Storage System Best Practices 
Performance     
41
The amount of SP memory available for read and write cache depends on the CLARiiON model.  For 
optimal performance, always allocate all the memory available for caching to read and write cache.  Note 
that the use of the FAST Cache and LUN Compression features (FLARE revision 30.0 and later) decreases 
the amount of memory available for read/write cache usage.  See the 
FAST Cache
‖ and ―
LUN 
compression
‖ sections
for details. 
If you wish, you may allocate all of the storage system‘s memory be used as write cache. 
The following 
table shows the maximum possible cache allocations.  Storage system write cache is mirrored between SPs 
so that write cache‘s contents will not be lost if there is a system failure.  A single write cache allocation 
applies to both SPs.  Because of this mirroring, allocating write cache consumes twice the amount of the 
allocation.  (Each of the two SPs receives the same allocation taken from memory.)  For example, if you 
allocate 250 MB to write cache, 500 MB of system memory is consumed.  
Read cache is not mirrored. When you allocate memory for read cache, you are only allocating it on one SP.  
Because of this, SPs always have the same amount of write cache, but they may have different amounts of 
read cache.  To use the available SP memory efficiently, in practice it‘s best to a
llocate the same amount of 
read cache to both SPs.  
Table 9 Maximum cache allocations in FLARE 29 
CX4-120 
CX4-240 
CX4-480 
CX4-960 
Maximum Storage System Cache (MB)  
1196 
2522 
8996 
21520 
Maximum Storage System Write Cache (MB)  598 
1261 
4498 
10760/6000* 
Maximum Read Cache per SP (MB) 
598 
1261 
4498 
10760 
* CX4-960 write cache is a lower number with a 2 Gb/s DAE 0 installed. 
Allocating read and write cache recommendations 
Generally, for storage systems with 2 GB or less of available cache memory, use about 20 percent of the 
memory for read cache and the remainder for write cache.  For larger capacity cache configurations, use as 
much memory for write cache as possible while reserving about 1 GB for read cache.  Specific 
recommendations are as follows: 
Export pdf to powerpoint - Library control component:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Export pdf to powerpoint - Library control component:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Storage System Best Practices 
42
EMC CLARiiON Best Practices for Performance and Availability: Release 30.0 Firmware Update Applied Best Practices  
Table 10 CX4 recommended cache settings 
CX4-120 
CX4-240 
CX4-480 
CX4-960 
Write Cache (MB)   498 
1011 
3600 
9760 
Read Cache (MB)  100 
250 
898 
1000 
Total Cache (MB)  598 
1261 
4498 
10760 
Watermarks 
Watermarks  help manage write cache flushing.  The goal of setting watermarks is to avoid forced flushes 
while maximizing write cache hits.  Using watermarks, cache can be tuned to decrease response time while 
maintaining a reserve of cache pages to match the workload‘s b
ursts, and system maintenance.  
CLARiiON has two watermarks: high and low.  These parameters work together to manage the flushing 
conditions.  Watermarks only apply when write cache is activated.  The margin of cache above the high 
watermark is set to contain bursts of write I/O and to prevent forced flushing.  The low watermark sets a 
minimum amount of write data to maintain in cache.  It is also the point at which the storage system stops 
high water or forced flushing. The amount of cache below the low watermark is the smallest number of 
cache pages needed to ensure a high number of cache hits under normal conditions. This level can drop 
when a system is not busy due to idle flushing.  
The default CLARiiON watermarks are shown in the following table: 
Table 11 Default watermark Settings 
CLARiiON Default Cache Watermarks 
High  Low 
CLARiiON CX-series (All models)  80 
60 
The difference between the high watermark and the low watermark determines the rate and duration of 
flushing activity.  The larger the difference is, the less often you will see watermark flushing. The flushing 
does not start until the high watermark is passed.  Note that if there is a wide difference between the 
watermarks, when flushing does occur, it will be very heavy and sustained.  Intense flushing increases LBA 
sorting, coalescing, and concurrency in storage, but it may have an adverse effect on overall storage system 
performance.  The smaller the difference between the watermarks, the more constant the flushing activity.  
A lower rate of flushing permits other I/Os (particularly reads) to execute.   
In a bursty workload environment, lowering both watermarks will increase the cache‘s ―reserve‖ of free 
pages.  This allows the system to absorb bursts of write requests without forced flushing.  Generally, with 
Library control component:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Online Powerpoint to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Then just wait until the conversion from Powerpoint to PDF is complete and download the file.
www.rasteredge.com
Library control component:C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Viewer & Editor. WPF: View PDF. WPF: Annotate PDF. WPF: Export PDF. WPF: Print PDF. PDF Create. Create PDF from Word. Create PDF from Excel. Create PDF from PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Storage System Best Practices 
Performance     
43
the mid-model CLARiiON arrays (CX4-480) and lower, the high watermark should be 20 percent higher 
than the low watermark.  Otherwise, the high watermark may be set to be 10 percent higher than the low 
watermark 
The amount of storage system configurable cache is reduced when the optional FAST Cache feature is 
enabled.  The smaller cache affects the storage system‘s ability to handle bursts of I/O activity.  Adjust the 
watermarks after installing the FAST Cache enabler to handle expected I/O with the reduced amount of 
write cache. 
Vault drives 
The first five drives 0 through 4 in DAE0 in a CLARiiON CX4 are the system drives that contain the saved 
write cache in the event of a failure, the storage system‘s operating 
system files, the Persistent Storage 
Manager (PSM), and the FLARE configuration database.  These drives are also referred to as the system 
drives. 
System drives can be used just as any other drives on the system.  However, system drives have less usable 
capacity than data drives because they contain storage system files.  In addition, avoid if possible placing 
any response-time-sensitive data on the vault drives.  Also, the reserved LUN pool LUNs, clone private 
LUNs, write intent logs, clone, and mirror LUNs should not be placed on the vault drives.  
Vault drive capacity 
Vault drives on the CX4 series use about 62 GB of their per-drive capacity for system files.   
Bind the vault drives together as a RAID group (or groups).  This is because when vault drives are bound 
with non-vault drives into RAID groups, all drives in the group are reduced in capacity to match the vault 
drive‘s capacity.
Vault and PSM effects 
The first four drives of the vault contain the SP‘s operating system.  After the storage system is 
booted, the 
operating system files are only occasionally accessed.  Optimal performance of the storage system‘s OS 
requires prompt access.  To ensure this performance, EMC recommends using high-performance Fibre 
Channel, SAS, and Flash drives for the vault. 
The first three drives of the vault contain the PSM and FLARE configuration database.  The PSM and 
FLARE configuration database are used for storing critical storage system state information. SP access to 
the PSM is light, but the system requires undelayed access to the drives to avoid a delayed response to 
Unisphere Manager commands. 
All five of the vault drives are used for the cache vault.  The cache vault is only in use when the cache is 
dumping, or after recovery when it is being reloaded and flushed to the drives. With the CX4 series 
persistent cache, this is an uncommon event. However, during these times, host I/O response to these drives 
will be slowed. 
Vault drives may be used for moderate host I/O loads, such as general-purpose file serving. For these drives, 
restrict usage to no more than shown in the table below. 
Library control component:VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
PDF in WPF. Annotate PDF in WPF. Export PDF in WPF. Print PDF in WPF. PDF Create. Create PDF from Word. Create PDF from Excel. Create PDF from PowerPoint. Create
www.rasteredge.com
Library control component:VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
PDF Export. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: PDF Export. for converting MicroSoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint document to PDF file in VB
www.rasteredge.com
Storage System Best Practices 
44
EMC CLARiiON Best Practices for Performance and Availability: Release 30.0 Firmware Update Applied Best Practices  
Table 12 Maximum host I/O loads for vault drives 
Vault hard drive 
type 
Max. IOPS 
Max. bandwidth 
(MB/s) 
Fibre Channel  
100 
10 
SAS 
100 
10 
SATA 
50 
Flash drive 
1500 
60 
In general, when planning LUN provisioning, distribute busy LUNs equally over the available RAID 
groups.  If LUNs are provisioned on RAID groups composed of vault drives do not assume the full 
bandwidth of these RAID groups will be available.  Plan bandwidth utilization for LUNs on vault drives as 
if they are sharing the drives with an already busy LUN.  This will account for the CLARiiON‘s vault drive 
utilization. 
Flash drives as vault drives 
Starting with FLARE revision 28.5, Flash drives and SATA drives can be configured as vault drives.  SATA 
drives and Flash drives have the same vault capacity restrictions as Fibre Channel and SAS drives. Flash 
drives installed in vault drive locations cannot be used to create a FAST Cache. (See 
the ―
FAST Cache
‖ 
section.) This is restricted through FLARE.  
Starting with release 30, Flash drives are available with either SATA or Fibre Channel attachments. The 
same configuration rules apply to Flash drives of all attachment types. 
Note that Flash drives with both attachments and mechanical Fibre Channel drives can be hosted together in 
the same DAE.  Flash drives and mechanical SATA hard drives cannot share a DAE.  In addition, Fibre 
Channel and mechanical SATA drives cannot be provisioned to share the same DAE. 
Different drives have different bandwidth and IOPS restrictions. Flash drives have more bandwidth and 
IOPS than mechanical hard drives. Fibre Channel or SAS drives have more IOPS and bandwidth than 
SATA drives.  So, it is important not to provision busy LUNs on RAID groups made up of SATA vault 
drives. However, using Flash drives as vault drives allows you to provision user LUNs with higher 
workload demands to RAID groups including these drives.  You should always be careful if you use a vault 
drive to support a user workload; do not greatly exceed the recommendation found in Table 13. 
For example, assume five equally busy LUNs need be provisioned.  The LUNs need be allocated to three 
RAID groups.  One of these RAID groups is necessarily composed of the vault drives.  Place two of the new 
LUNs on each of the two non-vault drive RAID groups (for a total of four LUNs).  Place a single new LUN 
on the vault drive‘s RAID group.  Why?  Because before the new LUNs 
are provisioned, the RAID group 
built from the vault drives already has a busy LUN provisioned from the CLARiiON. 
Recommendations for AX4-5 and earlier CLARiiON storage systems 
For AX4-5 and the earlier CLARiiON systems, the CX4 considerations above apply. The reserved LUN 
pool, clone private LUNs, write intent logs, clone, and mirror LUNs should not be placed on the vault 
drives. Also, avoid placing any response-time sensitive data on the vault drives. 
On CLARiiONs that do not have the Improved Write Cache Availability, a vault drive failure will normally 
result in rebuild activity on these drives and a disabled write cache.  The HA vault option in Unisphere 
should be clear, if response-time sensitive access to data on these drives is needed under this condition.   
Library control component:C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
PDF Export. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: PDF Export. Able to export PDF document to HTML file. Able to create convert PDF to SVG file.
www.rasteredge.com
Library control component:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
Export PDF in WPF. Print PDF in WPF. PDF Create. Create PDF from Word. Create PDF from Excel. Create PDF from PowerPoint. Create PDF from Tiff. Create PDF from
www.rasteredge.com
Storage System Best Practices 
Performance     
45
With the HA vault disabled, the cache stays enabled during a vault drive rebuild, at the expense of a small 
amount of protection for cached data.  This is especially important with systems using SATA drives in the 
vault, due to the long time needed for these drives to rebuild and for the cache to re-enable. 
Load balancing 
There is a performance advantage to evenly distributing the workload‘s requirement for storage system 
resources across all of the available storage system‘s resources.  This balan
cing is achieved at several levels: 
Balancing I/O across storage system front-end ports is largely performed by PowerPath in addition to a 
careful assignment of ports and zoning to hosts. The ―
PowerPath
‖ section has more informati
on. 
Balancing across storage processors is performed by LUN provisioning in anticipation of the workload‘s 
requirements.  The ―
LUN provisioning
‖ section has more information.
Balancing across back-end ports is performed by RAID gr
oup creation in anticipation of the workload‘s 
requirements for performance, capacity, and availability. The ―RAID group bus balancing‖ section has 
more information. 
Failback  
Should an SP fail, LUNs owned by that SP are trespassed by host multipathing applications to the surviving 
peer SP.  When a failure-related trespass occurs, performance may suffer, because of increased load on the 
surviving SP.  Failback is the ownership return of trespassed LUNs to their original owning SP. 
For best performance, after a failure-related trespass ensure that LUN ownership is quickly and completely 
restored (either automatically or manually) to the original owning SP.   
When PowerPath is installed on the host, failback is an automatic process.  The host OS may also support 
automatic failback without PowerPath.  For example, HP-UX natively supports failback.  Review the host 
OS‘s documentation to determine if, and how it supports a failback capability.  Failback is manual process 
when PowerPath is not installed, and the host OS does not support failback.  When not automatic, policies 
and procedures need to be in place to perform a manual failback after a trespass to ensure the original level 
of performance. 
Detailed information on failback, and the effects of trespass can be found in the EMC CLARiiON High 
Availability (HA) 
Best Practices Planning white paper available on Powerlink. 
Back-end considerations 
The CLARiiON‘s back
-end buses and drives constitute the back end.  The number of drives per DAE, the 
DAE to bus attachments, the RAID type (mirrored or parity), the type of drives (Fibre Channel, SAS, 
SATA, or Flash drive), and the distribution of the LUN‘s information on the drives all affect system 
performance.   
UltraPoint DAEs 
UltraPoint™ refers to the DAE2P, DAE3P, and DAE4P CLARiiON DAE delivered with CLARiiON CX4 
and CX3 series storage systems.  (In Unisphere, UltraPoint DAEs are shown as type DAE-2P.)  UltraPoint 
is a 4 Gb/s point-to-point Fibre Channel DAE.  UltraPoint can host 4 Gb/s or 2 Gb/s hard drives.     
DAE2 refers to the 2 Gb/s Fibre Channel DAE delivered with the earlier CLARiiON CX series.  The 
DAE2-ATA is a legacy 2 Gb/s DAE used with PATA drives on earlier CLARiiON models. 
Library control component:C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
Export PDF in WPF. Print PDF in WPF. PDF Create. Create PDF from Word. Create PDF from Excel. Create PDF from PowerPoint. Create PDF from Tiff. Create PDF from
www.rasteredge.com
Library control component:VB.NET PDF- HTML5 PDF Viewer for VB.NET Project
PDF in WPF. Annotate PDF in WPF. Export PDF in WPF. Print PDF in WPF. PDF Create. Create PDF from Word. Create PDF from Excel. Create PDF from PowerPoint. Create
www.rasteredge.com
Storage System Best Practices 
46
EMC CLARiiON Best Practices for Performance and Availability: Release 30.0 Firmware Update Applied Best Practices  
To ensure high performance and availability, we recommend that you only use UltraPoint DAEs and hard 
drives rated with 4 Gb/s interfaces on CLARiiON CX4 series storage systems. 
Using either 2 Gb/s drives or 2 Gb/s rated DAEs in a CLARiiON CX4 sets the connected CX4 bus (pair of 
loops, one to each SP) to a 2 Gb/s speed; all 4 Gb/s DAEs and their 4 Gb/s hard drives will run at the slower 
2 Gb/s bus speed.  Performance on the bus will be adversely affected, particularly in high bandwidth 
workloads.  After installing 2 Gb/s drives onto a 4 Gb/s bus use the Unisphere "Backend Bus Speed Reset 
Wizard" to complete the reconfiguration.  Both SPs must be rebooted at the same time to complete the 
reconfiguration. 
Note that CLARiiON CX, CX3, and CX4 Fibre Channel hard drives have been qualified for operation at 2 
Gb/s.  Contact your EMC representative for the part numbers of 2 Gb/s qualified hard drives.  Native 4 Gb/s 
DAEs may be operated at a lower 2 Gb/s back-end bus speed when 2 Gb/s drives are installed.  SATA hard 
drives can only operate installed in 4 Gb/s capable DAEs operating at 4 Gb/s. 
Best practices performance numbers for the CLARiiON CX4 are generated with 4 Gb/s back-end buses and 
4 Gb/s hard drives, except where noted.  It may not be possible to achieve published bandwidth if some or 
all of the back-end buses are running at 2 Gb/s.  
In addition to having increased bandwidth and hard drive hosting options, UltraPoint has increased 
availability over previous versions of DAEs.  UltraPoint DAEs can isolate a fault to a single hard drive.  
UltraPoint DAEs use a switch within the DAE to access the drives. The previous DAE technology used a 
Fibre Channel loop technology.   The current switch technology enables the CLARiiON to test hard drives 
individually before they are brought online or when an error is detected. 
The recommended approach for using non-UltraPoint DAEs or 2 Gb/s hard drives with CLARiiON CX4 
storage systems is:  
When a storage system is taken out of service, swap the DAE2s for UltraPoint DAEs, if possible. 
Separate all non-UltraPoint DAEs onto the same down-rated 2 Gb/s CX4 back-end bus(es). 
If possible, do not use 2 Gb/s DAEs on bus 0 of the CX4-960. This limits the amount of write cache that 
can be allocated 
Separate all the 2 Gb/s interfaced hard drives to their own DAE(s) on down-rated 2 Gb/s back-end 
buses. 
Provision LUNs without mixing 2 Gb/s interfaced hard drives with 4 Gb/s interfaced hard drives. 
Assign LUNs using the 2 Gb/s drives and back-end loops to workloads without high bandwidth 
requirements. 
Plan ahead before adding DAEs to the storage system.  Changing the bus or enclosure number of a 
configured DAE is not easily done once a DAE is provisioned.  If a DAE has been configured as Bus X 
Enclosure Y, with RAID groups and LUNs created there, the bus and enclosure address cannot be changed 
because the storage system will no longer recognize the RAID groups and their LUNs.  A LUN migration 
would be needed to change the bus or enclosure address and preserve the LUN‘s data.
Hot sparing 
Hot spares are hard drives used to replace failed drives.  Proactive sparing is the automatic activation of a 
hot spare when a drive indicates its likely failure.  Proactive sparing on the CLARiiON automatically selects 
hot spares from a pool of designated global hot spares.  Careful provisioning ensures the efficient use of 
available capacity and best performance until a replacement drive is installed.  Otherwise, it is possible for a 
Storage System Best Practices 
Performance     
47
less appropriate hot spare to be used as a replacement.  For example, a SATA hard drive could be 
automatically selected 
as a spare for a Fibre Channel RAID group‘s failed hard drive, resulting in possible 
performance degradation.   
If there were no hot spares configured of appropriate type and size when a drive fails, no rebuild occurs.  
The RAID group with the failed drive remains in a degraded state until the drive is replaced; then the failed 
drive‘s RAID group rebuilds from parity or its mirror drive, depending on the RAID level. 
The hot spare selection process uses the following criteria in order: 
1.  Failing drive in-use capacity - The replacement algorithm attempts to use the smallest capacity 
hot spare that can accommodate the capacity of the failed drive‘s LUNs.
2. Hot spare location - Hot spares on the same back-end bus as the failed drive are preferred over 
other like-size drives.  Ensure an appropriate (type, speed, and capacity) hot spare is located on 
the same bus of the hard drives it‘s replacing.  Standard racking of DAEs alternates the 
redundant back-end buses across adjacent DAEs, with the first DAE being bus 0, the next DAE 
bus 1, and so on.  Note that standard racking may not be in use, and the bus attachment should 
always be verified.  When provisioning hot spares, verify how many back-end buses the storage 
system has, and their connection to the storage system‘
s DAEs. 
3. Drive type - Any hard drive can act as a hot spare.  Flash drives are an exception.  Only a Flash 
drive can hot spare for another Flash drive.  In addition, proactive hot sparing does not support 
drives configured into a RAID 0 type group. 
When provisioning hot spares on storage systems having mixed types of drives (for example, both Fibre 
Channel and SATA), mixed drive speeds (for example, 10k rpm and 15k rpm), or mixed sizes (for example, 
300 GB and 1 TB), set up at least one hot spare for each type and speed of drive.  Hot spares must be of a 
type and speed such that they have enough capacity for the highest capacity drive they may be replacing. 
In-use capacity is the most important hot spare selection criteria.  It is a LUN-dependent criterion, not a 
drive capacity dependency.  The in-use LUN capacity of a failing drive is unpredictable.  This can lead to an 
unlikely hot spare selection.  For example, it is possible for a smaller hot spare on a different bus to be 
automatically selected over a hot spare drive identical to, and in the same DAE as the failing drive.  This 
occurs because the formatted capacity of the smaller, remote hot spare (the highest-order selection criteria) 
matches the in-
use capacity of the failing drive‘s LUNs more closely th
an the identical local hot spare.   
Finally, availability requires that there be a minimum of one hot spare for every in-use 30 drives (1:30).  On 
storage systems with mixed types, speeds, and capacities, a larger number of hot spares (resulting in a lower 
ratio) may be needed to ensure a match between the hot spare and the failed hard drive.  This will give the 
best performance until the failed hard drive is replaced. 
Hot sparing and FAST Cache 
Hot spares should be allocated for the Flash drive-based FAST Cache feature.  Hot sparing for FAST Cache 
works in a similar fashion to hot sparing for FLARE LUNs made up of Flash drives.  However, the FAST 
Cache feature‘s RAID 1 provisioning affects the result.
If a RAID-provisioned FAST Cache Flash drive fails, the normal FLARE RAID recovery described above 
attempts to initiate a repair with an available hot spare and a RAID group rebuild. If a hot spare is not 
Storage System Best Practices 
48
EMC CLARiiON Best Practices for Performance and Availability: Release 30.0 Firmware Update Applied Best Practices  
available, then FAST Cache remains in degraded mode.  In degraded mode, the cache page cleaning 
algorithm increases the rate of cleaning.   
A double drive failure within the FAST Cache may cause data loss.  This can occur if there are any dirty 
cache pages in the cache at the moment both drives fail.  It is possible that the Flash drives‘ data can be 
recovered through a service diagnosis procedure.  However, generally, a dual drive failure has the same 
outcome as with a single parity drive or mirrored protected RAID group. 
Hot sparing best practices 
The following summarizes the hot spare best practices: 
Have at least one hot spare of every speed, maximum needed capacity and type hard drive on the storage 
system. 
Position hot spares on the same buses containing the drives they may be required to replace. 
Maintain a minimum 1:30 ratio (round to one per two DAEs) of hot spares to data hard drives. 
Flash drive storage devices can only be hot spares for, and be hot spared by, other Flash drive devices. 
An in-depth discussion of hot spares can be found in the EMC CLARiiON Global Hot Spares and Proactive 
Hot Sparing white paper available on Powerlink. 
Hot sparing example 
The following is an availability example of hot sparing.  A customer owns a CX4-240 (two redundant back-
end buses). The storage system has four DAEs (0 thru 3).  The storage system is to be provisioned with the 
following hard drives: 
14x 7.2k rpm, 1 TB SATA hard drives configured in a single, 14 hard drive RAID 6 group (12+2) 
40x 15k rpm, 300 GB Fibre Channel hard drives configured in eight, 5 hard drive RAID 5 groups (4+1) 
How many hot spares should be used to complete the provisioning for this storage system?  Where should 
they be positioned? The answers to these questions are found next.  
Configuring the storage system for hot spares 
The following table summarizes the hot spare provisioning of the storage system for availability. 
Table 13 Hot spare provisioning example 
DAE 
Back-end 
bus 
Vault drives 
Data drives 
Hot spares 
Total DAE 
drives 
DAE0  0 
5x FC 
10x FC 
15 
DAE1  1 
14x SATA 
1x SATA 
15 
DAE2  0 
15x FC 
15 
DAE3  0 
10x FC 
1x FC 
11 
Total FC data drives 
49 
Total FC hot spares 
Total SATA drives 
14 
Total SATA hot spares 
Total all drives 
65 
Storage System Best Practices 
Performance     
49
Fifteen 300 GB 15k rpm Fibre Channel hard drives are configured on DAE0. Five of these hard drives are 
used by the vault.  Note that hot spares are not provisioned in the vault.  (This gives a total of 15 hard drives 
in DAE0 on Bus 0.) 
Configure DAE1 to be on bus 1.  Provision it with 10x 7.2k rpm 1 TB SATA hard drives.  In addition, 
provision it with a single 7.2k rpm 1 TB SATA hot spare.  Note a SATA hot spare identical in type, speed, 
and capacity to the data drives is provisioned on the SATA data drive‘s bus.  (This gives a total of 11 hard 
drives in DAE1 on Bus 1.) 
Configure DAE2 to be on bus 0.  Provision it with 15 Fibre Channel hard drives.  (This gives a total of 15 
hard drives in DAE2.) 
Configure DAE3 to be on Bus 0.  Note this is non-standard racking.  Provision it with 10 Fibre Channel 
hard drives.  In addition, provision it with a single 15k rpm 300 GB Fibre Channel hot spare (a total of 11 
hard drives in DAE3 on bus 0).  The Fibre Channel hot spare that is identical in type, speed, and capacity to 
the Fibre Channel data drives is provisioned on bus 0 ―spares‖ for the 15 drives in each of DAE0 and 
DAE2, and the 10 drives in DAE3.  Note that the ratio of Fibre Channel drives to hot spares is higher than 
30:1.  However, taking into account the SATA hot spare in DAE1, the overall ratio of hot spares to data 
drives is lower than 30:1. 
RAID groups 
Each RAID level has its own resource utilization, performance, and data protection characteristics.  For 
certain workloads, a particular RAID level can offer clear performance advantages over others. 
Note the number of configurable RAID groups is dependent on the maximum number of drives that can be 
hosted on the CX4 storage system model. 
CLARiiON storage systems support RAID levels 0, 1, 3, 5, 6, and 1/0.  Refer to the EMC CLARiiON Fibre 
Channel Storage Fundamentals white paper to learn how each RAID level delivers performance and 
availability.   
RAID groups and I/O block size 
Try to align the stripe size of the RAID group with the I/O block size for best performance.  This is 
particularly true for RAID groups used for large-block random workloads or uncached (cache disabled for 
the 
LUN) operation.  The ―evenness‖ of the stripe size has little or no effect on small block random or 
sequential access. Alignment matches the I/O block size to the stripe size or a multiple of the stripe size.  
Note this alignment is most effective when the I/O size is known and the I/O size is not too varied.   
In general this results in RAID groups with stripe sizes that are a power of two.  RAID 5 examples are 
(2+1), (4+1), and (8+1).  An odd-sized stripe with a large I/O block size results in the I/O wrapping to the 
next stripe on a single drive.  This delays the I/O.  For example, on a RAID 1/0 group of six drives (3+3) the 
stripe is 192 KB (3 * 64 KB).  If the I/O block size is 256 KB, it results in wrapping to the next stripe by one 
drive.  This is less optimal for high bandwidth, large-block random I/O. 
RAID capacity utilization characteristics 
The different RAID levels have different levels of capacity utilization.  To decide the type of RAID group 
and the number of drives to use in the RAID group you must consider the required capacity, availability, 
performance during operational and degraded states, and the available number of drives. 
Storage System Best Practices 
50
EMC CLARiiON Best Practices for Performance and Availability: Release 30.0 Firmware Update Applied Best Practices  
With parity RAID groups, the data-to-parity ratio in a RAID group is different depending on the RAID level 
chosen.  This ratio describes the number of drives capacity-wise within the group dedicated to parity and not 
used for data storage.  The data-to-parity ratio depends on the number of drives in the RAID group.  The 
maximum number of drives in a group is 16.  The minimum number is dependent on the RAID level.  Note 
a low ratio of data-to-parity limits the utility of parity RAID groups with the minimum number of drives.  
For example, a four-drive RAID 6 group (2+2) is not recommended. 
For parity RAID levels 3 and 5 the drive-
equivalent capacity of the RAID group‘s drives dedicated to parity 
is one; for parity RAID level 6 the equivalent capacity is two.  Note that in RAID 5 and RAID 6 groups, no 
single drive is dedicated to parity.  In these RAID levels, a portion of all drives is consumed by parity.  In 
RAID 3 there is a single dedicated parity drive. 
The relationship between parity RAID group type and RAID group size is important to understand when 
provisioning the storage system.  The percentage of drive capacity in a RAID group dedicated to parity 
decreases as the number of drives in the RAID group increases.  This is an efficient and economical use of 
the available drives. 
With mirrored RAID groups, the storage capacity of the RAID group is half the total capacity of the drives 
in the group. 
RAID 0 is a special case.  With RAID level 0, the storage capacity of the RAID group is the total capacity 
of the formatted drives in the group.  Note that RAID level 0 offers the highest capacity utilization, but 
provides no data protection. 
In summary, some percentage of available drive capacity is used to maintain availability.  Configuring the 
storage system‘s drives as parity
-type RAID groups results in a higher percentage of the installed drive 
capacity available for data storage than with mirror-type RAID groups.  The larger the parity RAID group 
is, the smaller the parity storage percentage penalty becomes.  However, performance and availability, in 
addition to storage capacity, need to be considered when provisioning RAID types. 
RAID performance characteristics 
The different RAID levels have different performance and availability depending on the type of RAID and 
the number of drives in the RAID group.  Certain RAID types and RAID group sizes are more suitable to 
particular workloads than others. 
When to use RAID 0 
We do not recommend using RAID 0 for data with any business value.   
RAID 0 groups can be used for non-critical data needing high speed (particularly write speed) and low cost 
capacity in situations where the time to rebuild will not affect business processes.  Information on RAID 0 
groups should be already backed up or replicated in protected storage.  RAID 0 offers no level of 
redundancy.  Proactive hot sparing is not enabled for RAID 0 groups.  A single drive failure in a RAID 0 
group will result in complete data loss of the group.  An unrecoverable media failure can result in a partial 
data loss.  A possible use of RAID 0 groups is scratch drives or temp storage. 
When to use RAID 1 
We do not recommend using RAID 1. RAID 1 groups are not expandable.  Use RAID 1/0 (1+1) groups as 
an alternative for single mirrored RAID groups. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested