Storage System Best Practices 
Performance     
71
The data placement options are: 
Lowest 
Highest 
Auto (Default) 
No Movement 
Lowest placement initially loads the LUN data in the lowest performance tier available.  Note that on 
occasion the highest-performance tier may be at capacity, and the next highest-performance tier will be 
used. Subsequent relocation is upward through the tiers.  That is, the most frequently accessed addresses are 
promoted into higher-performing storage devices.  
Highest placement initially loads the LUN data in the highest-performance tier.  Subsequent relocation is 
downwards through the tiers.  That is, more active data in lower tiers may move up to displace data  into 
lower-performing storage devices.  FAST attempts to maintain the data in the highest tier as long as the tier 
does not exceed the maximum used space unless the pool is already over its allocated maximum. 
Auto placement initially loads data by distributing it in an equal fashion across all available tiers.  Factors 
used to determine the distribution include number of tiers, tier capacity, tier type, storage system bus 
location, and storage processor ownership.   FAST balances capacity utilization across private resources in 
each tier, but it relocates data to higher-performing tiers as soon as possible, as long as less than maximum 
capacity in higher tiers is already in use.  Auto is the default placement type.  In pools where the Flash 
drives are installed and the Flash drives make up the smaller percentage of the pool‘s aggregate capacity, 
Auto  limits their initial use.  Auto shows a preference for available SATA or Fibre Channel drives. 
Subsequent I/O is used to quickly determine the data that should be promoted into the Flash tier.  
No Movement maintains the LUN‘s data in its current tier or tiers.  This disables FAST relocation.
The data placement option has a significant effect on the efficiency of the tiering process.  The 
recommended placement is Highest.  Highest results in the highest performance in the shortest amount of 
time; a bias will be shown for initially placing data in the highest-performing tiers over lower-performing 
tiers.   
FAST relocations 
FAST will monitor activity to all LUNs in each pool at a sub-LUN granularity equal to 1 GB. At an interval 
of every hour, a relative temperature is calculated across all 1 GB slices for each pool. This temperature 
uses an exponential moving average so historical access will have a lowering effect as that access profile 
ages over time. At each interval the pool properties display the number of slices that indicate hotter activity 
between tiers and as such, how much data is proposed to move up, and how much data that displaces 
downwards to lower tiers. Until the higher tiers reach their maximum utilization, you will always see data 
proposed to move up. When the higher tiers are heavily utilized, the remaining headroom is for new slices to 
be allocated for new data. If that occurs, on the next relocation schedule, slices will be moved down from 
the higher tiers to maintain a small margin of capacity within the tier in preparation for new slice allocation. 
If the aggregate of allocated capacity of LUNs with their allocation policy set to Highest Tier exceeds the 
available space in the highest tier, some slices must be allocated from the next available tier. During FAST 
calculations and relocations, these slices propose and move between the tiers they occupy based on their 
relative temperature due to activity levels. 
Conversion of pdf into ppt - Library SDK component:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Conversion of pdf into ppt - Library SDK component:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Storage System Best Practices 
72
EMC CLARiiON Best Practices for Performance and Availability: Release 30.0 Firmware Update Applied Best Practices  
If you require LUNs using the Auto-Tier method to place active data on the highest tier during relocation, 
you must ensure any highest tier only LUNs do not consume all of the 90 percent of that highest tier for that 
pool, otherwise the only time an auto-tier LUN may get a slice from that highest tier is when it is first 
allocated and used, but it will be pushed down on the next relocation.  
FAST will attempt to maintain each tier with a maximum of 90 percent allocation unless the pool capacity is 
already over 90 percent in use.  If the pool‘s capacity is running at 95 percent in use, FAST tries to maintain 
the same level of capacity usage on the highest tier (for example, 95 percent). 
Evaluation of candidate data for relocation is performed hourly.  Actual relocation of data is performed  at 
intervals that are either set manually or via the scheduler (where you set a start time and duration to perform 
slice relocation in hours and minutes). The scheduler invokes relocations on all pools that have FAST 
enabled, whereas manual relocation is invoked on a per-pool basis.     
FAST warm-up 
Warm-up is the filling of the highest-
level FAST tiers with the workload‘s worki
ng set.  The highest-level 
FAST tiers need to be completely warmed up for optimal FAST performance.  The efficient operation of the 
FAST depends on locality; the higher the locality of the working set, the higher the efficiency of the tiering 
process. Likewise, the time it takes for the highest-level tiers to warm up depends on locality in the 
workload.   
Additional FAST information 
Additional information on FAST can be found in the EMC FAST for CLARiiON white paper available on 
Powerlink. 
LUN compression 
LUN compression is a separately licensable feature available with FLARE 30.0 and later. 
Compression performs an algorithmic data compression of pool-based LUNs. All compressed LUNs are 
thin LUNs. Compressed LUNs can be in one or more pools.  FLARE LUNs can also be compressed.  If a 
FLARE LUN is provisioned for compression, it will be converted into a designated pool-based thin LUN. 
Note that a Virtual Provisioning pool with available capacity is required before a FLARE LUN can be 
converted to a compressed LUN.   The conversion of a FLARE LUN to a compressed thin LUN is 
considered a LUN migration.  
Compression candidate LUNs 
Not all LUNs are ideal candidates for compression.  In general, the data contents of a LUN need to be 
known to determine if the LUN is a suitable candidate for compression. This is because some CLARiiON 
LUN types and types of stored data do not benefit from data compression.  Reserved LUNs cannot be 
compressed.  Examples of reserved LUNs include metaLUN components, snapshot LUNs, or any LUN in 
the reserved LUN pool.  Stored data varies widely in how much it can be compressed.  Certain types of user 
LUNs can have their capacity usage substantially reduced because their data can be easily compressed.  For 
example, text files are highly compressible.  Data that is already compressed, or that is very random, will 
not reduce or significantly reduce its capacity through compression.  For example, already compressed data 
is codec compressed image, audio, and mixed media files.  They cannot be compressed further to decrease 
their capacity usage.   
In addition, the host I/O response time is affected by the degree of compression.  Uncompressible or host-
compressed stored data that does not need to be decompressed by the storage system will have a short I/O 
Library SDK component:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
clicking on the blue button or drag-and-drop your pptx or ppt file into the drop area. Then just wait until the conversion from Powerpoint to PDF is complete
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK component:VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
use for fast PPT (.pptx) to PDF conversion in .NET to render selected PowerPoint slide(s) into image source create a featured PPTX to PDF converting application
www.rasteredge.com
Storage System Best Practices 
Performance     
73
response time.  Highly compressible data stored on a compressed LUN will have a longer response time, as 
it must be decompressed.   
Settings and configurations  
Compression can be turned ON or OFF for a LUN.  Turning it ON causes the entire LUN to be compressed 
and subsequent I/O to be compressed for writes and decompressed for reads.  Compression is a background 
process, although read I/Os will decompress a portion of a source LUN immediately.  Writes to a 
compressed LUN  cause that area to be decompressed and written as usual, then it is recompressed as a 
background process.  The background process may be prioritized to avoid an adverse effect on overall 
storage system performance.  The priorities are: High, Medium, and Low, where High is the default. 
Compression can be turned OFF for a LUN.  This will cause the LUN to ―decompress.‖ Decompressing a 
LUN can take 60 minutes or longer depending on the size of the LUN.  We recommend that you enable the 
Write Caching at the pool level for a decompressing LUN.  
The number of compressed LUNs, the number of simultaneous compressions, and the number of migrations 
is model-dependent.  Table 20  shows the compression model dependencies.  Note these are entire LUNs. 
Table 20 Compression operations by CLARiiON model 
Maximum 
Compressed LUNs 
Maximum LUN 
Compressions Per 
Storage Processor 
Maximum LUN 
Migrations per 
Storage System 
CX4-120 
512 
CX4-240 
1024 
CX4-480 
2048 
12 
CX4-960 
2048 
10 
12 
Compressed LUN performance characteristics 
Compression should only be used for archival data that is infrequently accessed.  Accesses to a compressed 
LUN may have significantly higher response time accesses to a Virtual Provisioning pool-based LUN.  The 
duration of this response time is dependent on the size and type of the I/O, and the degree of compression.  
Note that at the host level, with a fully operational write cache, delays for writes to compressed LUNs are 
mitigated.  
Small-block random reads have the shortest response time; they are very similar to those of a typical pool-
based LUN. Large-block random reads are somewhat longer in duration.  Sequential reads have a longer 
response time than random reads.  Uncached-write I/O generally has a longer response than read I/O.  
Small-block random write operations have the longest response time.   
Library SDK component:How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF
PPT to PDF. Online C# Tutorial for Converting MS Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint to PDF. MS Office to PDF Conversion Overview. By integrating XDoc.PDF SDK into
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK component:How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word
XDoc.Word SDK into your C#.NET project, PDF, MS-Excel and MS-PPT can be converted to Word document. Generally speaking, following conversion types are supported
www.rasteredge.com
Storage System Best Practices 
74
EMC CLARiiON Best Practices for Performance and Availability: Release 30.0 Firmware Update Applied Best Practices  
Note that the degree to which the data has been compressed, or is compressible, also affects the response 
time.  Data that is minimally or not compressible has a short response time.  Highly compressed data has a 
longer response time. 
In addition, the effects of I/O type and compressibility are cumulative; small-block random writes of highly 
compressible data have the highest response time, while small-block random reads of data that is not 
compressible have the lowest response time.     
Storage administrators should take into account the longer response times of compressed LUNs when 
setting timeout thresholds.   
In addition, there is an overall storage system performance penalty for decompressions.  Large numbers of 
read I/Os to compressed LUNs, in addition to having a lower response time, have a small effect on storage 
processor performance.  Write I/Os have a higher response time, and may have a larger adverse effect on 
storage system performance.  If a significant amount of I/O is anticipated with an already compressed LUN, 
you should perform a LUN migration ahead of the I/O to quickly decompress the LUN to service the I/O.  
This assumes available capacity for the compressed LUN‘
s decompressed capacity.  
Storage devices 
The CLARiiON CX4 series supports the following types of storage devices: 
Fibre Channel 15k rpm and 10k rpm hard drives 
SATA 7.2k rpm and 5.4k rpm hard drives 
Flash drives (SSDs) 
These storage devices have different performance and availability characteristics that make them more or 
less appropriate to different workloads.  Note that all storage devices are not supported on all models of 
CX4 and AX4. 
Drive type hosting restrictions 
There are restrictions on which types of storage devices can be installed together within a CX4 or AX4 
DAE.   
Library SDK component:C# TIFF: Learn to Convert MS Word, Excel, and PPT to TIFF Image
C# TIFF - Conversion from Word, Excel, PPT to TIFF. is quiet easy to integrate this SDK into your C# directly use them in your project for fast file conversion.
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK component:C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe Provide Free Demo Code for PDF Conversion from Microsoft
www.rasteredge.com
Storage System Best Practices 
Performance     
75
The following table 
shows the restrictions.  A ―check‖ 
in the box indicates hosting within the same DAE is 
permitted, otherwise it is prohibited.  For example from the table, hosting Fibre Channel and SATA drives 
within the same DAE is prohibited. 
Table 21 Drive type DAE hosting restrictions 
Drive Type DAE Hosting Restrictions 
Drive Types  
Fibre  
Channel 
SAS 
SATA 
Flash  
Fibre Channel 
SAS 
SATA 
Flash  
Fibre Channel and SAS drive storage 
The Fibre Channel and SAS hard drives with 15k rpm rotational speed reduce the service times of random 
read and write requests and increase the sequential read write bandwidth.  Use these types of drives when 
request times need to be maintained in workloads with strict response time requirements. 
SATA drive storage 
Knowledge of the workload‘s access type is needed to determine how suitable 7.2k rpm SATA drives are 
for the workload.  SATA drives are economical in their large capacity; however they do not have the high 
performance or availability characteristics of Fibre Channel or SAS hard drives.  The following 
recommendations need be considered in using SATA drives: 
For sequential reads: SATA drive performance approximates Fibre Channel hard drive performance.  
For random reads: SATA drive performance decreases with increasing queue depth in comparison with 
Fibre Channel drives.  
For sequential writes: SATA drive performance is comparable with Fibre Channel performance. 
For random writes: SATA drive performance decreases in comparison to Fibre Channel performance 
with increasing queue depth. 
In addition to the 7.2k rpm SATA drives, there are the 5.4k rpm 1 TB SATA drives.  These hard drives 
provide high-capacity, low-power consumption, bulk storage.  Only full DAEs (15 hard drives) of these 
drives can be provisioned.   
In summary, we do not recommend SATA drives for sustained random workloads at high rates, due to their 
duty cycle limitations.  However, SATA drives provide a viable option for sequential workloads. 
Enterprise Flash Drive (Flash drive) storage 
Flash drives are a semiconductor-based storage device.  They offer a very low response time and high 
throughput in comparison to traditional mechanical hard disks and under the proper circumstances can 
provide very high throughput.  To fully leverage the advantages of Flash drives, their special properties 
must be taken into consideration in matching them to the workload that best demonstrates them. 
Library SDK component:VB.NET PowerPoint: PPTX to SVG Conversion; Render PPT to Vector
high-quality PPT (.pptx) to svg conversion in both be easily converted and rendered into svg image powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK component:VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert PowerPoint to BMP Image with VB PPT
converters, such as VB.NET PDF Converter, Excel VB.NET PPT converting library: As batch conversion is also to render PPT document page into RasterEdge-defined
www.rasteredge.com
Storage System Best Practices 
76
EMC CLARiiON Best Practices for Performance and Availability: Release 30.0 Firmware Update Applied Best Practices  
Flash drives are a FLARE revision-dependent feature.  Flash drive support requires FLARE revision 28.0 or 
later. 
Flash drives offer the best performance with highly concurrent, small-block, read-intensive, random I/O 
workloads.  Their capacity and provisioning restrictions of the Flash drives in comparison to conventional 
hard disks may restrict their usage to modest-capacity LUNs.  Generally, Flash drives provide their greatest 
performance advantages compared to mechanical hard drives when LUNs have: 
A drive utilization greater than 70 percent 
A queue length (ABQL) greater than 12 
Average response times greater than 10 ms 
An I/O read-to-write ratio of 60 percent or greater 
An I/O block-size of 16 KB or less 
An in-depth discussion of Flash drives can be found in the An Introduction to EMC CLARiiON and Celerra 
Unified Storage Platform Storage Device Technology white paper available on Powerlink. 
Configuration requirements 
There are some differences in Flash drive configuration requirements over hard disks.  Their usage requires 
the following provisioning restrictions: 
Flash drives cannot be installed in a DAE with SATA hard drives.  They may share a DAE with Fibre 
Channel hard drives. 
Flash drives require their own hot spares.  Other drive types cannot be used as hot spares for Flash 
drives.  In addition, Flash drives cannot hot spare for hard drives.  It is important that at least one Flash 
drive hot spare be available while maintaining a minimum ratio of 1:30 hot spares to all hard drive types 
for optimum availability. 
Flash drives can only be included in metaLUNs composed of LUNs with Flash drive-based RAID 
groups. 
Currently, Flash drives are available from EMC on CLARiiON storage systems in the following unit count 
ordering limitations.  Larger numbers are supported.  Consult with an EMC Performance Professional on the 
resource utilization requirements of larger Flash drive installations. 
Table 22 CLARiiON Flash drive configurations 
CLARiiON  
model 
Minimum  
Flash drives 
Maximum  
Flash drives 
CX4-120 and CX4-240 
60 
CX4-480 and CX4-960 
(all configurations) 
120 
Capacity considerations 
The following table lists the Flash drive per device capacities.  Note that bound capacity is slightly less than 
the formatted capacity due to storage system metadata. 
Library SDK component:.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Convert. Convert Word/Excel/PPT to PDF. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). PDF Write. Insert text, text box into PDF. Edit, delete text from PDF. Insert images into PDF
www.rasteredge.com
Storage System Best Practices 
Performance     
77
Table 23 Flash drive capacity 
Nominal 
Capacity (GB) 
Bound 
Capacity (GB) 
73 
66.60 
100 
91.69 
200 
183.41 
400 
366.76 
All available CLARiiON RAID levels are supported by hard drives are available with Flash drives.  Each 
RAID level and RAID group size have a different amount of user data capacity.   However, RAID 5 groups 
offer the highest ratio of user data capacity with data protection to Flash drives.   
The capacity of any Flash drive-based LUN can be extended through the use of extended RAID groups 
sometimes called wide RAID groups or metaLUNs to the maximum number of Flash drives permitted on 
the CLARiiON model.  Note the maximum number of either Flash drives or hard disks in any CLARiiON 
RAID group is 16. 
I/O considerations 
Knowledge of the required capacity, I/O type, block size, and access type is needed to determine how 
suitable Flash drives are for the workload.  In addition, the application threading model needs to be 
thoroughly understood to better take advantage of the Flash drive storage devices unique capabilities. 
Flash drives can provide very high IOPS and low response time.  In particular, they have exceptional small-
block, random read performance and are particularly suited to highly concurrent workloads.  Small-block is 
4 KB or small multiples of 4 KB.  ―Highly concurrent‖ means 32 or more threads per Flash drive
-based 
RAID group. 
Be aware, that as with many semiconductor-based storage devices,  that Flash drive uncached write 
performance is slower than their read performance.  To most fully leverage Flash drive performance, they 
are recommended  for use with workloads having a large majority of read I/Os to writes. 
The following I/O type recommendations should be considered in using Flash drives with parity RAID 5 
groups using the default settings: 
For sequential reads:  When four or greater threads can be guaranteed, Flash drives have up to twice the 
bandwidth of Fibre Channel hard drives with large-block, sequential reads.  This is because the Flash 
dr
ive does not have a mechanical drive‘s seek time.
For random reads:  Flash drives have the best random read performance of any CLARiiON storage 
device.  Throughput is particularly high with the ideal block size of 4 KB or less.  Throughput decreases 
as the block size increases from the maximum.   
For sequential writes:  Flash drives are somewhat slower than Fibre Channel hard drives with single 
threaded write bandwidth.  They are somewhat higher in bandwidth to Fibre Channel when high 
concurrency is guaranteed. 
For random writes:  Flash drives have superior random write performance over Fibre Channel hard 
drives.   Throughput is particularly high with highly concurrent access using a 4 KB block size.  
Throughput decreases with increasing block size.  
Storage System Best Practices 
78
EMC CLARiiON Best Practices for Performance and Availability: Release 30.0 Firmware Update Applied Best Practices  
To achieve the highest throughput, a highly concurrent workload is required.  Note, this may require 
partitioning Flash drive RAID groups into two or more LUNs, or sharing RAID groups between SPs.  Note 
that sharing RAID groups between SPs is contrary to hard disk-based best practices.  Its use requires an in-
depth understanding of the I/O. 
Cache considerations 
By default, Flash drive-based LUNs have both their read and write cache set to off.  Note the performance 
described in the previous sections applies to the default cache-off configuration for Flash drive-based LUNs.  
However, certain well-behaved workloads may benefit from cache-on operation.  Well-behaved workloads 
do not risk saturating the cache. 
In particular, small-block sequential I/O-based workloads can benefit from cache-on operation.  For 
example, sequential write performance can be improved by write-cache coalescing to achieve full-stripe 
writes. 
Some applications performing random writes may be affected by the cached versus uncached performance 
of Flash drives.  With write-cache on, Flash drive write performance as seen by the host will be identical to 
hard drive-based write performance.  However, back-end throughput, if properly provisioned for, will be 
higher than available with hard drives.  A likely candidate for cached-operation is small-block, sequential 
database log writes. 
RAID group considerations 
The performance and storage system resource utilization profile of Flash drives differs from the traditional 
rules for RAID group provisioning. 
There is a model-dependent maximum number of allowed Flash drive per storage system.  This is a total 
Flash drive limit.  It includes drives used as either FAST Cache or for storage.  The following table shows 
the limits: 
Table 24 Maximum Flash drives per CLARiiON model, FLARE Rev. 30 
CX4-120 
CX4-240 
CX4-480 
CX4-960 
Maximum Flash drives  
60 
60 
120 
120 
Due to their high performance and high availability, RAID 5 is the optimal RAID level for Flash drives.  It 
is also the most economical in its ratio of available user data capacity to nominal capacity. 
There is no limitation on the RAID group size for groups with Flash drives, other than a maximum of 16 per 
RAID group.  Other factors, such as front-end port, SP CPU, and back-end bus utilization particular to the 
individual workload‘s I/O, are the important considerations when configuring Flash drives for the 
CLARiiON. 
Generally, for small-block, random I/O workloads, add Flash drives to the RAID group until the needed 
number of IOPS or the required capacity is reached.  For large-block random and sequential I/O there is a 
small operational preference for (4+1) and (8+1), since the stripe size is even and un-cached I/O may 
leverage full stripe writes. 
Balancing of the back-end bus resource utilization becomes important with the high bandwidth of Flash  
drives.  Bus bandwidth utilization will affect all storage devices on the same storage system back-end bus. 
Storage System Best Practices 
Performance     
79
As bus utilization climbs due to heavily utilized Flash drives, there is less bandwidth available for the I/O 
requests of other storage devices.  
The best practices for RAID group-bus balancing with conventional hard drives also apply to Flash drives. 
(See the ―RAID group bus balancing‖ section.) The maximum number of Flash drives per b
ack-end bus is 
dependent on how the Flash-drive-based RAID group's LUNs are configured, and on the application's 
requirement for bandwidth or IOPS.   
If aFlash-drive-based RAID group's LUN(s) are accessed by a single SP, available bandwidth is about 360 
MB/s. Otherwise, if a partitioned RAID group's LUNs are owned by both SPs, available bandwidth is 720 
MB/s. (This bandwidth distribution is the same as with Fibre Channel drives.)  
When provisioning Flash drive RAID groups with more than four drives and high bandwidth (> 300 MB/s) 
workloads, distribute the drives across two or more storage system buses.  For example, with a five-drive 
(4+1) Flash RAID 5 group,   and assuming standard racking (DAEs are installed on alternating buses), 
position two drives in one DAE, and three drives in an adjacent DAE.  
When 16 or more Flash drives are installed on a storage system servicing a high IOPS workload, further 
precautions are required. High IOPS is > 50K back-end IOPS.  Evenly distribute the RAID group's LUNs 
across the storage processors to further distribute the back-end I/O.  With high IOPS, do not provision more 
than eight Flash drives per storage processor per bus (a bus loop). That is a 15 Flash drive maximum per 
bus.  In some cases with many Flash drives provisioned on multiple-bus CLARiiONs, dedicating a bus 
exclusively to Flash drives should be considered. 
Flash drive rebuilds 
Flash drive RAID group rebuilds are primarily affected by available back-end bus bandwidth.   
When all of the RAID group‘s Flash drives
are on the same back-end bus, the rebuild rate is the same as 
Fibre Channel rates. (See the ―
Rebuilds
‖ section.)  When a parity RAID group‘s Flash drives are distributed 
across the available back-end buses as evenly as possible, the Rebuild rate is as shown in Table 25. 
Table 25 Flash drive rebuild rates for RAID 5 
Priority 
Parity RAID 
rate (MB/s) 
Low 
Medium  6 
High 
13 
ASAP 
250 
Please note that a large percentage of the available bus bandwidth may be consumed by a Flash drive ASAP 
rebuild.  If bandwidth-sensitive applications are executing elsewhere on the storage system, the economical 
High (the default), Medium, or Low priorities should be chosen for rebuilds.  
Flash drive performance over time 
Flash drives do not maintain the same performance over the life of the drive.  The IOPS rates of a Flash 
drive are better when the drive is new than when it has been in service for a period of time.  The reduction in 
Flash drive performance over time is a side effect of the way they reuse capacity released by file system 
deletes.  It is due to the effect of fragmentation of the drive‘s mass storage, 
not individual locations 
Storage System Best Practices 
80
EMC CLARiiON Best Practices for Performance and Availability: Release 30.0 Firmware Update Applied Best Practices  
―wearing out.‖  Drives can be re
-initialized to restore their original performance.  However, re-initialization 
is destructive to stored data.  The performance metrics used as a rule-of-thumb in this document are a 
conservative per-drive IOPS number that is achievable in the long run, with a broad range of I/O profiles for 
Flash drives that have been in service over a long period. 
Additional information 
Further general information on Flash drives can be found in the Unified Flash Drive Technology Technical 
Notes available on Powerlink. 
FAST Cache 
Storage systems with FLARE revision 30 or later support an optional performance-enhancing FAST Cache.  
The FAST Cache is a storage pool of Flash drives configured to function as a secondary I/O cache.  
Frequently accessed data is copied to the FAST Cache Flash drives; subsequent accesses to this data 
experience Flash drive response times.   This cache automatically provides low-latency and high-I/O 
performance for the most-used data, without requiring the larger number of Flash drives to provision an 
entire LUN.  The increase in performance provided by the FAST Cache varies with the workload and the 
configured cache capacity.  Workloads with high locality, small block size, and random I/O benefit the 
most.  Workloads made up of sequential I/Os benefit the least.  In addition, the larger the FAST Cache 
capacity, the higher the performance is. FAST Cache supports both pool-based and FLARE LUNs.  Finally, 
FAST Cache should not be used on systems that have very high storage processor utilization (> 90%). 
Factors affecting FAST Cache performance 
Locality is based on the data set requested locality of reference.   Locality of reference means storage 
locations being frequently accessed. There are two types of locality, ―when written‖ and ―where written.‖  
In the real world an applicati
on is more likely to access today‘s data than access data created three years 
ago.  When data is written, temporal locality refers to the reuse of storage locations within a short period of 
time. A short duration is considered to be within a couple of seconds to within several hours. This is locality 
based on when data is being used.   
Today‘s data is likely residing on mechanical hard drive LBAs that are near each other, because they hold 
new data that has only recently been written.  This is locality based on where data is located on its host 
storage device.  ―Where written‖ refers to the use of data stored physically relatively closely on the storage 
system's mass storage. Physical closeness means being stored in nearby sectors or sectors on nearby tracks 
of a mechanical hard drive.   
Note that physical closeness of data is not a factor when data is stored on FLARE LUNs implemented from 
Flash drives.  
A data set with high locality of reference gets the best FAST Cache performance. 
The extent of the data set is also important to understand.  The extent of the working data set varies from 
application to application.  A 3 to 5 percent extent is common, but a 20 percent extent is easily possible.  For 
example, a 1.2 TB database with a 20 percent working data set has about 250 GB of frequently accessed 
capacity.  Storage architects and administrators should confer with their application‘s architects and analysts 
to determine ahead of time the size of the working data set. 
The size of the I/O can affect performance.  FAST Cache performs best with small and medium-sized I/O.  
Medium block size is from 8 KB to 32 KB in capacity.  Ideally the size of the I/O would equal the page size 
of the Flash drive for the best performance.  The typical Flash drive page size is 4 KB.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested