mvc view to pdf itextsharp : Convert pdf to tiff Library software class asp.net wpf winforms ajax JF_NetworkSociety33-part1311

have been made in the 1940s with television. Believing the impact of
the Internet would eventually be much more significant than that of
television, in 2000 the World Internet Project launched the study of
the Internet that should have been conducted on television.
Methods
Using a RDD sample, the Center creates a carefully constructed
representative sample of the American population. Non-users as well
as users make up the sample, as it is essential to talk to non-users
before they go on the Internet and understand as much as possible
about their lifestyle. While the project did not begin before a signifi-
cant portion of the population was online, the project is at the begin-
ning of broadband at home, online media and the wireless Internet in
the United States. In the first year, when the household was contacted,
the interviewer crafted a roster on all household members over the
age of 12. The computer then randomly chose one of those members
and the interviewer spoke only to that person. A parent’s permission is
required for interviews with those between ages 12-17 and the survey
is conducted in English and Spanish.
The interviews cover a wide range of topics. For both users and
non-users of the Internet, the interview examines all types of media
use and users’ credibility toward media. Communication patterns,
ranging from telephone use to conversation time face-to-face with
family, friends and neighbors, are covered, as is a whole range of ques-
tions about buying behavior and shopping decisions. Questions also
are asked about use of leisure time, trust in institutions, attitudes
toward technology and much more. 
Non-users are asked about why they are not online, whether they
anticipate ever connecting and what it might take to get them to con-
nect. They are also asked their perceptions of what is happening
online. Users of the Internet are asked when they first went online,
what made them connect and their perceptions of online life. Users
also are  asked  detailed questions  about  how they connect to the
Internet and from where, how often they connect and for how long
and what they do online. In the area of consumer behavior they are
also asked about whether they buy online and, if not, what is barring
them, as well as general attitudes toward online security and privacy.
306
The Network Society
Convert pdf to tiff - Library software class:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to tiff - Library software class:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
The World Internet Project is based on the belief that the technol-
ogy may continue to grow in important ways and the best way to
understand the impact is to watch non-users as they become users,
telephone modem users as they move to broadband and all users as
they gain experience. In addition to watching that change, the project
will also determine whether people drop off the Internet (between
2000 and 2004, about 3% of Internet users left each year—some of
them later returned) and whether they ever return and, if so, when
and what brought them back. The study also believes that some of the
most important impacts of the technology may be in unpredictable
areas and, therefore, the best way to see that change is to create a
baseline profile of people’s lifestyles and to go back to the same people
year after year in order to watch the impact and change.
International Partnerships
While technology change is occurring in America faster than in
most of the world, the United States is not at the forefront of that
change.  Penetration  rates  for  the  Internet  have  been  higher  in
Scandinavia than in the United States, and America is just beginning to
enter the wireless area for anything more sophisticated than voice
communication. While high percentages of Europeans and Asians use
their mobile phones for SMS and accessing the Internet, this use of
mobile is in its infancy in the U.S. Therefore, to gain a worldwide per-
spective on the rate and nature of technological change and its impact
on lifestyle, the project reached out to partners around the world to
conduct parallel studies in their own countries. At the moment, close
to 20 other countries are part of the World Internet Project. 
In year one, in addition to the United States, surveys were con-
ducted in Sweden, Italy, Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan and Japan.
The  second  year saw  the addition  of  Germany, Hungary,  Spain,
Macao, China, South Korea, Canada and Chile. Additional partners
are now in India, Argentina, Israel, Australia, Portugal and the Czech
Republic. Great effort is now being focused on finding African and
more Latin American partners.
In each country the work is carried out by a university or qualified
research  institution.  Membership  in  the  World  Internet  Project
requires  the  use  of  common  questions  in  each  nation’s  survey,
Internet and Society in a Global Perspective
307
Library software class:Online Convert PDF file to Tiff. Best free online PDF Tif
Using this .NET PDF to TIFF conversion control, C# developers can render and convert PDF document to TIFF image file with no loss in original file quality.
www.rasteredge.com
Library software class:Online Convert PDF file to Word. Best free online PDF Conversion
Download Free Trial. Convert a Tiff/Tif File to PDF. Easy converting! We try to make it as easy as possible to convert your Tiff/Tif files to PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
although each country is free to add additional questions of particular
interest to them or their region. In Asia, Chinese-speaking countries
(China, Hong Kong, Singapore and Taiwan) are aligning their efforts
to look at issues of common concern. 
Lessons Learned from Five Years in the Field
Conducting such a widespread international, longitudinal project
begins to yield real results and trends after three years in the field.
While the project has four years’ or more data from the United States,
Singapore, Italy and Sweden, enough countries have produced data
from two or more years in the field to begin to discern and understand
trends. The latest report from the United States (http://digitalcenter
.org) identifies ten major trends that have shown themselves after ten
years of the public Internet in the U.S. and after five years of data.
Most of those trends can also be found in the industrialized nations of
Europe and Asia and in many of the developing nations as well. Not
surprisingly, each country has also identified unique issues and trends
that  have  more  to  do with national culture  or  development  and
demonstrate the local character of the Internet around the world.
This paper focuses on the common issues, problems and develop-
ments that have become clear in a longitudinal look at the social,
political and economic impact of the Internet.
The Advantages of Experience Have Diminished
Sometime over the past year, a subtle but important development
on the Internet began to emerge: for the first time the advantages of
having Internet experience began to diminish and even disappear. The
rate of this diminution is greatest for those countries that have had the
greatest Internet penetration for the longest time: United States,
Sweden, Germany, Japan and Canada.
Over the past five years we have been tracking Internet use, follow-
ing the same non-users as they became dial-up and then broadband
users. From the beginning we saw significant and pronounced differ-
ences between the newest users (who had just gone online) and the
most experienced users (who had been online seven years or more).
Those experience differences accounted for enormous differences in
how often users went online and with what type of connection, how
308
The Network Society
Library software class:Online Convert Excel to PDF file. Best free online export xlsx
Download Free Trial. Convert a Excel File to PDF. Easy converting! We try to make it as easy as possible to convert your xlsx/xls files to PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
Library software class:C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
filePath). Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF with specified zoom value and save it on the disk. Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value.
www.rasteredge.com
long they stayed connected, their attitudes towards the Internet and,
most importantly, what they did while connected. Indeed, Internet
penetration only moved to large numbers in Europe as users could
move  to  broadband  (mostly  DSL),  bypassing  the  expensive  per-
minute phone charges associate with dial-up. In the U.S. and Canada,
where low-cost unlimited dial was possible, users stayed on modem
connections far longer until broadband costs began to decline over the
past two-to-three years.
The most experienced users connected over twice as long as the
newcomers and were far more likely to be connected through a high-
speed connection. Long-time users also connected from more places,
both inside and outside the home. The biggest differences, however,
over four years was in what the new and experienced users did while
connected. New users were much more likely to be looking at chat
rooms, playing games and searching for entertainment information
and—most interesting to us—searching for medical information. We
were intrigued that medical searching seemed to be one of the heavi-
est uses by new Internet users: they seemed to have an unlimited
curiosity about medical issues, issues about which, perhaps, they did
not feel comfortable asking friends, parents or even physicians.
Over the years, experienced users were spending much more time
than novices buying online, doing work related to their jobs and look-
ing at news online. Fours years ago the average new Internet users did
not make an online purchase until they had been online between 18
and 24 months. The most important factor accounting for this lag was
fear about privacy and security, although other fears and concerns
came into play. Prospective shoppers four years ago also did not buy
online because they feared the product would not be delivered or
would be delivered damaged. They were also concerned whether they
could trust online descriptions of products. Overwhelmingly, they did
not like the absence of live human beings in the buying process.
Sometime in late 2003 or early 2004 everything began to change.
Now the differences between new and experienced Internet users have
almost disappeared. Although long-time users still connect longer, in
most other areas the differences have flattened enormously. New users
are only slightly more likely to be looking at chat rooms or playing
games online, and they are just about as likely to be looking at news,
entertainment information or doing work related to their jobs. 
Internet and Society in a Global Perspective
309
Library software class:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
C# PDF - Convert PDF to JPEG in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF to JPEG Converting & Conversion Control. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references:
www.rasteredge.com
Library software class:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Convert PDF to HTML. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to HTML in VB.NET Demo Code. Add necessary references:
www.rasteredge.com
Shopping differences have shown immense change. Today, new
users buy online almost from the day they get connected. Indeed, the
desire to make an online purchase is one of the most compelling fac-
tors causing non-users to get an Internet connection in the first place.
The 18-to- 24-month lag period is gone. Both Internet users and non-
users believe that prices are lower online and that the availability of
products is greater. Merchants successfully convinced many non-users
to go online and start buying at lower prices. Many merchants (espe-
cially airlines) now charge service fees when buying over the phone or
in person, but no service charge when buying on the Internet.
While fears about privacy and security have not diminished over the
years, they no longer serve as a barrier that prevents buying: people now
buy in spite of the fears. Concerns about damaged products or mislead-
ing descriptions have also disappeared as actual buying experience has
demonstrated there was little basis for the fears. And the most dramatic
change: lack of live humans in the buying process has been transformed
from a liability to an asset. Now buyers report they don’t want to have
to deal with a real person and prefer buying through a computer—
unless they experience a problem and need customer service.
The most likely cause four years ago for the vast differences in
Internet use by experienced and new users was demographic differ-
ences. In the United States, the earliest Internet users were much more
likely to be white or Asian, highly educated, male and with higher
incomes. They were also much more technologically inclined. Over
the past four years, more and more of America has gone online, with
the fastest  growing  groups  being African-Americans and Latinos,
females, lower income and those with less education. In virtually all the
other nations of the project, the first and heaviest users were also the
most educated with higher incomes and much more likely to be male.
Another important change is that new users go online knowing
what to expect from the Internet having, in many cases, been online
before with a friend’s or relative’s connection. The learning curve for
online behavior is much shallower. New users know what to expect
when they connect and now get down to business much faster than
new users of several years ago. Four years ago new users did much
more exploring and experimenting before getting down to business on
the Internet. For many of the reasons stated above, now they get to
business right away.
310
The Network Society
Library software class:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
DocumentType.DOCX DocumentType.TIFF. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size. Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified resolution and
www.rasteredge.com
Library software class:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF to Tiff. Convert PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to
www.rasteredge.com
Internet Users Watch Less Television
In every country for which we have collected data, Internet users
watch less television than those who are not online. The amount of tel-
evision watched lessens, although not significantly, as users gain experi-
ence on the net. It is not surprising that Internet users watch less
television than non-users since for many people their at-home, awake
time has been dominated by television; if they are to carve out time
from their lives to go online, it almost must come from television.
Figure 13.1 Number of hours of watched television per user and
non user of internet
Looking at 2003 data and the 12 countries that collected informa-
tion on television use, the average across those countries is that non-
users of the Internet watched 4.03 hours more television a week than
users. The country with the highest television viewing among users
and non-users is Japan and the nation with the lowest among the
countries measured is South Korea. In Japan non-users watch 26.3
hours of television per week (and users 20.9) while, just a few hundred
miles (and a great cultural divide) away, South Korean non-users
watch 14.5 hours of television a week and users watch 10.2.
Internet and Society in a Global Perspective
311
Non-users
Users
B
r
i
t
a
i
n
C
a
n
a
d
a
C
h
i
l
e
(
S
a
n
t
i
a
g
o
)
G
e
r
m
a
n
y
H
u
n
g
a
r
y
J
a
p
a
n
K
o
r
e
a
M
a
c
a
o
S
i
n
g
a
p
o
r
e
T
a
i
w
a
n
U
S
A
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
N
u
m
b
e
r
o
f
h
o
u
r
s
20.2
14.5
18.7
22.9
17.5
26.3
14.5
18.1
24.3
15.6
16.8
15.9
11.2
13
18.3
11.8
20.9
10.2
16.2
20.4
12.9
11.6
Looking at the gaps between Internet users and non-users and tele-
vision use, the greatest gap is found in Chile and Hungary at 5.7 hours
a week more television by non-users. It is important to note that in
2003  the  Chilean  data  was  urban-based  and  drawn  mostly  from
Santiago. Had the entire Chilean nation been measured (as it is now),
the numbers and the gap might be slightly different. Although the
gaps between Hungary and urban Chile are the same, Chileans report
watching  slightly  more  television. It is  also noteworthy that the
biggest gaps between users and non-users occurred in two places that
had relatively low television viewing when compared to the nine other
countries.  The  nation  surveyed  with  the  smallest  gap  between
Internet users and non-users is Sweden where the difference comes to
1.4 hours a week. Not far behind is the region of Macao (now part of
China)  where the gap, although very  low,  is slightly higher  than
Sweden at 1.7 hours a week. 
When Internet users are asked whether they watch more or less tel-
evision, it also becomes apparent that the Internet is cutting into tele-
vision time. Relatively few Internet users report that they are watching
more television. Among those who do, the highest percentage is that
in Singapore where 13.4% of users say they are using television more.
The country reporting the smallest increase is Sweden where only
0.3% say viewing has increased. Spain also reports tiny increases at
0.9%. Across eight countries, an average of 5.08% report more televi-
sion use after discovering the net. Far larger are the percentages
reporting watching less television. The average of those saying they
are watching less television across the same eight nations is 31.3%, or
about six times as many saying they are watching more. The country
with the highest percentage of Internet users watching less television
is Spain at 41.1%, closely followed by urban China at 39.9% and the
United States at 38.3%. The country reporting the smallest number
of  those  saying  they are  watching less  television  is  Singapore  at
19.1%, closely followed by Sweden at 21.2%.
The  year-to-year  results  are  able  to  clearly  demonstrate  that
Internet users watch less television than non-users. Those differences
may be due to demographic factors, that in many countries Internet
users are somewhat younger or have higher education or incomes. It is
compelling to learn that users watch less television, but the more rele-
vant research question is whether the Internet is the reason they watch
312
The Network Society
less. Would they watch the same amount of television if there were no
Internet? As they access the net does their television use decrease and,
if so, in predicable patterns as they gain experience and knowledge of
the web? These are the very questions that a panel study can begin to
elicit. Great attention is currently being focused in those countries
that have been in the field for three or more years to look at changes
in lifestyle as people use the Internet. Although it will take another
two-to-three years to fully answer these questions, early data show
that television use does decline as non-users become Internet users.
The scientific answer to this question is of critical importance to the
television industry around the world as millions of people move onto
the net every year. If these new users begin a process of watching con-
sistently less television, the long-term future of television will be as a
vastly smaller and less significant medium than it has been in the past.
Figure 13.2 Changes in time of watched television per user and
non user of internet
As we measure television watching and its possible displacement by
the Internet, two essential observations are coming into focus. First, a
majority of Internet users in most countries are multi-tasking and, at
Internet and Society in a Global Perspective
313
More or much more time
Less or much less time
P
e
r
c
e
n
t
o
f
i
n
t
e
r
n
e
t
u
s
e
r
s
w
i
t
h
h
o
m
e
a
c
c
e
s
s
(
%
)
Canada
China
Germany Portugal Singapore Spain
Sweden
USA
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
2.2
10.9
7.5
3.1
13.4
0.9
0.3
2.3
37.2
39.9
27.0
26.4
19.1
41.1
21.1
38.3
least some of the time, are on the Internet at the same time as they are
watching television. Television began as a medium that received the
audience’s full and undivided attention. Only after years of experience
did viewers begin to eat or engage in other activities as they watched
television. The Internet, on the other hand, because it can be asyn-
chronous, began as one activity among many (talking on the tele-
phone, watching television, sending Instant Messages, listening to the
radio) for its users. The American data show that not only do a vast
majority of people multi-task while they are online, a small majority
are occupied with three or more tasks while on the web. Clearly, the
mindset and environment of younger users is not focused on one
media activity at a time. 
Second, we have also noticed that television displacement begins to
change as Internet users move from dial-up use to broadband. Dial-up
users at home tend to go into another room away from family members
and television and stay online an average of 20-to-30 minutes at a time
(with some exceptions). Broadband users are online many more times a
day for far shorter periods. Broadband users are more likely to go
online with other people around them and, whereas dial-up use tends to
displace television program viewing (30-minute blocks), broadband use
tends to disrupt television advertising viewing (1-to-2-minute blocks).
All of this will ultimately change the nature of television displacement,
likely resulting in users not watching significantly less television, but,
rather, watching it in a significantly different manner.
Internet as an Important Source of Information
For several generations, survey researchers have been tracking how
citizens get their information. In the United States organizations such
as Gallup and Roper have tracked where Americans get their informa-
tion and how that has changed over the years. Internationally, the
Internet became a medium for public use in the 1990s, especially after
browsers were developed allowing users to access the world wide web
(WWW). From the beginning, people turned to the web to get infor-
mation, whether it was a movie start time, product information or
research on a catastrophic illness. 
From the beginning, the World Internet Project has been tracking
the importance of the Internet as a source of information and enter-
314
The Network Society
tainment and the ways in which usage changes and may affect other
media as well. Clearly, during the first five  years of tracking  the
Internet, it has been perceived much more clearly and strongly as a
source  of  information  rather  than  as  a  place  for  entertainment
(although it is heavily used to find information about entertainment).
In the United States, the Internet has surpassed television as a
source of information and remains heavily used for information in
most of the world surveyed in the project. Only in Sweden do the
majority of users not consider the Internet to be an important or
extremely important source of information. In eight other countries
the majority do consider the net to be an important or extremely
important source of information. The place with the highest reliance
on the web for information is urban Chile where 81.8% say the
Internet is at least important in their use of information while only
3% say it is unimportant. Following Chile are Singapore at 77.6% and
Spain at 71.8%. Urban China is close to Spain at 69.7%, raising
important political questions that the project is striving to study. In
the United States and Canada about 60% of Internet users consider
the web an important source of information. During the course of the
project the trend is toward the perception of the Internet as a place to
go to get information and increasingly users are relying on it for that
purpose. At the same time, the Internet has made far less significant
inroads in the perception that it is a place to go for entertainment.
Reliability and Credibility of Information
As the Internet becomes one of the most important sources of
information for people in countries throughout the world, it is essen-
tial to track the faith users have in the credibility of that information.
The Internet will continue to grow as a source of information in peo-
ple’s lives if those users continue to believe they can trust the informa-
tion  they  find  there.  In  most  countries  television  has  surpassed
newspapers and magazines as the most credible of media. Most of this
is attributable to the sense that “seeing is believing.” Many critics have
argued that, if people had a better understanding of media literacy and
the process of editing and special effects that can go into video compi-
lation, they might be more skeptical of the information they receive
through television.
Internet and Society in a Global Perspective
315
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested