Figure 9.3 Media Center Control System 
But beyond the entertainment uses of such a network lies the world
of education. Both the current Real Networks and Microsoft IP Video
Codecs make it possible to publish video at VHS quality at 500 KBPS
and DVD quality at 1.5 MBPS. These tools could enable the most
important  Distance  Learning  initiative  in  history.  When  MIT
announced that it was going to allow people to audit it’s courses on
the internet, it was but one more sign that the extraordinary institu-
tions of learning in our country are ready to embrace IP based dis-
tance learning. Not only can kids catch up on their courses on line,
but also the whole world of continuing education for adults would be
transformed. The fact that the technology companies of every EU
country are always trying to raise the number of foreign technology
workers they can employ is symbolic of the inability to retrain our
workers for the high paying jobs of today. Universal broadband to the
home would enable a platform for Universities and private Training
Companies to sell their services to the country as a whole. 
Now the obvious question that arises is: Why would the current
Media Powers whose enormous market capitalizations have been built
on a world of scarcity ever allow such a world of abundance to come
into being? The answer quite simply is that they would make more
246
The Network Society
Pdf to tiff - control SDK platform:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
www.rasteredge.com
Pdf to tiff - control SDK platform:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
money. To understand this we must look at the five constituents 
that  control  the  current  media  universe:  Producers,  Advertisers,
Distributors, Telecom Suppliers and Talent.
Producers 
Producers develop, create,  and  finance  programming.  Though
many Producers are also distributors (AOL-Time Warner, Viacom,
Disney, Bertelsmann) it is important to separate the two roles in order
to  understand  the  IP-TV  Challenge.  As  an  example,  let’s  take
Discovery Networks. Originally begun as the Discovery Channel,
their task was to buy existing nature programming from around the
world as cheaply as possible and package it for distribution under the
Discovery Channel brand. This proved to be quite lucrative as the
demographic of educated affluent customers attracted to this pro-
gramming was being sought by higher end advertisers (Mercedes,
Merrill Lynch, etc) who were just beginning to move their ads from
high end print publications (Wall Street Journal, New Yorker, Vanity
Fair, etc) into television. Needless to say for Mercedes to advertise on
a Network sit-com was a total waste of money and so the cheap pric-
ing of Discovery Channel was a relatively efficient buy. However, two
things happened from the point of view of Discovery as a Producer
that has changed the economics. First they began to run out of pro-
gramming they could acquire cheaply and therefore had to begin pro-
ducing their own shows at a much higher cost per hour. Second, as the
number  of  cable  distribution  channels  began  to  grow (and then
explode with satellite and digital cable) Discovery believed it had to
defend  it’s  brand  against  imitators  and  so  grew  niche  networks
(Animal Planet, Discovery Health), each of which had to be pro-
grammed 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days per year. 
Today the programming budget for the twelve Discovery Networks
is probably in excess of $1.5 billion per year
4
. Now the audience for
this type of programming has not grown by a factor of 24x, so they are
basically cannibalizing their own and their advertisers audience. If you
extrapolate this out to the universe of almost 300 “Programming
Services” on cable or satellite, you can see that the economics of a
500-channel universe will become increasingly tenuous. Discovery
The IP TV Revolution
247
Legg Mason Estimate, July 2004
control SDK platform:Online Convert PDF file to Tiff. Best free online PDF Tif
Online PDF to Tiff Converter. Download Free Trial. Then just wait until the conversion from PDF to Tiff is complete and download the file.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Create PDF from Tiff. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Create PDF from Tiff. C#.NET PDF - .NET PDF Library for Creating PDF from Tiff in C#.
www.rasteredge.com
alone is responsible for programming 105,000 hours of television per
year. Even assuming that half the hours are re-runs, the programming
will have to get cheaper each year in order for them to reach break-
even on the new networks as there is no way the advertiser will con-
tinue to pay higher rates for an increasingly fractured audience (the
average Discovery digital channel is reaching less than 80,000 viewers
per program).
Contrasting  this  with  our  Universal  Broadband  Network,  one
could easily see how Discovery could cut by half its programming
budget and produce twenty great hours of new “on demand” pro-
gramming a week with extraordinary production values. The most
fanatic viewer of Discovery type programming probably does not have
more than ten hours per week to spend watching this type of pro-
gramming. But if they did, Discovery could cheaply archive every sin-
gle episode of programming it owns and make those accessible on a
pay per view or subscription basis. For the viewer, the programming
could be watched when they wanted to watch it, with full VCR-like
controls and Discovery could offer a “My Discovery” option that
would push pet shows to the pet lover and alligator wrestling to the
fans of that genre. Since the object of Discovery’s business is to sell
advertising, it could offer the pet food advertiser very targeted oppor-
tunities to not only advertise to the specific audience they wanted, but
to also sell their product through interactive ads with e-commerce
capability. All of the technology to enable this vision currently is in
place. More importantly, the costs of streaming the programming are
going through a dramatic downswing (Table 9.1).
Advertisers
The movement of Euros away from the broadcast networks to cable
and Satellite networks continues, but this year even cable networks have
had to lower their rates. The famous maxim by U.S. department store
mogul John Wanamaker that “50% of my advertising expenditures are
wasted. I just don’t know which 50%” is truer than ever. This problem
has  been  exacerbated  by  the  introduction  of  the  Personal  Video
Recorder (PVR), originally under the brand name TiVo and now intro-
duced as an add-on to the standard cable set top box. The potential
effect of widespread diffusion of PVR’s is quite dramatic (Table 9.1) and
could lead to a quicker adoption of the IP-TV paradigm.
248
The Network Society
control SDK platform:Online Convert PDF file to Word. Best free online PDF Conversion
Creating a PDF from Tiff/Tif has never been so easy! Web Security. Your PDF and Tiff/Tif files will be deleted from our servers an hour after the conversion.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:Online Convert Excel to PDF file. Best free online export xlsx
Online Excel to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a Excel File to PDF. Drag and drop your excel file into the box or
www.rasteredge.com
Table 9.1 Downward Internet Streaming Costs
Today
End-1 Yr
End-2 Yr
End-5 Yr
Stream:Megabits/Second
0.300
0.300
0.300
0.300
Cost per Gigabyte
$1.150
$0.690
$0.414
$0.069
Annual Improvement
(40)%
(40)%
(40)%
Usage Megabits per Hour
1,080
1,080
1,080
1,080
Gigabytes per Hour
0.14
0.14
0.14
0.14
Cost per Hour
$0.1553
$0.0932
$0.0559
$0.0121
Cost per Streamed Units 
($)/Min.
0.0026
0.0016
0.0009
0.0002
Hours of Usage per Day
8
8
8
8
Hours of Usage per Year
2,920
2,920
2,920
2,920
Streaming Cost per Year 
@ 8-Hr Day
$453.33
$272.00
$163.20
$35.25
Streaming Cost per Month
37.78
22.67
13.60
2.94
Sub.Fees for 40 Basic 
Cable Nets
7.98
8.38
8.80
10.18
Annual Increase in 
Subscriber Fees
5%
5%
5%
Total Content and Web 
Transport Costs
$45.76
$31.05
$22.40
$13.12
Add Cable Op.EBITDA 
Margin
35%
35%
35%
35%
Total Charged Consumer
$61.77
$41.91
$30.24
$17.72
Source:Sanford Bernstein & Co.
The ability of the Internet to target an audience was seen as a way
out of the misplaced advertising trap, but it quickly became clear that
the ubiquitous banner ad lacked the basic power of the ad industry:
emotion. As banners proliferated, the web surfer simply didn’t even
see them, much less click through (click-throughs were lower than
1%). A video quality broadband network affords advertisers the Holy
Grail; the ability to target like the web combined with the ability to
run full screen 30-second commercials that allow interested users to
click-through to the e-commerce page of the advertiser. If you are
moved  by  the  Gap  ad,  you  can  immediately  buy  the  clothes.
Furthermore, the ad buyer can specify a demographic target (females,
14-18, in specific zip codes) and only pay for that target. In recent
tests with this broadband technology, click through rates on interac-
tive video ads were more than 30%.
The IP TV Revolution
249
control SDK platform:VB.NET Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF
Create PDF from Word. Create PDF from Excel. Create PDF from PowerPoint. Create PDF from Tiff. Create VB.NET PDF - Convert Tiff to PDF. Online
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:RasterEdge XDoc.Tiff for .NET - SDK for Tiff Document Imaging
Able to view and edit Tiff rapidly. Convert. Convert Tiff to PDF. Convert Tiff to Jpeg Images. Convert PDF to Tiff. Convert Jpeg Images to Tiff. Tiff File Process
www.rasteredge.com
250
The Network Society
T
a
b
l
e
9
.
2
P
V
R
P
e
n
e
t
r
a
t
i
o
n
a
n
d
C
o
m
m
e
r
c
i
a
l
S
k
i
p
p
i
n
g
E
s
t
i
m
a
t
e
s
P
V
R
N
e
g
a
t
i
v
e
I
m
p
a
c
t
s
2
0
0
4
E
2
0
0
5
E
2
0
0
6
E
2
0
0
7
E
2
0
0
8
E
2
0
0
9
E
2
0
1
4
E
2
0
1
6
E
P
V
R
A
s
s
u
m
p
t
i
o
n
s
2
2
P
V
R
P
e
n
e
t
r
a
t
i
o
n
6
%
1
1
%
1
6
%
2
0
%
2
2
%
2
5
%
2
5
%
3
5
%
2
3
P
V
R
S
@
Y
e
a
r
-
E
n
d
7
1
2
1
8
2
2
2
5
2
8
4
2
4
6
2
4
G
r
o
w
t
h
o
f
P
V
R
s
1
0
3
%
8
5
%
5
0
%
2
2
%
1
4
%
1
2
%
6
%
4
%
P
V
R
I
m
p
a
c
t
C
a
l
c
u
l
a
t
i
o
n
s
2
5
P
c
t
o
f
R
e
c
o
r
d
e
d
C
o
m
m
e
r
c
i
a
l
s
S
k
i
p
p
e
d
7
0
%
7
0
%
7
0
%
7
0
%
7
0
%
7
0
%
7
0
%
7
0
%
2
6
P
c
t
o
f
T
o
t
a
l
C
o
m
m
e
r
c
i
a
l
s
S
k
i
p
p
e
d
i
n
P
V
R
H
o
u
s
e
h
o
l
d
s
1
4
.
8
1
%
1
5
.
9
6
%
1
7
.
1
6
%
1
8
.
4
0
%
1
9
.
6
9
%
2
1
.
0
2
%
2
7
.
4
3
%
2
9
.
9
9
%
2
7
E
f
f
e
c
t
i
v
e
A
v
e
r
a
g
e
H
o
m
e
s
R
e
d
u
c
e
d
b
y
P
V
R
s
(
0
.
9
6
)
(
1
.
9
2
)
(
3
.
0
9
)
(
4
.
0
5
)
(
4
.
9
2
)
(
5
.
8
8
)
(
1
1
.
4
6
)
(
1
3
.
6
8
)
2
8
A
d
v
e
r
t
i
s
i
n
g
A
t
R
i
s
k
i
n
A
l
l
P
V
R
H
H
L
D
s
(
$
m
i
l
)
$
(
5
6
0
)
$
(
1
,
1
7
2
)
$
(
2
,
0
1
5
)
$
(
2
,
7
8
2
)
$
(
3
,
5
8
7
)
$
(
4
,
5
2
2
)
$
(
1
0
,
8
3
4
)
$
(
1
3
,
9
8
0
)
2
9
P
c
t
o
f
T
V
A
d
v
e
r
t
i
s
i
n
g
A
t
R
i
s
k
(
1
)
%
(
2
)
%
(
3
)
%
(
4
)
%
(
4
)
%
(
5
)
%
(
1
0
)
%
(
1
1
)
%
3
0
A
d
d
i
n
g
D
e
m
o
g
r
a
p
h
i
c
P
r
e
m
i
u
m
1
2
5
%
1
2
5
%
1
2
5
%
1
2
5
%
1
2
5
%
1
2
5
%
1
1
0
%
1
1
0
%
3
1
A
d
j
u
s
t
e
d
A
t
R
i
s
k
i
n
A
l
l
P
V
R
H
H
L
D
s
(
$
m
i
l
)
$
(
7
0
0
)
$
(
1
,
4
6
5
)
$
(
2
,
5
1
9
)
$
(
3
,
4
7
8
)
$
(
4
,
4
8
4
)
$
(
5
,
6
5
3
)
$
(
1
1
,
9
1
7
)
$
(
1
5
,
3
7
8
)
3
2
A
d
j
u
s
t
e
d
P
c
t
o
f
T
V
A
d
v
e
r
t
i
s
i
n
g
A
t
R
i
s
k
(
1
)
%
(
2
)
%
(
4
)
%
(
5
)
%
(
5
)
%
(
6
)
%
(
1
1
)
%
(
1
2
)
%
S
o
u
r
c
e
:
S
a
n
f
o
r
d
B
e
r
n
s
t
e
i
n
&
C
O
control SDK platform:C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Tiff
Convert PDF to Word; Convert PDF to Tiff; Convert PDF to HTML; Convert PDF to Image; Tiff Conversion. • Convert Tiff image to PDF (.pdf). Tiff Annotation.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Tiff
Convert PDF to Word; Convert PDF to Tiff; Convert PDF to HTML; Convert PDF to Image; Tiff Conversion. • Convert Tiff image to PDF (.pdf). Tiff Annotation.
www.rasteredge.com
Distributors
In a new world media order, the role of distributor would change.
Today, the six basic conduits for video media are theaters, broadcast
TV, cable TV, satellite TV, video rental stores, and broadband IP net-
works. The classic producer/distributor like AOL Time Warner seeks
to market its product through every one of these channels. And in
each of these channels there is a third party who can demand a share
of the revenue from the transaction. 
To begin to understand this new world of IP-TV it will be impor-
tant to differentiate between Broadband Carriers and Broadcasters.
Broadband carriers would be comprised of all DSL providers (FT, BT,
Telecom  Italia,  Deutsche  Telekom,  etc)  all  cable  providers  with
upgraded Hybrid Fiber/Coax plants, all ISP’s offering Broadband
service  (AOL,  Tiscali,  MSN)  and  all  fixed  wireless  providers.
Broadcasters would consist of all over the air TV networks and all
Satellite networks. In an IP-TV world the Broadband Carriers would
make their money by providing metered service much like your cellu-
lar or utility service. Heavy users of streaming media would pay more
than  light  users.  Distributors  of  content  could  then  sell  to  the
Carrier’s customer base on an Open Access basis and use the three
basic models for payment: monthly subscription, pay per view or ad
supported content. Clearly the Broadcasting model would not be able
to compete because of lack of a two-way network. However, this tran-
sition to IP-TV would be gradual and still the “Event” type of pro-
gramming like sports or award shows which demands a specific mass
audience to be present at a specific time would be a staple of the
broadcasting universe for a long time.
Telecom Suppliers
The last few years has seen a steep downturn in the Telecom econ-
omy. The obvious reason was that without reasonably priced broad-
band  connectivity  in  the  last mile,  no one needed  to  enable the
immense backbone networks that had been built. Companies like
Cisco, Nortel, and Lucent saw their market caps fall by 50%. Because
much of the last mile Broadband connectivity is controlled by the
national telecoms, there was a clear bottleneck in the system. Recent
The IP TV Revolution
251
attempts at regulatory relief have proved only partially successful. It is
here that the European market must make aggressive moves to keep
up in the Broadband economy. Although the necessary fiber backbone
for a Trans-European IP TV system is in place, the local build out of
robust broadband capacity to the home is lagging both Asian and the
U.S. In the U.S. the huge capital investment by cable companies in
hybrid fiber coax has led to their ability to offer 6 MBPS downstream
to the home. (Figure 9.4) 
Figure 9.4 U.S. Cable Capital Expenditures
Source:Kagan World Media, 
B
r
o
a
d
b
a
n
d
C
a
b
l
e
F
i
n
a
n
c
i
a
l
D
a
t
a
b
o
o
k
The recent announcements by both by U.S.  carriers SBC and
Verizon to build out their fiber to the home networks also presage a
real boost to the IP-TV vision. By unlocking the bottleneck, thereby
creating  a need to enable  the immense  dark fiber  backbone,  the
European Telecom Economy could be put back on solid footing and a
potentially  fatal  blow  to  the  regions  economic  health  could  be
avoided.
252
The Network Society
5.67
6.81
5.61
10.62
14.61
16.07
14.53
10.60
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
B
i
l
l
i
o
n
s
o
f
d
o
l
l
a
r
s
(
$
)
Talent 
It is one of the great ironies of the age of media consolidation that
giants like Fox, Time Warner and Canal + promote themselves as
“Brands.” In the world of entertainment, the artist is the brand. The
navigation metaphor of Apple’s I-Tunes, a digital music service that
has sold 54 million downloads in one year acknowledged this reality.
All you needed to do was type in the name of the artist. It is actually
impossible to search by record company “brand.” Further empower-
ing the notion of the artist’s primacy is the arrival of powerful new
inexpensive digital tools for both music and video production. This
production doesn’t have to be as expensive as it is and the true artist
will work for much less if he or she has a real stake in the gross earn-
ing power of their work.
So how would the arrival of Universal Broadband help foster a new
artistic renaissance in the culture? If the world of distribution scarcity
has built a wasteful media economy, it would stand to reason that a
world of abundant, cheap digital technology and distribution might
help the true artist escape the current media “Hit” economics. If the
only things being financed are aimed at the mass audience that appeal
to the raunchiest lowest common denominator, then the artist with a
different perspective has a hard time getting financed. This realization
is leading some in the entertainment business to realize that the
tyranny of the 80-20 rule could be broken. Chris Anderson of Wired
Magazine has described a new selling model called “The Long Tail,”
in which on-line retailers are finding that even the most obscure con-
tent sells at an acceptable level on line. Although the average large
record store might have a total of 40,000 individual songs in it’s racks,
the digital music service Rhapsody currently has over 500,000 (Figure
9.5) and song number 499,999 sells well enough to pay for itself.
Is IP-TV a pipe dream? Some Mobius-shaped fantasy? By year-end
2005 there will be 40 million homes in the EU with Broadband. An
additional 5 million college students have access to broadband at their
University. Moving the signal from the PC to the TV will evolve over
the next 12 months as new set top boxes, game consoles and wireless
home networks proliferate. What is needed is the combination of
political will and the vision to realize that the educational and cultural
needs of the country will be enhanced by the widespread deployment
of IP-TV. 
The IP TV Revolution
253
Figure 9.5 Monthly Download Performance of Rhapsody-
Source-Wired Magazine
Source:Wired magazine
We are in the Media Interregnum. In the past lies the failed ortho-
doxy of the domination of all media by a few major corporations, sub-
jecting  artists,  citizens,  politicians,  marketers  and  the  technology
economy to their will. In the future lies a Renaissance of media, enter-
tainment and learning fueling a new technology growth economy that
will lift our minds and our spirits and keep our economic growth on
track in the process. This radical change in the media landscape will
not arrive without some serious turf battles between owners of content
and owners of “pipe.” Cable and Telephone companies will naturally
migrate towards a “walled garden” approach to Broadband, hoping to
preserve their “gatekeeper” status between content owners and their
customers. Already in the U.S. the cable companies have gotten the
FCC to reclassify broadband to an Information service from its previ-
ous classification as a Telecommunications service. This is not a trivial
difference. Telecommunications services have a “common carrier”
component, preventing the owner of the network from discriminating
254
The Network Society
6.1
2
1
0
39,000
100,000
200,000
500,000
Titles ranked by popularity
A
v
e
r
a
g
e
n
u
m
b
e
r
o
f
p
l
a
y
s
p
e
r
m
o
n
t
h
o
n
R
h
a
p
s
o
d
y
(
t
h
o
u
s
a
n
d
s
)
Songs
available
at both
Wal-Mart
and
Rhapsody
Songs available only at Rhapsody
The Long Tail —
95% of songs rent once per month
in any way. As the Center for Digital Democracy states, “The principle
of nondiscriminatory communication has long governed our telephone
system and the Internet itself, allowing any party to transmit any mes-
sage to any other party without interference by the network operator.
This principle of free expression should be maintained for broadband
as well. High-speed Internet users should be allowed unimpeded com-
munications with any network device, use of any lawful service, and
transmission of any data.” In order to move into a new world of IP-TV
that will be the preferred platform for all of the constituencies of the
digital age, the EU can take the lead to preserve the open nature of
Broadband Internet and usher in a new age of IP TV.
The IP TV Revolution
255
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested