convert mvc view to pdf using itextsharp : Convert pdf to single page tiff SDK software project winforms wpf web page UWP itcdtab49_en2-part1038

15 
coefficient is 0.04 implies when the skill and technology content manufactures of exports increases 
by 10 per cent, GDP per capita increases by 0.40 per cent. 
The  second  column  of  tables  1.a  to  1.c  measures  the  institutional  elasticity  or  the 
percentage change in GDP per capita when institutional quality changes by 1 per cent. In all the 
three specifications, more than 75 per cent of the observations show a positive estimate of the 
institutional elasticity. Here, at the median of IQI slope coefficient is 0.16 (table 1.c) implies, 
controlled  for  the  high  skill  and  technology  content  manufactures  of  exports  and  education 
variables,  when institutional quality increases by 1 per cent, GDP per capita increases by 0.16 per 
cent which is a large impact. 
The third column of tables 1.a to 1.c measures the education elasticity or the percentage 
change in GDP per capita when education changes by 1 per cent. In all the three specifications, 
more than 75 per cent of the observations show a positive estimate of the educational elasticity. 
Here, at the median of CGER slope coefficient is 1.384 (table 1.c) implies, controlled for the high 
skill and technology content manufactures of exports and institutional quality variable,  when 
combined school enrolment  increases by 1 per cent, GDP per capita increases by 1.39 per cent 
which is also a large impact. All standard errors are obtained via bootstrapping and are provided in 
the parentheses below the estimates.  So, the results in tables 1.a to 1.c shows that for three 
categories of exports contents, we can make two important observations. First, there is quite large 
evidence  of  a  statistically  significant,  positive  impact  of  high  skill  and  technology  content 
manufactures on development as compared to low and medium groups. Second, the effect of 
higher NSEXP is not uniform across country-time period combinations. 
Tables 2.a  to  2.c  show the nonparametric  median estimates of  the responsiveness  of 
GDPPCpenn to changes in (C/D/E) NSEXP for each country.  
For CNSEXP at the median, Uruguay has the highest positive and significant estimate of 
GDPPCpenn/
CNSEXP,  while  Malaysia  has  the  highest  negative  and  significant  estimate. 
Among 88 countries, 39 countries have positive median estimates and 49 have negative median 
estimates. In the case of IQI, 58 countries have positive median estimates and 30 countries have 
negative median estimates. For CGER, 62 countries have positive median estimates and 26 have 
negative median estimates.   
For DNSEXP at the median, Malaysia has the highest positive and significant estimate of 
GDPPCpenn/
DNSEXP, while Peru has the highest negative and significant estimate. Among 88 
countries, 53 countries have positive median estimates and 35 have negative median estimates. In 
this case, IQI in 59 countries have positive median estimates and 29 countries have negative 
median estimates. For CGER, 64 countries have positive median estimates and 24 have negative 
median estimates.   
For ENSEXP at the median, Malaysia has the highest positive and significant estimate of 
GDPPCpenn/
ENSEXP,  while  Philippines has the  highest  negative and  significant estimate. 
Among 87 countries (data on Seychelles is missing), 66 countries have positive median estimates 
and 21 have  negative  median estimates.  Similarly, IQI  in 58 countries have positive median 
estimates and CGER in 77 countries have positive median estimates respectively.   
Table 3 presents the median elasticities by time periods to access any changes in the 
GDPPCpenn- C/D/E) NSEXP relationship over time. Table 3.a shows that for every time period, 
the median nonparametric estimate of the slope of the GDPPCpenn- CNSEXP function is negative 
but statistically insignificant, although in values, the median elasticities have not been stable over 
time. The GDPPCpenn- IQI function is positive and statistically significant over time as well as 
the function of GDPPCpenn-CGER.  
Convert pdf to single page tiff - SDK software project:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to single page tiff - SDK software project:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
16 
Table  3.b  shows  the  GDPPCpenn-  DNSEXP  function  is  positive  and  statistically 
significant in some years. The values of median elasticities remained within the range of 0.010 and 
0.017 over time which is much higher than median elasticties of GDPPCpenn- CNSEXP. 
Table 3.b presents the median elasticities by time periods to access any changes in the 
GDPPCpenn- ENSEXP relationship over time has increased positively and statistically significant 
in all the 13 years. It is also worth noting that their absolute values are in the range of 0.026 and 
0.063  (in  2007).   In  summary, we  can make  observation that  the  impact of high skill and 
technology content manufactures exports on GDP per capita has increased over time as compared 
to two other groups of products. 
The nonparametric estimate of the regression function or the slope at any observation is a 
weighted average, where the weights are determined by the closeness of other data points to that 
observation. Also, he nonparametric estimates are calculated at every data point, so we are able to 
examine the nonparametric slope estimates for various subgroups. We examine median estimates 
for  three  continents:  (a)  Asia,  (b)  Americas  and  (c)  Africa.  Tables  4.a  to  4.c  show  the 
nonparametric median estimates of the responsiveness of GDPPCpenn to changes in (C/D/E) 
NSEXP for each continents. At the median, estimate of the slope of the GDPPCpenn- CNSEXP 
function is negative and statistically significant for Asia [-0.027(0.011)] and Americas [-0.010 
(0.002)], and then impact is positive but insignificant [0.001(.001)] for Africa. Table 4.a also 
shows  that  institutions  have  positive  and  significant  impact  in  Americas  and  Asia,  while 
educational achievements have positive and significant impact in all continents.  
In the case of GDPPCpenn- DNSEXP estimates at the median, all the continents have 
positive and statistically significant impact with largest impact on DNSEXP on GDP per capita is 
in  Americas  [0.031  (0.004)].  The  results  for  IQI  and  CGER  are  similar  as  in  the  case  of 
GDPPCpenn- CNSEXP functional estimates as in table 4.a.  
Interestingly, estimate of the slope of the GDPPCpenn- ENSEXP function is positive and 
statistically significant for Asia [0.0 61(0.008)], followed by Americas [0.0 55(0.005)] and Africa 
[0.025(0.003)].  Once  again,  for  these  continents,  there  is  strong  evidence  of  a  statistically 
significant positive relationship between GDPPCpenn and ENSEXP as compared to CNSEXP and 
DNSEXP.  
It should also be noted that IQI impact is largest in Americas on GDPPDpenn (table 4.c, 
0.644) compared to Asia and Africa. Whereas in the case of CGER, for all the continents, it has a 
positive and significant impact on GDPPCpenn and is largest in Asia (table 4.c, col. 3, 2.030).    
Tables 5.a to 5.c show estimated results for two different country groups distinguished by 
their  growing  importance  in  the  world  economy:  emerging  countries  and  other  developing 
countries at the median.  For CNSEXP, impact is negative but significant for both the country 
groups. However, the impact is positive and statistically significant for DNSEXP and ENSEXP. 
The higher shares of medium and high skill technology intensive manufactures tend to have higher 
positive and significant impact for the emerging South countries.  
Tables 6.a to 6.c present estimates separately for two country groups distinguished by 
income levels: least developed countries and small island developing countries (LDCSIDS) and 
non  LDCSIDS.  Like  before,  impact  of  DNSEXP  and  ENSEXP  is  positive  and  statistically 
significant in the case of both groups and estimated coefficient is much higher of ENSEXP in non-
LDCSIDS compared to LDCSIDS group of countries. IQI and CGER have positive and significant 
impact on GDPPCpenn for both groups of countries.  
To summarize the effects of CNSEXP, DNSEXP and ENSEXP covariates, we note the 
following: the nonparametric estimate of 
GDPPCpenn/
CNSEXP is negative and significant and 
SDK software project:Online Convert PDF file to Tiff. Best free online PDF Tif
C# developers can render and convert PDF document to TIFF image file with no loss in original file quality. Both single page and multi-page Tiff image files
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software project:VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Able to remove a single page from adobe PDF document in VB.NET. using RasterEdge. XDoc.PDF; How to VB.NET: Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File.
www.rasteredge.com
17 
that  of 
GDPPCpenn/
DNSEXP  is  positive  and  significant  at  the  median.    The  median 
nonparametric estimate of responsiveness of 
GDPPCpenn/
ENSEXP is positive and significant 
for the entire dataset and different country groups and years under consideration. The higher values 
of  the  estimated  elasticities  for  ENSEXP  suggest  that  high  skill  and  technology  intensive 
manufactures have higher impact on GDP per capita than low and medium skill and technology 
intensive manufactures in contributing the path of development of a country.  
Also, the effects of the remaining covariates, 
GDPPCpenn/
IQI and 
GDPPCpenn/
CGER are mostly positive and significant in influencing GDP per capita in this current sample.  
In addition, if we look at the estimates for the entire dataset, the parametric estimate of the 
impact of CNSEXP, DNSEXP and ENSEXP on GDPPCpenn are always positive and statistically 
significant    and  their  estimated  slope  coefficient  varies  from  0.058  (CNSEXP)  to  0.196 
(DNSEXP), with 0.151 for ENSEXP. Also, the parametric estimates lie above third quartile of the 
nonparametric estimates and are multiple  times  as large as  the  median of the nonparametric 
estimates.  It  is  clear  that  parametric  estimates  are  global  estimates  whereas  nonparametric 
estimates are locally weighted, vary across the observations and give a broader picture of the 
GDPPCpenn- (C/D/E) NSEXP relationship. The 
GDPPCpenn/
IQI and 
GDPPCpenn/
CGER 
have  positive  and  significant  impact  on  GDP  per  capita  as  well  likewise  in  the  case  of 
nonparametric estimates.  
Furthermore,  any discrepancy between  the  signs of  the parametric and nonparametric 
estimates may arise due to two types of biases: a misspecification bias and an endogeneity/omitted 
variable  bias.  The  parametric  model  potentially  suffers  from  both,  the  nonparametric  model 
potentially suffers only from the second type of bias. Thus, it is the misspecification bias and its 
interaction  with  the  endogeneity  bias  that  drives  the  differences  across  the  two  estimation 
techniques. Nonparametric instrumental variable techniques are not fully developed and will be 
explored in our future research. 
4.2 Extended Model Results: Robustness Checks 
 
In this section, we include two additional variables, as has been used in the literature, to 
test the robustness of results in tables 1.a to 1.c. The objective here is to cross check to (a) resource 
availability from financial sector (PCRDBOFGDP) institutions such as banks and (b) effective 
foreign market access (WAVG) – as an exogenous variable − play a role in influencing GDP per 
capita other than through level of skill and technology intensive manufactures exports, institutional 
quality and combined gross enrolment. We run these model specifications for the sample of 64 
developing countries from the core model sample as the data is not consistently available for 
PCRDBOFGDP and WAVG. 
Tables 7.a to 7.c examines the impact of PCRDBOFGDP and WAVG on GDPPCpenn for 
countries with three different types of skill and technology intensive manufactures exports. It 
displays the 25
th
, 50
th
and 75
th
percentiles of all nonparametric estimates. More than 50 per cent of 
the nonparametric estimates of the impact of PCRDBOFGDP on GDPPCpenn are significant 
positive in all the three types of exports structure. For all three levels of export structures at the 75
th
percentile, the nonparametric estimate of WAVG-GDPPCpenn relationship is positive significant at 
the  conventional  levels.   It appears that the majority  of the countries have not been able to 
completely take advantage of the effective foreign market access (and preferences) in favorably 
influencing the  development  paths of their economies.  On  the other hand, the  results clearly 
indicate that efficient functioning of the financial market and credit flows for business sector 
development is critical ingredient to increase the level of GDP per capita in all countries over the 
SDK software project:C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
application. Able to remove a single page from PDF document. Ability Demo Code: How to Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File in C#.NET. How to
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software project:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
PDF pages, VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET convert PDF to SVG. Users can view PDF document in single page or continue
www.rasteredge.com
18 
time period. More importantly, the level of skill and technology intensity manufacture exports still 
matters for improving the level of GDP per capita, along with a strong institutional structure and 
educational level.  
Table 8 shows the impact of all the five covariates at the median for all the countries in the 
sample  with the high skill  and technology intensive manufacture exports share.
8
The results 
suggest that for a 60 per cent of the country-time period observations, the relationship between 
ENSEXP  and  GDP  per  capita  is  significant  positive,  while  70  per  cent  of  cases  are  for 
PCRDBOFGDP  and  only  23  per  cent  for  WAVG.  The  relationship  between  CGER  and 
GPPPCpenn is the strongest (77 per cent) and followed by IQI (59 per cent).  So, the country level 
results also show that higher level of skill and technology contents of exports matter to improve the 
GDP per capita along with good institutions, human capital and financial markets. Tables 9.a to 9.c 
present results of the nonparametric estimates at the median by year for all the covariates.  The 
results provide further support a positive impact of ENSEXP on GDP per capita along with other 
covariates except for WAVG.   
Likewise in core model (table 4), we now present the results by region. The new set of 
results in tables 10.a to 10.c indicate that the impact of CNSEXP and DNSEXP on GDP per capita 
is positive significant Africa, along with institutions, human capital and financial credit flows. The 
effective foreign market access is positive and significant in the specification with DNSEXP in 
African countries. It seems that the level of effective foreign market access to these low-income 
countries has not been uniform across all sectors and their impact is also dispersed across countries 
with the regions. In the case of Americas, the results show that their increasing share in ENSEXP 
has been helping them to improve their GDP per capita along with support from human capital, 
institutions and financial resource availability. The impact of ENSEXP on GDP per capita is 
positive in Asia but not significant while human capital and efficient financial market activities 
have positive and significant impact on their economic development.  
A similar set of results are obtained in tables 11.a to 11.c in the case of emerging South 
countries in comparison to other south countries in the sample. It clearly shows that emerging 
south countries have transformed their exports structure from low skill and technology contents 
exports to higher level of products to raise their level of GDP per capita. Another set of results for 
LDCSIDS indicate that WAVG has positive and significant impact on GDP per capita in the case 
of DNSEXP and ENSEXP of specifications which implies that highly targeted preferential foreign 
market access of LDCSIDS exports products, especially in developed market could help them to 
influence  their  GDP  per  capita  as  shown  in  tables  11.a  to  11.c.  It  also  appears  that  for 
GDPPCpenn/
ENSEXP in LDCSIDS is positive and significant in this extended model. This 
implies that the countries in LDCSIDS group when undertake policies to improve their export 
structure  for  more  sophisticated  products,  could  potentially  improve  their  GDP  per  capita 
effectively as was shown in the case of core model (table 6c).   
8
We report only the median nonparametric estimates of ENSEXP for brevity. More detailed nonparametric 
results for DNSEXP and CNSEXP and the remaining covariates are available if requested from the authors. 
SDK software project:C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Similarly, Tiff image with single page or multiple pages is supported. Description: Convert to PDF and save it on the disk. Parameters:
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software project:VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
csv to PDF, C#.NET convert PDF to svg, C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images Users can view PDF document in single page or continue
www.rasteredge.com
19 
5.  Conclusions 
The impact of high  skill and technology intensive manufactures exports on economic 
performance has enormous implications for development policy makers and international agencies 
to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). In this paper, we reassess the relationship 
between three levels of skill and technology contents of manufactures and GDP per capita by 
utilizing the Li–Racine methodology.  
We examine here a dataset of 88 developing countries over the 1995–2007 time period. 
There is strong evidence of a statistically significant, positive impact of high skill and technology 
content products on GDP per capita. It’s worth noting that the nonparametric estimates are far from 
uniform over all country-time period combinations.  
The paper also offers a closer look of the impact on institutional quality, human capital on 
GDP per capita for various country-groups in the core model. The extended model also provides 
evidence that a flow of credit and well function financial markets are essential to support higher 
level of economic performance. We also found that effective market access for products from 
Africa and low income economies have been helpful to enhance their export capacity vis-à-vis 
GDP per capita. Due to differences in level of economic development in Asia and the Americas, a 
majority of the countries have not been, a first look at the evidence, beneficial of the foreign 
market access of their products.   
The results of the nonparametric model of our paper support the notion that in general the 
higher level of skill and technology intensive manufactures could help increase GDP per capita in 
developing countries. Our paper supports the view that countries with higher quality of exports 
product along with better institutional quality, human capital and financial markets are in a better 
position to reap benefits from trade integration and economic policies. On the other hand, countries 
with low skill and technology related products with weak institutional quality, lower level of 
human  capital  and  lack  of  financial  resources  find  it  difficult  to  enhance  their  economic 
performance level. Overall, our empirical evidence indicate that effective support to the exports 
sectors, which has competitive advantage to enhance their capability to produce high quality and 
skill and technology content exports. Developing countries should underscore the urgent need for 
trade-policy support along with emphasizing on augmenting domestic investment for high quality 
of human capital development and increasing institutional efficiency as a necessary component to 
improve productive capacity for harmonious economic development.  
SDK software project:C# Word - Convert Word to TIFF in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word control, C# developers can render and convert Word document Both single page and multi-page Tiff image files are acceptable
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software project:VB.NET Image: Multi-page TIFF Editor SDK; Process TIFF in VB.NET
this VB.NET multi-page TIFF imaging SDK owns rich APIs, using which developers can easily load, save, view, edit, annotate, manipulate, convert and compress
www.rasteredge.com
20 
References 
Acemoglu D, Johnson S and Robinson J (2001). The colonial origins of comparative development: 
An empirical investigation. American Economic Review. 91 (5): 1369–1401.  
Aitchison  J  and  Aitken  CGG (1976).  Multivariate  Binary Discrimination  by  Kernel Method, 
Biometrika, Vol 63 (3), 413 – 420. 
Anderson TW (1984). An Introduction to Multivariate Statistical Analysis, 2
nd
Edition. JohnWiley 
and Sons.  New York. 
Basu SR, Klein LR and Nagar AL (2005). Quality of Life: Comparing India and China,The paper 
presented at Project LINK meeting, 1 November 2005, United Nations Office at Geneva. 
Basu SR (2007). The E7 in international trade: Dynamism and cooperation, paper presented at the 
Project LINK International Meeting, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Beijing, China, 
14–17 May 2007.  
Basu SR (2008). A new way to link development to institutions, policies and geography. Policy 
Issues  in  International  Trade  and  Commodities.  United  Nations  publication. 
UNCTAD/ITCD/TAB/38. New York and Geneva. 
Basu  SR  (forthcoming).  Retooling  Trade  Policy  in  Developing  Countries:  Does  Technology 
Intensity of Exports Matter for GDP Per Capita?  Policy Issues in International Trade and 
Commodities. United Nations publication. UNCTAD/ITCD/TAB/. New York and Geneva. 
Cingranelli-Richards (CIRI) Human Rights Dataset.  http://ciri.binghamton.edu/.  
Dollar  D and Kraay A (2003). Institutions,  trade and  growth: revisiting the evidence. Policy 
research working paper no. 3004. World Bank. 
Easterly W and Levine R (2003). Tropics, germs, and crops: how endowments influence economic 
development. Journal of Monetary Economics. 50 (1): 3–39.  
Hausmann  R  and  Klinger  B  (2006).  Structural  transformation  and  patterns  of  comparative 
advantage in product space. CID Working Paper, No. 128. Cambridge, Massachusetts: 
Harvard University, Center for International Development. 
Hausmann R, Hwang J and Rodrik D (2006). What you Export Matters, NBER Working Paper No. 
11905. 
The  Heritage  Foundation  and  The  Wall  Street  Journal.  Index  of  Economic  Freedom. 
http://www.heritage.org/research/features/index/. 
Henisz WJ. The Political Constraint Index (POLCON) Dataset.  
Imbs J and Wacziarg R (2003). Stages of diversification. American Economic Review. Vol. 93, No. 
1 (March), 63-86. 
Klinger B (2009) Is South-South Trade a Testing Ground? Policy Issues in International Trade and 
Commodities.  United  Nations  publication.  UNCTAD/ITCD/TAB/40.  New  York  and 
Geneva. 
21 
Lall S (2000). Selective industrial  and trade  policies in developing  countries:  theoretical and 
empirical issues. QEH Working Paper, No. 48. Oxford, United Kingdom: Queen Elizabeth 
House, University of Oxford. August. 
Lall S, Weiss J and Zhang J (2005). The “Sophistication” of Exports: A new Measure of Product 
Characteristics, QEH Working Paper Series, 123. 
Li Q and Racine J (2004). Cross-Validated Local Linear Nonparametric Regression, Statistica 
Sinica, Vol 14 (2), 485 – 512. 
Nagar AL and Basu SR (2002). Weighting socio-economic variables of human development: A 
latent variable approach. In: Ullah A et al., eds. Handbook of Applied Econometrics and 
Statistical Inference. New York. Marcel Dekker. 
Pagan A and Ullah A (1999). Nonparametric Econometrics. New York. Cambridge University 
Press.  
Polity IV Project. Political Regime Characteristics and Transitions, 1800-2008, by M.G. Marshall, 
K. Jaggers, and T.R. Gurr.  
PRIO  (International  Peace  Research  Institute).  Vanhanen’s  index  of  democracy. 
http://www.prio.no/CSCW/Datasets/Governance/Vanhanens-index-of-democracy/. 
PRS Group. International Country Risk Guide. http://www.prsgroup.com/ICRG.aspx. 
Racine  J  and  Li  Q  (2004).  Nonparametric  Estimation  of  Regression  Functions  with  both 
Categorical and Continuous data, Journal of Econometrics, Vol 119 (1), 99 – 130. 
Rodrik D, Subramanian A and Trebbi F (2004). Institutions rule: The primacy of institutions over 
geography and integration in economic development. Journal of Economic Growth. 9 (2): 
131–165. 
Rodrik D (2007). Industrial development: some stylized facts and policy directions. In Industrial 
Development for the 21st Century: Sustainable Development Perspectives. United Nations 
publication, New York.  
Shirotori M, Tumurchudur B and Cadot O (2010). Revealed Factor Intensity Indices at the Product 
Level, Policy Issues in International Trade and Commodities. United Nations publication. 
UNCTAD/ITCD/TAB/44. New York and Geneva. 
Sachs J (2003). Institutions don’t rule: Direct effects of geography on per capita income. Working 
paper no. 9490. National Bureau of Economic Research. 
Silverman BW (1986). Density Estimation for Statistics and Data Analysis, Chapman Hall, New 
York.  
UNCTAD (1996). Trade and Development Report, 1996: Developing Countries in World Trade. 
New York and Geneva. 
UNCTAD (2002). Trade and Development Report, 2002: Developing Countries in World Trade. 
New York and Geneva. 
UNCTAD (2007). Developing Countries in International Trade: Trade and Development Index. 
New York and Geneva. 
22 
UNCTAD (2009). Global economic crisis: implications for trade and development, Report by the 
UNCTAD  secretariat,  TD/B/C.I/CRP.1,  Trade  and  Development  Board,  Trade  and 
Development Commission, First session, Geneva, 11–15 May 2009 
UNCTAD: 
Trade 
Analysis  and  Information 
System  (TRAINS),  database, 
http://r0.unctad.org/trains_new/index.shtm. 
United  Nations,  Department  of  Economic  and  Social  Affairs  (UN–DESA)  (2006).  World 
Economic and Social Survey 2006: Diverging Growth and Development. New York 
United  Nations,  Department  of  Economic  and  Social  Affairs  (UN–DESA)  (2010).  World 
Economic and Social Survey 2010: Retooling Global  Development. New York. 
United Nations  Economic  Commission for Africa  (2007). Economic Report  on Africa 2007: 
Accelerating  Africa’s  Development  through  Diversification.  Addis  Ababa,  Ethiopia: 
UNECA. 
World Bank (2009). Breaking into New Markets: Emerging Lessons for Export Diversification, 
eds. R. Newfarmer, W. Shaw and P. Walkenhorst. Washington, DC: World Bank. 
23 
List of tables 
Table 1: Nonparametric First, Second and Third Quartile Estimates 
Table 1.a: Low Skill- and Technology-Intensive Manufactures   
Dependent variable: GDP per capita  
(international $, 2005 Constant Prices)_ lnGDPPCPenn 
lncnsexp 
lniqi 
lncger 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
1
st
quartile 
-0.059* 
(.011) 
-0.060* 
(.005) 
-0.159* 
(.034) 
Median 
-0.006* 
(.001) 
0.086* 
(.004) 
0.627* 
(.05) 
3
rd
quartile 
0.029* 
(.002) 
0.316* 
(.021) 
1.384* 
(.062) 
Parametric 
0.058* 
(.013) 
0.295* 
(.051) 
1.46* 
(.065) 
Table 1.b: Medium Skill- and Technology-Intensive Manufactures   
Dependent variable: GDP per capita  
(international $, 2005 Constant Prices)_ lnGDPPCPenn 
lndnsexp 
lniqi 
lncger 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
1
st
quartile 
-0.032* 
(.004) 
-0.056* 
(.009) 
-0.018 
(.063) 
Median 
0.013* 
(.003) 
0.119* 
(.011) 
0.737* 
(.041) 
3
rd
quartile 
0.082* 
(.004) 
0.324* 
(.017) 
1.478* 
(.069) 
Parametric 
0.196* 
(.014) 
0.249* 
(.249) 
1.34* 
(.061) 
Table 1.c: High Skill- and Technology-Intensive Manufactures   
Dependent variable: GDP per capita  
(international $, 2005 Constant Prices)_ lnGDPPCPenn 
lnensexp 
lniqi 
lncger 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
1
st
quartile 
-0.004** 
(.001) 
-0.109* 
(.018) 
0.466* 
(.026) 
Median 
0.040* 
(.002) 
0.160* 
(.018) 
1.384* 
(.047) 
3
rd
quartile 
0.121* 
(.005) 
0.623* 
(.022) 
2.211* 
(.055) 
Parametric 
.151* 
(.011) 
.348* 
(.048) 
1.31* 
(.062) 
Notes:  Standard errors are in parentheses. 
Standard errors of nonparametric estimates are obtained from bootstrapping (seed 10101) 
* significant at 1% level, ** significant at 5% level, *** significant at 10% level. 
24 
Table 2: Nonparametric Median Estimates by Country 
Table 2.a: Low skill- and Technology-Intensive Manufactures   
Dependent variable: GDP per capita 
(international $, 2005 Constant Prices)_ lnGDPPCPenn 
ccode 
lncnsexp 
se 
lniqi 
se 
lncger 
se 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 
AFG 
-0.082 
.054 
0.084* 
.003 
-0.423 
.435 
ARG 
-0.414* 
.014 
0.983* 
.018 
1.305* 
.001 
BDI 
0.002* 
.000 
0.000 
.020 
-0.375* 
.056 
BEN 
-0.018 
.019 
-0.019* 
.003 
0.280* 
.071 
BFA 
0.133* 
.007 
0.363* 
.016 
0.806* 
.071 
BGD 
0.097* 
.002 
-0.089* 
.001 
1.953* 
.006 
BHS 
-0.018* 
.000 
0.034 
.036 
1.449* 
.064 
BLZ 
-0.008* 
.000 
0.166* 
.016 
1.964* 
.02 
BOL 
-0.116* 
.000 
0.056* 
.002 
0.902* 
.008 
BRA 
-0.097* 
.001 
0.542* 
.005 
-0.620* 
.007 
BTN 
-0.001 
.001 
0.493* 
.056 
2.260* 
.064 
CAF 
0.036* 
.000 
0.090* 
.001 
0.374* 
.009 
CHL 
-0.022* 
.003 
-0.046* 
.000 
3.326* 
.015 
CHN 
-0.125* 
.026 
0.208* 
.005 
13.121* 
.163 
CIV 
0.192* 
.000 
0.050* 
.002 
-0.338* 
.002 
CMR 
-0.040* 
.001 
-0.136* 
.019 
0.259* 
.004 
COL 
0.045* 
.000 
0.238* 
.000 
1.092* 
.000 
COM 
0.009* 
.000 
0.088* 
.005 
-0.166* 
.009 
CPV 
-0.043* 
.000 
1.4* 
.001 
3.122* 
.011 
CRI 
0.031* 
.001 
1.539* 
.001 
1.873* 
.008 
CUB 
0.006* 
.000 
0.204* 
.005 
1.288* 
.012 
DJI 
0.026* 
.009 
-1.210* 
.164 
0.027 
.037 
DMA 
-0.063* 
.000 
-0.070* 
.011 
-1.16* 
.017 
DOM 
0.044* 
.006 
0.897* 
.037 
1.512* 
.126 
EGY 
-0.183* 
.001 
0.080* 
.0001 
-0.5* 
.019 
ERI 
-0.039* 
.007 
0.02 
.02 
-0.475* 
.06 
ETH 
0.097*** 
.052 
0.187* 
.041 
0.263 
.293 
FJI 
-0.046* 
.000 
0.02* 
.001 
-0.015 
.019 
GHA 
-0.036* 
.001 
0.007* 
.002 
1.412* 
.029 
GIN 
0.003 
.005 
0.035 
.047 
0.431** 
.174 
GMB 
-0.012* 
.000 
-0.034* 
.001 
1.028* 
.012 
GNB 
-0.007* 
.000 
0.41* 
.001 
-10.516* 
.086 
GRD 
-0.042* 
.000 
1.912* 
.000 
2.114* 
.030 
GTM 
0.002* 
.000 
0.121* 
.015 
0.485* 
.006 
GUY 
0.054* 
.008 
0.169* 
.045 
-0.1648 
.011 
HND 
0.032* 
.001 
0.404* 
.009 
1.242* 
.005 
IDN 
-0.210* 
.022 
-0.218* 
.033 
1.005* 
.041 
IND 
0.046 
.054 
-0.104* 
.008 
1.923* 
.093 
JAM 
-0.011* 
.000 
0.240* 
.000 
0.014 
.027 
JOR 
0.029* 
.000 
-0.151* 
.000 
1.123* 
.011 
KEN 
0.004* 
.000 
-0.026* 
.008 
0.280* 
.000 
KHM 
0.090* 
.024 
-0.148 
.134 
2.03* 
.016 
KNA 
-0.02* 
.007 
0.352* 
.006 
-0.947* 
.006 
KOR 
0.003 
.008 
-0.456* 
.005 
4.126* 
.072 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested