic, but it is likely to give uneven results. 
Plaids for high bandwidth 
Plaids are used in high-bandwidth applications for several reasons: 
Plaids can increase concurrency (parallel access) to the storage system. 
Plaids allow more than one host HBA and CLARiiON SP to service a single volume. 
Very large volumes can be split across more than one CLARiiON system. 
Increasing concurrency 
Plaids are useful when applications are single-threaded.  If the application I/O size fills the volume manager 
stripe, the volume manager can access the LUNs making up the volume concurrently.  
Host Best Practices 
20
EMC CLARiiON Best Practices for Performance and Availability: Release 30.0 Firmware Update Applied Best Practices  
Plaids and OLTP 
OLTP applications are hard to analyze and suffer from hot spots. A hot spot is a RAID group with a higher-
than-average drive utilization.  Plaids are an effective way to distribute I/O across many hard drives. An 
application that can keep many drives busy benefits from a high drive count.  
Note some volume managers recommend small host stripes (16 KB to 64 KB). This is not correct for 
CLARiiON LUNs, which use a striped RAID type. For OLTP, the volume manager stripe element should 
be set to the CLARiiON stripe size (typically 128 KB to 512 KB). The primary cost of a plaid for OLTP 
purposes is most users end up with a cross plaid.  
HBAs  
The network topology used for host attach depends on the goals of the system. More than one HBA is 
always recommended for both performance and availability.  The positive performance effect of HBAs is in 
their use for multipathing.  Multiple paths give the storage system administrator the ability to balance a load 
across CLARiiON resources.  The ―
PowerPath
‖ section on page 
25 has a description of CLARiiON 
multipathing. 
Keep HBAs and their driver behavior in mind when tuning a storage system. The HBA firmware, the HBA 
driver version used, and the operating system of the host can all affect the maximum I/O size and the degree 
of concurrency presented to the storage system.  The EMC Support Matrix service provides suggested 
settings for drives and firmware, and these suggestions should be followed. 
Each HBA port should be configured on its switch with a separate zone that contains the HBA and the SP 
ports with which it communicates. EMC recommends a single-initiator zoning strategy. 
File systems 
Proper configuration of the host‘s file system can have a significant positive effect on storage system 
performance.  Storage can be allocated to file systems through volume managers and the operating system.  
The host‘s file systems may support shared access to storage from multiple hosts.
File system buffering 
File-system buffering reduces load on the storage system.  Application-level buffering is generally more 
efficient than file-system buffering.  Buffering should be maximized to increase storage system 
performance. 
There are, however, some exceptions to the increased buffering advantage.  The exceptions are: 
When application-level buffering is already being applied 
Hosts with large memory models 
Ensure that application-level buffering and file-system buffering do not work to cross purposes on the host.  
Application-level buffering assumes the application (for example, Oracle) can buffer its I/O more 
intelligently than the operating system.  It also assumes the application can achieve better I/O response time 
without the file system‘s I/O coalescing.  
The extent of the file system resident in host memory should be known.  With 64-bit operating systems, 
hosts can have up to 128 GB of main memory.  With these large memory model hosts, it is possible for the 
entire file system to be buffered.  Having the file system in memory greatly reduces the response times for 
read I/Os, which might have been buffered.  Write I/Os should use a write-through feature to ensure 
persistence of committed data. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested