Babatunde, Journal of International and Global Economic Studies, 2(1), June 2009, 68-92 
68
Can Trade Liberalization Stimulate Export Performance in 
Sub-Saharan Africa? 
Musibau Adetunji Babatunde
*
University of Ibadan 
Abstract This study examines the response of merchandise export to real exchange rate-based 
trade liberalization in Sub-Saharan Africa between 1980 and 2005. This is because the last two 
decades have witnessed a  significant fall in trade barriers across many SSA  countries in an 
attempt  to  boost  exports  and  foster  economic  growth.  The  panel  least  squares  estimation 
technique was adopted for the study. In addition, heterogeneous panels for the four sub-regions 
(West, East, Central and Southern Africa) of SSA are estimated using time/series cross- section 
technique. The main findings are that trade liberalization can stimulate export performance albeit 
marginally and indirectly. Trade liberalization stimulates export performance through increased 
access to imported inputs. In addition, evidence revealed that a more competitive and stable real 
effective exchange rate can stimulate export performance. The impact of trade and exchange rate 
policy reforms also vary across the four sub-regions of SSA. 
Keywords: Export, tariff rate, exchange rate, panel data, elasticity, Sub-Saharan Africa 
JEL Classification: F4, F41 
1
.
Introduction 
The dismal performance of the Import Substitution Industrialization (ISI) Strategy led to the 
adoption of outward-oriented development strategy by many sub-Saharan African countries as 
part of their structural adjustment and reform programmes from the mid-1980s.  The structural 
adjustment  programme  (SAP) was  adopted  with  the  purpose  of  liberalizing their  economies 
particularly the external sector. The main purpose of trade liberalization over this period was to 
promote economic growth by capturing the static and dynamic gains from trade through a more 
efficient allocation of resources; greater competition; an increase in the flow of knowledge and 
investment and, ultimately, a faster rate of capital accumulation and technical progress. It was 
the belief that barriers to trade and anti-export bias would reduce export growth below potential 
(Santos-Paulino and Thirwall, 2004). As a result, the adoption of trade liberalization measures 
would  reduce  anti-export  bias  and  make  exports  (especially  non-traditional  ones)  more 
competitive in international markets, mainly by reducing trade policy barriers, exchange rate 
distortions and export duties. 
Consequently, trade  policies in  most SSA countries went through  major changes within the 
context of SAP during this period. Foreign trade was liberalized through the reduction of tariffs 
and non-tariff barriers and reduction of import duties applied to imports in a large number of 
Bulk pdf to tiff converter - control SDK system:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
www.rasteredge.com
Bulk pdf to tiff converter - control SDK system:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
Babatunde, Journal of International and Global Economic Studies, 2(1), June 2009, 68-92 
69
SSA  countries.  In  addition,  import  permits  were  abolished  and  duty  rates  as  part  of  tariff 
liberalization were also lowered in many SSA countries.  Currencies were devalued to encourage 
exporters, with the aim of boosting exports and growth and fostering the integration of SSA into 
the global economy. A sizeable number of SSA countries virtually eliminated parallel market 
premiums, with buying  and selling of foreign  exchange  then becoming market-based, while 
abolishing  previous  restrictions  on  currency  transactions.  Thus,  this  new  policy  strategy 
attempted to promote greater openness in order to boost growth and encourage the competitive 
integration of the SSA economies into the globalizing world. 
However, the assertion of a  strong  influence  of  a liberalized trade policy regime  on export 
performance has remained largely unresolved in the literature. The argument is based on whether 
trade liberalization can lead to an improved export performance. While some studies have found 
a positive association between trade liberalization and export supply performance (Michealy et 
al, 1991; Thomas et al,  1991;  Weiss, 1992; Joshi  and  Little,  1996;  Dijkstra,  1997;  Santos-
Paulino,2000, Ahmed, 2000 and Niemi, 2001), some other studies have found little empirical 
evidence  to  support the link  (Clarke  and Kirkpatric,  1991;  Greenaway and Sapsford,  1994; 
Shafaedin,1994; Agosin 1991, Moon, 1997, Utkulu et al, 2004, Morrissey and Mold (2006) ). 
Parts  of  the  controversy  have  been  on  the  importance  of  complementary  reforms,  stage  of 
development  before  opening  up  to  trade,  sequence  and  degree  of  liberalization  as  well  as 
methodological  and  measurement  issues  among  others.  Having  liberalized  the  trade  policy 
regime in the last two decades and in view of the contradictory findings from the literature, it 
may be a worthwhile venture to re-consider and update the evidence of the effects of trade 
liberalization  on  export  performance  in  SSA.  Therefore,  the  focus  of  this  study  will  be  to 
evaluate if and/or to what extent a real exchange rate based trade liberalization has helped in 
promoting growth of SSA exports.  
We take a departure from the Santos-Paulino (2000) study by addressing the issue from the 
supply side. The approach of examining trade liberalization through the demand side may likely 
yield  inconclusive  evidence.  Trade  liberalization  effects  on  export  performance  are  better 
captured using the export supply approach since the reduction of the anti-export bias is expected 
to improve the level of export supply. In addition, the contrasting evidence provided by time 
series-evidence regarding the link between trade and exchange rate policy reform and export 
performance is assessed with the utilization of panel data technique. Finally, region-specific 
analysis is also carried out to examine whether the impact of trade and exchange rate policy 
reforms on exports varies across regions. Rather than the use of dummy variable to capture the 
effect  of  trade  liberalization  (Ahmed,  2000;  Santos-Paulino,  2000),  this  study  attempts  the 
quantification of trade liberalization measures (impact and outcome effects).
1
The rest of the 
paper  is  divided  as  follows:  section  2  provides  the  trade  liberalization  experience  of  SSA 
countries while the theoretical  framework on  which the model  is  predicated  is  discussed  in 
section  3.  The  empirical  results  are  reported  and  discussed  in  section  4  while  section  5 
summarizes and concludes. 
2. Trade Policy Reforms in SSA   
The failure of the import–substitution strategy and the debt crisis in the early 1980s led to a new 
consensus on the importance of trade liberalization and exports in growth strategies. This new 
control SDK system:C# TIFF: Online C# Guide for TIFF to SVG Conversion
better testing or using of our .NET TIFF Converter SDK in new TIFFDocument(@"C:\Source\ Tiff\sample.tif"); // bulk operation for converting TIFF document to
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:C# TIFF: How to Convert TIFF to GIF Using Sample C# Code
Converting Library, conversions from TIFF to PDF & vector SVG TIFFDocument doc = new TIFFDocument(@"C:\Source\Tiff\sample.tif"); // bulk operation for
www.rasteredge.com
Babatunde, Journal of International and Global Economic Studies, 2(1), June 2009, 68-92 
70
consensus was the main focus of the reforms initiated by SSA countries and the developing 
world  in general from  the early  1980s,  within  the  framework  of  the Structural Adjustment 
Programmes.
2
As a result, the mid 1980s witnessed the formulation and implementation of wide-
ranging trade liberalization measures by most SSA countries with the support of the IMF and the 
World Bank.
3
The end result is that starting from the mid 1980s, and especially in the 1990s, most SSA African 
countries liberalized  their  trade regime to some  extent,  with  many  countries reducing  trade 
barriers significantly more than others (especially restrictions on imports). These reforms were 
aimed at making it easier to import, by reducing tariffs and non-tariff barriers, and encouraging 
exports, by eliminating export taxes and providing export incentives. Tariffs are now the main 
trade policy instruments of most SSA countries.  A broad picture of trade policy reform can be 
obtained by examining the trends in SSA countries tariffs level. A clear pattern emerges from the 
data presented in Table 1. Average tariffs have been reduced significantly, almost halved on 
average, in SSA over the past 20 years. For example, average schedule tariff that was 38.5% 
between 1980 and 1985 in the West African region stood at 14.4% between 2000 and 2002 
period.  Column 4 of Table 1 reports the percentage reduction between early 1990s and early 
2000s. While the overall variation or spread in tariffs has been reduced, progress varies across 
the regions of SSA. Although Southern Africa has consistently had the lowest tariffs among the 
regions of SSA, the East and West Africa regions reduced tariffs the most since the 1990s. A 
breakdown of the tariff rates of various regions is provided in Table 2. . For example, average 
schedule tariff that was 76.4% between 1980 and 1985 in the Guinea stood at 16.9% between 
2000 and 2002 period.   In addition, Table 3 presents more detailed data, reporting average 
applied trade–weighted import tariff rates for primary products, ores and metals, manufactured 
products, chemical products and machinery and transport equipment for selected SSA countries. 
The pattern of average tariff rates by sector in SSA recorded in Table 3 is consistent with the 
evidence in Tables 1 and 2. Tariff rates in virtually all the SSA countries were compressed. For 
example, tariff rates on primary products, which averaged 34.4 per cent in 1994, have gone down 
to 16.0 per cent by 2004 in Kenya. Similarly Ghana, which recorded an average tariff rate of 
14.1 per cent on manufactured products, now recorded a tariff rate of 12.5 per cent in 2004. A 
similar  result  was  recorded  by  other  SSA  countries  in  products  such  as  ores  and  metals, 
chemical, machinery and other manufactured products. Although tariff rates are a little bit higher 
in manufacturing than in primary products, the gap is very close and there is no country with 
average tariffs in primary products and manufactured products in excess of 20%. The reduction 
in tariff rates could not be said to have negatively affected revenue collection from this source, 
partly because of the simultaneous expansion of the tax base made possible by larger programme 
funded imports and a steep rise of the local currency value of imports due to large currency 
depreciations.  Moreover,  revenue  increase  may  have  been  induced  by  the  tariffication  of 
quantitative restrictions and increased compliance from taxpayers because of the lowering of the 
scheduled rates.  
The tariff structure has also been simplified to not more than five bands in most cases with the 
reduction of the number of bands after the adoption of trade liberalization. For example, the 
number of bands was reduced from 8 to 5 (0%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 25%) between 1994 and 1999 in 
Kenya, the reduction was made to four in Zambia (0%, 5%, 15%, 25%) and Tanzania with a 
control SDK system:VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
VB.NET Image Processing Control SDK FAQs. Q 1: Does this VB.NET image processing control SDK allow developers to process & edit image in bulk?
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:VB.NET TIFF: Convert TIFF to HTML Web Page Using VB.NET TIFF
like VB.NET PDF to HTML converter toolkit to convert PDF document to this VB.NET TIFF to HTML converter SDK support converting TIFF files to HTML in bulk?
www.rasteredge.com
Babatunde, Journal of International and Global Economic Studies, 2(1), June 2009, 68-92 
71
simplified five-tier structure with tariff rates of (0%, 5%, 10%, 20%, 25%). The modal rate, i.e. 
the most common, ranges from 10% to 25% and applies to between 12 to 33% of all tariff lines 
depending on the country. Tariffs in some cases are also based on common external tariff (CET) 
as  a  result of the  regional  integration  arrangement among  the  West  African Economic  and 
Monetary Union (WAEMU) countries. For instance, the CET groups custom duties into four 
major categories in Niger, Mali, Benin and Burkina Faso in the order of essential goods (0%); 
staple  goods (5%), intermediate  goods and  inputs  (10%)  and  final  consumer  goods  (20%). 
Similarly, duty  rates as part of tariff liberalization were significantly  lowered  in  some  SSA 
countries. For example, Mauritius reduced its rates from 250 per cent to 100 per cent; Tanzania 
from 200 per cent to 60 per cent; Zambia from 150 per cent to 50 per cent and in Kenya from 
170 per cent to 40 per cent. In Zimbabwe and Ghana the rates range from 5 per cent to 30 per 
cent and 10  per cent to 40 per cent respectively (Oyejide,  Ndulu and Gunning,  1999). The 
general pattern is that significant tariff reductions (trade liberalization) can be observed in almost 
all SSA countries, although the timing and extent of reductions vary across countries.
4
Interestingly, the data in Table 4 reveals that average tariff rates of SSA are relatively higher 
compared to the average tariff rates for  all categories of developing  countries. The value is 
however seen to be higher than the East Asia and the Latin America region but lower than the 
South Asia region tariff rates. In contrast to the pattern reported in Table 3, tariffs are generally 
lower for manufactures than for other goods in other regions. Additionally, other measures were 
also adopted to reduce anti-export bias in most of the SSA countries. Export taxes and levies 
were either significantly reduced or totally eliminated in most of the SSA countries under our 
review. For example, Cameroon removed all export taxes while Mali abolished export levies and 
duties on most exports (the only export levies in force are the service provision contribution 
(SPC) of 3% on the free on board (f.o.b) value of gold and the tax of CFAF 7.5 per kg of fish), 
Ghana has no export quotas or voluntary export restraints. In a similar vein, Uganda replaced its 
export licensing requirements by a less restrictive export certification system in 1990 and also 
abolished  export  taxes.  Most exportation  in Botswana  does not  require  permits.  Significant 
reduction in the effective rates of protection was also achieved in most of the SSA countries. 
Countries such as Kenya, South Africa, Ghana, Mali, Tanzania, Zimbabwe and Cote d’Ivoire 
witnessed a significant reduction in their effective protection rates. 
The remaining export prohibitions that still exist in some cases apply only to sensitive goods 
because  of  the  need  to  ensure  quality  and  for  health  and  environmental  reasons.  Export 
processing zones (EPZs) were also established by the government in some of the SSA countries. 
For  example,  the Free  Zones Act was  enacted  in  the  Gambia. Incentives  take  the  form  of 
exemptions or reductions in duties and taxes. Free zone enterprises are required to export a 
substantial  proportion  of  their  production;  the  Government  is  currently  using  an  indicative 
benchmark of 70%.  Similarly, Mali also created free trade zones as part of the measures adopted 
to boost export performance. Export Processing Zones companies also account for the bulk of 
manufacturing exports in Mauritius, which is dominated by textiles and clothing. 
Exchange rate regimes in most of the SSA countries were also liberalized. A good number of 
SSA  countries  stopped  fixing  exchange  rates  and  overvaluing  their  currencies  in  order  to 
stimulate exports and make the economy more competitive. Kenya, Uganda, Ghana, Tanzania, 
Zambia, Nigeria, and Cote d’Ivoire virtually eliminated exchange rate premiums, where buying 
control SDK system:C# PDF: Start to Create, Load and Save PDF Document
and it contains all document information of PDF file. It is an extension of BaseDocument. C# programmers can use PDFDocument object to do bulk operations like
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:C# TIFF: Complete TIFF to PNG Image Conversion Using C# Project
a TIFF document TIFFDocument doc = new TIFFDocument(@"C:\Source\Tiff\sample.tif"); // bulk operation for It supports converting TIFF to PDF document, TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
Babatunde, Journal of International and Global Economic Studies, 2(1), June 2009, 68-92 
72
and selling of foreign exchange is now market-based and abolishing previous restrictions on 
current transactions. The system of multiple exchange rates was abolished in Burundi. From 
1996, Ethiopian currency, the Birr, was allowed to float, thereby resulting in the convergence of 
the official, auction and parallel market exchange rates. After liberalizing its external sector in 
1990, Benin Republic’s currency was devalued and its black market premium averaged only 2 
per cent between 1990 and 1999. We can therefore conclude that most SSA countries witnessed 
a significant relaxation of trade barriers. Import restrictions are now lower and export barriers 
have been significantly reduced.  
3. Theoretical Considerations 
We formulate a variant of the imperfect substitutes model that incorporates a specific extension 
that trade liberalization of a country can affect the supply of export. The major assumption of the 
model is that neither imports nor exports are perfect substitutes for domestic goods. Exports are 
imperfect substitutes in world markets for other countries’ domestically produced goods, or third 
countries’ exports. If domestic and foreign goods were perfect substitutes, a given country would 
be  either an  exporter  or an importer. In addition,  price differences  for  the  same product  in 
different countries (after conversion into a common currency) and also between the domestic and 
export prices of a given product in the same country do not allow imports or exports to be perfect 
substitutes. On the supply side, the producer is assumed to maximize profits subject to a cost 
constraint. This procedure yields an export supply function that depends positively on the price 
of exports, negatively on input prices, and positively on productive capacity. Thus, the standard 
export supply function is presented in terms of the foreign market price relative to alternative 
prices  in  the  domestic  market,  and  the  economy’s  productive  capacity  to  support  export 
production. In formal terms, the relationship is given as: 
( , , , , )
it
X
t
PCu
f P
X
=
(1) 
where X
t
is the level of exports at time t,  is the price of export and PC is the economy’s 
productive capacity to produce exports. Since exports are supply constrained, an increase in the 
productive capacity of the economy is likely to have a positive effect on export supply. This is 
because a country’s exports will not only depend on export prices but also on excess supply 
which in turn is dependent on the output capacity of the economy. We however assume that the 
dominant relative price competition occurs among exporters. The relative price term is therefore 
taken to be the ratio of the export price (P
x
) to competitors’ export prices (P
w
) adjusted for 
exchange rate change, that is, 
(
)
X
P
P P P e
w
x
/
.  
)
),
(( /
f P P P P e e PC
X
w
x
t
=
(2) 
Trade liberalization in the form of less protectionism, more openness, and less distorted prices as 
a  whole  leads to  the  reduction  of  anti-export  bias and a  strong  supply response  of  export. 
Following  Ahmed  (2000),  a  channel  through  which  trade  liberalization  may  affect  export 
performance is through tariff reduction.  For example, let us consider a small country relative to 
the  world  market.    The  country  consumes  and  produces  three  categories  of  commodities 
control SDK system:VB.NET Image: VB.NET Example to Load Image from .NET Graphics in .
are enabled to load an image or bulk ones from formats such as png, jpeg, gif, tiff and bmp provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:VB.NET Image: VB Code to Download and Save Image from Web URL
able to download, view and save the bulk of image change the sample PNG to BMP/JPEG/TIFF/GIF provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
Babatunde, Journal of International and Global Economic Studies, 2(1), June 2009, 68-92 
73
exportable (EX), importable (IM) and non-tradable (NT).  It is assumed that excess supply of EX 
will be exported while excess demand for IM will be imported and the imports of intermediate 
and capital goods are critical inputs in the production of exports.  A single tariff rate (t) is 
assumed to be applied to IM with no export taxes and subsidies.  The price of IM, EX and NT 
are  P
IM
,  P
EX
and  P
NT
respectively  in  the  domestic  market.    The  price  of  importables  and 
exportables  are  simultaneously assumed to depend on  prices  in the  foreign market  and the 
exchange rate while in the case of IM, the tariff rate.  The prices are therefore expressed as: 
M
I
IM
eP
P
=
(3) 
M
E
EM
eP
P
=
(4) 
If 
is assumed constant, the rise in the value of either e or t increases 
while 
can only be affected by a rise in e.  The price of non-tradable is also assumed constant.  In 
this case, a rise in 
or 
results in a rise in the rate of switch between exportables and 
importables.  The imposition of an import tariff therefore alters the relative prices by raising 
relative to
by the amount of the tariff rate.  Consequently,  
EX
IM
P
P
=
EM
IM
P
,
IM
P
P
P
EM
P
IM
P
EM
(1 t)
eP
P
M
I
IM
+
=
(5) 
The adoption of a real exchange rate based trade liberalization with respect to a fall in the tariff 
rate and the simultaneous depreciation of the exchange rate reduce 
relative to
 The fall 
of 
to 
shifts  resources away  from non-tradables (NT)  into exportables (EX)  with the 
incentive being the  exchange  rate depreciation,  which  raises  the  price of exportables  (
relative to that of non-tradables (
).  Assuming the absence of quantitative restrictions on 
some  imports,  a  real  devaluation  increases  the  price  not  only  of  tradables  relative  to  non-
tradables but also of exportables relative to importables, thereby reducing anti-export bias and 
therefore increases export competitiveness.   
IM
P
EX
P
IM
P
EX
P
EX
P
NT
P
Nevertheless, while  the lowering  of tariff barriers, non-tariff barriers and devaluation of the 
domestic  currency  may  increase  the  neutrality  of  the  trade  regime,  the  net  effect  of  such 
measures on export performance may depend on the nature of the income and price elasticity of 
demand and supply at home and abroad.  It is expected that a tariff rate reduction will have a 
greater  effect,  the  more  elastic  the  price  responsiveness  of  exports.  In  addition,  domestic 
currency  undervaluation  (overvaluation)  can  encourage  (discourage)  export  competitiveness, 
because it increases (reduces) returns to entrepreneurial activity, most likely in the process of 
discovering new, high-productivity exports. Another channel by which trade liberalization may 
lead to better export performance is through greater access to imported inputs and capital goods. 
Restrictive trade regimes may make it difficult for potential exporters to obtain the inputs or 
equipment needed. Trade liberalization increases the availability of such imported inputs which 
are critical  inputs  in  the production  of  exports.  Allowing  for  the  above  considerations, the 
extended export supply function can be expressed as: 
control SDK system:C# Word: How to Compress, Decompress Word in C#.NET Projects
formats, such as JBIG2, JPEG2000, TIFF and other it easy to create single or bulk Word compression powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:C# Imaging - Planet Barcode Generation Guide
formats. Creating single or bulk PLANET bar codes on documents such as PDF, Office Word, Excel, PowerPoint and multi-page TIFF. Empower
www.rasteredge.com
Babatunde, Journal of International and Global Economic Studies, 2(1), June 2009, 68-92 
74
1
2
3
4
5
log
log( /
)
log
log
log
log
it
i
x
w
it
it
it
it
it
X
P P e
PC
TRF
IMPTR
EXOV u
γ
λ
λ
λ
λ
λ
= +
+
+
+
+
+
(6) 
where TRF
it
is tariff rate, IMPTR
it
is import of raw materials and EXOV
it
is real exchange rate 
overvaluation  and u  is  the  random  term  with  its  usual  classical  properties.  The  implicit 
assumption made in equation (6) is that the adjustment of export supply to changes in relative 
prices, productive capacity, and trade liberalization is instantaneous such that
. In reality, 
it is more reasonable to assume lagged adjustment. Exports are therefore assumed to adjust to the 
difference between supply for exports in period t and the actual flow in the previous period: 
t
s
t
X
X
=
[
]
1
log
log
log
=
Δ
it
e
it
it
X
X
X
γ
(7) 
Where 
γ
is the coefficient of adjustment (assumed positive) and 
Δ
is a first-difference operator, 
.The adjustment function in equation (7) assumes that the quantity 
of exports adjusts to conditions of excess supply in the rest of the world. Substituting equation 
(8) into (7), we obtain an estimating equation for export demand of the form: 
1
log
log
log
=
Δ
it
it
X
X
X
it
1
2
3
4
5
3
1
log
log( /
)
log
log
log
log
it
i
x
w
it
it
it
t
it
X
P P e
PCit
TRF
IMPTR
EXOV
X
u
γ
λ
λ
λ
λ
λ
α
= +
+
+
+
+
+
(8) 
Equation (9) can be further written as: 
1
1
2
3
4
5
3
1
log
log
log
log
log
log
log
d
t
t
it
it
it
it
t
it
X
REER
PC
TRF
IMPTR
EXOV
X
u
φ
δ
λ
λ
λ
λ
λ
α
= + +
+
+
+
+
+
(9) 
A priori, we expect
0
0,
0,
0,
3
4
2
1
<
>
>
>
λ
λ
λ
λ
.   
Where 
1
φ
and 
t
δ
are the country-specific and year specific effects and the real effective exchange 
rate  (REER)  is
 For  each  SSA  economy, X  is  defined  as  real  aggregate 
merchandise exports; REER is relative price of exports measured by the real effective exchange 
rate. This is because the REER takes into account the weighted real exchange rate between a 
country  and  its  trading  partners.  It  is  therefore,  an  index  of  export  competitiveness.  Trade 
liberalization is likely to depreciate REER. An increase in production capacity of the economy is 
likely to have a positive effect on export performance. The greater utilization of capacity is 
expected to lead to higher exports, although it is not likely that higher exports lead to a greater 
utilization  of  available  capacity.  The  choice  of  the  measure  of  productive  capacity  is 
inconclusive in the literature. Different studies have used different measures of the productive 
capacity. For example, Bond (1985) and Senhandji and Montenegro (1995) use trend or secular 
output with the  argument that  relative prices alone cannot fully  explain the willingness and 
ability to supply exports. Muscatelli et al (1995) used the stock of fixed capital to capture the 
effects of  increasing productive capacity  and  productivity on  export supply for some  Asian 
newly industrialized economies. In another dimension, Bayes et al (1995), Hossain et al (1997) 
it
w
x
P P P e
)
/
log(
Babatunde, Journal of International and Global Economic Studies, 2(1), June 2009, 68-92 
75
and Ahmed (2000) measured capacity utilization as the predicted values of GDP. Milner and 
Zgovu (2004) however used Agricultural GDP as a measure of the productive capacity. The 
choice of the productive capacity for this study was data-constrained, and we take manufacturing 
GDP as a proxy for capacity. 
Tariff (TRF) is measured as average nominal tariff rate; IMPT is measured as import of raw 
materials and EXOV is measured as real exchange rate overvaluation. If changes in the incentive 
to export were a significant determinant of export performance, this would show up in terms of a 
significant positive  coefficient on an export incentive  variable. Thus, we hypothesize that if 
increased  access  to  imports  was  important,  there  would  be  a  positive  relationship  between 
exports and level of imported inputs (IMPTR). In addition, if there is an absolute bias against 
exports  as  a  result  of  high  tariff on  imported inputs, this  would  be reflected  in  an  inverse 
relationship between tariff and exports. 
4. Data Sources and Empirical Results 
For resource rich countries, given the fact that export of extractive products such as crude oil and 
natural  minerals are  generally influenced by other  fundamentals, the study excluded oil and 
mineral  in  order  to  isolate  and  analyze  export  behaviour  independently  of  fluctuations  in 
international commodity prices. Since both cross-section and time series data are available, we 
estimate the cross-country regression equation using the form: 
it
i
it
it
Z
Y
x
ε
δ
β
+
+
=
(10) 
Where Y is a matrix of explanatory variables that vary across time and countries; Z is matrix of 
variables that vary across individual countries but are constant for each individual country across 
the periods and x
it
is the dependent variable. However, given that the number of time periods 
used in this study is relatively high (for panel data), it is likely that the bias generated by the 
inclusion of a lagged dependent variable will be very small. All the variables are measured in 
logarithm forms. The data for this study were sourced from World Bank World Development 
Indicators CD ROM, World Bank African Development Indicator database. 
The descriptive statistics  of the  variables  used  in  the  analysis  is  presented  in  Table 5. The 
descriptive statistics revealed that average logarithm value of merchandise export and average 
tariff rate is 8.99 and 1.33 respectively while the average log value of real effective exchange 
rate stood at 2.10. Table 6 reported the pairwise correlation matrix for the same variables. Tariff 
rate and exchange rate overvaluation are negatively correlated with merchandise export whereas 
productive capacity (proxy by manufacturing GDP) and imports of raw materials is positively 
correlated with merchandise export (as would be expected).    
The fixed effects regression result reported in  Column 1  of Table 6 revealed that countries 
productive capacity (LPC) had a positive but not significant impact on export performance in 
SSA  during  the  review period.  The  variable  was  positive but  not  significant.  This  positive 
relationship is a  suggestion  that economies of scale  may  be a  contributory factor in export 
performance in SSA. However, the real effective exchange rate variable did not come with the 
expected sign in the cross-country regression analysis. It was positive and significant while a-
Babatunde, Journal of International and Global Economic Studies, 2(1), June 2009, 68-92 
76
priori,  a  negative  relationship  was  expected.  Nevertheless,  the  exchange  rate  overvaluation 
(LEXROV)  variable  has  the  expected  sign  and  is  statistically  significant.  An  overvalued 
exchange rate can therefore be said to have strong implications for export performance in SSA. 
Although insignificant, the result showed that the level of tariff in SSA acts as a disincentive to 
exports. As expected, there is a negative but insignificant relationship between the average tariff 
rate and merchandise exports  in  SSA. Nevertheless, the import of raw materials variable is 
positive and statistically  significant at  the  1%  level  significance  level  suggesting that  trade 
liberalization can affect export performance through increased access to inputs. 
The random effects regression result in Column 2 of Table 6 provides more interesting result and 
confirms  the  fixed  effect  results.  It  showed  that  the  tariff  rate  variable  is  negative  and 
insignificant  suggesting  that  trade  liberalization  in  the  form  of  tariff  reduction  has  only  a 
marginal impact on export performance. The negative relationship between tariff and export is an 
indication of absolute bias against export as a result of high tariff on imported inputs. However, 
the absolute bias against export seems to be marginal. The tariff elasticity of export was 0.02. 
For every 1% reduction in tariff rate, merchandise export should increased by 0.02%. The proxy 
of the productive capacity variable (MGDP) is still positive but not statistically significant.  The 
import of raw material variable (LIMPTR) is positive and statistically significant at the 5% level. 
In addition, the real effective exchange rate has a significant effect on export performance. The 
coefficient  for  the  variable  is  negative  and  statistically  significant.  The  exchange  rate 
overvaluation variable (LEXROV) is still negative but insignificant. The variable (LEER) turned 
out  to be  negative  and  statistically  significant suggesting that  exchange  rate  policy reforms 
affects export performance in SSA more than trade liberalization. The coefficient of the one-year 
lag value of exports (merchandise, manufactured and agricultural) is significantly different from 
zero in all  the  three cases  (merchandise, manufactured  and agricultural  exports)  implying  a 
degree of dynamic adjustment for SSA export product.  
In  order  to  examine  whether  there  are  sub-regional  differences  in  the  effect  of  trade  and 
exchange  rate policy reforms  on export performance, the SSA  countries in the sample were 
classified  into  four  regions:  West  Africa,  East  Africa,  Central  Africa  and  Southern  Africa. 
Consequently,  the  two-step  generalized  least  squares  estimator  with  maximum  likelihood 
estimates (MLE) interaction is adopted for the procedure. This is because of its suitability for 
analyzing  data  observed for  a relatively large  number of periods  and  for  a  relatively  small 
number of cross sectional units. The model allows for groupwise heteroscedasticity, cross-group 
correlation, and within-group autocorrelation. The relevance of this type of model is that the 
error term need not have the same properties for each country. The time-series/cross-section 
(TSCS) model allows for the error term of each cross section unit to be freely correlated across 
equations, as in the Seemingly Unrelated Regressions (SURE) case (Santos-Paulino, 2000). 
The results for all the SSA countries in column (1) confirm the findings of the fixed and random 
effect  estimates.  There  is  indication  of  relative  price  (REER),  access  to  imported  inputs 
(IMPTR),  and  productive  capacity  (MGDP)  effects  on  export  performance.  The  results  are 
however insignificant. In addition, it provides evidence that trade liberalization through tariff 
reductions  do  not  significantly  improves  the  sensitivity  of  exports.  The  real  exchange  rate 
overvaluation  (EXROV)  although  with  the  expected  sign  is  not  significant.  The  sub-region 
specific estimates provide more diverse results. With reference to the tariff rate (LTRF), only the 
Babatunde, Journal of International and Global Economic Studies, 2(1), June 2009, 68-92 
77
Central Africa sub-region recorded a significantly negative relationship effect (at the 10% level 
of significance) with merchandise export. The sign on the coefficient for other sub-regions is 
positive and statistically significant in the case of the West Africa and East Africa sub-regions 
and  insignificant in the Southern  Africa sub-region.   In  a similar manner,  only  the  Central 
African sub-region recorded a positive albeit insignificant relationship between the productive 
capacity (LPC) of the economy and export. The result revealed a negative relationship in the 
other three sub-regions. The import of raw materials however came out positive and statistically 
significant in the West Africa and East Africa sub-region but insignificant with respect to the 
Central  and Southern Africa  sub-region.  The coefficient  on the real  effective exchange rate 
(LREER) is negative in the case of East Africa, Central Africa and the Southern Africa sub-
region suggesting exchange rate management is important in stimulating export performance. 
Although statistically significant, the variable did not come with the expected negative sign in 
West Africa but rather with a positive sign. With respect to overvaluation of the exchange rate 
variable, econometric evidence reported in Table 6 showed that overvaluation of the exchange 
rate in the West Africa significantly affects export performance in the sub-region. Although, the 
coefficient is also negative. 
However, while the form of pooling considered under this technique allows for some flexibility 
in the disturbance properties for each country, it requires the assumption of a common parameter 
vector. The evidence of residual serial correlation may suggest that some allowance for country 
specific effects is necessary (Santos-Paulino, 2000). While the evidence obtained in the study are 
similar to some of the results obtained by other studies it conflicts some other one. For example, 
it contrast Ahmed (2000) and Santos-Paulino (2000) results that found a positive and significant 
relationship  between  their  indicator  of  trade  liberalization  and  export  performance.  The 
significance of their trade liberalization variable as earlier argued could be due to the use of a 
dummy variable which could have biased the effects upwards. However, it confirms the findings 
of Jenkins (1996) for Bolivia, Utkulu et al (2004) for Turkey and Morrissey and Mold (2006) for 
Africa that  effective exchange  rate management rather  than  trade liberalization  is  the  major 
determinants of export performance. 
Thus, the marginal and indirect impact of reductions in protection suggests that other domestic 
policy constraints may be a significant factor in affecting export performance in SSA. Oyejide, 
Ndulu and Gunning (1999) indicated that domestic supply constraints constitute a significant part 
of the anti-export bias observed over the last three decades. They argued that anti-export bias has 
been on the decline because of the downward trend in exchange rate premia and import tariff 
rates coupled with the dismantling of quantitative restrictions. However, the switch to use of 
exchange rate for clearing disequilibrium in the market for foreign exchange had significantly 
reduced the need for using trade liberalization instruments for managing balance of payments 
pressures. This may therefore be attributed to the significance of the exchange rate variable in 
our model.   
5. Summary and Conclusion 
While the evidence abound that the countries analyzed have undertaken some form of trade and 
exchange  rate  policy  reform  within  the  context  of macroeconomic reforms,  commitment  to 
international  institutions,  or  internal  economic  adjustment.  However,  there  exist  significant 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested