IHS TECHNOLOGY 
Paving the way: how online advertising 
enables the digital economy of the future 
November 2015
ihs.com 
Executive Summary 
Online advertising is a key driver of the European digital economy that promotes business and economic 
growth  and  paves  the  way  for  broader  digital  sector  innovation.  This  report  illustrates  this  integral 
contribution of online advertising. Highlights are:  
€46 billion were invested in online advertising in Europe in 2014. Out of this sum, publishers active 
Europe generated revenues €30.7 billion from online advertising, or 30.4% of all advertising revenue. 
In terms of gross value added (GVA), a standard measure of the contribution to the overall economy 
similar to GDP, €22 billion are 
directly attributable to online advertising in the EU-28. Advertising 
includes a multiplier effect throughout the economy as Euros flow through supply chains (indirect 
effects) and as companies and their supplies hire and pay employees (induced effects). Considering 
these effects, the contribution of online advertising increases up to €113 billion. 
Yet  approaches  which  locate  economic  value  only  within  the  immediate  value  chain  are 
underestimating the much broader economic contribution of advertising. Firms advertise because 
doing so leads to increased sales. These sales lead to economic activities outside of the advertising 
value chain. Incorporating these ripple effects increases the value of online advertising to 473 billion, 
or 5% of the overall economy (expressed in GVA) in the EU-28. 
0.9 million European jobs (or 0.4% of the EU-28 total) are directly supported by online advertising; 
this increases to 1.4m jobs if indirect and induced effects are considered, and to 5.4 million, or 2.5% 
of the EU-28 workforce, if broader ripple effects are taken into account.  
Online advertising is an integral funding model for high-growth digital sectors in Europe. In 2014, 
54% of all online video revenues in the EU-28 were generated by advertising. For the publishing 
industry, advertising is by far the most important source for funding journalistic content with 75% of 
all their online revenues coming from advertising. Similarly, the buoyant mobile content market 
depends on advertising. In 2015, paid-for app revenues have been replaced by advertising as the 
top revenue source. 
Online advertising is an incubator for digital skills that rejuvenate a plethora of different industries. As 
advertising becomes increasingly data-driven and technology-centric, the sector is at the forefront of 
nurturing and hiring talent that possesses the skills to transform and future-proof other industries.  
Convert pdf to 300 dpi tiff - Library SDK component:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to 300 dpi tiff - Library SDK component:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
Paving the way: how online advertising enables the digital economy of the future 
Table of Contents 
1.  Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 3 
2.  Advertising and the economy.......................................................................................................... 4 
2.1 
How advertising creates value .............................................................................................. 4 
Advertising-related activities ........................................................................................................... 4 
Audience-related effects ................................................................................................................. 5 
Spill-over effects ............................................................................................................................. 6 
Mapping the advertising sector ....................................................................................................... 6 
2.2 
How big is it? The size of advertising in Europe ................................................................... 7 
3.  Online advertising ......................................................................................................................... 10 
3.1 
Introducing online advertising .............................................................................................. 10 
3.2 
Job-creation and the wider economy: how online advertising contributes .......................... 11 
Indicative estimates ...................................................................................................................... 11 
Impact of online advertising’s specific characteristics
.................................................................. 12 
3.3 
Structural changes in online advertising .............................................................................. 14 
4.  Online advertising in the wider digital economy............................................................................ 15 
4.1 
Introducing the digital economy ........................................................................................... 15 
4.2 
The role of online advertising in the digital economy .......................................................... 16 
4.3 
Online advertising and skills needed in the economy of the future ..................................... 18 
5.  Conclusions................................................................................................................................... 19 
6.  Policy recommendations ............................................................................................................... 20 
7.  Methodology for selected figures in this paper ............................................................................. 24 
(a) Direct footprint of advertising services .................................................................................... 24 
(b) Direct footprint of advertising related activities ........................................................................ 24 
(c) Extended footprint of advertising-related activities (direct + indirect + induced effects) ......... 25 
(d) Overall economic impact (including audience-related effects) ................................................ 26 
8.  Bibliography .................................................................................................................................. 27 
Library SDK component:C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Convert smooth lines to curves. outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; // create optimizing with resolution higher than 300 dpi to 150
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK component:VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Convert smooth lines to curves. outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; 'create optimizing with resolution higher than 300 dpi to 150 dpi
www.rasteredge.com
Paving the way: how online advertising enables the digital economy of the future 
1. Introduction 
Over the last ten  years, online advertising in Europe has transformed  from a  nascent 
industry with a marginal share of the advertising market (1999: 0.5%) to the second largest 
advertising medium in Europe attracting 30.4% of all advertising revenue in 2014. With 
publisher revenu
es at €30.7bn in 2014, it is larger than all types of advertising except TV, 
which it is expected to surpass by the end of 2015.  
Figure 1: Online advertising revenue evolution over time, 2006-2015. [Source: IAB Europe, 
IHS Technology] 
Figure 2: European advertising revenue share by medium [Source: IHS Technology] 
Advertising, no matter whether online or in traditional media channels, contributes to the 
economy  in  a  variety  of  ways.  These  include  the  contribution  to  employment  and  to 
economic output, but also other, less direct impacts, such as supporting the development of 
the wider media, content, and online industries.  
The European Commission has embarked recently on a number of initiatives aimed at 
deepening the development of a Digital Single Market (DSM), one of the top 10 overall 
priorities for  the  Juncker  Commission. While this  covers  a wide  range  of  issues  and 
industries 
from audiovisual services to e-commerce and online platforms 
a key ambition 
throughout is to create the conditions necessary for the development of European global 
leaders in the digital economy.  
15 
16 
19 
22 
24 
27 
31 
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
bn
0%
20%
40%
60%
80%
100%
1999 20002001 20022003 20042005 2006 20072008 20092010 20112012 2013 20142015
2013 20142015
15
TV
Radio
Print
Out-of-home
Cinema
Online
Library SDK component:C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
int targetResolution = 300; Bitmap bitmap3 = page.GetBitmap(targetResolution); bitmap3.Save(inputFilePath + "_3 Description: Convert all the PDF pages to
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK component:VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(0) ' Convert the first New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get the first page of PDF. Render the page with a resolution of 300 dpi.
www.rasteredge.com
Paving the way: how online advertising enables the digital economy of the future 
Advertising has a key role to play in making this ambition a reality, as the technologies and 
skills being developed there can also drive value in a wide variety of industries. Importantly, 
Europe has  already shown that it  can produce world-leading talent in  this  space. The 
challenge for policymakers thus is to create the conditions for this success to become 
widespread, and then for the gains to spread across the economy. 
Over the next few pages, this paper sets out these arguments in more detail. We start by 
examining advertising’s role in the economy, first in a broader sense (section 
2) and then for 
the specific case of online advertising (section 3). In section 4 we narrow our view further, 
looking at some indirect but strategically critical ways in which online advertising can help 
develop the wider European digital economy. Section 7 summarises our key arguments. 
2. Advertising and the economy 
2.1  How advertising creates value 
The ways in which advertising impacts on the economy fall into three groups:  
advertising-related activities 
that is, through the jobs and income produced by 
the advertising and publishing industries and their suppliers; 
audience-related effects 
that is, by stimulating demand for advertisers’ products; 
and 
spill-over effects 
other, less tangible mechanisms that can lead to other sectors of 
the economy innovating or becoming more productive.  
We discuss these types of effects separately below. 
Advertising-related activities 
At a direct level, advertising involves activities by three types of firms:  
Advertisers, who have demand for audiences to communicate a marketing message 
with the purpose of generating awareness and/or sales for their products.  
Publishers, or media outlets, who serve audiences by providing them with content, 
a
nd serve advertisers by supplying them with audiences. In this report, ‘publisher’ 
includes any type of company where audience attention and content meet.  
Advertising services 
providers, which connect advertiser demand with publishers’ 
audience supply. These are firms that create, buy, sell, plan, and manage advertising 
content and delivery. Intermediaries can work on behalf of advertisers (the demand 
side),  publishers  (the  supply  side),  or  both.  Intermediaries  include  advertising 
creative agencies, planning and buying agencies and technology and data vendors.  
The money spent by advertisers to promote their products is commonly referred to as “
ad 
spend
”, and what publishers receive (whether via intermediaries or directly from advertisers) 
is commonly calle
d “
ad sales
” or “
ad revenue
”. The situation is as depicted in 
Figure 3: 
Library SDK component:C# Word - Render Word to Other Images
DOCXPage page = (DOCXPage)doc.GetPage(0); // Convert the first page to a REImage object. Render the page with a resolution of 300 dpi.
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK component:C# powerpoint - Render PowerPoint to Other Images
PPTXPage page = (PPTXPage)doc.GetPage(0); // Convert the first page to a REImage object. Render the page with a resolution of 300 dpi.
www.rasteredge.com
Paving the way: how online advertising enables the digital economy of the future 
Figure 3: Types of agents and money flows in directly involved in the immediate advertising value 
chain 
The economic impact of advertising is not limited to firms in the immediate advertising value 
chain above (or what economists call “
direct effects
”), as they also involve these firms’ 
suppliers,  their  suppliers’  suppliers,  and  so  on  (“
indirect  effects
”).  For  example,
an 
advertising agency might hire a production company to shoot a TV commercial, and the 
production  company  might  in  turn  hire  filming  equipment  from  a  specialist  supplier. 
Moreover, all of these activities support the jobs of employees throughout this extended 
advertising ecosystem, who in turn spend money as consumers - thereby triggering further 
economic activity (“
induced effects
”). All of this activity can be said to be supported by 
advertising and as such can be seen as part of its contribution to the economy.
i
The economic activity associated to any of these players can be measured in terms of 
turnover, jobs, profits, or other metrics. Because money is used and reused across the 
supply  chain as  firms  rely on each other for part of their activities,  it is generally  not 
meaningful to add up the turnover of different firms across the supply chain as doing so 
would  involve  over-counting.
ii
Instead,  economists  usually  employ gross value added 
(GVA). This metric denotes a firm’s turnover minus what it pays it
s suppliers, which can be 
added up and whose total sum across the economy is roughly equivalent to the economy’s 
gross domestic product or GDP (GDP is equivalent to the sum of all industries’ GVA plus 
taxes minus subsidies). 
Audience-related effects 
The effects discussed until now are simply the consequences of an industry serving its 
customers and dealing with its suppliers; similar observations would apply to any industry. 
As  such,  they  are  essentially  unrelated  to the nature  of  advertising,  its effects  on  its 
audiences, and any value that this effect might create for advertisers. 
But firms (e.g. a cosmetics brand) advertise because doing so leads to increased sales 
either directly or indirectly through building positive sentiment and share of voice around its 
products. These sales lead to economic activities (e.g. the production and distribution of 
cosmetics, which involves a complex supply chain involving jobs, value added, etc.) which 
are  unrelated  to  the  advertising-related  activities  described  above.  This  suggests  that 
approaches  which  locate  economic  value  only  within  the  immediate  value  chain  are 
underestimating the broader economic contribution of advertising.  
However,  evidence  and  interpretation  of  these  wider  audience-related  effects  is  not 
straightforward. Even if we accept that advertising creates value for the firms that advertise 
by  stimulating  demand  for  their  products,  it  does  not  simply  follow  that  advertising 
contributes  to  overall  economic  growth.  An  observed  correlation  between  advertising 
expenditure and GDP is not by itself evidence of cause and effect (as it could simply mean 
Publishers
Advertising 
services
Advertisers
Ad sales
Ad spend
Library SDK component:VB.NET Image: Generate GS1-128/EAN-128 Barcode on Image & Document
EAN-128 barcode image resolution in DPI to fulfill set rotate barcode.DrawBarcode( reImage, 300, 450) 'draw Its supported document types are PDF, Word and TIFF.
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK component:C# Excel - Render Excel to Other Images
XLSXPage page = (XLSXPage)doc.GetPage(0); // Convert the first page to a REImage object. Render the page with a resolution of 300 dpi.
www.rasteredge.com
Paving the way: how online advertising enables the digital economy of the future 
that when the economy grows firms advertise more); and if advertising only resulted in 
demand for advertisers’ brands increasing at the expense of others’ (i.e. 
a shift in market 
shares), then its contribution to the economy might be limited to the ‘advertising
-related 
activities’ discussed above. 
But  if  advertising  does  lead  to  increased  sales  overall, or to  increased  innovation  or 
productivity stemming from intensified competition, then this could mean a significant impact 
on GDP. And, if we consider that (for reasons analogous to those given above for the case 
of advertising-related activities) this would benefit not just those firms that advertise but also 
their suppliers (e.g. chemical manufacturers), their suppliers and their employees, we can 
expect this effect to be substantial.  
Whether advertising leads to economic growth through its effect on audiences is a matter of 
debate
iii
; this has led some studies on the impact of advertising to only consider advertising-
related economic activities of the type we discussed earlier.
iv
While we acknowledge this, we 
note that several studies have found evidence in support of the view that advertising leads to 
economic  growth  far  in  excess  of  what  might  be  attributed  to  what  we  have  called 
advertising-related activities. We list some of these in Box 1 in section 2.2. 
Spill-over effects 
Advertising also  has  other  less directly measurable,  but nonetheless  highly  significant, 
impacts on the economy. By serving as a key source of funds for both the media and digital 
sectors, advertising underpins the development of industries that are economically important 
in their own right, and which, particularly in the case of the digital economy, in turn play a 
strong role in driving value creation across the economy. Moreover, the skills developed 
within the advertising industry are highly relevant elsewhere in the economy. We return to 
these considerations for the case of the digital economy in section 4. 
Mapping the advertising sector 
We have described the role played by advertising in the economy, distinguishing between 
advertising-related activities and audience-related effects, as well as between direct and 
other effects. For future reference our discussion is summarised in Figure 4 below: 
Library SDK component:VB.NET Image: Barcode Generator to Add UPC-A to Image, TIFF, PDF &
SaveDocumentFile(doc, "c:/upc-a.pdf", New PDFEncoder SupSpace = 15F barcode.DrawBarcode( reImage, 300, 450) 'draw 1: left 0: center 2: right, Resolution(DPI), 72.
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK component:VB.NET Image: How to Add Interleaved 2 of 5 Barcode to Document
REFile.SaveDocumentFile(doc, "c:/interleaved2of5.pdf", New PDFEncoder N = 2F barcode.DrawBarcode(reImage, 300, 450) 'draw 0: center 2: right, Resolution(DPI),
www.rasteredge.com
Paving the way: how online advertising enables the digital economy of the future 
Figure 4: Overall view of the economic impact of advertising 
2.2  How big is it? The size of advertising in Europe 
In this section we provide estimates of the size of advertising in Europe. At the simplest 
level, we can consider some of the key available measures of economic activity. Official 
Europea
 statistics    include  an  industry  category  (labelled  ‘advertising’)  that  broadly 
corresponds  to  our  concept  of  the  ‘advertising  services’  as  used  in 
Figure  4  above 
(specifically,  it  refers  to advertising  agencies and sales houses
v
).Under  this definition, 
according to Eurostat data in 2013 the European advertising services industry accounted for 
around  0.9m  jobs (or  around 0.4% all  EU  employment). In  terms of  economic  value, 
according to Eurostat by 2012 the industry accounted for a
round €43 billion in GVA (or 
around 0.4% of of EU GVA).  
However, as we saw earlier, advertising services account for only a part of the impact that 
advertising has on the economy. Although we are not aware of existing EU-level estimates 
of these effects, relevant studies have been published for other markets (notably the UK and 
the USA), from which we can make indicative extrapolations for the EU case. These studies 
and their key points are summarized in Box 1 below: 
Audience-related effects
Advertising-related activities
Skills, Industry development, R&D, infrastructure, etc
Spill-over 
effects
Extra jobs support increased consumer demand for goods/services across the economy
Induced 
effects
Publishers
Consumers
Advertising 
services
Brands
Suppliers
Suppliers
Suppliers
Ad sales
Ad spend
Direct 
effects
Indirect 
effects
Suppliers
Suppliers
Suppliers
Paving the way: how online advertising enables the digital economy of the future 
Box 1: Selected literature on impacts of advertising 
The following studies consider advertising-related activities: 
A 2011 study by the Work Foundation
vi
set out to estimate the economic impact of advertising 
in in the UK economy. As part of this, it used a multiplier of 2.0 for the link between (marginal) 
GVA in the advertising industry
vii
and net GVA contribution to the economy.  
A 2012 study by Deloitte
viii
set out to assess the impact of advertising in the UK in terms of a 
number of metrics. As part of this, and drawing on previously published government studies, 
Deloitte estimated the number of jobs involved in advertising across brands, the ad industry 
and publishers. It also considered the jobs involved through direct, indirect and induced 
effects, for which it calculated multipliers (of the order of around 1.6) linking direct and overall 
jobs effects. 
A 2005 study by Cambridge Economics
ix
estimated the economic impact of the ‘Screen 
Industries’ in the UK. As part of this, the authors produced estimates for the ‘multipliers’ 
linking an increase in ad sales and the resulting GVA impact across direct, indirect and 
induced effects. For ad spend incurred in London, it found that this multiplier was 2.1 (for 
other UK regions it was slightly smaller). 
Additionally, the following studies consider ad
vertising’s overall impact on the economy, including 
(explicitly or implicitly) audience-related effects: 
A 2013 report by IHS Global Insight set out to assess the economic impact of advertising 
expenditures in the United States.
x
As part of this, IHS estimated the impact of ad spend on 
job creation linked to increased consumer demand for products, considering both direct 
effects (i.e. jobs at brands) as well as indirect effects (jobs at brands’ suppliers) and induced 
effects (linked to these jobs in turn increasing demand across the economy). IHS estimated 
that the overall effect combining all these effects (as well as advertising-related activities) of 
an additional US$ 1m ad spend is 81 jobs, the vast majority of which are linked to audience-
side effects (for example, in terms of turnover, IHS estimate that the impact on advertisers is 
8.8 times larger than the combined impact on ad agencies and publishers). 
The 2012 Deloitte study mentioned above involved an econometric regression of GDP and 
advertising expenditure in seventeen countries over a fourteen-year period, using statistical 
techniques intended to isolate the causal effects of advertising on GDP. It concluded that a 
sustained 1% increase in advertising spend leads to an increase in GDP of 0.07% within one 
year and 0.6% within ten years.   
A 2010 study by McKinsey
xi
used econometric analysis to investigate the link between 
advertising expenditure  and GDP in G-20 countries. It concluded that over 2002-2017 
advertising supported on average 15.7% of GDP growth in these countries. 
Our EU-wide estimates in Figure 5 below rely on the figures quoted above.
We  have  extrapolated the  findings  in  these studies  to produce  indicative estimates of 
advertising’s  economic  fo
otprint  in  terms  value  added  and  jobs  using  four  different, 
increasingly broad definitions of scope: 
Paving the way: how online advertising enables the digital economy of the future 
(a) Direct footprint of advertising services:  GVA  and  jobs  data  as  reported  by 
Eurostat for the ‘advertising’ industry in official statistics (corresponding to
advertising 
services in our definition) 
(b) Direct footprint of advertising related activities: as above, plus jobs and value 
added for advertising-funded publishers  (for advertisers that are  only partly  ad-
funded, only a corresponding proportion of jobs and value added is taken), and 
advertising-related staff within advertisers (e.g. within marketing departments) 
(c) Extended footprint of advertising-related activities: as per (b) above, but also 
considering the corresponding indirect and induced effects, in the sense discussed in 
section 2.1   
(d) Overall economic impact: including all of the above as well as audience-related 
effects. 
The results are shown in Figure 5, where it should be stressed that our estimations are 
subject not only to any potential weaknesses in the studies listed above (in particular, the 
existence of audience-related effects is not uncontested in the literature) but also to multiple 
assumptions involved in our extrapolation process (whose details are discussed in section 7. 
Accordingly, the figures shown here are intended as only indicative, with emphasis on 
relative sizes and orders of magnitude rather than exact numbers.  
Figure 5: Estimated 2013 Contribution of advertising to EU employment and GVA advertising through 
direct, indirect, induced and audience-related effects. GVA data for 2013 has been estimated based 
on available 2013 data. ‘Empty boxes’ de
note high and low estimates depending on the sources and 
methodologies used. [Source: IHS Technology estimates based on data and estimates from IHS 
Global Insight, IHS Technology, Eurostat, Deloitte, Cambridge Economics and Work Foundation] 
It should be noted from these figures that the audience-related effects are several times 
larger than those attributable only to industry effects (in both cases, around twenty times 
larger than the direct, narrow effects). Intuitively, this means that when considering the 
0.9 
2.9 
4.5 
17.7 
0.4%
1.3%
2.1%
8.1%
0%
2%
4%
6%
8%
0
5
10
15
20
(a) Advertising services 
-direct
(b) Advertising 
activities -direct
(c) Advertising 
activities -extended
(d) Overall impact
%
 
o
f
 
E
U
 
e
m
p
l
o
y
m
e
n
t
J
o
b
s
 
(
m
i
l
l
i
o
n
)
42
72
144
948
372
1,555
0%
5%
10%
15%
500 
1,000 
1,500 
2,000 
%
 
o
f
 
E
U
 
G
V
A
G
V
A
 
(
b
n
)
Paving the way: how online advertising enables the digital economy of the future 
10 
impact of advertising on the economy, by far the largest impact is related to the effects that 
advertising has on audiences (and the effects that in turn this has on brands and their 
suppliers), so that all the jobs and profits created within the advertising and publishing 
industries (and their suppliers) pales in comparison. However, we stress that the existence 
and magnitude of audience-related effects are less firmly established than the effects linked 
to advertising activities, and therefore the corresponding effects should be taken with a 
degree of conditionality (accordingly, the third and fourth bars in the GVA figures above are 
shown in a different pattern).  
Finally, we note that of  the four columns in in  Figure 5,  column (a)  is  relatively  less 
meaningful in the context of the economic footprint of advertising, as it restricts our view to 
advertising  services  (i.e.  intermediaries) rather  than considering  all  persons working in 
advertising. Because of this, when in the next section we turn to online advertising, we will 
only consider measures of impact analogous to columns (b)-(d) above. 
3. Online advertising 
3.1  Introducing online advertising 
By online advertising we mean advertising on the internet across all formats (display incl. 
video,  paid-for-search,  classifieds  &  directories),  devices  (e.g.  mobile  &  desktop)  and 
transaction mechanisms  (programmatic and non-programmatic). As  stated  in section 1, 
online advertising has been growing at a roughly constant linear, double-digit rate for the 
past decade; it evolved from a marginal trend to €30.7bn in 2014, and establishing itself as 
the second largest media category behind TV - which we forecast will be overtaken by the 
end of 2015. 
Figure 6
: European advertising revenue by format, €
billion, 2014 [Source: IHS] 
Yet the perspective of publisher revenues only presents a partial picture of the size of online 
advertising.  If  we consider the  actual spend  on  online  advertising from  the  advertiser 
perspective,  including money  flowing to advertising technology providers,  agencies and 
other intermediaries, production costs, data and analytics services, online advertising was 
worth €46.4bn in 2014.
0.7  
5.2  
7.8  
26.8  
30.7  
33.5  
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
Cinema
Radio
OOH
Print
Online
TV
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested