mvc view to pdf itextsharp : Converting pdf to tiff format SDK application service wpf html winforms dnn JF_NetworkSociety19-part1288

online to citizens. They also progress further in the use of ICTs than
Stage Two E-government, which has tended to focus on putting trans-
actions such as payments to government online. 
Their specific objective of a focus on cross-agency consolidation is
to reduce redundancies and complexity through standardization of
generic business operations in government. A cross-agency approach
also limits operational and information processing autonomy—the
“stovepipes”—of government agencies and departments (http://www.
whitehouse.gov/omb/egov/about_backgrnd.htm). 
The projects are overseen and supported by the Office of E-govern-
ment and Information Technology, a statutory office within the U.S.
Office of Management and Budget established by law in 2002. An
organization chart detailing the new structures within OMB is pre-
sented below. The Administrator for E-government and IT, shown at
the apex of the organization chart, is the Chief Information Officer of
the federal government and an associate director of OMB reporting to
the Director. The position initially was held by Mark Forman, a politi-
cal appointee, and is currently held by Karen Evans, a career civil ser-
vant. The Associate Administrator for E-Government and Information
Technology, reporting to the Administrator, is responsible for the 25
cross-agency projects. The five portfolio managers represented in the
organization chart—some of whom are career civil servants and others
of whom are political appointees—have specific responsibility to over-
see the 25 cross-agency initiatives. A management consulting group
(not shown), whose members are not government employees but pri-
vate contractors detailed to OMB have been responsible for most of
the day-to-day communications and reporting with the programs. In
effect, they serve as staff and liaisons between OMB and the cross-
agency projects which are based in and across government agencies. 
The new organization within OMB signals a major institutional
development in the U.S. federal government. Before passage of the E-
Government Act of 2002 (Public Law 107-347), which established the
federal  CIO  and OMB  structure,  there  was no formal  structural
capacity within OMB to oversee and guide cross-agency initiatives.
The structural gap formed a major impediment to the development of
networked governance during the Clinton administration. In terms of
political development and fundamental changes in the nature of the
bureaucratic state, we see in these organizational changes the emer-
166
The Network Society
Converting pdf to tiff format - SDK application service:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
www.rasteredge.com
Converting pdf to tiff format - SDK application service:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
gent institutionalization of a governance structure for the direction
and oversight of cross-agency, or networked, governance.
The  organization chart  depicts  the  25 cross-agency  initiatives
reporting directly to portfolio managers within OMB. This represen-
tation is meant only to indicate that oversight and guidance of the
projects is exercised by portfolio managers. The managing agency for
each project is a federal agency rather than OMB. The projects are
not part of the OMB hierarchy. The formal authority for each project
belongs to the federal agency designated by OMB as the “managing
partner,” or lead agency. 
The matrix presented below arrays federal agencies along the top of
the grid and projects along the left side. Agency partners for each
project are marked with an x. The managing partner is denoted by an
X in bold-face type. For example, the column and row colored blue
indicate that the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is a
partner agency in eight initiatives and the managing partner of two
projects, health informatics and federal grants.
Each managing partner agency appointed a program manager to
lead its project. The program managers are typically senior, experi-
enced career federal civil servants. They have been responsible for
developing a consultative process among agencies involved in each
project and, in consultation with OMB, they are responsible for devel-
oping project goals and objectives. In most cases, program managers
were also required to devise a funding plan to support the project in
addition to a staffing plan. Neither funds nor staff were allocated as
part of the president’s plan.
The E-Government Act, the legislation that codified the new orga-
nizational structure within OMB, provided for federal funding for the
projects of approximately $345 million over four years. But an average
of only $4 to 5 million per annum has actually been appropriated by
Congress. Strategies developed by each project for funding, staffing
and internal governance vary widely and have been largely contingent
on the skills and experience of the program manager. So far, the legis-
lature has not adapted organizationally to networked government.
This lag in institutional development makes it difficult to build net-
worked systems because appropriations of funds continue to flow to
individual agencies and programs within them.
Central Issues in the Political Development of the Virtual State
167
SDK application service:VB.NET Image: Tutorial for Converting Image and Document in VB.NET
than thirty image and document formats, including PDF, TIFF, GIF, BMP SDK to convert image, image format and its there comes a need of converting image from one
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:VB.NET TIFF: TIFF Converter Control SDK; Convert TIFF to Image &
TIFF to PDF conversion without using external PDF document processing VB.NE TIFF to JPEG Converting Plugin, VB.NE conversion SDK is able to convert TIFF file to
www.rasteredge.com
168
The Network Society
T
a
b
l
e
5
.
2
P
r
e
s
i
d
e
n
t
i
a
l
M
a
n
a
g
e
m
e
n
t
I
n
i
t
i
a
t
i
v
e
E
-
G
o
v
e
r
n
m
e
n
t
P
r
o
j
e
c
t
s
:
P
a
r
t
n
e
r
A
g
e
n
c
i
e
s
a
n
d
M
a
n
a
g
i
n
g
P
a
r
t
n
e
r
s
P
r
o
j
e
c
t
s
/
D
e
p
a
r
t
m
e
n
t
s
C
o
n
s
o
l
i
d
a
t
e
d
H
e
a
l
t
h
I
n
f
o
r
m
a
t
i
c
s
X
X
X
X
D
i
s
a
s
t
e
r
M
a
n
a
g
e
m
e
n
t
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
E
-
A
u
t
h
e
n
t
i
c
a
t
i
o
n
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
G
r
a
n
t
s
.
g
o
v
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
E
-
P
a
y
r
o
l
l
X
X
X
X
X
E
-
T
r
a
i
n
i
n
g
X
X
X
X
X
X
E
-
T
r
a
v
e
l
X
X
X
X
X
X
E
-
V
i
t
a
l
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
E
-
R
e
c
o
r
d
s
M
a
n
a
g
e
m
e
n
t
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
G
o
v
B
e
n
e
f
i
t
s
.
g
o
v
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
E
x
p
a
n
d
i
n
g
E
l
e
c
t
r
.
T
a
x
P
r
o
d
u
c
t
s
X
X
I
R
S
F
r
e
e
F
i
l
e
X
F
e
d
e
r
a
l
A
s
s
e
t
S
a
l
e
s
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
G
e
o
s
p
a
t
i
a
l
O
n
e
-
S
t
o
p
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
I
n
t
e
g
r
a
t
e
d
A
c
q
u
i
s
i
t
i
o
n
E
n
v
.
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
E
n
t
e
r
p
r
i
s
e
H
R
I
n
t
e
g
r
a
t
i
o
n
X
X
X
X
X
E
-
C
l
e
a
r
a
n
c
e
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
D
o
C
D
o
D
D
o
E
D
o
E
d
D
o
I
D
o
J
D
o
L
D
o
T
E
P
F
D
I
C
F
E
M
A
G
S
A
H
H
S
H
U
D
N
A
R
A
N
A
S
A
N
R
C
N
S
F
O
P
S
B
A
S
m
i
t
h
s
o
n
i
a
n
S
S
A
S
t
a
t
t
e
T
r
e
a
s
u
r
y
U
S
A
I
D
U
S
D
A
V
A
SDK application service:C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
PDF to multiple image forms, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET C#.NET DLLs Solution for Converting Images to PDF in C# using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF;
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
Support converting PDF document to SVG image within C#.NET project some situations, it is quite necessary to convert PDF document into SVG image format.
www.rasteredge.com
Central Issues in the Political Development of the Virtual State
169
T
a
b
l
e
5
.
2
P
r
e
s
i
d
e
n
t
i
a
l
M
a
n
a
g
e
m
e
n
t
I
n
i
t
i
a
t
i
v
e
E
-
G
o
v
e
r
n
m
e
n
t
P
r
o
j
e
c
t
s
:
P
a
r
t
n
e
r
A
g
e
n
c
i
e
s
a
n
d
M
a
n
a
g
i
n
g
P
a
r
t
n
e
r
s
P
r
o
j
e
c
t
s
/
D
e
p
a
r
t
m
e
n
t
s
I
n
t
l
T
r
a
d
e
P
r
o
c
.
S
t
r
e
a
m
l
i
n
i
n
g
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s
G
a
t
e
w
a
y
X
X
X
X
X
X
E
-
L
o
a
n
s
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
E
-
R
u
l
e
m
a
k
i
n
g
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
R
e
c
r
e
a
t
i
o
n
O
n
e
-
S
t
o
p
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
R
e
c
r
u
i
t
m
e
n
t
O
n
e
-
S
t
o
p
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
U
S
A
S
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
S
A
F
E
C
O
M
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
S
o
u
r
c
e
:
O
M
B
P
r
o
j
e
c
t
M
a
n
a
g
e
m
e
n
t
O
f
f
i
c
e
:
E
-
G
o
v
P
a
r
t
n
e
r
A
g
e
n
c
i
e
s
P
u
b
l
i
c
.
x
l
s
,
u
n
p
u
b
l
i
s
h
e
d
d
o
c
u
m
e
n
t
,
n
o
d
a
t
e
,
R
e
v
i
s
e
d
,
J
u
l
y
1
,
2
0
0
4
.
D
o
C
D
o
D
D
o
E
D
o
E
d
D
o
I
D
o
J
D
o
L
D
o
T
E
P
F
D
I
C
F
E
M
A
G
S
A
H
H
S
H
U
D
N
A
R
A
N
A
S
A
N
R
C
N
S
F
O
P
S
B
A
S
m
i
t
h
s
o
n
i
a
n
S
S
A
S
t
a
t
t
e
T
r
e
a
s
u
r
y
U
S
A
I
D
U
S
D
A
V
A
(
c
o
n
t
i
n
u
e
d
)
SDK application service:C# Raster - Raster Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
This image converting library component offers reliable C#.NET image from image or document, like multi-page TIFF file page is a guide of ico format and offers
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:VB.NET TIFF: How to Convert TIFF to PDF in a VB.NET Doc Imaging
Function Private Sub New(imagesource As List(Of REImage)) End Sub ' API for converting TIFF file to PDF Private Sub Convert(s As Stream, format As ImageFormat
www.rasteredge.com
U.S. Federal IT Budget
U.S. federal investments in government IT spending increased
steadily from approximately $36.4 billion dollars in 2001 to 59.3 bil-
lion in 2004. According to OMB estimates, eighty percent of this
spending is for external consultants indicating a high level of contract-
ing out of ICT services. Technical expertise and human capital in the
federal government is being greatly weakened as a result under the
“competitive outsourcing” policy and lack of human capital with IT
expertise in the federal government. But this increase in investment
also suggests a commitment to building a virtual state. 
Figure 5.3 OMB Office of E-Government and Information
Technology Organization Chart
Source: Office of Management and Budget “Implementation of the President’s Manage-
ment Agenda for E-Government: E-Government Strategy” p 19, 2/27/2002, http://www.
whitehouse.gov/omb/inforeg/egovstrategy.pdf, and www.egov.gov, accessed 7/1/2004.
170
The Network Society
Administrator
for E-Gov and IT
Assoc. Administrator
for E-Gov and IT
Portfolio
Management Office
Gov’t to Citizen
Portfolio Manager
Gov’t to Business
Portfolio Manager
Gov’t to Gov’t
Portfolio Manager
Internal Efficiency
and Effectivenss
Portfolio Manager
Recreation
One-Stop
Rule-making
Geospatial
One-Stop
E-Training
Gov Benefits
Expanding
Tax Products
for Business
Grants.gov
E-Loans
Federal Asset
Sales
Disaster
Management
Enterprise HR
IRS Free File
International
Trade Process
Streamlining
SAFECOM
Records
Management
IRS Free File
Business
Gateway
E-Vital
E-Clearance
USA Services
Consolidated
Health
Informatics
E-Payroll
E-Travel
Integrated
Acquisition
Environment
EAuthentication
E-Authentication
Portfolio Manager
SDK application service:Convert Image & Documents Formats in Web Viewer| Online Tutorials
page provides detailed information for converting images or Barcodes from Your Documents. Multi-page Tiff Processing; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:VB.NET Word: VB Tutorial to Convert Word to Other Formats in .NET
VB.NET code, RasterEdge VB.NET Word to TIFF converter control to customize the VB.NET Word converting application by How to Convert & Render Word to PDF in VB
www.rasteredge.com
Figure 5.4 U.S. Federal Government IT Spending
Source: OMB: “Report  on  Information Technology  (IT)  Spending  for  the  Federal
Government, Fiscal Years 2000, 2001, 2002”, OMB:“Report on Information Technology
(IT)  Spending for the Federal Government, Fiscal Years 2002, 2003, 2004” Excel
spreadsheet: http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/budget/fy2004/,  accessed  7/2/04,
OMB:“Report on Information Technology (IT) Spending for the Federal Government for
Fiscal Years 2003, 2004, and 2005”: http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/budget/fy2005/,
accessed 7-2-04 
The E-Government Act tied appropriations to strategic, business
and IT plans of agencies and created a fund of $345 million to support
cross-agency initiatives and monitoring of their development for fiscal
years 2002 to 2004. In contrast to the bottom-up approach of the
Clinton administration, the Bush administration approach is top-
down,  engineering  in  its  approach  to  systems  development,  and
emphasizes strict and rigorous project management. Yet there have
been enormous disparities between the funds actually allocated to the
e-government projects and and the congressional appropriation. As
John Spotila, former director of Information and Regulatory Affairs in
OMB, remarked: “… Even without homeland security absorbing most
of the IT dollars, cross-agency projects have never been a favorite of
Congress, where appropriations are awarded through a ‘stovepipe sys-
tem’ of committees that makes a multi-agency approach difficult.”
10
Appropriations for the cross-agency initiatives were $5 million in FY
2002 and 2003 and only $3 million in FY2004. A congressional source
Central Issues in the Political Development of the Virtual State
171
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
30
35
40
45
50
55
60
B
i
l
l
i
o
n
s
o
f
d
o
l
l
a
r
s
(
$
)
10Quotation from Federal Computer Week, February 18, 2002: http://www.fcw.com/fcw/
articles/2002/0218/cov-budget1-02-18-02.asp
recently  noted:  “We  have  never  been  convinced  that  the  fund
[requested to support cross-agency initiatives] doesn’t duplicate what
already exists in other agencies or performs unique functions … It has
never been well-justified, and we don’t have a lot of spare cash lying
around.”
11
Conclusions 
The bureaucratic state is not outmoded, but the nature and struc-
ture of the state is changing fundamentally as information and com-
munication technologies are being absorbed into governments. It is
not vanishing but remains critical to standard setting, rule by fiat soft-
ened by consultation, integrity of processes, and accountability. It is
the locus of the “national interest” in an increasingly globalized net-
work of nations. The virtual state is intersectoral, interagency, and
intergovernmental yet achieves connection through standardization,
rationalization, and systems interdependence. 
Although communications researchers have used the concept “co-
evolution” to refer to reciprocal relationships between technology and
organizations and their co-development, the reference to co-evolution
connotes that enactment simply happens. By contrast, I have devel-
oped  the  technology  enactment  framework  to  examine  how  the
actions of public officials and other government decisionmakers inter-
act to enact technology. So the technology enactment framework
builds specificity and explanatory power into models of co-evolution
of technology and government organizations
This chapter has focused on structural and institutional changes to
the state in the elaboration of the technology enactment framework
and the illustration of recent efforts by the U.S. government to create
inter-agency structures and processes. Technology plays a key role in
changing the capacity of public servants to engage in knowledge cre-
ation and exchange. These informal exchanges among professionals
within and  outside government through  the  Internet comprise  a 
powerful change in the public policymaking process. Information
172
The Network Society
11John Scofield, spokesman for the House Appropriations Committee, quoted in
Government Computer News, February 9, 2004. See http://gcn.com/23_3/news/24892-
1.html, accessed July 2, 2004.
technology has afforded the capacity for different and greater commu-
nication, for different and great information and knowledge sharing,
and for greater transparency and display of complex information. All
of these change the types of conversations and dialogue for govern-
ment officials. The daily, informal exchanges are among the most
important and potentially far-reaching changes in policymaking and
governance. 
The virtual state is intersectoral, interagency, and intergovernmental.
But it achieves this fluidity and cross-boundary character through stan-
dardization, rationalization, and the management of interdependence. 
Is the virtual state a non-place?
The idea of a “non-place,” drawn from contemporary theory in
anthropology, refers to the increasing use of generic systems, applica-
tions, interfaces, terminologies, and more to replace unique, particular
place-based images, systems, terms and other markers.
12
Generic, cor-
porate systems tend to ignore the particularities of countries, regions,
cities, and other local geographic and historic “places.” In fact, the
desire of corporations to communicate their “brand,” intensifies the
diminishing of place. For example, the external face of the McDonalds
Corporation looks the same in every country regardless of “place.”
Airports tend to look the same so that a person in an airport may have
few markers that provide information about the particular culture of 
a place. 
I have not yet drawn out the implications for government and 
governance of this increasing homogenization of approaches. But I
would say that there might be a loss of attention to the particular
problems and political issues that belong to particular places given
their unique history and geographic features. This is the general idea
of a “non-place.” 
I do not think that the virtual state in any country will become a
“non-place” for many years. But I want to issue a warning about the
increasing use of pre-packaged, generic applications, interfaces, and
Central Issues in the Political Development of the Virtual State
173
12See Marc Augé, non-places: introduction to an anthropology of supermodernity (London: Verso,
1995). Translated by John Howe.
systems in governments around the world. These homogenized, stan-
dardized products are those of major multi-national firms. They pro-
vide organizations and inter-organizational networks with the ability
to inter-operate, which is a great benefit to governments and societies.
But they diminish local particularities that provide a sense of place and
serve to maintain distinctive cultures. 
The challenges that lie ahead are not simply technical. Indeed, the
technical challenges are relatively simple. The more complex and dif-
ficult challenges related to the virtual state are intellectual, govern-
mental  and  practical.  As  the  use  of  ICTs  in  government  moves
forward there is much more at stake than simply increasing efficiency
and service levels. Bureaucracies and the bureaucratic model have
been the source of government accountability, fairness, and integrity
of processes. If the bureaucratic form is changing, what forms, struc-
tures, and processes will replace it? Given these governance chal-
lenges, business models and business language can be limiting and
misleading as a source of wisdom and advice for building the virtual
state. Business experience can inform operations and systems develop-
ment. But public servants and the polity will have to engage in delib-
eration to bring clarity to governance questions.
The role of the public servant is changing but remains critical in
democracies. Civil servants play a vital role in domestic—and increas-
ingly in transnational and global—policy regimes. Professional, expe-
rienced public servants are essential to the virtual state. I suppose that
it is obvious to say that professional, experienced public servants are
critical. But in the United States, many conservatives would like to
eliminate the public service and to use contract workers instead. So,
my comment is made in the context of a debate about the privatization
of the public service. The argument is that e-government and net-
worked government make professionalism and experience even more
important within the entire public service. IT is not a substitute for
experience and professionalism. It is not a strategy for deskilling the
public service although it may be possible to eliminate some jobs
made redundant by IT. It is critical also for IT professionals to have
better interaction with other professionals.
All public servants need to be knowledgeable about IT, if not in a
technical sense then in terms of understanding its strategic and politi-
cal importance. Governments must be careful customers of private
174
The Network Society
consultants and vendors. I do not think that most private firms really
understand the differences between government and private sector
organizations. And most do not care about these differences or view
them as their responsibility to understand. Hence, public servants
must understand the differences between systems built for the private
sector  and  the  requirements  necessary  for  government  systems.
Vendors generally do not understand the higher standards of account-
ability that are the obligation of the state, fair and equal treatment of
citizens, access, transparency and, in particular, security and privacy
necessary for government systems.
These are not obvious statements in the present business environ-
ment. In the U.S. some public servants have been intimidated by
Congress and private consultants to believe that they are inferior deci-
sion makers, that they are out of date in their thinking and that, 
in nearly all cases, that the private sector “can do it better than gov-
ernment.” Public servants, in many cases, insufficiently value their
knowledge and experience to negotiate in a strong way with private
firms. It is necessary for contractors to build the large systems for 
government. But it is also necessary for public servants to play a
strong role in the design, development and implementation of those
systems. They are the decision makers with the experience and depth
of knowledge of government operations and politics. Thus public ser-
vants are the decision makers who know when to import a system
from the private sector and when a system needs to be modified for
public use.
Researchers and practitioners are just beginning to explore the
potential for cross-agency capacity and policymaking. Extending the
ideas presented in this paper beyond inter-agency relationships within
the federal state, one can readily imagine that we may have to redefine
and modify ideas about federalism due to networked governance.
Moreover, the increasing use of inter-sectoral relationships—that is,
relationships among the public, private and nonprofit sectors—marks
the virtual state. There is strong evidence to support the claim that
virtual integration, that is, the location of information and services
from different agencies and programs on one website, does in some
cases lead to pressure or the desire of decision makers for actual orga-
nizational level integration. 
Central Issues in the Political Development of the Virtual State
175
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested