SHELL: HOW TO USE THE IEEETRAN LAT
E
XCLASS
11
TABLE II
AS
IMPLE
E
XAMPLE
T
ABLE
First
Next
1.0
2.0
designed to be more customizable than the former) may be of
help in producing algorithm-like structures (although authors
are of course free to use whatever L
A
T
E
Xcommands they are
most comfortable with in this regard). However, do not use
the floating algorithm environment of algorithm.sty (also by
Williams and Brito) or algorithm2e.sty (by Christophe Fiorio)
as the only floating structures IEEE uses are figures and tables.
Furthermore, IEEEtran will not be in control of the (non-IEEE)
caption style produced by the algorithm.sty or algorithm2e.sty
float environments.
C. Tables
Tables are handled in a similar fashion, but with a few
notable differences. For example, the code
\begin{table}[!t]
\renewcommand{\arraystretch}{1.3}
\caption{A Simple Example Table}
\label{table_example}
\centering
\begin{tabular}{c||c}
\hline
\bfseries First & \bfseries Next\\
\hline\hline
1.0 & 2.0\\
\hline
\end{tabular}
\end{table}
results in Table II. Note that the IEEE places table captions
before the tables and, given that they serve much like titles,
are usually capitalized except for words such as a, an, and, as,
at, but, by, for, in, nor, of, on, or, the, to and up, which are
usually not capitalized unless they are the first or last word of
the caption.
Be aware that, to prevent a change of meaning that would
result from case changes, the IEEE generally uses the standard
text font, not the small caps font, when rendering units as well
as letters in math in table captions. This can be achieved via
the use of
\upshape
:
\caption{Diagnosis of Rotor Faults in a DRFOC Drive U
sing the VCT(Flux Loop Bandwidth (FLB) = 10 {\upshap
e Hz}; 75% Load; 1450 {\upshape r/min})}
Thanks to Zhaowen Hou for providing information on this
topic as well as the above example.
Within the table environment, the default text size is foot-
notesize which is what IEEE typically uses for tables. When
using the tabular environment to construct tables, it is usually
agood idea to increase the value of
\arraystretch
above
unity to “open up” the table rows a tad. Also, IEEE often
uses tables with “open sides,” (without vertical lines along
each side) although the “closed side” form (e.g., Table I) is
more commonly used for the tables within this document.
Unfortunately, the standard LAT
E
X2
"
tabular environment
has a number of shortcomings. Two notable problems are (1)
TABLE III
T
HE
S
KEWING
A
NGLES
()
FOR
Mu(H) + X
2
AND
Mu(H) + HX
a
H(Mu)+ F
2
H(Mu) + Cl
2
(H)
80:9b
83:2
(Mu)
86:7
87:7
a
for the abstraction reaction, Mu + HX !
MuH + X.
b
1degree = =180 radians.
the corners where lines meet are improperly formed; and (2) it
is not very flexible in terms of user control. For these reasons,
authors are urged to look into some of the other packages
for making tables. A good one that provides revised “drop-in
replacements” for both the tabular and array environments is
Frank Mittelbach’s and David Carlisle’s array package [28].
Even more powerful (and complex) is the tabular and array
environments provided by the mdwtab.sty package which is
part of Mark Wooding’s MDW Tools [17].
As an alternative, IEEEtran offers the IEEEeqnarraybox
command which can also be used to produce tables
9
of high
quality. See Appendix F for more details.
1) Footnotes Within Tables: Footnotes normally cannot be
placed directly within some commands and environments such
as
\parbox
,
tabular
, etc., because they become “trapped”
inside. One way around this is to split the place the footnote
marker (
\footnotemark
)is located (within the table) from
where the footnote text itself is declared (outside of the table
using
\footnotetext
).
Another approach is to use the footnote.sty package (which
is part of Mark Wooding’s MDW Tools [17]) which allows
environments to be configured so as not to trap footnotes:
\usepackage{footnote}
\makesavenoteenv{tabular}
Note that is probably not a good idea to use footnotes in
floating structures (like
table
)because the position of each
can move relative to one another. To put the footnote at the
end of a table instead of at the bottom of the page, just
enclose
tabular
,etc., inside a minipage (no footnote package
needed). A very good approach for handling footnotes within
tables (including those that float) is to use Donald Arseneau’s
threeparttable package [29] which was used to generate Table
III (the code of which is an example in the threeparttable.sty
file).
D. Double Column Floats
L
A
T
E
X’s
figure
*
and
table
*
environments produce fig-
ures and tables that span both columns. This capability is
sometimes needed for structures that are too wide for a single
column.
It is a limitation of the L
A
T
E
X2
"
kernel that double column
floats cannot be placed at the bottom of pages. That is to
say “
\begin{figure
*
}[!b]
” will not normally work as
intended. Authors that need this capability should obtain and
load Sigitas Tolušis’ stfloats package [19] which patches the
9
Table I was made using this command.
Converting pdf to tiff file - control SDK system:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
www.rasteredge.com
Converting pdf to tiff file - control SDK system:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
12
JOURNAL OF LAT
E
XCLASS FILES, VOL. 14, NO. 8, AUGUST 2015
L
A
T
E
X2
"
output routine to allow it to handle double column
floats at the bottom of pages. Please note that stfloats is a
very invasive package which may not work with versions of
LAT
E
Xother than the standard LAT
E
X2
"
release and may cause
problems with other packages that modify the output and/or
float routines (such as those that balance columns, alter the
placement of floating figures, etc.). IEEE authors are warned
not to use packages that allow material to be placed across the
middle of the two text columns (such as cuted.sty, midfloat.sty,
etc.) as the IEEE does not do this.
Another LAT
E
X2
"
limitation (patched with stfloats or not) is
that double column floats will not appear on the same page
where they are defined. So, the user will have to define such
things prior to the page on which they are to (possibly) appear.
LAT
E
X2
"
(patched with stfloats or not) does not attempt
to keep double and single column floats in sequence with
each other. This can be fixed by loading Frank Mittelbach,
David Carlisle and Chris Rowley’s fixltx2e package (already
installed on most L
A
T
E
Xsystems) [30]. Note that fixltx2e.sty
is the replacement (and superset) of the older fix2col.sty [30].
However, fixltx2e/fix2col should not be used with the stfloats
package as they both modify some of the same float routines
in different ways.
Be aware that L
A
T
E
X2
"
kernels dated 2015 and later have
fixltx2e.sty’s corrections already built into the system in which
case a warning will be issued if an attempt is made to load
fixltx2e.sty as it is no longer needed.
Morten Høgholm’s dblfloatfix package [31] provides the
combined functionality of both the fixltx2e and stfloats pack-
ages and is now the recommended way to obtain these features.
Finally, authors should also be aware that the L
A
T
E
X2
"
ker-
nel (patched with stfloats or not) has a long standing limitation
in that it will not allow rubber space that spans both columns
to stretch or shrink as needed for each of the two main text
columns. Therefore, it is possible for double column floats to
cause underfull vbox errors because the remaining text height
may not be equal to an integer number of normal size lines.
The problem can occur in main text columns (on pages with
double column floats) that do not have vertical rubber spacing
(such as that around section headings, equations, etc.) and
results in underfull vbox warnings coupled with paragraphs
that are “pulled apart” from each other. To correct this, users
can manually tweak the amount of space between the double
column structure and main text by inserting a command like
\vspace
*
{-3pt}
(adjusted as needed) within the double column structure. Inci-
dentally, IEEEtran automatically compensates for this problem
when forming the paper title.
1) Double Column Equations: It is possible, but not pleas-
ant, to use
figure
*
to obtain double column equations. The
IEEE rarely uses double column equations because they can
waste space, so this capability is easy to abuse. Authors
who are considering the use of a double column equation
should verify that there are a few examples of such in papers
previously published in the journal they plan to submit to.
There are complications. Although the IEEE does not place
constraints on the order of the double column equations
relative to the equations of the main text (that is to say a
set of double column equations can be at the top or bottom
of a page in which they would normally appear in the middle
had they been regular equations), the double column equation
numbers must increase as one progresses down the page (i.e.,
double column equations at the bottom of a page must be
of higher number than those at the top). Furthermore, double
column equations should appear on the same page where they
are referenced (on the page they would have appeared had
they been regular equations). Compounding the difficulty even
further is the fact that L
A
T
E
X2
"
will not place double column
equations on the same page on which they are defined. Finally,
the IEEE does not generally allow other figures or tables to
come between the double column equations and the main text
(which are separated from each other by a rule). All of this
means that the place where a double column equation must be
defined has to be “disconnected” from the place where it will
eventually be referred to in the text—and the user will have
to manually intervene in the equation numbering system.
Therefore, users have to (1) define double column equations
on the page prior to the one that they are to appear; (2) reset
the equation counter when the double column equations are
defined so as not to disturb the regular equation numbers;
(3) manually set the double column equation numbers and (4)
increment the equation counter at the point the double column
equations are referenced in the text so that they are accounted
for in the numbering of the regular equations after that point.
To do all of this, it is convenient to have a “scratch pad”
counter to temporarily save equation numbers. This can be
done via a command such as
\newcounter{MYtempeqncnt}
in the preamble of the document. Now, the double column
equations are defined on the page prior to the one in which
they are to appear (and in this example supposed that they are
to be equation numbers six and seven):
\begin{figure
*
}[!t]
% ensure that we have normalsize text
\normalsize
% Store the current equation number.
\setcounter{MYtempeqncnt}{\value{equation}}
% Set the equation number to one less than the one
% desired for the first equation here.
% The value here will have to changed if equations
% are added or removed prior to the place these
% equations are referenced in the main text.
\setcounter{equation}{5}
\begin{equation}
\label{eqn_dbl_x}
x = 5 + 7 + 9 + 11 + 13 + 15 + 17 + 19 + 21+ 23 + 25
+ 27 + 29 + 31
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}
\label{eqn_dbl_y}
y = 4 + 6 + 8 + 10 + 12 + 14 + 16 + 18 + 20+ 22 + 24
+ 26 + 28 + 30
\end{equation}
% Restore the current equation number.
\setcounter{equation}{\value{MYtempeqncnt}}
% The IEEE uses as a separator
\hrulefill
% The spacer can be tweaked to stop underfull vboxes.
\vspace
*
{4pt}
\end{figure
*
}
control SDK system:Online Convert PDF file to Tiff. Best free online PDF Tif
XDoc.PDF) is a multifunctional PDF document converting tool, which can control, C# developers can render and convert PDF document to TIFF image file
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert TIFF Image File
controls. Visual C#.NET demo code for converting PDF document to Tiff image file is offered. How to Convert Jpeg Images to Tiff.
www.rasteredge.com
SHELL: HOW TO USE THE IEEETRAN LAT
E
XCLASS
13
x= 5 + 7 + 9 + 11 + 13 + 15 + 17 + 19 + 21 + 23 + 25 + 27 + 29 + 31
(6)
y= 4 + 6 + 8 + 10 + 12 + 14 + 16 + 18 + 20 + 22 + 24 + 26 + 28 + 30
(7)
The result of which is shown at the top of this page. This
technique allows the definition of the equations to be posi-
tioned arbitrarily as needed so that the (floating) equations
will appear where desired. The “[!t]” option forces L
A
T
E
Xto
do its best to place the equations at the top of the next page.
Had it been “[!b]” instead, then the stfloats (or even better,
dblfloatfix) package would need to be loaded and the
\vspac
e
command, followed by the
\hrulefill
command, would
have to occur before the equations in the figure.
The double column equations can then been referenced in
the main text like:
% The previous equation was number five.
% Account for the double column equations here.
\addtocounter{equation}{2}
As can be seen in (\ref{eqn_dbl_x}) and
(\ref{eqn_dbl_y}) at the top of the page ...
Thankfully, double column equations are rare.
XI. L
ISTS
The traditional LAT
E
X itemize, enumerate and description
(IED) list environments are ill-suited for producing the style
of lists used in IEEE publications. The main problem is that
they do not provide the user a means for controlling the
parameters of the resultant list. Furthermore, making global
changes to the parameters of the underlying
\list
will result
(often unexpectedly to a user) in the improper behavior of
other commands that depend on it, such as
\quote
.Finally,
L
A
T
E
X’s
\list
considers the left margin of the list text to be
the reference point that determines how the list is positioned
relative to the left margin of the main text:
\labelwidth
z
}|
{
Label
\labelsep
z
}|
{
|
{z
}
\leftmargin
List Text
This contrasts with IEEE lists which use the label box as
the reference point for the list structure. i.e., for a given
circumstance, the list labels will be indented by a certain
amount, the list text block will be indented from the label
boxes by a given amount and these spacings will determine
the position of the list text.
For these reasons, IEEEtran provides enhanced IED list
environments that make it much easier to produce IEEE style
lists. The underlying
\list
remains the same as in traditional
L
A
T
E
Xso as not to break code that depends upon it. IEEEtran
uses a new length variable,
\IEEElabelindent
,so that users
can specify IED list structures directly in IEEE fashion:
|
{z
}
\IEEElabelindent
\labelwidth
z
}|
{
Label
\labelsep
z
}|
{
List Text
The IEEEtran IED lists ignore all “external” changes to the list
length parameters. Instead, IED lists are controlled exclusively
via two interfaces:
1) “global” control via the
\IEEEiedlistdecl
command;
and
2) “local” control via an optional argument that can be
provided to
\itemize
,
\enumerate
, and
\descrip
tion
.
For example, declaring
\renewcommand{\IEEEiedlistdecl}{\settowidth{\labelwi
dth}{Hello}}
in an IEEEtran document will set the default width of the
label boxes in all later IED lists to be equal to the width
of “Hello”. Note: Because setting a
\labelwidth
is so
commonly performed, IEEEtran provides a command:
\IEEE
setlabelwidth{X}
which is a shorter form of:
\settowid
th{\labelwidth}{X}
.
The local control is used if the parameters are to apply only
to an individual IED list:
\begin{itemize}[\IEEEsetlabelwidth{$\gamma$}]
Within an IED list, the local control is executed just after the
global control and therefore, the commands in the local control
can both augment and countermand those in the global control.
Please note that the code in the local and global controls are
executed in the same manner as normal LAT
E
Xcode. Therefore,
the user should ensure that unwanted blank spaces do not
appear in the controls. If a control definition is too long to
fit on one line, shield the end of lines with “%” to prevent
them from being interpreted as blanks (Section IV-B1 has
some information on this topic). Also, note that the L
A
T
E
X
parser requires that braces be placed around commands with
optional arguments that are placed directly within the optional
arguments of other commands:
\begin{itemize}[{\mycmd[1]{example}}]
This IEEEtran IED implementation makes it easy to control
IED lists, even when they are deeply nested.
The default spacings the IED lists use are stored in various
length (not macro) commands. Changes to these “master”
defaults are rarely needed and should be done only at the
beginning of the document, not in the IED list controls. These
constants will now be briefly explained.
\IEEEilabelindent
: This length is the default amount
the itemized list label boxes are indented from the left mar-
gin. The IEEE seems to use at least two different values.
For example, in the IEEE/OSA J
OURNAL OF
L
IGHTWAVE
T
ECHNOLOGY
and the IEEE J
OURNAL ON
S
ELECTED
A
R
-
EAS IN
C
OMMUNICATIONS
, they tend to use an indention
equal to
\parindent
, while for IEEE T
RANSACTIONS ON
C
OMMUNICATIONS
they tend to indent itemized lists a little
more (
1.3\parindent
). The shorter length is stored as
\IE
control SDK system:Online Convert Excel to PDF file. Best free online export xlsx
Your Excel file is converted to look just the same as it does in your office software. Creating a PDF from xlsx/xls has never been so easy! Easy converting!
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
is a C# programming example for converting PDF to Word inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf"; PDFDocument doc DocumentType.DOCX DocumentType.TIFF.
www.rasteredge.com
14
JOURNAL OF LAT
E
XCLASS FILES, VOL. 14, NO. 8, AUGUST 2015
EEilabelindentA
and the longer as
\IEEEilabelindent
B
.The default is to use the shorter version. To use the longer
version do a
\setlength{\IEEEilabelindent}{\IEEEilabelindentB}
at the beginning of the document.
\IEEEelabelindent
:This length is the default amount
the enumerated list label boxes are indented from the left
margin. Normally, the same as
\parindent
.
\IEEEdlabelindent
:Ditto for description list labels. Nor-
mally, the same as
\parindent
.
\IEEEiednormlabelsep
: This length is the normal de-
fault spacing between the IED list label boxes and the list
text.
\IEEEiedmathlabelsep
: For nomenclature description
lists (a list of math symbols and their explanations), the IEEE
usually increases the separation between the terms and the
definitions. This length is set to the longer than normal length.
To invoke its use, just issue the command
\IEEEusemathla
belsep
in a list control.
\IEEEiedtopsep
: This length is the extra vertical sepa-
ration put above and below each IED list. The IEEE usually
puts a little extra spacing around each list. However, this extra
spacing is barely noticeable.
\IEEElabelindentfactori
through
\IEEElabelin
dentfactorvi
: These contain the factors by which the
effective
\IEEElabelindent
is reduced as the list nesting
depth increases. The IEEE normally decreases the amount of
indention as the list nesting level increases because there isn’t
much room to indent with two column text. IEEEtran has
an “automatic indention cut-back” feature that provides this
behavior. The actual amount the label boxes will be indented
is
\IEEElabelindent
multiplied by the
\IEEElabelinden
tfactorX
corresponding to the level of nesting depth (where
“X” is the nesting depth in roman numerals). This provides a
means by which the user can alter the effective
\IEEElabel
indent
for deeper levels. There may not be such a thing as
correct “standard IEEE” values. What the IEEE actually does
may depend on the specific circumstances. The first list level
almost always has full indention. The second levels usually
have only 75% of the normal indentation. Third level and
greater nestings are very rare, and probably don’t use any
indentation. These factors are not lengths, but rather constant
macros like
\baselinestretch
so
\renewcommand
should
be used if they need to be changed. The default values are
\IEEElabelindentfactori
1.0
\IEEElabelindentfactorii
0.75
\IEEElabelindentfactoriii 0.0
\IEEElabelindentfactoriv
0.0
\IEEElabelindentfactorv
0.0
\IEEElabelindentfactorvi
0.0
The use of these factors in IED lists may be suspended by
issuing the command
\IEEEnolabelindentfactortrue
in
a list control (which has the same effect as setting all the
indent factors to 1.0).
Normally, IEEEtran automatically calculates
\leftmargin
based upon the current values of
\IEEElabelindent
,
\labe
lwidth
and
\labelsep
.To stop this auto-calculation so that
amanually specified value of
\leftmargin
is used instead,
just use
\IEEEnocalcleftmargintrue
in a list control. This
feature should not be needed during the course of normal IEEE
related work.
IEEEtran provides a means to manually specify the justifica-
tion within the IED list label boxes. The commands
\IEEEied
labeljustifyl
,
\IEEEiedlabeljustifyc
and
\IEEEied
labeljustifyr
can be used in a list control to justify the list
labels to the left, center, and right sides, respectively. Itemize
and enumerate lists automatically default to right justification,
while description defaults to left justification. The justification
commands should not be needed during the course of normal
IEEE related work.
In addition to modifying the behavior of
itemize
,
enumer
ate
and
description
,IEEEtran also provides the respective
aliases
IEEEitemize
,
IEEEenumerate
and
IEEEdescript
ion
, which provides a way for the user to access the IEEE
style list environments even in the event another package is
loaded that overrides the IED list environments. For special-
ized applications, the original L
A
T
E
XIED list environments are
retained as
LaTeXitemize
,
LaTeXenumerate
and
LaTeXde
scription
.
A. Itemize
The itemized lists will normally automatically calculate the
width of whatever symbol the current list level is using so that
auser can just call
\begin{itemize}...\end{itemize}
without doing anything special. Furthermore, the auto-label-
width feature will work properly even if
\labelitemX
has
been redefined (where “X” indicates “i,ii, .. iv”, whichever
is appropriate) before the list begins. However, if any item
symbols are to be specified via
\item[X]
(this is rare and may
well be nonstandard as far as IEEE related work is concerned),
then the following form can be used:
\begin{itemize}[\IEEEsetlabelwidth{Z}]
\item[X] blah
\item[Y] blah
.
.
\end{itemize}
where “Z” is the longest label in the list.
B. Enumerate
The important thing to note about enumerated lists is that
the
\labelwidth
will default to the length of “9)” in the
normal size and style. Therefore, the width of the longest label
will have to be manually specified if any of the following
conditions are true:
1) a top level list has more than 9 items;
2) a relevant
\labelenumX
or
\theenumX
has been rede-
fined;
3)
\item[X]
has been used to manually specify labels;
4) the labels are using a font that is not the normal size
and style;
5) the enumerated list is nested (i.e., not at the top level)
and is therefore not using Arabic digits as labels.
For example:
control SDK system:C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
This PDF document converting library component offers reliable C# image or document, or from PDF document to other file formats, like multi-page TIFF file.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
a series of demo code directly for converting MicroSoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint document to PDF file in VB.NET application. Conversion of TIFF to PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
SHELL: HOW TO USE THE IEEETRAN LAT
E
XCLASS
15
\begin{enumerate}[\IEEEsetlabelwidth{12)}]
\item blah
\item blah
.
.
% 12 items total
\end{enumerate}
C. Description
Generally speaking, the longest label width will always have
to be specified for description lists. Furthermore, the author
may wish to use
\IEEEmathlabelsep
for
\labelsep
when
building a math symbol list. For example:
\begin{description}[\IEEEsetlabelwidth{$\alpha\omega
\pi\theta\mu$}\IEEEusemathlabelsep]
\item[$\gamma\delta\beta$] Is the index of..
\item[$\alpha\omega\pi\theta\mu$] Gives the..
.
.
\end{description}
Sometimes it can be difficult to ascertain from inspection
which of the labels is the longest. For such cases, a little
diagnostic code may be helpful to measure a length and then
to display the result on the console:
\newlength{\mydiaglen} % put in preamble
.
.
\settowidth{\mydiaglen}{$\alpha\beta\gamma$}
\showthe\mydiaglen
XII. T
HEOREMS AND
P
ROOFS
Theorems and related structures such as axioms, corollaries
and lemmas, are handled in the traditional L
A
T
E
Xfashion. The
user must first declare the structure name via the
\newtheorem{struct_type}{struct_title}[in_counter]
command where
struct_type
is the user chosen identifier
for the structure,
struct_title
is the heading that is used for
the structure and
in_counter
is an optional name of a counter
whose number will be displayed with the structure number
and whose update will reset the structure counter. Most IEEE
papers use sequential theorem numbering throughout the entire
work, so an
in_counter
is usually not specified. However,
those papers that do use
in_counter
usually use “
section
such that the section number is the first part of each theorem
number. After the structure is defined it can be used via
\begin{struct_type}[extra_title]
.
.
\end{struct_type}
where
extra_title
is an optional name that is displayed
with the structure.
For example, the most common way to do theorems would
be to use
\newtheorem{theorem}{Theorem}
followed as needed by environments like
\begin{theorem}[Einstein-Podolsky-Rosenberg]
Sometimes it is desirable that a structure share its counter
with another structure. This can be accomplished by using the
alternate form of
\newtheorem
\newtheorem{struct_type}[num_like]{struct_title}
where
num_like
is the name of an existing structure.
IEEE theorem numbers are prefixed by the section number
they were defined in (e.g., 2.5). This presents a difficulty with
appendices (especially when numbered with Roman numerals)
because the theorem numbers will not be unique. To remedy
this, within Roman numbered appendices, IEEEtran will add
an “A” prefix (e.g., A2.5). For Alpha number appendices,
theorem numbering is more straightforward (e.g., A.5, B.5,
etc.). For a single appendix, a constant “A” prefix is used (e.g.,
A.5).
A. Proofs
Proofs are easily handled by the predefined IEEEproof
environment:
\begin{IEEEproof}
.
.
\end{IEEEproof}
The Q.E.D. symbol “
”is automatically placed at the end of
each proof. If needed, the symbol can be manually accessed
via the
\IEEEQED
command. Both the closed (default) “
and open “
”forms are provided as
\IEEEQEDclosed
and
\IEEEQEDopen
, respectively. To change the default from
closed to open (some journals and/or authors prefer the open
form), just redefine
\IEEEQED
as desired:
\renewcommand{\IEEEQED}{\IEEEQEDopen}
IEEEproof also supports an optional argument which allows
the default string “Proof” to be overridden:
\begin{IEEEproof}[Proof of Theorem \ref{thm:my}]
XIII. E
ND
S
ECTIONS
A. Appendices
The
\appendix
command is used to start a single appendix.
An optional argument can be used to specify a title:
\appendix[Proof of the Zonklar Equations]
After issuing
\appendix
, the
\section
command will be
disabled and any attempt to use
\section
will be ignored
and will cause a warning message to be generated. (The
single appendix marks the end of the enumerated sections
and the section counter is fixed at zero—one does not state
“see Appendix A” when there is only one appendix, instead
“see the Appendix” is used.) However, all lower
\subsecti
on
commands and the
\section
*
form will work as normal
as these may still be needed for things like acknowledgments.
\appendices
is used when there is more than one ap-
pendix section.
\section
is then used to declare each ap-
pendix:
\section{Proof of the First Zonklar Equation}
control SDK system:VB.NET TIFF: TIFF Converter Control SDK; Convert TIFF to Image &
to PDF conversion without using external PDF document processing VB.NE TIFF to JPEG Converting Plugin, VB.NE conversion SDK is able to convert TIFF file to JPEG
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Besides, this PDF converting library also makes PDF document visible and searchable on the Internet by converting PDF document file into HTML webpage.
www.rasteredge.com
16
JOURNAL OF LAT
E
XCLASS FILES, VOL. 14, NO. 8, AUGUST 2015
The mandatory argument to section can be left blank (
\sect
ion{}
)if no title is desired. It is important to remember to
declare a section before any additional subsections or labels
that refer to section (or subsection, etc.) numbers. As with
\a
ppendix
,the
\section
*
command and the lower
\subsec
tion
commands will still work as usual.
There are two appendix numbering conventions used by
IEEE. Capital letters (e.g., “Appendix B”) and Roman nu-
merals (e.g., “Appendix II”). The former appears to be more
popular and is the IEEEtran default. Use the IEEEtran class
option romanappendices to get Roman numbered appendices.
Some authors prefer to have the appendix number to be part
of equation numbers for equations that appear in an appendix.
This can be accomplished by redefining the equation numbers
as
\renewcommand{\theequation}{\thesection.\arabic{equa
tion}}
before the first appendix equation. For a single appendix, the
constant “A” should be used in place of
\thesection
.
B. Acknowledgments
Acknowledgments and other unnumbered sections are cre-
ated using the
\section
*
command:
\section
*
{Acknowledgment}
\addcontentsline{toc}{section}{Acknowledgment}
The second, optional, command is needed to manually add
such sections to the table of contents (which is rarely used,
but some authors may do so with draft papers) as well as the
document’s PDF bookmarks (if using hyperref.sty).
Note that IEEE Computer Society papers typically use the
plural form “Acknowledgments”.
C. Bibliographies
Bibliographies are most easily (and correctly) generated
using the IEEEtran B
IB
T
E
X package [32] which is easily
invoked via
\bibliographystyle{IEEEtran}
\bibliography{IEEEabrv,mybibfile}
See the IEEEtran B
IB
T
E
X package documentation for more
information.
When submitting the document source (.tex) file to external
parties, it is strongly recommended that the B
IB
T
E
X.bbl file
be manually copied into the document (within the traditional
L
A
T
E
X bibliography environment) so as not to depend on
external files to generate the bibliography and to prevent the
possibility of changes occurring therein.
D. Biographies
Biographies for journal articles are created using the IEEE-
biography environment which supports an optional argument
for the inclusion of a photo:
\begin{IEEEbiography}[{\includegraphics[width=1in,he
ight=1.25in,clip,keepaspectratio]{./shell}}]{Michael
Shell}
.
.
\end{IEEEbiography}
Note the extra set of braces that are required to prevent the
L
A
T
E
Xparser from becoming confused when commands with
optional arguments are used within an optional argument of
another command. Alternatively, a LAT
E
X macro (command)
could be defined to facilitate a shorthand notation for the
author photos. If the optional argument is not used, space will
be reserved for a photo and the message “PLACE PHOTO
HERE” will be displayed in place of a photo.
IEEEtran is a tad overly cautious about preventing the
IEEEbiography photo area from being broken across pages.
If it looks as though a IEEEbiography should be able to be
“squeezed” at the end of a page, but instead it begins on a
new page, try inserting
\vspace
*
{-2\baselineskip}
or so before the IEEEbiography and see if it can fit.
IEEE’s algorithm for spacing around biographies can be a
tad complex because esthetics must be considered. IEEEtran
places
\vfil
above biographies. This allows the user to shove
biographies down or up as desired by placing the infinitely
more stretchable
\vfill
before or after the biographies.
The photo area is 1 in wide and 1.25 in long. The IEEE
recommends that author photo images should be of 220 dpi
(dots per inch) resolution and in gray scale with 8 bits/sample.
If no photo is available, the
\IEEEbiographynophoto
environment, which does not support an optional argument
or reserve space for a photo, can be used instead.
XIV. L
AST
P
AGE
C
OLUMN
E
QUALIZATION
The IEEE (coarsely) equalizes the lengths of the columns
on the last page. The balance is coarse in the sense that
reference or IEEEbiography entries are not usually broken—so
the column lengths are not usually perfectly equal.
Balancing the last two columns is especially important for
camera ready work. It is recommended that authors use the
manual approach by putting in
\newpage
at the appropriate
point or
\enlargethispage{-X.Yin}
somewhere at the top
of the first column of the last page where “X.Yin” is the
amount to effectively shorten the text height of the given page.
Sometimes such a command has to be located between
bibliography entries. This can be a problem because, although
the command can be placed within the .bbl file, it will get
overwritten the next time B
IB
T
E
Xis run. For this situation,
IEEEtran offers a way to invoke commands just before a given
reference number via the
\IEEEtriggeratref{}
command.
For instance, issuing the command
\IEEEtriggeratref{10}
before the bibliography will insert a page break just before
reference number ten. The command that is executed defaults
to
\newpage
. However, this can be changed via the
\IEEE
triggercmd
command:
\IEEEtriggercmd{\enlargethispage{-5.35in}}
Note that manually set break points or page sizes will have to
be readjusted if the document content ever changes.
SHELL: HOW TO USE THE IEEETRAN LAT
E
XCLASS
17
There are L
A
T
E
X packages, such as balance.sty [33] and
flushend.sty [34], that are designed to automatically balance
the columns on the last page. Flushend does not require the
placement of any special command in the first column of the
last page, balance.sty may. However, the use of these packages
is not recommended because they are known to be less than
perfectly reliable in their operation. The author of balance.sty
does not guarantee that it will work with every possible type
of page, especially pages with figures. Under certain circum-
stances, flushend.sty will cause a spacing anomaly between
two lines within a reference in the second column of the last
page (becomes larger than the space between references). This
problem seems to result because the bibliography in IEEEtran
is a list with zero space between the list items which are in
footnotesize. The problem can also occur under article.cls for
the same type of list. It may be possible to manually correct
the flushend anomaly by tweaking the spacer at the column
break via a flushend command such as “
\atColsBreak{\vs
kip-2pt}
”, but having to do so partially defeats the purpose
of using the package in the first place. If using flushend.sty or
balance.sty, be sure to check the document carefully for any
spacing problems—especially on the last page.
A
PPENDIX
A
I
NSTALLING
IEEE
TRAN
First of all, users should be aware that, depending on the
target operating system of the IEEEtran archive packaging
(e.g., .tar.gz for Unix, or .zip for MS Windows), the plain text
based IEEEtran files (.bst, .cls, .sty, .tex, etc.) may use one of
two different types of end-of-line character conventions. Unix
(including Mac OS X) systems use line feed
<lf>
(
0x0A
),
while MS Windows systems use carriage return/line feed pairs
<cr><lf>
(
0x0D 0x0A
) to signal the end of lines.10 Most
modern L
A
T
E
X systems are tolerant of differing end-of-line
conventions, but some text editors aren’t. (Symptoms here
include text appearing all on one long line, double spacing,
etc.)
L
A
T
E
X.cls files can be accessed system-wide when they are
placed in the
<texmf>/tex/latex
directory, where
<tex
mf>
is the root directory of the user’s T
E
Xinstallation. On
systems that have a local texmf tree (
<texmflocal>
), which
may be named “
texmf-local
”or “
localtexmf
”, it may be
advisable to install packages in
<texmflocal>
, rather than
<texmf>
as the contents of the former, unlike that of the
latter, are preserved after the LAT
E
Xsystem is reinstalled and/or
upgraded.
It is recommended that the user create a subdirectory <t
exmf or texmflocal>/tex/latex/IEEE for all IEEE
related L
A
T
E
Xclass and package files. On some L
A
T
E
Xsystems,
the directory look-up tables will need to be refreshed after
making additions or deletions to the system files. For T
E
X
Live systems this is accomplished via executing
texhash
as root. MiKT
E
Xusers can run
10
The fact that different conventions exist for plain text is, of course, an
absurdity in itself. See the Wikipedia article “Newline” at http://en.wikipedia.
org/wiki/Newline for the history and details.
initexmf -u
to accomplish the same thing.
Users not willing or able to install the files system-wide can
install them in their personal directories, but will then have to
provide the path (full or relative) in addition to the filename
when referring to them in L
A
T
E
X.
A
PPENDIX
B
P
OST
S
CRIPT
/PDF O
UTPUT
Some L
A
T
E
Xsystems are not properly configured to produce
quality PostScript and/or PDF output. This has historically
been more of a problem with IEEE-related work because the
unique font combination the IEEE uses has been known to
trigger problems with some L
A
T
E
X setups. Fortunately, these
types of problems are now relatively uncommon on modern
LAT
E
Xsystems.
To assist IEEE authors in detecting and correcting prob-
lems with LAT
E
X PostScript/PDF generation, the “Testflow”
diagnostic suite was developed [35]. Authors are encouraged
to take the time to go through the testflow diagnostic and
identify and correct potential problems before their LAT
E
X
systems have to be relied on for production work. Papers with
problems such as incorrect margins, font types, PDF format
errors and/or improper font embedding can incur delays during
the manuscript acceptance process.
A
PPENDIX
C
O
THER
U
SEFUL OR
R
ELATED
E
XTERNAL
P
ACKAGES
A. The acronym.sty Package
Tobias Oetiker’s acronym.sty [36] may be useful with
papers that have a lot of acronyms. However, beware of a
compatibility issue between the acronym environment and the
IEEEtran description lists (see Appendix E).
B. The url.sty Package
Papers that contain URLs, email address, etc., can likely
benefit from the use of Donald Arseneau’s url.sty L
A
T
E
X
package [37] which provides for more intelligent line breaking
within such structures. Note that IEEEtran.cls automatically
sets the url font style of url.sty to “same” (that is, URLs will
be rendered in the same font as the text they appear in) as
IEEE journals do. To override this, the author must place the
\urlstyle
after
\begin{document}
.
C. The IEEEtrantools Package
Some of the unique commands provided by the IEEEtran
L
A
T
E
X class may be of use in non-IEEE related work using
other class files (e.g., dissertations, technical reports, etc.).
The IEEEtrantools.sty package [38] provides several popular
IEEEtran commands including
\IEEEPARstart
, the IEEE
style IED list environments, the IEEEeqnarray family of
commands, the IEEEproof environment and
\IEEEauthor
refmark
. The IEEEtrantools package is not needed under,
and should not be loaded with, the IEEEtran class. See the
IEEEtrantools documentation for more details.
18
JOURNAL OF LAT
E
XCLASS FILES, VOL. 14, NO. 8, AUGUST 2015
A
PPENDIX
D
C
OMMON
U
SER
M
ISTAKES
Many user mistakes with IEEEtran involve doing too much
rather than too little. Older class files may have required hacks
in order to get the formatting closer to that of the IEEE. These
tweaks are no longer needed. Users should carefully check
all the loaded packages to ensure that they are still useful
under the latest version of IEEEtran. Don’t load packages just
because “this is the way it always has been done.” The same
is true for manually adjusted spacing, margins, paper sizes,
etc.
Below are a few of the more commonly encountered mis-
takes to avoid.
Placing labels before captions: This is considered to be
one of the most frequent mistakes made in LAT
E
Xof all time.
Remember that
\label
must be placed after or within
\cap
tion
to be able to reference figures/tables properly. As it is
\caption
that actually sets up the reference counter,
\labe
l
’s placed prior to
\caption
will refer to the section number,
instead of the desired figure/table number.
Altering the default fonts: Authors should allow IEEEtran
to manage the fonts. Unless specifically instructed otherwise,
such as under comsoc mode or in the author instructions of the
specific conference/journal being submitted to, do not attempt
to use packages that override the default fonts such as pslatex,
mathptm, etc.
Altering the default spacings, section heading styles,
margins or column style: Authors should not attempt to
manually alter the margins, paper size (except as provided
in IEEEtran class options) or use packages that do so (geom-
etry.sty, etc.). There should be no need to add spacing around
figures, equations, etc., (except possibly for double column
floats as described in Section X-D).
Using bitmapped graphics for line art: L
A
T
E
Xhas always
favored the use of Encapsulated PostScript (EPS) or under
pdfL
A
T
E
X, Portable Document Format (PDF), (which can be
considered to be a type of subset of PostScript), for graphics
(see Section X-A for more information), and for good reason.
EPS/PDF supports both vector (that is, containing objects
such as lines, circles, etc., that are mathematically described)
and bitmap (that is, containing only samples in the form
of pixels) images. The former should always be used for
drawings, graphs, charts, etc., while the latter usually has
to be employed with photos (because their contents usually
cannot be easily described mathematically). The drawing and
graphing tools used by the author should be capable of
outputting directly11 in vector (EPS or PDF) format. Vector
EPS/PDF images can be scaled, rotated and magnified without
undergoing degradation such as pixelization or becoming gray
or “jaggedy.” For photos, the IEEE recommends the use of
EPS/PDF (which is easy to directly import into (pdf)L
A
T
E
Xin a
portable manner), PNG or TIFF. For author photos JPEG (JPG)
is usually acceptable. The use of other graphic formats such
as BMP, EMF, VSD, etc., is unacceptable for IEEE journals.
11
Once an image in EPS/PDF vector form is converted to a bitmap form
(GIF, PNG, TIFF, JPEG, etc.) it will almost always be irretrievably locked
into bitmap form even if it is later converted back into EPS/PDF.
Some IEEE conferences may be more liberal with regard to
the types of graphics formats they accept.
Using bitmapped fonts and/or not embedding and
subsetting all document fonts: Authors should check their
system with the testflow diagnostic [35] to ensure that only
vector (Type 1) fonts are being used and that all fonts are
embedded and subsetted. A document that uses bitmapped
fonts and/or fails to contain all (and only) the needed font
glyphs may be rejected by the IEEE. Watch out for graphical
drawing applications that produce output with these problems
(suspect this if the problem goes away when the figures are
not included).
Using older graphics packages: Authors should not use
anything other than the graphics and/or graphicx (preferred)
package for figures. Older interfaces such as psfig, epsf, etc.,
have been obsolete for many years.
Failing to properly divide long equations: It is the author’s
responsibility to ensure that all equations fit within the width of
their columns. Admittedly, breaking an equation is not always
easy to do and two column formatting places serious con-
straints on allowed equation width. However, only the author
can divide his/her equation without unintentionally altering its
meaning or affecting readability. Using subfunctions is a valid
way to reduce to width of an equation, but altering the math
font size is not.
Manually formatting references: Not only is this error
prone, but requires a lot of work as well. It is better to use
the IEEEtran B
IB
T
E
Xstyle [32].
A
PPENDIX
E
K
NOWN
I
SSUES
acronym.sty: The acronym environment will have a prob-
lem with IEEEtran because of the modified IEEE style
description list environment. The optional argument of the
acronym environment cannot be used to set the width of the
longest label. A workaround is to use
\IEEEiedlistdecl
to
accomplish the same thing:
\renewcommand{\IEEEiedlistdecl}{\IEEEsetlabelwidth{S
ONET}}
\begin{acronym}
.
.
\end{acronym}
\renewcommand{\IEEEiedlistdecl}{\relax}% reset back
cite.sty: Versions prior to 5.0 (2009-03-20) will not hyper-
link citation numbers under hyperref.sty.
hyperref.sty: Versions prior to 6.72u will interfere with the
optional argument to
\appendix
.
Small caps font variations: The small caps font used in
the free L
A
T
E
Xsystems have about 80% the height of normal
sized letters. However, the small caps font the IEEE uses in the
journals is slightly smaller with a ratio of around 75%. So, the
widths of the section headings produced under the free L
A
T
E
X
systems will be slightly wider than that used in actual journals.
The small caps font used in many commercial LAT
E
Xsystems
(such as those from YandY) has a ratio of about 65%. So,
those systems will produce section headings that are narrower
than those in IEEE publications. Such variations should not
be cause for concern.
SHELL: HOW TO USE THE IEEETRAN LAT
E
XCLASS
19
A
PPENDIX
F
T
HE
IEEE
EQNARRAY
C
OMMANDS
(Optional—for advanced users)
Virtually all LAT
E
Xalignment commands such as
\eqnarr
ay
,
\array
and
\tabular
are based on the T
E
Xcommand
\halign
. LAT
E
X’s goal of simplifying the use of
\halign
is
noble. However, in hiding much of the lower level interface, a
fair degree of flexibility is lost. This has resulted in the devel-
opment of several packages such as amsmath [11], array.sty
[28], and the MDW tools [17], each of which provides much
more powerful alignment structures.
IEEEtran also provides its own unique set of alignment
tools which are known as the IEEEeqnarray family. The
design philosophy of the IEEEeqnarray family is to provide
aL
A
T
E
Xalignment interface that is based more closely on the
underlying
\halign
, but to couple this with high level col-
umn definition management and automated preamble building
mechanisms (which are tedious to do in T
E
X). As a result,
the IEEEeqnarray family of commands are flexible enough
to be almost universal replacements for all the other LAT
E
X
commands for producing multiline equations and aligned box
structures such as matrices and tables of text and/or mathe-
matics. Because the user is shielded less from the
\halign
underpinnings, the rules of operation are more involved. So,
the IEEEeqnarray commands are aimed primarily toward the
more advanced L
A
T
E
Xusers.
The use of the IEEEeqnarray family of tools described
in this section is totally optional. The IEEEeqnarray code
is self-contained and does not depend on other alignment
packages—which can be used along side, or in place of, it. The
IEEEtrantools.sty package (See Appendix C-C) is available
for those who wish to use the IEEEeqnarray family outside of
IEEEtran.cls.
Recommended sources of information on the use of IEEEe-
qnarray include Stefan M. Moser’s How to Typeset Equations
in L
A
T
E
X[6] and Tobias Oetiker’s The Not So Short Introduction
to L
A
T
E
X2
"
[5].
A. IEEEeqnarray
The IEEEeqnarray environment is for multiline equations
that occupy the entire column. It is used in much the same
way as
\eqnarray
,but with two additional arguments, one
of which is mandatory and the other is optional:
\begin{IEEEeqnarray}[decl]{cols}
.
\end{IEEEeqnarray}
The optional argument is for commands that are to be executed
within the environment, but before the alignment actually be-
gins. This is just like the local control of the IEEEtran IED list
environments. There is also a global control,
\IEEEeqnarray
decl
, which is executed just prior to the local control. By
default,
\IEEEeqnarraydecl
is defined to be
\relax
. As
mentioned in Section XI, users should be careful not to allow
unwanted spaces to occur in these controls because such
things will appear just before the IEEEeqnarray structure.
Furthermore, remember that, to prevent the LAT
E
Xparser from
TABLE IV
IEEE
EQNARRAY
P
REDEFINED
C
OLUMN
T
YPES
I.D.
Description
I.D.
Description
l
left math
v
vertical rule
c
centered math
vv
two vertical rules
r
right math
V
double vertical rule
L
left math with ords
VV
two double vertical rules
C
centered math with ords
h
horizontal rule
R
right math with ords
H
double horizontal rule
s
left text
x
empty
t
centered text
X
empty math
u
right text
Note: S, T, U, p, and P are likely to be used in future versions.
TABLE V
IEEE
EQNARRAY
P
REDEFINED
C
OLUMN
S
EPARATION
(G
LUE
)T
YPES
I.D.
Width
*
I.D.
Width
!
1=6
em
.
0.5\arraycolsep
,
1=6
em
/
1.0\arraycolsep
:
2=9
em
?
2.0\arraycolsep
;
5=18
em
*
0pt plus 1fil
1
em
+
1000pt minus 1000pt
"
2
em
-
0pt
*
All em values are referenced to the math font.
1em = \quad; 2em = \qquad
becoming confused, the contents of an optional argument must
be enclosed in braces if the argument contains commands with
optional arguments.
The mandatory argument
cols
contains the column and
inter-column separator spacing (“inter-column tabskip glue”
in T
E
Xspeak) type specifiers. Column types are identified by
letters. Several predefined column types are available as shown
in Table IV. There are two kinds of glue types. Predefined glue
types are indicated by various punctuation marks as shown in
Table V. User defined glue types are indicated by numbers.
The rules for placing these specifiers are as follows: (1) no
two glue specifiers can appear next to each other—they are
not additive and must be separated from each other by at least
one column specifier; (2) zero inter-column spacing will be
assumed between back-to-back column specifiers; (3) because
of rule one, back-to-back numerals will be considered as being
asingle glue specified by the numerical value represented by
all the digits; (4) a multiletter column specifier can be accessed
by enclosing the letters within braces (otherwise it would be
interpreted as being several single letter column specifiers).
Because of rule three, braces are not needed around multidigit
glue specifiers; (5) there must be at least one column specifier,
but there is no fixed upper limit of how many columns can be
supported; and (6) for
\IEEEeqnarray
, “
+
” centering glue
will be assumed at each end of the
cols
specification if
no column glue is specified there. This results in a centered
structure like
\eqnarray
(the 1000pt minus 1000pt glue on
each side “compresses” as needed from each side of the main
text column to center that which is between). Also,
\IEEE
eqnarray
automatically adds a hidden column for equation
20
JOURNAL OF LAT
E
XCLASS FILES, VOL. 14, NO. 8, AUGUST 2015
numbers to the right of the last specified column. Currently,
there is no support for equation numbers on the left side.
12
B. Defining Column Types
New column types are defined with the
\IEEEeqnarraydefcol{col_id}{predef}{postdef}
command. The
col_id
argument contains the name of the
column specifier which should consist only of one or more
letters. A given column specifier, even the predefined ones, can
be redefined at will without warning or error.
13
The
predef
argument contains the commands that will be inserted before
each cell in the column. The
postdef
argument contains the
commands that will be inserted after each cell in the column.
For example,
\IEEEeqnarraydefcol{g}{\hfil$\clubsuit$}{$\diamondsu
it$\hfil}
Will define a “g” text column which will place club and
diamond suit symbols on either side of a cell’s contents and
center the respective structure within the cell. e.g.,
|Hello}
Using
\hfil
to control cell alignment allows the user
to override the column alignment on a cell-by-cell basis by
placing the infinitely more stretchable
\hfill
on one or both
sides of a cell’s contents.
\hfill
can even be placed between
items in a cell to force them apart and against the “cell walls.”
The IEEEeqnarray predefined columns are designed to allow
user overrides via
\hfill
whenever possible (even for the
math mode cells).
Please note that T
E
Xwill not allow unmatched braces within
the arguments of commands. If braces are needed, such as for
the argument of a command, they will have to be provided
within the cells themselves. For example,
\IEEEeqnarraydefcol{myp}{\parbox[c]{0.5in}}{}
\begin{IEEEeqnarraybox}{{myp}c}
{first\\second}&\alpha\\
&\beta%
\end{IEEEeqnarraybox}
defines a column type named “myp” that will place text within
a0.5inch wide parbox which is centered on the cell’s baseline.
Note that because the column type name consists of more than
one letter, it has to be enclosed within an extra set of braces
in the column specifications or else it would be interpreted as
three adjacent columns “m”, “y” and “p”. Also, the contents
of the cell must be enclosed within braces so that (1) the
\par
box
command sees the entire contents as its argument; and (2)
the newline within the parbox will not be interpreted as being
the end of the alignment row. Be aware that it can happen that
acolumn is given an empty cell, such as in the second row in
the example, or when entering blank separator rows. When this
happens, a
\relax
will appear in the column which will be
acquired as the command’s argument. Therefore, commands
in column definitions that acquire arguments from the cells
should not choke if fed
\relax
.
12This is notto say that its impossiblewith the existing capability, just
ugly.
13
Thus allowing new predefined column types to be added without breaking
existing code.
For reference, the definitions of the predefined column types
are shown here:
% math
\IEEEeqnarraydefcol{l}{$\IEEEeqnarraymathstyle}{$\hfil}
\IEEEeqnarraydefcol{c}{\hfil$\IEEEeqnarraymathstyle}{$\hfil}
\IEEEeqnarraydefcol{r}{\hfil$\IEEEeqnarraymathstyle}{$}
\IEEEeqnarraydefcol{L}{$\IEEEeqnarraymathstyle{}}{{}$\hfil}
\IEEEeqnarraydefcol{C}{\hfil$\IEEEeqnarraymathstyle{}}{{}$\h
fil}
\IEEEeqnarraydefcol{R}{\hfil$\IEEEeqnarraymathstyle{}}{{}$}
% text
\IEEEeqnarraydefcol{s}{\IEEEeqnarraytextstyle}{\hfil}
\IEEEeqnarraydefcol{t}{\hfil\IEEEeqnarraytextstyle}{\hfil}
\IEEEeqnarraydefcol{u}{\hfil\IEEEeqnarraytextstyle}{}
% vertical rules
\IEEEeqnarraydefcol{v}{}{\vrule width\arrayrulewidth}
\IEEEeqnarraydefcol{vv}{\vrule width\arrayrulewidth\hfil}{\h
fil\vrule width\arrayrulewidth}
\IEEEeqnarraydefcol{V}{}{\vrule width\arrayrulewidth\hskip\d
oublerulesep\vrule width\arrayrulewidth}
\IEEEeqnarraydefcol{VV}{\vrule width\arrayrulewidth\hskip\do
ublerulesep\vrule width\arrayrulewidth\hfil}%
{\hfil\vrule width\arrayrulewidth\hskip\doublerulesep\vrule
width\arrayrulewidth}
% horizontal rules
\IEEEeqnarraydefcol{h}{}{\leaders\hrule height\arrayrulewidt
h\hfil}
\IEEEeqnarraydefcol{H}{}{\leaders\vbox{\hrule width\arrayrul
ewidth\vskip\doublerulesep\hrule width\arrayrulewidth}\hfil}
% plain
\IEEEeqnarraydefcol{x}{}{}
\IEEEeqnarraydefcol{X}{$}{$}
Note the inclusion of the commands
\IEEEeqnarraymat
hstyle
and
\IEEEeqnarraytextstyle
in the math and
text columns, respectively. These commands allow the user
to control the style of all of the math and text columns.
However, because the changes apply to all the columns, the
user will have to define new column types if different styles
are needed in the same alignment (or different styles can be
manually specified in each cell). The default definitions for
these commands are
\newcommand{\IEEEeqnarraymathstyle}{\displaystyle}
\newcommand{\IEEEeqnarraytextstyle}{\relax}
which allows the text columns to be in whatever style was in
effect when the alignment was started and the default math
style will be in display style, but can be easily changed as
needed. e.g.,
\begin{IEEEeqnarray}[\renewcommand{\IEEEeqnarraymath
style}{\scriptstyle}]{rCl}
will result in script style math columns.
The columns relating to vertical and horizontal lines will
be discussed in Appendix F-K as they are typically used only
when producing tables.
The “x” and “X” columns are basic empty text and math
mode columns without any formatting or style controls.
C. Defining Glue Types
New column separation glue types are defined with the
\IEEEeqnarraydefcolsep{colsep_id}{def}
command. The
colsep_id
argument contains the number of
the column separation glue specifier which should consist only
of numerals. Different glue type names must have different
numerical values. (Don’t get too cute—“007” is identical to
“7”.) User defined column glue specifiers can be redefined
at will without warning or error. The
def
argument contains
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested