recommended: left justified, ragged right 
Justified text was the style for many years—we grew up on it. 
But there has been a great deal of research on readability (how easy 
something is to read) and it shows that those disruptive, inconsis­
tent gaps between the words inhibit the flow of reading. Besides, 
they look dumb. Keep your eyes open as you look at professionally-
printed work...and you’ll find there’s a very strong trend now to 
align type on the left and leave the right ragged. 
not recommended: fully justified text 
Justified text was the style for many years—we grew up on it. But 
there has been a great deal of research on readability (how easy some­
thing is to read) and it shows that those disruptive, inconsistent gaps 
between  the words inhibit  the flow of  reading.  Besides,  they look 
dumb.  Keep  your eyes open  as you look at  professionally-printed 
work...and you’ll find there’s a very strong trend now to align type on 
the 
left 
and 
leave 
the 
right 
ragged. 
not recommended: centered text 
Justified text was the style for many years—we grew up on it.  
But there has been a great deal of research on readability 
(how easy something is to read) and it shows that those  
disruptive, inconsistent gaps between the words 
inhibit the flow of reading. Besides, they look dumb. 
Keep your eyes open as you look at professionally-printed 
work...and you’ll find there’s a very strong trend now to align type  
on the left  and  leave  the  right  ragged.  
a plain english handbook 
45 
Change pdf to ppt - application Library cloud:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Change pdf to ppt - application Library cloud:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Use linespacing to lighten the page 
Linespacing, or “leading” (rhymes with sledding), refers to the amount 
of space between lines of text. Leading controls the density and read­
ability of the text. Just as type is measured in points, so is leading. 
A type description of 12/16 means that 12pt type has been set with 4pts 
of additional leading between the lines. Generous leading can give 
a long paragraph a lighter, “airier” feeling and make it easier to read. 
Avoid setting type without any additional leading (such as 10/10 or 
12/12), sometimes referred to as being “set solid.” Typically, you should 
allow at least 2pts of leading between lines of type. You may want to 
add more leading, depending on the “airiness” you would like the 
document to have. In this document, for ease of reading, the general 
text has been set at 11/16, and most examples have been set at 10/12. 
Review the following examples to see how leading affects readability. 
11/11 
Justified text was the style for many years—we grew up on it. 
But there has been a great deal of research on readability (how easy 
something is to read) and it shows that those disruptive, inconsis­
tent gaps between the words inhibit the flow of reading. Besides, 
they look dumb. Keep your eyes open as you look at professionally-
printed work...and you’ll find there’s a very strong trend now to 
align type on the left and leave the right ragged. 
11/13 
Justified text was the style for many years—we grew up on it. 
But there has been a great deal of research on readability (how easy 
something is to read) and it shows that those disruptive, inconsis­
tent gaps between the words inhibit the flow of reading. Besides, 
they look dumb. Keep your eyes open as you look at professionally-
printed work...and you’ll find there’s a very strong trend now to 
align type on the left and leave the right ragged. 
11/15 
Justified text was the style for many years—we grew up on it. 
But there has been a great deal of research on readability (how easy 
something is to read) and it shows that those disruptive, inconsis­
tent gaps between the words inhibit the flow of reading. Besides, 
they look dumb. Keep your eyes open as you look at professionally-
printed work...and you’ll find there’s a very strong trend now to 
align type on the left and leave the right ragged. 
46 a plain english handbook 
application Library cloud:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Creating a PDF from PPTX/PPT has never been so easy! Web Security. Your PDF and PPTX/PPT files will be deleted from our servers an hour after the conversion.
www.rasteredge.com
application Library cloud:How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word
Convert Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word.
www.rasteredge.com
Keep lines to a reasonable length 
A comfortable line length for most readers is 32 to 64 characters. Any  
longer than that, and your readers will lose their place when they read  
from line to line. A safe rule to follow is: the smaller the type size, the  
shorter the line length. This is why when you pick up any newspaper,  
magazine, or large book, you’ll rarely see text that goes from one side of  
the page clear to the other, as you do in disclosure documents.  
Columns also help your readers to move quickly and easily through  
large amounts of text. An average column width can vary from 25–40  
characters. Remember to use ample white space between columns, too.  
don’t 
Justified text was the style for many years—we grew up on it. But there has been a great deal of research 
on readability (how easy something is to read) and it shows that those disruptive, inconsistent gaps between 
the words inhibit the flow of reading. Besides, they look dumb. Keep your eyes open as you look at profes­
sionally-printed work...and you’ll find there’s a very strong trend now to align type on the left and leave the 
right ragged. 
do 
Justified text was the style for many years—we grew up on it. 
But there has been a great deal of research on readability (how easy  
something is to read) and it shows that those disruptive, inconsis­
tent gaps between the words inhibit the flow of reading. Besides,  
they look dumb. Keep your eyes open as you look at professionally-
printed work...and you’ll find there’s a very strong trend now to  
align type on the left and leave the right ragged. 
do 
Justified text was the style for many 
Besides, they look dumb. Keep your 
years—we grew up on it. But there has  eyes open as you look at professionally-
been a great deal of research on read-
printed work...and you’ll find there’s a 
ability (how easy something is to read)  very strong trend now to align type on 
and it shows that those disruptive, 
the left and leave the right ragged. 
inconsistent gaps between the words 
inhibit the flow of reading. 
a plain english handbook 
47 
application Library cloud:C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document
PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document.
www.rasteredge.com
application Library cloud:How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF
Convert Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF
www.rasteredge.com
Sidebars, like this one, are a 
handy way to convey informa­
tion that might muddy the 
general text. Try to keep your 
sidebars to “snippets” of infor­
mation. 
Keep paragraph length relatively short 
To reduce dense text, keep paragraphs as short as possible. Even though 
paragraph length is determined by content, here are some design tips 
that can help to lighten a long paragraph. 
Use bullets to list information wherever possible. This makes informa­
tion easier to absorb in one quick glance, as the following illustrates: 
before 
The funds invest mainly in the stocks of U.S. and foreign compa­
nies that are showing improved earnings and that sell at low prices 
relative to their cash flows or growth rates. The Fund also invests 
in debt, both investment grade and junk bonds, and U.S Treasury 
securities. 
after 
We invest the fund’s assets in: 
•  stocks of U.S. and foreign companies that 
– show improved earnings, and 
– sell at low prices relative to their cash flows or growth rates; 
•  debt, both investment grade and junk bonds; and 
•  U.S. Treasuries. 
Use tables to increase clarity 
Use tables to increase clarity and cut down text. Tables often convey 
information more quickly and clearly than text. The information in this 
table is more easily grasped in a table than in narrative form: 
before 
Our investment advisory agreements cover the Growth Fund, 
International Fund, Muni Fund, Bond Fund, and the Money Market 
Fund.  The effective date for agreements for the Growth Fund and 
the International Fund is June 1, 1993, and for the Muni Fund, 
Bond Fund and Money Market Fund, June 1, 1994. 
after 
Our Investment Advisory Agreement covers these funds: 
Investment Advisory Agreement 
effective date 
Fund name 
June 1, 1993 
Growth Fund 
International Fund 
June 1, 1994 
Muni Fund 
Bond Fund 
Money Market Fund 
48 a plain english handbook 
application Library cloud:VB.NET PowerPoint: Process & Manipulate PPT (.pptx) Slide(s)
If you want to change the order of current processing control add-on can do PPT creating, loading powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
www.rasteredge.com
application Library cloud:C# TIFF: Learn to Convert MS Word, Excel, and PPT to TIFF Image
C# TIFF - Conversion from Word, Excel, PPT to TIFF. Learn How to Change MS Word, Excel, and PowerPoint to TIFF Image File in C#. Overview
www.rasteredge.com
Graphics 
Graphics often illuminate information more clearly and quickly than 
text. This section introduces some basic guidelines about using graph­
ics in your document. To learn more, books and articles cover the topic 
in rich and rewarding detail. The best known work, The Visual Display 
of Quantitative Information, by Edward R. Tufte, provides practical advice 
on creating graphics. In the introduction of his book, he writes about 
the importance and value of graphics: 
At their best, graphics are instruments for reasoning about quantita­
tive information. Often the most effective way to describe, explore, 
and summarize a set of numbers—even a very large set—is to 
look at pictures of those numbers. Furthermore, of all methods for 
analyzing and communicating statistical information, well-designed 
data graphics are usually the simplest and at the same time the 
most powerful. 
On page 51 of his book, Tufte formulates a number of basic principles 
to follow in creating excellent graphics. Among them are these: 
Graphical excellence is that which gives to the viewer the greatest 
number of ideas in the shortest time with the least ink in the smallest 
space. 
And graphical excellence requires telling the truth about data. 
A few experts have studied the use of graphics in securities documents, 
isolating the areas presenting the most problems. We can boil down 
their advice to these guidelines. 
a plain english handbook 
49 
application Library cloud:VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
VB.NET PowerPoint - Render PPT to PDF in VB.NET. What VB.NET demo code can I use for fast PPT (.pptx) to PDF conversion in .NET class application?
www.rasteredge.com
application Library cloud:VB.NET PowerPoint: Read & Scan Barcode Image from PPT Slide
VB.NET PPT PDF-417 barcode scanning SDK to detect PDF-417 barcode image from PowerPoint slide. VB.NET APIs to detect and decode
www.rasteredge.com
Keep the design simple 
Keep the design of any graphic as simple as possible. Pare away any 
non-essential design elements so the data stands out. Think of it this 
way: as much of the ink as possible in a graphic should deal with a 
data point and not decoration. Some of the worst mistakes occur when 
design elements interfere with the clear presentation of information, 
such as needless 3-D effects, drop shadows, patterns, and excessive grid 
lines. Don’t let a design element turn into what Tufte calls “chartjunk.” 
These examples show how a 3-D bar graph provides initial visual 
appeal, but is harder to read and understand than a straightforward 
presentation of the same information. The multiple lines of the 3-D 
bars confuse some readers because the front of the bars appear to have 
a lower value than the back of the bars. 
before 
$0 
$10 
$20 
$30 
$40 
$50 
$60 
1997 Quarterly Sales Revenue in millions 
1st Quarter  2nd Quarter  3rd Quarter  4th Quarter 
$36 
$45 
$32 
$49 
$60 
$50 
$40 
$30 
$20 
$10 
$0 
1st Quarter 
2nd Quarter 
3rd Quarter 
4th Quarter 
1997 Quarterly Sales Revenue in millions 
after 
50 a plain english handbook 
Check proportions of visuals 
Generally, you should avoid graphics that start at a non-zero baseline, 
because they distort differences by destroying correct proportions. 
Compare these two bar charts to see how the non-zero baseline can 
mislead the reader as to the magnitude of change from quarter to 
quarter. 
before 
after 
$25 
$30 
$35 
$40 
$45 
$50 
$55 
1997 Quarterly Sales Revenue 
in millions 
Q1  Q2  Q3  Q4 
$36 
$45 
$32 
$49 
$0 
$10 
$20 
$30 
$40 
$50 
$60 
1997 Quarterly Sales Revenue 
in millions 
Q1  Q2  Q3  Q4 
$36 
$45 
$32 
$49 
“Extensive studies of annual 
reports of major corporations 
in the United States and 
the United Kingdom have 
shown that about 25 percent 
of the graphs they contain 
are distorted substantially.” 
Alan J. Davis 
Graphical Information: 
Where to Draw the Line 
Draw graphics to scale 
Any graphic should be proportionately correct or drawn to scale. 
For example, if you are showing an increase in oil production through 
a series of oil barrels in ever-increasing sizes, make sure a barrel 
isn’t represented as 50% bigger when production only went up 25%  
that year.  
Be consistent when grouping graphics 
If you group graphics side-by-side, avoid changing your scale from one 
graphic to another, as in the examples above. Also, lining up three 
graphics that present data in billions, millions, then dollars can mislead 
the reader. 
a plain english handbook 
51 
Don’t reverse time 
In graphics showing information over time, time should flow forward, 
not backward. In these examples, even though the first graphic is 
clearly labeled, it gives a false visual impression that earnings are going 
down over time rather than up. 
before 
Annual Sales Revenue 
in millions 
$200 
$162 
$123 
$87 
$150 
$100 
$50 
$0 
1997  1996  1995  
after 
Annual Sales Revenue 
in millions 
$200 
$150 
$100 
$50 
$0 
$162 
$87 
$123 
1995  1996  1997 
Organize data to hasten insights 
Choose an organization that helps the reader grasp information and 
comparisons quickly. For instance, if you have a list of foreign stock 
markets showing their returns in one year, list them in descending 
order by the magnitude of their returns instead of in alphabetical order. 
before  
1994 Foreign Markets 
Total Returns in U.S. dollars 
Argentina 
–23.6 %  
Brazil 
+64.3  
Greece 
 0.6  
Hong Kong 
–28.9  
Indonesia 
–26.3  
Malaysia 
–20.2  
Mexico 
– 
39.7  
Philippines 
– 10.1  
Singapore 
 5.8  
Turkey 
– 
50.5  
after  
1994 Foreign Markets 
Total Returns in U.S. dollars 
Brazil 
+64.3 %  
Singapore 
 5.8  
Greece 
 0.6  
Philippines 
– 10.1  
Malaysia 
–20.2  
Argentina 
–23.6  
Indonesia 
–26.3  
Hong Kong 
–28.9  
Mexico 
– 39.7  
Turkey 
– 50.5  
52 a plain english handbook 
Integrate text with graphics 
A graphic and its text should be together. You don’t want to break your 
reader’s concentration by separating the two, forcing your reader on a 
detour to another page in search of the graphic that goes with the text. 
Think twice about pie charts 
According to Tufte, “...the only worse design than a pie chart is several 
of them....” Pie charts can be useful in illustrating parts of a whole, but 
not when you divide the pie into more than 5 or 6 slices. Most readers 
find it difficult to draw accurate comparisons between pie slices or 
between multiple pie charts because the slices form irregular shapes. 
Showing the same information in a table can often be clearer.  
Don’t forget your typography 
When choosing a typeface for text such as axis labels, consider 
using a sans serif typeface if the type is small and the text is short in 
length. If you want to insert a note or explanation directly on the graph­
ic, use a serif font if the text is long. Continue to use upper and lower­
case type for increased legibility. The guidelines for good typography we 
discussed earlier still apply when creating graphics. 
Trust your eye 
Finally, one guideline rises above all others in importance and rests 
squarely with you. Cultivate an appreciation of graphics and then trust 
your eye. If a graphic seems unclear or unhelpful to you, no matter 
how many “guidelines” it follows, it probably is. 
Graphics communicate numbers and concepts visually. You turn to 
graphics when they stimulate a deeper or quicker understanding and 
appreciation of a situation than words alone. To create a good graphic, 
you must study the design critically and assess whether it conveys 
information honestly, accurately, and efficiently.   
a plain english handbook 
53 
Color 
Black is a color 
The majority of your documents will be produced in black and white. 
When designing these documents, it’s easy to forget that you are using 
a color: black. Since black is such a powerful color, balancing it on the 
page can be a tightrope act: too little emphasis can grey-out the page, 
too much can blacken it. 
If you are using only black, your use of type is usually the way you 
balance the page’s color. Some typefaces are heavier or lighter than 
others, and most type families are available in varying weights. For 
example: 
heavy: Times Extra Bold 
less heavy: Times Bold 
lighter: Times Semi Bold 
lighter still: Times Regular 
hea
vy:
U
n
iv
ers 
Bl
ack 
l
ess
h
e
avy: Univ
e
r
s
Bold 
light
e
r: Univ
e
r
s
R
e
gul
a
li
ght
e
s
t
ill
: Un
i
v
e
r
s
L
i
ght 
Choosing the proper combinations of type weights will help to make 
your document look more inviting. 
Some additional ways to introduce visual appeal to a one-color docu­
ment are through: 
•  shading 
•  graphics 
•  rules or lines 
•  colored paper stocks 
Again, your use of these elements should not overwhelm or distract 
from the legibility of your text. 
• 
54 a plain english handbook 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested