25
subsidy reductions have a different influence
on various countries and groups of economic
agents.
Consumers and producers in different
country groups
The  ATPSM  results  reflect  the
theoretical considerations set out above.
Consumers in developed countries, which
provide the bulk of export subsidies, benefit
from the elimination of export subsidies,
whereas the additional consumer surplus for
all other country groups is negative (last
column in table 5) because of increasing prices.
Producers, however, benefit in all country
groups from a reduction of export subsidies
except  in  developed  countries,  where
producers lose the export support (table 6).
Exports from developing  countries are
increasing and these exporters benefit from
higher world market prices. As expected,
Cairns Group members in particular gain if
export subsidies are removed.
Basic
Difference
(no exp. sub. 50 per cent
Elimination
reduction)
reduction
Elimination
and Basic
$m
$m
$m
$m
Developed
15 151
18 684
22 785
7 634
Developing
-4 943
-12 877
-20 795
-15 852
Least developed
-1 408
-1 853
-2 298
-890
World
8 799
3 953
-309
-9 108
Cairns
-3 274
-5 485
-7 689
-4 415
Developing, ex. Cairns
-2 069
-8 453
-14 826
-12 757
Group of 20
-3 815
-8 271
-12 718
-8 903
Table 5. Consumer surplus impacts resulting from
export subsidies reductions
Basic
Difference
(no exp. sub. 50 per cent
Elimination
reduction)
reduction
Elimination
and Basic
$m
$m
$m
$m
Developed
-9 973
-15 101
-20 428
-10 455
Developing
6 062
13 527
21 031
14 969
Least developed
1 320
1 711
2 104
784
World
-2 590
138
2 706
5 296
Cairns
4 037
6 492
8 961
4 924
Developing, ex. Cairns
2 942
8 869
14 825
11 883
Group of 20
4 045
8 437
12 850
8 805
Table 6. Producer surplus impacts resulting from
export subsidies reductions
Convert pdf to grayscale tiff - application SDK utility:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to grayscale tiff - application SDK utility:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
26
The high additional gains for producers
($15 billion) and losses for consumers ($16
billion) in developing countries caused by
elimination of export subsidies are remarkable
compared with the surplus changes in the tariff
reduction scenario ($6 billion and $5 billion,
respectively). The average price increase
resulting from an elimination of export
subsidies is higher than the one resulting from
the tariff reduction scenario, and so the
negative effect on consumers is greater.
Producers in developing countries benefit
from the higher world price and increased
exports. Furthermore, their own markets
remain substantially protected. Producers in
developing  countries as a group  would
probably gain a great deal from elimination of
export subsidies. These gains are not confined
to Cairns group countries but, as shown in
table 6, also to non-Cairns Group developing
country producers. However, they depend on
the assumption that changes in world prices
are fully transmitted to the domestic market,
which is also the reason  for their own
consumers’ losses.
Welfare changes
Eliminating all export subsidies yields
global annual welfare gains of $4.3 billion
(table 8). The welfare change is the sum of
changes of the consumer and producer surplus
(including quota rents) and government
revenue. As might be expected, if export
subsidies are eliminated, the only immediate
aggregate winners in terms of welfare are the
subsidizing exporters and the net agricultural
exporters. In subsidizing  countries, the
reduction in export subsidy expenditures
generates most of the gains. The vast majority
of Cairns Group members, developed and
developing alike, benefit from the increase in
net export revenues and experience a welfare
gain. In many of the other developing and
developed countries, with the exception of the
subsidizing countries, the positive producer
surplus does not outweigh consumer losses
caused by increasing food prices if equal
weights are attached to both groups.
Difference
Reduction
Reduction
Reduction
Elimination
0 per cent
50 per cent 100 per cent
and Basic
$m
$m
$m
$m
Developed
3 356
4 094
5 291
1 935
Developing
6 987
8 516
10 201
3 214
Least developed
626
722
823
197
World
10 970
13 333
16 315
5 345
Cairns
3 148
4 376
5 685
2 537
Developing, ex. Cairns
4 881
5 786
6 809
1 928
Group of 20
4 857
5 981
7 175
2 318
Table 7. Export revenue change impacts
application SDK utility:How to C#: Special Effects
Firstly, call SepareteImageChannel(ChannelType.Red) to get a grayscale image which extract form the left.png image's red channel.
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK utility:How to C#: Color and Lightness Effects
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET It may be useful to convert an image to 1bpp for it will permanently modify the image to 1bpp grayscale image of
www.rasteredge.com
27
This is especially the case for least
developed and net food-importing developing
countries. These countries are supply-side-
constrained and cannot adequately respond to
the higher prices. In ATPSM this is reflected
in a low  base production  (the currently
observed production) and supply elasticities as
estimated by the FAO. Furthermore, export
subsidies are often on temperate product foods
imported by food-deficit developing countries.
Many  of   these  countries  do  not  have
comparative advantages in the production of
these commodities and thus suffer from terms-
of-trade losses. However, in the longer term,
supply capacities could be improved and
substitutes  increasingly  produced.  An
enhanced effort in technical assistance and
support programmes could contribute to
mitigating adjustment costs. Neither these
possibilities nor potential dynamic gains from
increasing investments are reflected in the
ATPSM results.
In the current round of negotiations
almost all countries, including net food-
importing developing countries, demanded the
elimination of  export subsidies.  This is
understandable if Governments give more
weight to producer welfare than the welfare
of consumers. Improving rural development
and poverty alleviation among the rural
population may be reasons for such an
emphasis in some countries. In others, this
emphasis may reflect the political power of
producers.  Furthermore, many countries hope
to considerably increase their food production
once export subsidies are eliminated and thus
to be less dependent on food imports. This
makes an improvement of supply-side factors
such  as  strengthening  institutions  and
upgrading the infrastructure very important.
Additionally, if increasing domestic production
enhances food security, the elimination of
export subsidies contributes positively.
Sectoral analysis
The effects of  eliminating export
subsidies vary for each commodity. Figure 8
shows the difference in the welfare effect of
the Elimination scenario and the Basic scenario
for the 11 commodities for which export
subsidy expenditures are at the bound levels.
In  the  following  the  effects  of
removing subsidies on bovine meat, sugar,
wheat, dairy and vegetable oil, oilseeds and
tobacco are analysed in greater detail. We will
always compare the scenario in which the
export subsidies and export credit subsidy
Basic
Difference
(no exp. sub. 50 per cent
Elimination
reduction)
reduction
Elimination
and Basic
$m
$m
$m
$m
Developed
8 870
11 402
14 405
5 535
Developing
717
129
-360
-1 077
Least developed
-116
-172
-226
-110
World
9 471
11 360
13 819
4 348
Cairns
797
1 069
1 369
572
Developing, ex. Cairns
514
-57
-545
-1 059
Group of 20
146
-29
-175
-321
Table 8. Welfare impacts
application SDK utility:How to C#: File Format Support
PDF. Write pdf. DPX. Writes 1 through 16-bit grayscale and 24-bit color. SVG. Convert all support image format to svg format. Read SVG image format as bitmap.
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK utility:C# Image: How to Encode & Decode JPEG 2000 Images Using C#.NET JP2
file from local files to 8-bit grayscale, 16-bit grayscale, 48-bit We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
www.rasteredge.com
28
elements for the respective commodity are
eliminated with the Basic scenario. It is clear,
however, that producers in countries that
initially do not provide export subsidies always
benefit from reductions of export subsidies.
Bovine meat
On  the  basis  of  the  model,  the
elimination of total beef export subsidies of
$0.8 billion leads to additional welfare gains
of $1.83 billion. The welfare gains exceed the
initial expenditure because export prices affect
domestic prices and distort production for the
domestic market as well as the export market.
The world market price for bovine meat
increases by an additional 1.86 percentage
points. The EU provides 98 per cent of total
export subsidies and its additional welfare gain
is $1.85 billion.  The welfare gain has three
components. First, EU consumers gain an
additional $5.16 billion from reduced domestic
consumer prices; second, producers lose $5.48
billion because of decreasing domestic
producer prises and decreasing production;
and, third, government revenue increases by
$2.17 billion. The latter is composed of a fall
in subsidy expenditure and additional out-of-
quota tariff revenue of $1.37 billion. The
removal of the export subsidy leads to a
further decrease in consumer prices in the EU
and this generates additional imports. Since the
import tariff is the same under both scenarios,
the tariff revenue increases when the subsidy
is eliminated.
The changes in consumer and producer
surplus and the welfare effects are as in the
simplified theoretical model described in
section 3. If, in figure 5, the domestic price
decreases owing to the policy change from P
D
and ends up between P
S
and P
w
, the tariff
revenue would increase, as is the result here.
For this, the tariff T and the subsidy would
have to be reduced. However, as discussed in
section 5, the underlying economic model in
ATPSM differs in that there is a composite
tariff that combines the three measures –
import tariffs, export subsidies and domestic
support – because of two-way trade. Thus,
separate changes in border measures can be
assessed, although there is an interaction
between tariffs and export subsidies.
The EU as the provider of most of the beef
export subsidies gains most from their elimi-
nation. Net exporters of bovine meat  such as
Australia, New Zealand, Brazil, China, Canada,
Uruguay and Argentina also gain.
136
1 833
496
309
417
419
394
228
24
- 35
13
107
- 200
0
200
400
600
800
1 000
1 200
1 400
1 600
1 800
2 000
Milk,
conc.
Bovine
meat
Cheese Barley Sugar Wheat Butter Pigmeat Poultry Maize
Rice
Others
Figure 8.  Additional welfare gains, by commodity
Source: ATPSM simulations.
application SDK utility:DocImage SDK for .NET: Document Imaging Features
images, like SVG and XPS Convert specified page Type 6 (OJPEG) encoding Image only PDF encoding support. CMYK, RGB, ICCBased, Indexed Color, GrayScale, Lab, etc
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK utility:VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Convert smooth lines to curves. Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; 'create optimizing PDFCompression.JBIG2Decode '--Options for Grayscale Image-- 'to
www.rasteredge.com
29
Norway, which also provides export
subsidies on bovine meat, gains $26 million,
for the same reason as the EU. Other major
winners from an  elimination  of export
subsidies on bovine meat are Australia, New
Zealand, Brazil, China, Canada, Uruguay and
Argentina. These net exporters gain from
increased world market prices. The additional
gains per gross value of production from the
export subsidy elimination on bovine meat are
even higher in some African countries. Among
the latter are, for example, Botswana, Mali and
Namibia. Zimbabwe also gains. However, these
ACP member countries may suffer from
preference erosion since export subsidies add
to the border protection faced by countries
that do not benefit from preferential access.
In our simulation it has been assumed for
bovine meat that quota rents that originate
from tariff rate quotas accrue to importing
countries. These quota rents do not fully cover
all preferential access rents but capture most
effects of preference erosion. A simulation in
which the initial quota rents accrue to
exporting countries shows, indeed, that some
of these countries could lose as the result of a
liberalization of the bovine meat market owing
to preference erosions. However, these losses
stem from tariff reductions, and not from
export  subsidy reductions, because the
additional effect of  eliminating export
subsidies is always positive for these African
countries.  Table 9 shows that  the least
developed countries gain as a group from the
elimination of export subsidies. The major
winners in this group of countries are Mali,
Sudan, Myanmar, Burkina Faso and Chad.
However, there are also some least developed
countries such as Angola with greater losses
if export subsidies on beef are removed
entirely.
In addition to some least developed
countries, net beef-importing countries such
as Japan, the United States, the Republic of
Korea and Mexico lose as the result of an
elimination of export subsidies on bovine
meat. The United States does not provide any
export subsidies on bovine meat. Japan, with
minus  $61 million, is  the biggest  loser.
Producers in all these countries benefit from
higher prices, but their gains do not outweigh
the consumers’ losses, so that the overall
welfare gains concerning bovine meat are
smaller in the Elimination scenario than in the
Basic scenario.
Producers in all developing and least
developed countries gain from an elimination
of export subsidies.
Sugar
When export subsidies on sugar of
initially $482 million are eliminated in addition
to reducing tariffs, the world price for sugar is
additionally increased by 2.3 percentage points.
The additional global welfare gain is $417
million. The EU provides 96 per cent of the
initial export subsidy expenditures and gains
$342 million from the elimination of sugar
subsidies. Consumers gain $707 million,
producers  lose  $1,053  million  and  the
additional government revenue increase is
$689 million (mainly $460 million in saved
export subsidy expenditures and $387 million
in additional tariff revenue). Other major
winners are Brazil, Mauritius, India, Australia,
Thailand, Fiji and Cuba. It is important to note
here that we are comparing two simulations
that differ only concerning the export subsidy
reduction and we report the differences of
these two simulations. Mauritius loses from
sugar market liberalization  in the Basic
scenario owing to preference erosion, but it
gains from the additional elimination of export
subsidies. We assumed in all scenarios that
quota rents on sugar accrue to exporters.
Developed
1 861
Developing
-45
LDC
586
World
1 816
Table 9. Additional welfare gains
from eliminating export subsidies
on bovine meat ($m)
application SDK utility:.NET PDF SDK | Read & Processing PDF files
to convert PDF files to raster images (color or grayscale) in .NET Imaging SDK; Able to convert PDF documents into other formats (multipage TIFF, JPEG, etc
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK utility:C# TIFF: How to Print TIFF Document File | C# Developer Guide
C# method; Enable users to print grayscale TIFF page in C:/ HP Color LaserJet 5550 PCL 6"); }; TIFF. powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
30
Among the winners are other African countries
such as Zimbabwe, South Africa, Swaziland
and Côte d’Ivoire and Caribbean countries
such as Belize.
However, gains for many developing
countries would probably be limited since, on
the one hand, access to markets is limited by
historical quota allocations, and, on the other
hand, it would be difficult in a liberalized
market to compete with lower-cost producers
such as Brazil.
In major net sugar-importing countries
such as the United States,  the Russian
Federation, Japan, China, Indonesia, Pakistan,
the Islamic Republic of Iran, the Republic of
Korea and Algeria imports and tariff revenue
decrease and the consumer surplus decreases
more than offset producer gains.
Both developing and least developed
countries gain as a group from removing
export subsidies on sugar, whereas developed
countries lose (see table 10). Thus, according
to  our  results  a  development-friendly
negotiation round should aim at phasing out
all export subsidies on sugar as early as
possible.
Dairy products
Subsidies on dairy products amount to
almost 40 per cent of total export subsidies.
The EU provides almost 80 per cent of
subsidies on dairy products. It gains about $1.4
billion and the other countries providing the
bulk of subsidies – Norway, Canada, the
United States and the Czech Republic – also
gain. Countries benefiting from additional
exports include Australia, Argentina and New
Zealand. Many least developed and developing
countries have negative additional welfare
effects as the result of removing export
subsidies on dairy products (see table 11). This
reflects again the fact that producer gains in
these countries  may  be  outweighed by
consumer losses.
Table 11. Additional welfare gains
from eliminating export subsidies
on dairy products ($m)
Wheat
The elimination of export subsidies on
wheat has specifically negative impacts on least
developed countries. In the ATPSM database
all least developed countries are net wheat
importers and all except one least developed
country lose from elimination of export
subsidies of initially $395 million, essentially
because of the computed increase in the world
market price of  2.55 percentage points.
However, since parts of the least developed
country imports are provided as food aid and
thus are not fully paid for by the beneficiaries,
the negative impact may be overstated if food
aid is continuing to be provided. The EU
provides 84 per cent and the United States 13
per cent of total wheat export subsidies. The
EU, the United States, Canada, Australia and
Argentina are the five largest beneficiaries of
the elimination of export subsidies. Among
the  developing  countries gaining  from
elimination of wheat subsidies are wheat-
producing countries  such as  Argentina,
Kazakhstan and Hungary.
Developed
1 439
Developing
-364
LDC
-39
World
1 036
Table 10.  Additional welfare gains
from eliminating export subsidies
on sugar ($m)
Developed
4 648
Developing
4 185
LDC
880
World
417
application SDK utility:.NET JPEG 2000 SDK | Encode & Decode JPEG 2000 Images
bit grayscale images within Microsoft .NET Framework. Offer Lossy and lossless data compression; Ability to compress 24-bit RGB color and 8-bit grayscale images;
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK utility:C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Convert smooth lines to curves. Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; // create optimizing JBIG2Decode; // -- Options for Grayscale Image -- // to enable
www.rasteredge.com
31
Table 12. Additional welfare gains
from eliminating export subsides
on wheat ($m)
Thus, although there are efficiency
gains from eliminating export subsidies on
wheat, such a policy is expected to cause some
hardship  for many  developing country
consumers (table 12). Since supply responses
are taken into account by ATPSM, the results
suggest that it would be difficult for most
developing countries to increase their wheat
production or production of substitutes during
the first years after elimination and with this
to reduce wheat imports sufficiently to
outweigh higher world prices.
Vegetable oil, oilseeds and tobacco
The  EU  proposal  includes  the
elimination of export subsidies for products
of specific interest to developing countries as
well as wheat, vegetable oil, oilseeds and
tobacco. Export subsidies for these products
accounted for only 6.5 per cent of the EU’s
average export subsidies during the period
from 1995 to 2000 ($356 million). In the
ATPSM database, export subsidy expenditures,
which include export credit subsidy elements,
are $459 million for these products. Excluding
wheat, expenditures for vegetable oil, oilseeds
and tobacco account for only about 1 per cent
of total export subsidy expenditures. The
United States provides the majority of the
subsidies on these products. In line with the
relatively small amount of subsidies, the gains
and losses also small (see table 13, which shows
the results from jointly removing subsidies on
vegetable oil, oilseeds and tobacco). Countries
such as Argentina, Brazil, Indonesia and
Malaysia benefit from elimination of export
subsidies on these products. Welfare gains are
several million dollars, respectively.  However,
some developing countries such as China,
India and Pakistan may experience initial
welfare losses. These countries are currently
all net vegetable oil importers.
Developed
843
Developing
-293
LDC
-52
World
498
Table 13. Additional welfare gains
from eliminating export subsidies on
vegetable oil, oilseeds and tobacco ($m)
Developed
5
Developing
-6
LDC
-2
World
3
32
Agricultural export subsidies are one
of  the most distorting of the numerous
measures distorting agricultural trade, and
impose an unreasonable burden on third
country producers, many of whom are in
developing or least developed countries. Most
developing countries cannot afford to pay
export subsidies and fear that they are losing
some of their export competitiveness relative
to developed countries. Our results confirm
that producers in developing countries would
be the major winners from an elimination of
export subsidies.
Export subsidies are interrelated with
other policies such as tariffs that maintain high
domestic prices and domestic support. The
measures may lead to overproduction, which
is disposed of through export subsidies onto
world markets with adverse  effects for
producers in non-subsidizing countries. In
order to protect their producers against cheap
subsidized imports these countries may impose
high tariffs. Thus, the elimination of export
subsidies, a reform of domestic support
policies and reductions in import tariffs are
likely to go hand in hand.  As shown by
Anderson (2003) and others, developing
countries would benefit from liberalizing their
own markets and the elimination of export
subsidies would make this more feasible
without costly adjustments.
Furthermore, a reinforcement of the
rural population, which heavily depends on
agricultural production and is in general
disproportionately poor, may contribute to
poverty alleviation. Export subsidies can
distort local markets in developing countries,
causing harmful effects to small agricultural
producers and possibly food security.
Using the partial equilibrium model,
ATPSM, we estimate global gains from an
elimination of all export subsidies of some
$4.3 billion.
23
The disaggregated results show
that the effects differ greatly by commodity,
country  and  groups  within  countries.
Agricultural exporters such as the Cairns
Group members and producers in developing
countries are the major winners. Consumers
in many developing countries would, however,
experience higher food prices. In net food-
importing countries producer gains may not
immediately outweigh consumer losses. The
supply capacity has to be increased in order to
be able to adequately respond to the expected
increase in international prices. To that end,
efforts would need to be made to expand those
countries’ supply capacity and to provide
assistance during adjustment periods.
The biggest gains for developing
countries as a group would come from the
elimination of export subsidies on sugar. Some
least developed countries and Latin American
countries would gain significantly from the
elimination of export subsidies on bovine
meat. It is shown that, in general, preference-
receiving countries would also benefit from
elimination of beef and sugar export subsidies,
although some may lose from preference
erosion owing to a reduction of bound tariffs.
This  conclusion  does  not  hold  for  all
commodities. As nearly every developing
country is a net importer of wheat, they would
face higher food bills for their wheat imports.
Producers and some developing country
exporters such as Argentina would, however,
benefit from the elimination of wheat export
subsidies.
7.  CONCLUSIONS
23
This is in the same order of magnitude as estimates using the GTAP model, version 5.3.
33
In terms of total welfare, the EU as
the largest provider of export subsidies would
receive the largest gains from elimination of
export subsidies. Producers, however, would
lose as the result of such a policy.
All WTO members gave development
a central role in the Doha work programme.
UNCTAD (UNCTAD, 2003) has designed
several development indicators against which
progress in the multilateral trading system with
regard to development goals can be assessed.
With  regard  to  the  indicator  “Equal
opportunity for unequal partners”, the
elimination of export subsidies would level the
playing field, as developing countries are not
able to subsidize their exports, and thus make
a contribution. A positive contribution to
achieving  the  goals set  out in the UN
Millennium Declaration, which is a factor
contributing to the indicator “Serving the
public interest”, is also likely, although some
developing countries are expected to initially
experience welfare losses. The estimated
welfare impacts are the sum of gains to
producers,  exporters,  consumers  and
taxpayers. A problem with such welfare
estimates is the presumption of equal weights
and the calculation at national levels. In many
developing countries agriculture is particularly
important because a disproportionately high
share of the poor live in rural areas. Thus, since
the agricultural sector in developing countries
would benefit from an elimination of export
subsidies, the framework agreement would
contribute to achieving the goals of the
Millennium Declaration in countries where the
majority of the poor are subsistence farmers
or live in rural areas. It may, however, increase
the necessity for support to the urban poor.
Furthermore, since world commodity prices
would increase as a result of eliminating export
subsidies, this policy would serve the indicator
“Revitalizing  the commodities sector”.
However, since the bulk of  the  export
subsidies is not on commodities, on which
many developing countries heavily depend, the
contribution is limited. Finally, to benefit from
the elimination of export subsidies, developing
countries need a “coherent” development
strategy which includes improving their supply
capacity and reducing transportation costs.
The limitations of the analysis should
be kept in mind. The model from which the
conclusions are  drawn  relies  on several
important assumptions. One is that production
quotas are not binding and therefore supply
immediately responds to subsidy changes. This
assumption leads to an overstatement of the
benefits to third country exporters. A second
assumption is the focus on budgetary outlay
constraints rather than volume constraints.
Another limitation is data availability. Here,
only official export subsidies were considered
and a possible bilateral nature, where subsidies
are provided only for exports to specific
countries, could not be taken into account. As
has been confirmed by recent WTO Dispute
Panel decisions, the officially notified export
subsidies are lower than actual subsidies; thus
our analysis underestimates the result of an
elimination of all forms of  subsidizing
exports. Further limitations that are common
to computable equilibrium models were
discussed above.
In spite of these limitations, the results
provide a useful indication of the likely impacts
of a reduction or an elimination of export
subsidies. Producers in developing countries
would receive considerable gains without high
adjustment costs. Least developed countries
and net food-importing countries should be
aware of the possible impact on consumers
resulting from increasing food prices for
specific products such as wheat. Although this
may be advantageous to their producers, who
include some of the poorest sections of
society, it may also have consequences for the
urban poor. It therefore seems reasonable to
develop support mechanisms to help the
poorer countries to adjust to the changes that
are likely to occur as a result of the current
WTO negotiations.
34
ABARE (2001). “Export subsidies in the current WTO agriculture negotiations”, ABARE current
issues, July 2001.
ABARE (2003). “Three pillars of agricultural support” by Ivan Roberts, ABARE Report 03.5.
Anderson, K. (2004). “Agriculture, trade reform and poverty reduction: Implications for sub-
Saharan Africa”, UNCTAD Policy Issues in International Trade and Commodities Study
Series, No. 22, Geneva.
Brander, J.A. and Spencer, B.J. (1984). “Export Subsidies and International Market Share Rivalry”,
NBER Working Paper No. W1464.
CAIRNS Group (2000). Cairns Group Negotiating Proposal, Export Competition, WTO document
G/AG/NG/W/11.
De Gorter, H. (2004). “Market access, export subsidies, and domestic support: Developing new
rules for the agreement on agriculture“ in Agriculture and the New Trade Agenda, Ingco, M. D.
and Winters, A. L. (eds.), Cambridge University Press.
European Commission (2002). “WTO and agriculture: European Commission proposes more
market opening, less trade-distorting support and a radically better deal for developing
countries”, Brussels.
European Commission and United States (2003). “Joint EC-US paper: Agriculture”, WTO
document JOB(03)/157, Geneva.
Gaisford, J. D. and W. A. Kerr (2001). “Deadlock in Geneva: The battle over export subsidies in
agriculture”, University of Calgary, Department of Economics Discussion Paper No. 2001-
07.
Hoekman, B., Ng, F. and Olarreaga, M. (2003). “Agricultural tariffs versus subsidies: What’s more
important for developing countries”, mimeo, World Bank, Washington, DC.
Laird, S., Cernat, L. and Turrini, A. (2003). “Back to basics: market access issues in the Doha
Agenda”, United Nations, UNCTAD/DITC/TAB/Misc.9.
Leetmaa, S. (2001). “Agricultural policy reform in the WTO: The road ahead”, Burfisher, M.E.
(eds.), ERS Agricultural Economics Report No. 802, May 2001.
REFERENCES
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested