International Journal of Business and Management; Vol. 8, No. 22; 2013 
ISSN 1833-3850      E-ISSN 1833-8119 
Published by Canadian Center of Science and Education 
65 
Harnessing Migration for Service Export from Sub Saharan Africa: A 
New Dawn for an Age Old Phenomenon 
Cynthia A. Bulley
1
1
Central Business School, Central University College, Ghana 
Correspondence: Cynthia A. Bulley, Central Business School, Central University College, Accra, Ghana. Tel: 
233-24-416-0060. E-mail: ayorkorb@hotmail.com 
Received: June 5, 2013                      Accepted: September 16, 2013              Online Published: October 15, 2013 
doi:10.5539/ijbm.v8n22p65                URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.5539/ijbm.v8n22p65 
Abstract 
Migration issues  have enjoyed  numerous  debates and  research  in the past  two decades. The purpose of this 
article is to establish the need to re-examine health and education migration to determine if it can be harnessed 
for an international service exports. Secondary data is analysed to develop a case for harnessing migration in 
some  sectors  from  the  developing  countries.  The  study  throws  more  light  on  the  migration  of  health  and 
education worker phenomenon by expounding and collating information and puts forward a set of proposition 
for a research agenda. From the discussions, questions are developed for a more comprehensive  quantitative 
data generation. The direction of the study is a clarion call for data that will be the facilitating factor to propel 
policy makers to re-examine migration as an export activity. The study contributes to literature on international 
business specifically migration and international service exports. 
Keywords: migration, brain drain, brain gain, human capital, service exports 
1. Introduction   
1.1 Migration of Skilled Personnel 
The  prevailing  national concerns about  migration  of  health  and  education professionals searching for better 
opportunities in Europe, North America and other parts of the world cannot be overcome easily. Migration is an 
age old phenomenon that has been with us over time. Inter – regional emigration to urbanized city centres and 
migration to neighbouring and developed countries play a central role in the redistribution of labour. Migration 
estimates by the World Bank for Africans living outside their home country is 30 million (World Bank, March 
2011). It must be stated that accurate figures for migration is difficult to come by because most migrants would 
not go through the appropriate channel to be captured in any data collection. Developing countries particularly 
have a high rate of migration of skilled labour leading to a depletion of their already low level of human capital. 
The past few years have seen a large number of professional and highly skilled personnel (notably health and 
education sectors) moving to other countries especially the developed countries for work related purposes and 
better opportunities. The number of health and education sector professionals migrating has increased in recent 
times in response to the demand for their services in major developed countries (Shive, 2010; Chanda, 2002). 
Various  reasons  explain  the  continued  phenomenal  migration  from  the  developing  countries  (Bump,  2006; 
Alderman, 1994; Fosu,  1992). In Ghana, a  number  of factors  including  economic  needs,  professional career 
development and remuneration challenges, lack of job equipment and facilities among others are major reasons 
for migration (Ewusi, 1986; Fosu, 1992; Alderman, 1994; Anarfi & Kwankye, 2003). Migration has had both 
positive and negative impact on the economies of many developing countries. In Ghana, Anarfi et al. (2003) 
studies reveal that 14,000 education workers (teachers) migrated between 1975 and 1981 to various countries 
including the ECOWAS countries. Between 1995 and 2002, health professionals who migrated as against the 
percentage of those trained over that period shows a phenomenal rate of 69.4% for medical doctors, 27.3 % for 
dentists, 43.3% for pharmacists and 100% for environmental health specialists (Anarfi et al, 2003).   
The extent of the brain drain and the associated shortages of personnel in the various sectors negate the positive 
gains  from  migration.  Worldwide  statistics  on  international  remittances  flow  from  migrants  to  developing 
countries was  estimated at $351 billion in  2011  (World Bank, 2011).  Ghana’s remittances increased  to $1.8 
billion in 2009 from $450 million in 1999 (DFID, 2011). In 2009, the remittances was equal to11% of Ghana’s 
Create powerpoint from pdf - SDK control service:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Create powerpoint from pdf - SDK control service:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
www.ccsenet.org/ijbm 
International Journal of Business and Management 
Vol. 8, No. 22; 2013 
66 
GDP, this and  other indicators point  to migration being an  important phenomena that must be tapped to the 
nations advantage (DFID, 2011).   
Developing  countries  can  exploit  the  opportunities  generated  from  the  positive  aspects  of  migration  whilst 
reducing the negative effects. This calls for a comparative analysis to measure the gains from migration against 
the drain and the possibility of a planned exporting activity. The choice of the health and education sectors is 
based on statistics from those sectors in Ghana, studies on the high incidence of migration of these personnel 
(Ewusi, 1986; Fosu, 1992; Alderman, 1994; Chanda, 2002; Casely Hayford, 2009), and the preceding shortages 
of such personnel in some developed co untries (Brush, Sochalski and Berger, 2004). 
This paper is a discourse on migration, service exports and a call for further research to fill statistical gaps that 
would aid policy decisions.The specific objective of this study is to identify critical issues and a research agenda 
for an in-depth analysis 
1.2 The Problem in Developing Countries 
The health and education sectors have had phenomenal migration rates in many developing countries in recent 
times (Shive, 2010; Larsen et al., 2002; Chanda, 2002). International initiatives to develop policies to respond to 
this complex problem have not curbed the phenomenon (UN, 2006; Timur, 2000). Chanda (2002) estimates that 
about 10,000 health professionals left South Africa alone between 1989 and 1997. In Egypt another 10,000 health 
sector personnel migrated, and Ghana recorded a 60% of medical doctors who left the shores, not forgetting the 
nursing and other professions whose numbers are phenomenal (Chanda, 2002).  This  puts the  phenomena on 
startling levels creating a drain for most developing countries. Even with the OECD countries introduction of 
direct recruitment policies initiated in 2005, developing countries are still faced with the challenge of migration in 
these sectors (Dumont & Lemaître, 2006).  
Besides the negative impact of brain drain there are the positive effects derived from remittances, investments, 
knowledge, equipment and ideas transfer. This flow back brings about the comparison of the two concepts - brain 
drain  and  brain  gained.  The  existing  literature  on  brain  drain  sees  it  as  a  problem  –  shortage  of  skilled 
professionals and a loss of human capital that must be stopped. That on brain gain sees programmed export as an 
improvement. There  are recorded benefits from brain drain, remittances, improved human capital  and others 
(Shive, 2010; Batista & Vicente, 2007; Beine, Docquier & Rapoport, 2006). Other sources have advocated for the 
benefits of a planned  migration  programme.  So far not much has  been done to  comparatively study the two 
concepts to establish which is more advantageous.  
Most developing countries are already exporting some form of service but the absence of comparable detailed 
research studies make diversification difficult. In comparison with other areas of statistical information, there is 
limited internationally accepted statistical data on migration from the sectors in developing countries like Ghana 
for  example.  This  creates  a  gap  in the available  information. In  Ghana,  the  health minister’s  assertion  that 
migration in the sector has reduced from 68% to 2% within a year needs statistics for confirmation (JOY News, 
2012).  
Hoffman and Lawrence (1996) have emphasized the difficulty of finding reliable data on migration due to the 
variety of sources used to generate such information. Also the lack of data on the stock and flow (inflow and 
outflow) of these professionals is a major challenge that hinders its management.   
Export  activities  in  many  developing  countries  focus  on  goods  thus  overshadowing  the  opportunities  in 
diversifying into service exports. But is the issue that simple?  
1.3 Literature Overview 
To date, migration has taken a different turn. Large numbers of the well educated professionals are migrating 
and seeking better job opportunities in the developed countries. Well educated professionals basically are those 
who have completed higher education  (college and professional courses) as well as those with technical  and 
practical work experience (Wereko, 1997; Faulwetter, 1986).   
Most of the health and education professionals migrate due to economic and social situation, others for work 
related reasons. Various studies have examined the magnitude of international migration. Large scale migration 
due to economic reasons took shape in the early 1980s in Ghana (Anarfi et al, 2003). This was in response to 
weakened economic conditions, growing unemployment and job availability, better remuneration, political and 
social instability and the lack of career opportunities (Ewusi, 1986; Fosu, 1992; Alderman, 1994; Anarfi et al, 
2003). Whether the reasons for migrating is economic or social, developing countries can exploit  the natural 
situation to their  advantage by monitoring,  evaluating  and  coming  out  with  studies  that  examine the  factor 
advantage generated from migration. Salmon et al., (2008) in their research concluded that managed migration 
SDK control service:VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
in WPF. PDF Create. Create PDF from Word. Create PDF from Excel. Create PDF from PowerPoint. Create PDF from Tiff. Create PDF from Images.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
in WPF. PDF Create. Create PDF from Word. Create PDF from Excel. Create PDF from PowerPoint. Create PDF from Tiff. Create PDF from Images.
www.rasteredge.com
www.ccsenet.org/ijbm 
International Journal of Business and Management 
Vol. 8, No. 22; 2013 
67 
programme in the Caribbean led to the training of nurses for export and temporary migration. If it is managed 
and the nations involved benefit financially from a planned programme then service exports from the developing 
countries would be achieved. In the Philippines the “nurse for export” programme has been implemented to test 
the concept (Binod, 2008; Lorenzo et al, 2007). The study concluded that the policy option to overcome the 
challenge of migration of health professionals with an export activity is leading to human capital development, 
benefits to migrant families and economic growth for the country. There is the need for this kind of research to 
analyze and throw more light on  the issue and compare available statistics.  This will ensure that developing 
countries  would  weigh  the  options  based  on  the  costs  and  benefits,  and  determine  the  advantages  or 
disadvantages there of.   
1.4 Brain Drain/Brain Gained   
Brain drain is caused by migration and has been a daunting problem for developing countries especially Africa 
where  it  is  seen  mainly  as  a  drain  and  a  loss.  The  drain  is  not  limited  to  the  medical  and  educational 
professionals who leave to seek employment there but the young migrants who leave to pursue higher education 
abroad  and  other  groups  of people.  The  International  Organization  for  Migration  puts  the  figure  at  20,000 
professionals leaving Africa each year since 1990 (Trebeje, 2005). The movement of people from one place in 
the world  ostensibly  for  better  conditions  cannot be eliminated. According to Watanabe (1970),  brain  drain 
covers all forms of migration including trained professionals. Todaro (1977) defined it as the migration of well 
educated and skilled professionals from developing countries.   
Wereko (1997) distinguished between the types of brain drain and examines it from three (3) main points: the 
people involved (emigrant), the country losing its citizen and the  country gaining from the phenomenon. All 
these studies are aimed at finding the causes and effects, ways to manage and find lasting solutions that will 
benefit all parties involved. 
The World Book Dictionary (Thorndike & Barnhart, 1987) defined brain drain as the “shortage of professional 
or  skilled  labour  caused by  the  emigration”  of  professionals  to  a  more  favourable  “labour  market”.  Beine, 
Docquier  and Rapoport  (2006), Dovlo  (2004), Dovlo & Nyonator  (1999), have all  argued  that international 
migration  is  causing  a  drain  on  developing countries.  Further,  Katz  and  Rapoport  (2005);  McCormick and 
Wahba (2000) and Stark, Helmenstein and Prskawetz (1997) have also noted in their studies that the brain drain 
though causing a loss on human capital is bringing benefits that is helping with development and alleviating 
poverty.   
The ‘drain’ cannot be prevented, nothing can be done about it therefore it is better to plan with it and not against 
it. But how can one gain through planning with an uncontrollable, voluntary and democratic process? How do 
the positive and negative effects of brain drain and brain gain balance out? 
To  gain  from  a  planned  and  directed  process  of  international  migration  would  call  for  and  may  require 
institutions or economies to impose on its citizens such a programme. This may seem like a conscription which 
may  or  may  not  favour  the  gains  that  would  be  expected  to  be  generated  from  it.  Planning  international 
migration like a service is quite problematic because services are intangible and not a commodity that can easily 
be developed, launched and sold like a physical product. Zeithaml, Bitner and Gremler (2013), Lovelock and 
Wirtz  (2011),  and  Palmer  (2005)  have  discussed  the  challenges  inherent  in  service  development.  They 
emphasized  that  the  characteristics  of  services–intangibility,  inseparability,  variability/heterogeneity, 
preishability and process–oriented nature of services make it challenging to plan on a large scale. The dependent 
human factor makes planning to capitalize and sell migration a daunting task.   
Brain drain deprives a nation of its well educated and skilled personnel (human capital). Intellectual property is 
lost  (Todaro,  1997).  But  the  reverse  (returns  from  migration)  and  positive  effect  from  remittances, 
additional/improvement in skills, resources and investments have been recorded by the World Bank (2011) and 
other researchers to bring in gains to the sending country that is making a difference in economic growth and 
development (Docquier and Marfouk, WB2005; Beine et al., WBER2007; Dumont and Lemaître, OECD2006).   
Another issue is the fact that the drain in addition takes personnel away from their home country either for a 
short or long period of time and may be permanent. But to gain from the drain would only lead to personnel 
moving away from home for a specified period. This may lead to investments in education which could be a 
backbone for a planned programme. Are the gains enough to warrant a planned programme? 
Brain drain is reported to be leading directly  to resource and assets  build – up  in addition to  remittances to 
family members in the home/sending countries (McCullock & Yellen, 1977; Anarfi et al, 2003). The first asset 
that returned migrant come with is the vast experience gained from their sojourn. But this is not a guaranteed 
SDK control service:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
Qualified Tiff files are exported with high resolution in VB.NET. Create multipage Tiff image files from PDF in VB.NET project. Support
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Create PDF from Tiff. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Create PDF from Tiff. Create PDF from Tiff in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET application.
www.rasteredge.com
www.ccsenet.org/ijbm 
International Journal of Business and Management 
Vol. 8, No. 22; 2013 
68 
gain from migration since experiences  have credence qualities and therefore  it  is  difficult to measure. Until 
empirical  studies  record  evidence  from  such  gains  it  will  be  difficult  to  assess.  Investments  in  productive 
business have been recorded in some migrant countries (Anarfi et al, 2003).   
Grubal and Scott (1966), Bhagwati and Hamada (1974), McCullock and Yellen (1977) examined these positive 
gains  from  migration.  But  it  calls  for  an  understanding  by  governments  of  migrant  countries  to  develop 
measures  to intervene with policies  and levies  on assets  and resources acquired to  gain from migration in a 
planned programme.  Further,  remittances  are  major gains from  migration, but  are  they likely to increase in 
volume or cedi equivalent or decrease? What is the volume of the brain drain (human capital loss) of skilled 
personnel  from  Ghana?  What  is  the  size  (percentage)  of  the  brain  gained?  Is  the  brain  drain  and  gains 
sustainable or limited to a period? 
Is migration per se a problem that warrants its management or curtailment? Migration has been examined and 
discussed by many researchers who see it as an integral part of globalization and development (Mpinganjira, 
2010, Tebeje, 2005; Shinn, 2002; Wereko, 1997).   
A free decision by individuals but the reported returns from migration (World Bank, 2012) is fostering countries 
that experience gains to consider ‘conscripted’ planned programmes (human capital development as a service). 
Are the net gains high enough to warrant a planned programme? The answers will emerge from this study. 
2. Methodology 
Secondary data was sourced from  Google scholar  and academic web  pages. One  article  led  to another  in  a 
snowballing effect. Journal articles and agency specific data were sourced. The main requirement for selecting 
journals and data for the review were that it dealt with international migration, policies on migration, brain drain, 
brain gain, service export, and health and education sector mobility. This method helped to focus and explore 
the necessary data to understand what needs to be done. The aim of the analysis is to review and establish the 
need to re-examine migration especially in  the health and education sectors in developing  countries  such  as 
Ghana to establish the need for data on the net effects and comparative quantitative information to aid policy 
makers.   
3. Situation Analysis 
The volume of migration flows from developing countries has increased even though the economic crisis is still 
looming in some developed countries. The OECD (2010) data indicates that international migrants from Africa 
rose from 16.3 million in 2000 to 19.2million in 2010. As at 2013, it is estimated that 30million Africans have 
left their home country to various locations. Figure 1 indicates the percentage of the various country population 
that have migrated. Cape Verde has the highest percentage (38%) of its population per the figure 1. Migration 
from the West African zone has seen varying levels. Ghana had a 46% rate of migration as compared to other 
West African  countries  in  2005  (OECD, 2005) Clemens and  Pettersson (2006) estimated  a  56%  of medical 
doctors and 24% of trained nurses worked outside Ghana. Sierra Leone has a 2.2% net migration rate per 1000 
people for the period 2005–2010, Liberia 13.3%, the Gambia 1.8% and Liberia13.3% for the same period (Ratha 
et al, 2011). 
SDK control service:C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
C#.NET PDF SDK- Create PDF from Word in Visual C#. Online C#.NET Tutorial for Create PDF from Microsoft Office Excel Spreadsheet Using .NET XDoc.PDF Library.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Create PDF from Word. |. Home ›› XDoc in C#. C# Demo Code to Create PDF Document from Word in C# Program with .NET XDoc.PDF Component.
www.rasteredge.com
www.ccsenet.org/ijbm 
International Journal of Business and Management 
Vol. 8, No. 22; 2013 
69 
Figure 1. Stock of migrants from Africa, 2010 (percentage of the population) World Bank (2011) 
The figures may not seem alarming but the stock of skilled professionals that migrate causes substantial effects 
on these countries. Data on skilled migrant is difficult to come by since most African countries do not collate 
such information. Varying data is collected by different sectors that need to provide license for highly trained 
personnel. Skilled migration rates in Africa are rather high. This is due to many factors including seeking higher 
education, better work conditions and a host of other economic, political and social factors. 
In contrast, studies have monitored the quantum of returns from migration and the concept of brain gained. Faini 
(2006),  Beine et al. (2006, 2003, 2001), Mountford (1997) and  Vidal (1998) have  documented returns  from 
migration in their studies to support the brain gain concept. Brain gain is the returns in terms of investments in 
productive ventures, assets and property repatriation, and return of more resourced and improved migrants. The 
gains  from  migration  are  spearheading  the  call  to  harness  the  phenomenon.  Currently,  most  African 
governments  are  exploiting  avenues  to  bring  in  migrants  in  the  ‘diaspora’  to  contribute  to development  in 
various sectors. Another  major factor  emanating from  migration is  the  remittances  from  migrants  to  family 
members. 
A number of studies have linked migration and remittances with financial sector growth in migrant countries. 
Ambrosius et al. (2008) in his research linked the flow of remittance to an appreciable growth in developing 
countries’ financial sector. Quartey’s (2004) studies on ‘remittance and poverty reduction’, Ratha et al. (2007) 
on  remittance  and  the  ‘macroeconomy’,  Gupta  et  al.  (2007)  on  remittance  and  ‘economic  growth  and 
development’ are  all  relevant research with useful conclusions.  These studies reveal the immense  impact of 
remittances on sending countries. 
The World Bank (2011), OECD (2010) and migration economists have noted that foreign inward transfer has a 
great  potential  for  propelling  growth  and  development.  These  flows  are  mainly  from  migrants  who  remit 
relatives. The total foreign remittances as against the gross domestic growth for Ghana make calls for managing 
migration  and  harnessing  it  for  development  a  necessity.  The  table  below  indicates  the  estimated  migrant 
remittances  to  Ghana  from  2005  to  2012.  The  figures  are  compared  to  the  gross  domestic  product  for  the 
country to show the volume of transfers from migrants for the period. 
SDK control service:C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Best C#.NET component to create searchable PDF document from Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint. Create PDF from Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:VB.NET PDF - Create PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
in WPF. PDF Create. Create PDF from Word. Create PDF from Excel. Create PDF from PowerPoint. Create PDF from Tiff. Create PDF from Images.
www.rasteredge.com
www.ccsenet.org/ijbm 
International Journal of Business and Management 
Vol. 8, No. 22; 2013 
70 
Table 1. Estimated Ghanaian migrant remittances from 2005 – 2012 in US dollars (raw figures) 
Year 
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011 
2012 
Incoming 
Remittances (in billion dollars) 
4.63 
5.68 
6.77 
8.75 
9.49 
12.45
15.16 
18.7 
As a percentage of GDP 
43.1%
27.8%
27.3%
30.6%
36.5%
38.5%
38.6%  45.9% 
Note: Bank of Ghana, 2009–official and private remittances. Updated with additional data for 2010 – 2012. 
GDP–Gross Domestic Product figures from Ghana Statistical Service, 2010.
4. Discussion 
4.1 Net Return on Migration and Brain Gained 
Remittances and transfers have propelled the economic advantage gained from migration (IMF, 2000; Anarfi et 
al, 2003). The World Bank (2012) has predicted a 7.3% increase in world remittances in 2012 from $483 billion 
for 2011, 7.9% in 2013 and 8.3% in 2014. India with $58 billion, China $57 billion, Mexico $24 billion and the 
Philippines with $23 billion respectively were the  top recipient of remittances in  2011  (World Bank, 2012). 
Developing countries’ share of global remittances from migrants (the World Bank in 2006 estimated that such 
remittances reduced poverty by “11% in Uganda, 6% in Bangladesh and 5% in Ghana) making it a delicate topic 
to unravel. Remittances are the funds  transferred  to developing  countries from migrants. Kapur and McHale 
(2003)  discussions  on  remittances  emphasizes  its  propensity  to  increase  economic  activities  and  household 
income thereby “trickling - up economics”. Remittances therefore have the ability to increase economic growth 
of a country, facilitating a stable source of funds and changing household income level. It facilitates foreign 
exchange  supply.  Sanders  (2007)  have  documented net returns  of migration  in  his  studies of the  Caribbean 
countries. Ghana with a population of 23.8 million and GDP growth rate of 5.8% (average percentage between 
2005 and 2009) has made considerable strides from returns from migration. It has helped to cushion household 
and investment income making it an important index for economic development. The remittance and gains from 
migration in effect have the ability to reduce poverty. From the available data on remittances flow from Ghana, 
the Bank of Ghana (2011) stated that remittances between 1999 and 2009 led to an 11% increase in the GDP 
leading  to  increases  in  enterprise  and  development  activities.  Further  returned  migrants  bring  a  worth  of 
knowledge acquired through plying their service abroad which can be of great benefit  to the country. These 
experts become facilitators and role models leading to a “netgain” (Pittman, 2010). The debate of brain gained 
from return migrated personnel will continue until several researches confirm it with tentative documentation.   
The Philippines is testing the sustainability of the “nurse for export” programme (Lorenzo et al, 2007; Binod, 
2007; Salmon et al,  2007).  Research on  these pilot programme  findings indicate that  the  “nurse  for  export” 
programme in the Philippines  and the  Caribbean  is addressing the  internal  nurse  shortage and  managing the 
prevailing migration. The economic impact may shadow exporting activities but the net gains from exporting 
services cannot be over ruled. The football player transfer and migration issue is a factor that can be factored in 
to weigh the gains from migration or temporary migration.   
4.2 Challenges in the Health and Education Sectors in Developing Countries 
Various  studies  indicate  that  the  health  and  education  professionals  who  do  not  migrate  or  drain  face  the 
following challenges: 
1)  Lack of equipment and necessary support systems. 
2)  Inadequate remuneration (World Bank, 2010; Ministry of Health Summit, 2009).   
Both reports make mention of the issue of health worker migration. The education sector is also challenged with 
manpower shortages and lack of equipment (Casely – Hayford, 2009). A synopsis of the challenges in the health 
sector range from the lack of facilities, equipment and needed support systems to shortages of personnel and 
funds (Ewusi, 1986; Fosu, 1992; Alderman, 1994; Chanda, 2002; Anarfi and Kwankye, 2003). Following from 
the above: 
1)  Makes for stunted professional development and expertise, and poor service delivery. 
www.ccsenet.org/ijbm 
International Journal of Business and Management 
Vol. 8, No. 22; 2013 
71 
2)  Makes  for inadequate  means to  support family and for  investment–net loss  to Gross  Domestic Product 
(GDP) growth. 
In Ghana for example, the two sectors have their unique challenges but a critical examination of migration has 
led to shortages of staff and gaps in service delivery (Dovlo, 2004).   
Significant moves have been made in various countries in sub–Saharan  Africa and on  international fronts to 
harness migration of skilled personnel. Lautier (2008) study of Tunisia’s export of health services is an example. 
The Philippines, India, Caribbean export mainly ICT professional services. These are not considered as having a 
critical local demand as health and education professionals in a developing context. (Salmon et al., 2008; Binod, 
2008; Kotabe et al., 1998). There is the need for developing countries to learn from each other by studying pilot 
cases and programmes instituted to manage migration. The Philippines and Caribbean programme is a step that 
can be studied and applied in other developing countries faced with migration in the case sectors. And this calls 
for  this  study  to  measure  the  indicators  to  determine  the  underlying  factors  and  concepts,  compare  across 
various country studies–Philippines, Caribbean and India and check if the ratios are enough to warrant a service 
export.   
4.3 Receivers of the Migrants 
Migration of professionals is fueled by the availability of employment and all other advantages that come with it. 
Brush, Sochalski and Berger (2004) have established the need of foreign personnel in the health sector in the 
developed  countries  like  the  United  States  (USA).  Chandra  et  al  (2007)  studies  confirm  the  need  of  these 
professionals  in  the  USA.  According  to  both  studies,  health  care  facilities  struggle  to  fill  current  staffing 
vacancies, and an undersupply is predicted over the next twenty years (Chandra et al., 2007; Brush et al., 2004). 
The access to international markets for employment for the health and education professionals abound. 
Despite the volume of migration by health and education professionals from the developing countries, studies 
indicate that inadequate supply still existing in a number of developed countries. Simoens et al. (2005) in their 
study recorded high nurse vacancy rates in the developed  countries and this  according to ICN report (2004) 
constitute  an important area of concern. In  the USA, there is an upsurge in employing foreign recruit in the 
sector. Their employment projections for nurses till 2014 gives an estimate of 1.2 million “new and replacement 
nurses” (Hecker, 2005). With such vacancies migrants have a higher chance of getting employment therefore it 
acts  like  an  enabler  to  the  phenomenon.  Undersupply  of  health  and  education  professionals  in  developing 
countries will persist for the next twenty years. 
4.4 Exporting Services 
Service marketing has gained international recognition due to the fact that it is the driving force for the growth 
of many  developed  economies  gross  domestic  product.  Trade  in  services  is  increasing  worldwide. Services 
export make up about 25% of the total value of world trade (Kotabe et al, 1998). Developed countries have gone 
beyond providing services locally to exporting to international markets. Globalization is another factor that has 
increased  world  trade  in  services.  The  sharp  increase  in  service  trade  is  partly  due  to  development  and 
integration  of telecommunications  and information technology in  business operations. Technology especially 
electronic  communications  is  making  it  possible  for  businesses  to  provide  services  faster  and  in  a  more 
convenient way. Now it is possible for firms to locate anyway in the world so far as communication is efficient 
and effective. In addition to technological changes, innovations by service firms have led to the development of 
new  and  improved  service  products.  In  the  developing  countries,  services  are  emerging  as  the  panacea  to 
increasing  revenues  leading  to  growth  and  development,  and  transformation  of  these  nations.  The  vast 
improvements in transportation and communication and the emergence of electronic commerce have made it 
easier for business to export services from developing countries. But service exports have not been given much 
attention in Africa. This may be partly due to the lack of awareness in many developing countries about the 
importance of services in development leading to weak and inconsistency in policies relating to the sector. Also 
the pace of development in terms of telecommunication and information technologies to promulgate the export 
of people – intensive services across borders in some developing countries is slow. UNCTAD, the World Trade 
Organization (1998), and the International Trade Centre (2006) have jointly come out with different studies on 
the  expansion  of  service  exports  particularly  relating  to  market  access,  challenges  and  opportunities  for 
developing countries. But most developing countries are faced with major constraints that hinder the building of 
a competitive service sector. The service industry is still growing and some nations are still at the infant stage. 
To  sustain growth in the service  sector requires  a  shift to other  sectors with  comparable factor advantage to 
exploit  it  to  the  fullest.  Migration  and  service  export  diversification  seems  like  an  elusive  activity  but  a 
comparative study would provide the needed information to evaluate its advantage.   
www.ccsenet.org/ijbm 
International Journal of Business and Management 
Vol. 8, No. 22; 2013 
72 
4.5 Classification of Service for Export 
Service  exports  is  basically  getting  revenue  for  providing  services  beyond  the  original  country  borders  or 
providing  services to a ‘non–resident’ customer  in the original country. There are four major ways in which 
services can be exported according to the Uruguay Round negotiations on the General Agreement on Trade in 
Services–GATS  (ITC/Commonwealth  Secretariat, 2002). The first form is  the “Cross – border trade” where 
services are provided from one country into another. The second mode is “Consumption abroad”. With this, a 
visiting ‘non-resident’ consumer consumes services abroad. The third way is “commercial presence” in which 
the service provider establishes physical presence abroad and the fourth – “Movement of natural persons”. This 
involves people moving across borders to provide services. This  classification follows similar works done in 
that  area  (Lovelock  &  Yip,  1996;  Eramilli,  1990;  Shostack,  1977).  Patterson  and  Cicic’s  (1995)  service 
performance based on the level of tangibility and inseparability classification follows GATS differentiation of 
the modes of service exports. “Cross border trade” reorganizes and package the service in a form that can be 
exported  like  training  programs  and  services  with  minor  or  major  goods  components.  The  “consumption 
abroad”  method  of  exporting  services  aligns  with  “location-free”  services  (Patterson  &  Cicic,  1995).  This 
method does not restrict the consuming importers’ location. Its mode emphasizes its short–term and transient 
nature.   
GATS  last  two  classification  “commercial  presence”  and  “movements  of  natural  persons”  are  highly 
people-based processing that involves long term establishment in the international market. The former calls for 
adapting services to meet the standards of the international customer. The latter is highly delivery sensitive, that 
is, both consumer and producer of the service must be present. 
The  distinction  between  the  four  ways  of  exporting  services  forms  the  basis  for  examining  a  natural 
phenomenon–migration from an export perspective. Health and education professionals fall into the “movement 
of natural persons’ category of the export services and this contributes to a better analysis of the phenomenon. 
The question one will ask is that services are performances and they are not created or performed until they are 
actually delivered therefore  exporting it  can be complex  and challenging. The characteristics  of services are 
another challenge that makes it seem difficult to export. The demand for health and education professionals in 
the developed country cannot be over ruled but are the figures adequate to warrant an export drive. Documented 
evidence indicates that these demands are highly creating shortages in the developing countries that need to be 
addressed also. 
4.6 Harnessing Migration for Export Development 
The export of services is almost always tackled from the development policy angle. As such most literature on 
migration  may  be  assumed  to  have  some  aspect  of  policy  or  development  concerns.  The  main  themes  in 
migration  studies focus on the brain  drain, remittances,  economic and policy development (Alderman, 1994, 
Benavides, 1997). In recent years, policy makers and analyst have begun to put more emphasis on the net gains 
from migration and the positive aspects which can be harnessed for national development. In Ghana, various 
studies on migration look at it from policy perspective and its effects on economic development and poverty 
reduction (Anarfi  & Kwankye,  2003; Fosu, 1992; Ewusi, 1986). The call for migration to be annexed as an 
exporting  activity  started  with  the  Caribbean  States  and  the  Philippines  (Salmon  et  al,  2008;  Batata,  2005; 
Bernavides,  1997).  These  calls  stemmed  from  the  magnitude  of  the  immigration  of  particular  sector 
professionals and the benefits that had been recorded from studies done. The benefits of harnessing migration 
for exporting purposes have been highlighted by various researchers (Kotabe et al., 1998; Salmon et al., 2008; 
Binod, 2008). In addition to managing migration in the sectors studied, an exporting activity would ensure that 
local shortages are managed. Advantages of a managed migration programme include: 
 Development of local capacity to create jobs. 
 Recruitment and management of workers. 
 Foreign earnings from the workers in the service export programme. 
 Data on migration readily available (assuming everybody agrees to the involuntary recruitment and posting 
to foreign lands). 
Salmon  et  al,  (2008)  review  of  the  managed  migration  programme  for  the  health  sector  records  various 
advantages. Among them is the development of local capacity that creates jobs for the people. In addition the 
Caribbean pilot case has recorded tremendous advantages in terms of recruitment and management of work in 
those  sectors  (Salmon  et  al,  2008;  Batata,  2005).  The  foreign  earnings  that  can  be  generated  from  such  a 
programme cannot be under  underestimated. The data  on migrant would  also be an important document for 
www.ccsenet.org/ijbm 
International Journal of Business and Management 
Vol. 8, No. 22; 2013 
73 
government strategies and the sectors. The feasibility of a health and education sector exports in Ghana have 
been discussed in various quarters but nothing tentative has come up. This study, it is hoped would whip up a 
new interest for the development of other avenues for migration management and service export diversification 
and a call for data to support it. There is the need for a study that would examine the prevailing migration of the 
health  and  education  professionals  from  Ghana  to  comparatively  determine  the  advantage  of  a  planned 
programme. 
4.7 Justification of the Review 
The  question  of  managing  the  movements  of  professionals  to  developed  countries  ostensibly  for  better 
emoluments and conditions is prevailing in Africa and cannot be overcome easily. There is the need for this kind 
of research  to throw  more light on  the issue. Migration of trained professionals is a big challenge in  Africa 
especially Ghana and this study would contribute to the understanding of a less researched area of international 
business practice–service exports.  
The  proposed comparative  research  it  is hoped would  lead  to  new and exciting  insights providing  a deeper 
understanding of the benefits, challenges and issues that are important to the study. Comparisons sharpen the 
focus of analysis on the case sectors identifying gaps, new directions and different perspectives on the issue. 
Further study should exploit migration variables in the sector chosen to provide statistics that can be used by 
academics to develop theory thereby adding to the existing knowledge on the subject. The outcome of the study 
would help policy makers to determine the viability of a planned program. It would also generate interest in 
diversifying service exports and create awareness to reflect the changing needs of the sectors discussed.   
This study called for examining migration literature and developing service export theories to attempt to explain 
the gaps in knowledge and determine the direction that could be exploited. Theory development under service 
exports or exporting  services is  lacking  and  comparative data  it  is hoped  will  facilitate  the  development of 
tentative  theory that will come out of the unique contingencies identified. The advantage or disadvantage  of 
harnessing and repackaging health and education services for export calls for examining all national indicators 
and  international  differences  and  migration to point  to  possible  direction that  could be  exploited.  This  will 
eventually  make  a valuable and practical  contribution  to  theory  development.  Exporting  services  cannot  be 
overlooked, it is changing and influencing academic research because no grounded theory or constructs have been 
established to propel and promote the activity. Comparative indicators for harnessing the health and education 
professional migration into an export activity would significantly help developing countries to know the way 
forward.  
5. Conclusion 
Developing countries need coherent and practical policies that can lead to effective management of the health 
and education professional migration. Migration policies should be revised to include new innovative ideas that 
would lead to income generation and economic development for sending  countries. Programmes such as the 
health and education personnel for export and return of skilled personnel for development should be encouraged. 
Remittance inflows are external source of funds that are helping migrant families and play an important role in 
economic growth and development in sending countries. Secondly, migration management programmes should 
be part of sending country strategies. Harnessing migration for export would need data and comparative analysis 
for policy development. The drain and benefit of the  prevailing migration has  led to many considerations to 
manage it. The study examines the pros and cons of migration and prospects of considering it for a marketing 
activity–service exports. Service export is a more innovative alternative to migration that leads to a more legal 
circular movement of people. In international business the problem of exporting a service which is an intangible 
product is froth with many questions. Further the problem of migration of health and education sector personnel 
is a big challenge that developing countries are grappling with. Therefore, the question put forward for future 
research is to measure the direct effects of health and education sector migration and identify the net results to 
exploit the idea of an  export  activity.  Many studies have  examined  migration but there  are  no  quantitative 
studies that measure the net effect of brain drain and brain gained to weigh the option of diversifying into an 
export activity. Developing countries especially those in Africa are challenged with this phenomenon that has 
seen  large  studies  but our readiness to  exploit it to  our  advantage makes a call for data to measure country 
specific information a necessary endeavour.   
References 
Alderman,  H. (1994). Ghana: Adjustment’s Star Pupil? In Sahn, D.  E. (Ed.), Adjusting  to Policy Failure in 
African Economics (pp. 23–52). Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press. 
www.ccsenet.org/ijbm 
International Journal of Business and Management 
Vol. 8, No. 22; 2013 
74 
Anarfi, J., & Kwankye, S. (2003). Migration from and to Ghana: A Background Paper. Brighton: Development 
Research 
Centre 
on 
Migration 
Globalisation 
and 
Poverty. 
Retrieved 
from 
http://www.migrationdrc.org/publications/working_papers/WP-C4.pdf 
Anarfi, J.,  Quartey,  P.,  &  Agyei,  J.  (2010).  Key Determinants  of  Migration  among  Health Professionals in 
Ghana. Development Research Centre on Migration, Globalization and Poverty 
Beine, M., Docquier, F., & Rapoport,  H. (2006).  Brain Drain and Human  Capital Formation in Developing 
Countries:  Winners and  Losers.  Discussion  Paper, I’Université Catholique de Louvain, Paper 2006n-23 
UCL. 
Retrieved 
from 
http://ideas.repec.org/p/ct/louvec/2006023.html 
http://econweb.umd.edu/~Lafortune/puc-readings/Beine_Docquier_Rapoport_2008.pdf 
Bhagwati, J. N., & Hamada, K, (1974). The Brain Drain, International Integration of Markets for Professionals 
and Unemployment: A Theoretical Analysis. Journal of Development Economics, 1(1), 19–40. 
Binod,  K.  (2008).  International  nurse  recruitment  in  India.  (Health  Research  and  Educational  Trust).  Gale 
Cengage Learning, 42(3), 2–4. 
Bump,  M.  (2006).  Ghana:  Searching  for  Opportunities  at  Home  and  Abroad.  Institute  for  the  ‘study  of 
International Migration, Georgetown University. Washington, DC: Migration Information Source. 
Casely,  H.  L.  (2009).  Political  Economic  Analysis  of  Education  in  Ghana.  Retrieved  from 
http://www.google.com/caselyhayford/ 
Chanda, R. (2002). Trade in Health Service. Bullectin of the World Health Organisazation, 80, 158–163. 
Docquier, F., & Marfouk, A. (2006). International Migration by Education Attainment 1990–2000. In C. Ozden 
&  M.  Schiff  (Eds.),  International  Migration,  brain  drain  and  remittances  (pp.  151–199).  New  York: 
McMillan and Palgave. 
Dovlo, D. (2004). The Brain Drain in Africa: An Emerging Challenge to Health Professionals. Education. 
Dovlo,  D.  &  Nyonator,  F.  (1999).  Migration  of  Graduates  of  the  University  of  Ghana  Medical  School:  A 
Preliminary Rapid Appraisal. Human Resources for Health Development Journal, 3(1), 34–37. 
Dumont & Lemaître. (2006). Women on the Move: The Neglected Gender Dimension of the Brain Drain. OECD. 
Retrieved from http://www.oecd.org/./40232336.pdf 
Ewusi,  K. (1986).  The Dimension and  Characteristics of Rural Poverty in Ghana. Accra: ISSER  Technical 
Publication. 
Ghana Statistical Service. (2010). Ghana Statistics. Retrieved from http://www.ghanastatisticalservice.com.gh 
IOM.  (2003).  International  Organisation  on  Migration-International  Labour  Organization  (ILO),  Migration 
Paper, Geneva: ILO office.   
Ministry  of  Health  (2009).  Ghana  Health  Sector  review,  2009,  Ministry  of  Health.  Retrieved  from 
http://moh-ghana.org/health_summit_April2009 
Pillinger, J.  (2011). Quality Health Care and Workers on the Move: Ghana National Report. Public Service 
International. Retrieved from http://www.world-psi.org/sites/default/files/documents/research/ghana.pdf 
Ratha, D., Mohapatra, S., Özden,  Ç., Plaza,  S., Shaw, C., & Shimeles,  A. (2011). Leveraging Migration for 
Africa:  Remittances,  Skills  and  Investments.  International  Bank  for  Reconstruction  and 
Development/World Bank. Washington, DC.   
Rapoport,  H.,  &  Docquier,  F.  (2008).  International  Migration  Trends  and  Challenges.  OECD  –  CEP  II, 
Conference, Paris. 
Salmon, M. E., Yan, J., Hewitt, H., & Guisinger, V. (2008). Managed Migration: The Caribbean approach to   
addressing  nursing  services  capacity.  Health  Research  and  Educational  Trust.  Retrieved  from 
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m4149/12 
Sanders,  R.  (2007).  Brain  Drain  or  Export  Earnings?  Cariseek,  Caribbean  News.  Retrieved  from 
http://www.bbc.co.uk/caribbean/News/Story/2007/10/071026_Sanders/251007shtml 
Sanders,  C.  (2003).  Capturing  a  Market  Share?  Migrant  Remittance  Transfer  and  Commercialisation  of 
Microfinance. 
Conference 
Paper, 
Johannesburg. 
Retrieved 
from 
http://www.dai.com/pdf/capture_a_market_share.pdf 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested