Building a Successful Online 
Community with Jive Forums
Jive Software, 317 SW Alder St, Ste 500, Portland, OR 97204  www.jivesoftware.com  
You’ve purchased your Jive Forums application or hosted service. How can you get the most from it? In 
this best practices paper, Jive Software provides guidelines for building a successful online community 
and specific recommendations for building an online community with Jive Forums.
This document is organized as follows:
Overview of online communities 
Steps for planning your online community 
Maintaining your online community
Copyright 2006, Jive Software.  All rights reserved
BeSt praCtiCeS
How to convert pdf to tiff using - control software system:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
www.rasteredge.com
How to convert pdf to tiff using - control software system:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
Jive Software, 317 SW Alder St, Ste 500, Portland, OR 97204  www.jivesoftware.com  
Three words sum up an online community: people, collabora-
tion, and content. An online community is a web-based, virtual 
community formed of people who come to it for a specific pur-
pose—usually to answer questions, get advice, receive support, 
get recognition or status, or collaborate on projects or games. 
Although they may have different labels depending on who you 
talk to, communities are comprised of several types of people, 
including observers, supporters, thought leaders, and modera-
tors. Finally, online communities are developed around a central 
theme or purpose. People collaborate around that purpose and 
generate output, or content, which arguably may be the most 
important piece in an online community’s success.
Types of Online Communities and Their Benefits
Six main types of online communities exist—some with overlap-
ping characteristics. Each offers specific benefits to its members 
and the individuals or organizations that launch and manage 
them.
Support Communities
are designed to provide technical sup-
port to customers and users of a company’s products or services. 
A major driver for these communities is to reduce call volume 
and increase service resolution by tapping into the collective 
knowledge of the user base and having customers answer other 
customers’ questions. Technical support agents from the com-
pany participate in the community to keep discussions productive 
and to address questions unanswered by the customer or user 
base.
Internal Communities
are designed for employees or mem-
bers of an organization, and are used to increase productivity by 
reducing duplicative effort and facilitating information sharing. 
People visit specific forums to locate information and connect 
directly with people who can help them on work-related issues. 
Because people are in the same organization, establishing trust 
and reputations is not an important element of these communi-
ties. Internal communities use collaborative features such as 
chat rooms, blogs, online collaboration, file storage, and integra-
tion with existing business systems. 
Media Communities
are developed around news, sports, or 
other entertainment-related content, and usually allow partici-
pants to comment and share opinions on current events. Many 
media organizations use these discussion threads as a source for 
eye-witness accounts of news events and news leads.
Topical Communities
address specific subjects or related 
topics; for example, an online community for new parents or pet 
owners. These communities typically use a question and answer 
format, and allow members to voice their opinions on topic areas. 
Many of these communities have “resident experts” who write 
editorials or insert expert advice to spawn conversation. Topical 
communities tend to have a very social and informal tone.  
Developer Communities
address very specific, targeted topics 
associated with technology development—for example, a group 
of software developers optimizing their applications for a new 
processor. Community members want to find the quickest path to 
a solution for a technical issue, though some members may be 
bolstering their professional reputation by being the recognized 
expert in a given technical area. These communities have deeper, 
more technical conversations than topical communities, and the 
tone is direct and succinct. 
Gaming Communities
are a hybrid of the topical and developer 
communities, having a large social aspect, but also generat-
ing highly technical discussions and content. People go to the 
community to share gaming experiences, plan games, and form 
teams. These communities can be very helpful and inclusive 
toward new members, but others may be clique-like and unwel-
coming. Companies create these communities to provide custom-
ers with a benefit that has an intentional side-effect of building 
and extending brand loyalty.
Educational Communities
use online communities to facili-
tate online classroom environments. Instructors can continue 
classroom dialog and provide support online. Students can also 
use the community to collaborate on team-based projects, home-
work, and other tasks. 
Motivations for Joining or Visiting a Community
People visit online communities for a variety of reasons. Some of 
the most common ones are to:
Receive Support
Devotees of products or topics often go to online forums to offer 
and receive support. The community also creates a sense of 
camaraderie, so members who get their questions answered 
successfully often feel a sense of gratitude, prompting them to 
help other community members.
Online Community Overview
control software system:Online Convert PDF file to Tiff. Best free online PDF Tif
Using this .NET PDF to TIFF conversion control, C# developers can render and convert PDF document to TIFF image file with no loss in original file quality.
www.rasteredge.com
control software system:C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
TIFF file. TIFFDocument doc = new TIFFDocument(inputFilePath); // Convert loaded TIFF file to PDF document. doc.ConvertToDocument
www.rasteredge.com
2
Jive Software, 317 SW Alder St, Ste 500, Portland, OR 97204  www.jivesoftware.com  
Build a Professional Reputation
Consultants, trainers, job-seekers, authors, and others building 
their professional reputations contribute content to online com-
munities to gain professional recognition of, and respect for, their 
expertise.
Enhance Professional Skills and Abilities
Online community members often follow a discussion thread 
to learn about specific topics and issues. In addition, members 
strengthen diagnostic and communication skills by offering advice 
to others and learning what works as they follow issues to their 
conclusion.
Build Confidence, Bolster Ego, and Simply Feel Good
Many people enjoy the knowledge that their thoughts and insights 
have the potential to instantaneously reach a worldwide audience. 
People also feel good when whey see others succeed with their 
advice and receive praises for that input.
A successful online community attracts and retains the right people; 
those right people collaborate regularly and productively to produce 
rich, highly relevant content; and that relevant content perpetuates 
the community by attracting more of the right people because of 
their need for, or interest in, the content. Good upfront planning will 
help ensure success with your online community. 
At Jive Software, we recommend addressing these important issues 
before you launch or re-launch your community. Depending on the 
scope of your community, the planning process should take two to 
six weeks. 
control software system:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic. dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Drawing.dll.
www.rasteredge.com
control software system:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
converter library control is a 100% clean .NET document image solution, which is designed to help .NET developers convert PDF to HTML webpage using simple VB
www.rasteredge.com

Jive Software, 317 SW Alder St, Ste 500, Portland, OR 97204  www.jivesoftware.com  
Verbalize Your Online Community Purpose and Goals
What do you hope to achieve with your online community—cus-
tomer self-service, call deflection, brand loyalty, customer 
research, “buzz” metrics, identification of prospective clients? 
Develop a clear purpose statement, and include benchmarks and 
measurable goals to determine if your community does what you 
want it to do once it is up and running.
Define Your Users and Determine Their Expectations
You have to know who you are trying to serve with your online 
community to design it in a way that will meet their expectations. 
To target who your users are and what they want:
Take a look at your existing customer base or a segment 
of that customer base—especially if you sell products or 
services. Understand how much they want to interact with 
your company. Use a survey, call, or email to find out what 
they want to get from the community.
Examine the competition. What types of people participate 
in your competitors’ online communities, what content is 
popular, and how deep do discussions go?
Identify other mediums for determining your user base. 
Conduct surveys of people you think are likely community 
participants or obtain mailing lists based on the demo-
graphic you want to target.
Include a feedback forum in your community design. Build 
it in from the start so that users can tell you exactly what 
they want.
Critique the Competition and Online Communities You Admire
Make a note of the aspects of those online communities that seem 
to work and those that do not. Adopt those that work if appropri-
ate for your community. 
Choose the Jive Forums Features You Want to Implement
Once you’ve determined what your users want from your online 
community, select the specific Jive Forums features that best 
meet those needs. For example: 
Reward Points and Question & Answer Workflow. Perhaps 
the most important feature you introduce to a community, 
a reward point system helps ensure that constructive 
participation is recognized.  Studies show that forums that 
have a reward system are 70% more likely to be successful.  
Jive’s reward point system is driven by a Q&A workflow that 
tracks the status of questions and escalates unanswered 
questions to experts. Customer support, developer, and 
internal communities often benefit from these features.
Themes. Themes allow you to create different brands 
around your communities by customizing the background 
color, logos, and fonts of your online community user inter-
face. Primarily customer support and gaming communities 
use this feature, although topical communities occasionally 
use this feature, too. 
Integrated Instant Messaging (IM) presence. You can en-
able members to associate IM handles with their member 
profiles, allowing them to show when they are online, so 
that other members may engage them in a live threaded 
discussion. Internal and developer communities most com-
monly implement this feature.
Group Chat. This feature allows you to associate a group 
chat room with a particular forum or category. Most types 
of communities can benefit from this feature.
Additional Features. Our Jive Forums Administrator Guide 
provides additional core features. Review the Guide to see 
which features best support your community goals and 
users.
Organize Your Content 
Well-organized content gets accessed, but to organize your con-
tent for Jive Forums, you need to understand the content hier-
archy: Community > Category > Forum > Thread > Message. 
Review the example of the online kayaking community on the next 
page (Figure 1) to understand this hierarchy.
When planning your forums, think about the reasons users will 
come to your site. What are some of the things they would be 
interested in? For example, if you design your online community 
for runners, consider the topics most likely to interest visitors—
shoes, nutrition, and training techniques. Devote a forum to each 
of these topics. 
Recognize when you need to create a category as opposed to a 
forum. If you find yourself creating different forums for the same 
product, such as “Product XYZ Support,” “Product XYZ Info,” and 
“Product XYZ News,” consider making a Product XYZ category. 
Create more general topic definitions because once your online 
community launches, your users will show you what they want 
and need. More general topics make it easier to manage your con-
tent as your categories and forums expand and divide over time. 
planning for an Online Community
control software system:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
DocumentType.DOCX DocumentType.TIFF. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size. Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified resolution and
www.rasteredge.com
control software system:C# TIFF: TIFF Editor SDK to Read & Manipulate TIFF File Using C#.
Convert Tiff file to bmp, gif, png, jpeg, and scanned PDF to Tiff, like Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF, and images. & decode over 20+ barcodes from Tiff file in C#
www.rasteredge.com
Choose a Thread Structure
Jive Forums offers two options for discussion thread structure: 
People can respond only to the original question, or people can 
respond to the original question and other responses. 
The first approach, which is seen in Figure 1, is a flat structure. 
The second approach is a threaded structure. Figure 2 shows 
the same online kayaking community example using a threaded 
structure. 
We recommend using a flat structure because threaded discus-
sions can become too fragmented and difficult to follow; espe-
cially in larger, more active communities.
Figure 1. Online Kayaking Community Hierarchy (Flat Structure)
Figure 2. Online Kayaking Community (Threaded Structure)
Kayaker Online 
Community
Forum: Find a 
Paddling Buddy
Forum:
Learn About a River
Forum: Discuss 
Paddling Techniques
Forum:
Expert Corner
Forum:
Learn About a River
Forum: Discuss 
Paddling Techniques
Forum:
Expert Corner
Forum: Find a 
Paddling Buddy
Category:
Playboaters
Category:
Creekboaters
Thread:
Intermediate
kayaker seeks 
same for Kayaking 
Clackamas River.  
Thread: Expert 
kayaker looking for 
partner in crime for 
White Salmon 
River, WA. 
Supercreek
Message: What 
day? I’m free 
Tuesdays.  Gonzo
Message: How 
many people do you 
want? I’m free 
Tuesday, too.  
GirlieBoater
Message: What 
does “expert 
kayaker” mean to 
you? WaterBaby
Message: Expert 
means that I paddle 
class IV and V 
mostly.  Fifteen years 
kayaking experience.
SuperCreek
Message: Cool.
Same level here.
Been paddling 
creeks for 10 years.
When/where do you 
want to meet? What 
section do you 
propose running?
Message: To me, expert 
means that you have 
your American Canoe 
Association certification, 
river rescue courses, and 
regularly paddle Class IV 
and V rivers.  Cascader
Message: I disagree.  I 
know tons of “expert” 
kayakers who have never 
had a formal course… 
they’re just amazing 
kayakers.  SplashPaddler
Kayaker Online 
Community
Forum: Find a 
Paddling Buddy
Forum:
Learn About a River
Forum: Discuss 
Paddling Techniques
Forum:
Expert Corner
Forum:
Learn About a River
Forum: Discuss 
Paddling Techniques
Forum:
Expert Corner
Forum: Find a 
Paddling Buddy
Category:
Playboaters
Category:
Creekboaters
Thread:
Intermediate
kayaker seeks 
same for Kayaking 
Clackamas River.  
Thread: Expert 
kayaker looking for 
partner in crime for 
White Salmon 
River, WA. 
Supercreek
Message: What 
day? I’m free 
Tuesdays.  Gonzo
Message: How 
many people do you 
want? I’m free 
Tuesday, too.  
GirlieBoater
Message: What 
does “expert 
kayaker” mean to 
you? WaterBaby
Message: Expert 
means that I paddle 
class IV and V 
mostly.  Fifteen years 
kayaking experience.
SuperCreek
Message: Cool.
Same level here.
Been paddling 
creeks for 10 years.
When/where do you 
want to meet? What 
section do you 
propose running?
Message: To me, expert 
means that you have 
your American Canoe 
Association certification, 
river rescue courses, and 
regularly paddle Class IV 
and V rivers.  Cascader
Message: I disagree.  I 
know tons of “expert” 
kayakers who have never 
had a formal course… 
they’re just amazing 
kayakers.  SplashPaddler
Kayaker Online 
Community
Forum: Find a 
Paddling Buddy
Forum:
Learn About a River
Forum: Discuss 
Paddling Techniques
Forum:
Expert Corner
Forum:
Learn About a River
Forum: Discuss 
Paddling Techniques
Forum:
Expert Corner
Forum: Find a 
Paddling Buddy
Category:
Playboaters
Category:
Creekboaters
Thread:
Intermediate
kayaker seeks 
same for Kayaking 
Clackamas River.  
Thread: Expert 
kayaker looking for 
partner in crime for 
White Salmon 
River, WA. 
Supercreek
Message: What 
day? I’m free 
Tuesdays.  Gonzo
Message: How 
many people do you 
want? I’m free 
Tuesday, too.  
GirlieBoater
Message: What 
does “expert 
kayaker” mean to 
you? WaterBaby
Message: Expert 
means that I paddle 
class IV and V 
mostly.  Fifteen years 
kayaking experience.
SuperCreek
Message: Cool.
Same level here.
Been paddling 
creeks for 10 years.
When/where do you 
want to meet? What 
section do you 
propose running?
Message: To me, expert 
means that you have 
your American Canoe 
Association certification, 
river rescue courses, and 
regularly paddle Class IV 
and V rivers.  Cascader
Message: I disagree.  I 
know tons of “expert” 
kayakers who have never 
had a formal course… 
they’re just amazing 
kayakers.  SplashPaddler
Kayaker Online 
Community
Forum: Find a 
Paddling Buddy
Forum:
Learn About a River
Forum: Discuss 
Paddling Techniques
Forum:
Expert Corner
Forum:
Learn About a River
Forum: Discuss 
Paddling Techniques
Forum:
Expert Corner
Forum: Find a 
Paddling Buddy
Category:
Playboaters
Category:
Creekboaters
Thread: Intermedi-
ate kayaker seeks 
same for Kayaking 
Clackamas River.  
PDXCreeker
Thread: Expert 
kayaker looking for 
partner in crime for 
White Salmon 
River, WA. 
Supercreek
Message: What day? I’m free 
Tuesdays.  Gonzo
Message: How many people do 
you want? I’m free Tuesday, too.  
GirlieBoater
Message: What does “expert 
kayaker” mean to you? 
WaterBaby
Message: Expert means that I 
paddle class IV and V mostly.  
Fifteen years kayaking experi-
ence.  SuperCreek
Message: Cool.  Same level 
here.  Been paddling creeks for 
10 years.  When/where do you 
want to meet? What section do 
you propose running?
Message: To me, expert means 
that you have your American 
Canoe Association certification, 
river rescue courses, and 
regularly paddle Class IV and V 
rivers.  Cascader
Message: I disagree.  I know 
tons of “expert” kayakers who 
have never had a formal 
course… they’re just amazing 
kayakers.  SplashPaddler
control software system:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB.NET Twain, VB.NET Barcode Read, VB.NET Barcode Generator, view less. VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to JPEG Using VB.
www.rasteredge.com
control software system:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
converter library control is a 100% clean .NET document image solution, which is designed to help .NET developers convert PDF to HTML webpage using simple C#
www.rasteredge.com

Jive Software, 317 SW Alder St, Ste 500, Portland, OR 97204  www.jivesoftware.com  
“Prime the Pump” with High-quality Content
Plan initial content that will, as Derek Powazek, author of Design 
for Community puts it, “prime the pump” for future high-quality 
communication and interaction. Content can include articles, links 
to other articles, editorials, features, reviews, documentation, 
FAQs—all depending on the type of online community you develop 
and the types of material you already have on hand. Be aware that 
the content you provide on the site, including the tone, whether 
tongue-in-cheek or all-business, sets the tone for the responses. 
If you need to reflect your company image in the community, 
select content that supports that goal. Remember that content is 
the most valuable thing you can provide your community; without 
it, discussions have no starting point. Identify people who can 
provide good content: employees with expert knowledge, support 
personnel, or even experts outside of your organization. 
Describe How You Will Attract and Retain Members
Drive Visitors to Your Site
You need a sound plan for driving the right people to your commu-
nity turning those first-time visitors into contributing members. 
We have included these features to help publicize and drive traffic 
to your community:
Community Everywhere. Allows you to insert a “Discuss 
This” icon next to web content so that content viewers can 
launch into a new or existing threaded discussion about the 
content. You can also use this to display existing comments 
on a web page that users can respond to within the web 
page.
RSS Feeds. Automatically populates your home or product 
pages with links to the most popular and latest threads.
Plan additional activities such as sending an email targeted to 
people you want to join with a link to a discussion that might inter-
est them, a scheduled online chat, or a training session about how 
to use the community. Link to the community from your e-news-
letters, make it a part of your customer service/support portal and 
workflow, and include forum threads in general content search. 
Get creative here—look for ways to let the right people know 
about your community. And from a purely functional standpoint, 
make the link to your online community from your web site stand 
out. 
Convert Visitors into Active Participants—Reward Them
Once you’ve attracted visitors to your community, you need to 
identify those members who contribute high-quality content and 
persuade them to contribute regularly. Active community mem-
bers care deeply about their status within the community—a fact 
that most companies greatly underestimate. 
Our status and reward system is driven by a sophisticated Q&A 
Workflow feature which rewards contributors who successfully 
address other participant’s questions.
Status levels give members prominence in the community and 
help members discern which posts are likely to be more useful 
than others. We recommend structuring your status levels so that 
you can easily add new levels as members accumulate more and 
more points. 
Our Q&A Workflow feature allows members to mark answers 
Helpful or Correct. Members are far more likely to contribute 
again when they get feedback that their insights or suggestions 
were appreciated. 
Organizations that have successfully implemented the reward and 
status features recommend implementing additional perks for 
star contributors. Some ideas below:
Spotlight them or their content on the community main 
page
Highlight their contributions in a newsletter
Reward them on a monthly or quarterly basis with t-shirts 
or an iPod
Send your top contributors to your annual user’s confer-
ence 
Determine Who Will Manage the Community and Assign 
Permissions
The number of people you will need to manage the system, con-
tent, and users associated with your online community depends 
on the level of activity you anticipate, the number of categories 
and forums you have, the effectiveness of the auto-modera-
tion features in your community, and the level of interaction you 
want with your community. Review the following table for a rough 
estimate of the number of hours you would need to devote to your 
online community based on page views and posts. 
Maximum Page 
Views Per 
Month
Maximum 
Posts Per 
Month
Estimated 
Administrator 
Hours Per Week
Estimated 
Moderator 
Hours Per Week
100,000
2,500
3
5
250,000
5,000
4
10
500,000
10,000
5
20
1,000,000
25,000
5
30
2,000,000
50,000
8
40
5,000,000
75,000
10
50
10,000,000
10,0000
12
60
6
Jive Software, 317 SW Alder St, Ste 500, Portland, OR 97204  www.jivesoftware.com  
We have identified the following administrative areas, roles, and 
responsibilities that you may need for your Jive Forums online 
community. At a minimum, you will need a system administrator.  
Review the list and identify people within your organization well-
suited for the various roles, but realize that as your community 
grows, you can always add more people to administer the com-
munity.
Be aware, that although there are several different types of roles 
below, you don’t need to have separate individuals responsible for 
each role!  Most communities, even large ones, have only 2 or 3 
people assigned with administrative privileges.
System Administration
System Administrator. Administers the entire instance, 
or community, of Jive Forums. Your system administrator 
tunes the system and specifies global attributes such as 
permissions, user administration, feature and user inter-
face settings, automated moderation settings, and virus 
scanning and attachment settings. 
Content Administration
Category Administrator. Administers the content of one or 
more categories, modifying the global settings specified by 
the system administrator and fine tuning for their specific 
category or categories. Within a category, you may also 
have a Forum Administrator. This individual administers 
one or more forums within a specific category. 
Moderator. Manages the content before and after posting 
in a moderated forum. This person also has additional non-
administrative responsibilities that are described in the 
Community Management section.
User Administration
User Administrator. Manages individual user accounts.
Group Administrator. Manages groups of users. This per-
son is almost always the same person acting as the User 
Administrator.
In addition, you will need individuals to manage the non-software 
aspects of the community. 
Community Management
Community Manager. Sets the direction of the community 
and organizes the content. Community managers decide 
when to split forums and categories, and determine the 
categories and forums that the community needs. 
Moderator. Manages and moderates individual forums, 
ensuring that discussions stay on topic, that people treat 
each other respectfully, and determines what to do with 
inappropriate content and members. 
Content Supplier. Creates high-value content to seed the 
community. You may use your support personnel, product 
managers, or developers as content suppliers. Consider 
inviting high-quality contributors to supply content.
Determine Your User Groups  and Assign Permissions
Jive Forums ships with two default user types that cannot be 
deleted: Anyone and Registered Users. An Anyone user is simply 
anyone who visits the community, and is designed to be associat-
ed with a guest or to allow anonymous access. A Registered User 
is someone who has entered your community’s required registra-
tion information. 
Forming Groups
Once an individual registers, you can add them to a user group. 
The benefit of forming user groups is that your can save time by 
adding and removing permissions to multiple users in a group 
simultaneously. Determine the user groups you’ll need before 
launching the community. For example, if you have an internal 
community, group users according to employee job function or de-
partment. Alternatively, if you run an online support community, 
group users by your different support contract levels.  
Selecting Permissions to Assign to Users and Groups
With Jive Forums, you have the option to provide your users and 
groups permission to:
Read forum content.
Rate a forum message.
Create a new thread in a forum.
Post reply messages in existing threads (but cannot create 
a new thread).
Attach files to messages.
Post private messages.
Post attachments with private messages.
Create a poll.
Vote in existing polls (but not create them).
There are 3 main classifications of users in your forums:
Anyone: The permissions you set for Anyone users are a 
blanket set of permissions for anyone who visits the site 
– registered or non-registered. Think hard about what you 
want people to be able to do anonymously, but weigh that 
against the need to engage visitors to convince them to 
participate. 

Jive Software, 317 SW Alder St, Ste 500, Portland, OR 97204  www.jivesoftware.com  
Registered: Registered Users permissions are globally 
assigned permissions you give to anyone who registers.  
Participants must be registered in order to participate in 
threaded discussions.
Groups & Individuals:  For registered participants you can 
assign individual permissions, or permissions based on 
their Group.  These permissions can also be assigned on a 
Category, Sub-Category, or Forum basis.  
How Jive Forums Applies Permissions
Jive Forums permissions are actually applied when a user ac-
cesses forum content. First, the application examines the global 
user permissions, and then it applies any group permissions that 
the user belongs to. After applying those “user” permissions, you 
can apply “content” permissions at the following levels:   
Community (Called Global in the Administrator Guide). 
Specify the permissions you want all users to have when 
they log into your community and access forum content. 
These permissions can be added or removed to users or 
groups at the category and forum levels. 
Category. When the user accesses forum content, the 
system checks the user’s Category permissions to see if 
they have been modified from the original Community level 
permissions. If so, when the user access forum content in 
that category or related subcategories, the Category per-
missions override the Community permissions.
Forum. When the user accesses forum content, the system 
checks the user’s Forum permissions to see if they have 
modified from the original Community settings or from the 
Category settings. If so, when the user is in that specific 
forum, the Forum permissions override the Community 
and Category settings. 
For example, in an online support community, all users may have 
Community permissions that allow them to view and post content 
in the general community, but only those customers who paid 
for gold level support, and who are part of a “Gold Level” support 
group, can see and participate in a specific forum where they get 
more specialized attention. Other customers do not have permis-
sion to even see the forum. 
Leverage Existing User Authentication Systems
If you have an existing user authentication system and/or an LDAP 
Directory, integrate these systems with your Jive Forums ap-
plication to offer members log-in convenience and save you time 
managing user permissions.  
Single Sign-on (SSO) Integration
Many web sites require visitors to authenticate themselves before 
they can access site content. By integrating with a Single Sign-on 
(SSO) system, users log in one time to authenticate and access 
web site content and the online community. We make the inte-
gration process simple, using the Auth Token and Auth Factory 
libraries. If you lack in-house expertise to do this integration, our 
experienced Professional Services staff can help.
LDAP Directory Integration
Avoid manual entry of user and permissions data by integrating 
your existing LDAP user database with your online community 
membership database. Refer to our Administrator’s Guide for 
more information.
Develop Your Usage Policy
Design a usage policy to ward off abuse or inadvertent posts that 
are not appropriate for the community. Individuals out to make 
trouble will eventually show up in your community if it’s a public 
one. Early warning can make a big difference, and can prevent 
your members from having a negative experience. Make the con-
sequences for unacceptable behavior clear. 
Derek Powazek, author of Design for Community recommends 
that you include a statement to the effect of: “We retain the right 
to remove content or deny individuals access anytime we feel it is 
necessary.” Some ideas for possible policy statements to include 
are:
No profanity.
Treat others with respect.
Stay on topic.
To help design your usage policy, review usage policies of sites 
you feel have the tone you want to have in your community.
Auto-moderation Features
We include several comprehensive auto-moderation features in 
Jive Forums to help you manage abuse or improper posts when 
they it inevitably occur in your community. 
1.
2.
3.

Jive Software, 317 SW Alder St, Ste 500, Portland, OR 97204  www.jivesoftware.com  
Filters and Interceptors
A filter dynamically formats message content before it posts to 
the community, while an interceptor, based on specific criteria, 
accepts, modifies, or rejects an entire incoming message before it 
enters the community. Filters and interceptors can be applied to 
message subject lines, body text, and properties. When you don’t 
want any part of a message with an offending word to enter the 
forum before an action is taken, use an interceptor instead of a 
filter. Examples of available filters are:
Profanity Filter. Automatically detects words in the profan-
ity list and replaces them with ***.  Use our list of common 
profanity terms from our Knowledge Base as a starting 
point, and then conduct a team-building exercise at the 
local watering hole to augment this list. This is the most 
commonly used filter, and you’ll definitely want to use it.
HTML Filter. Automatically detects and removes HTML 
tags. We recommend enabling this filter at all times to re-
duce security risks from Cross-Site Scripting attack (CSS) 
by preventing any HTML code to be rendered or executed.
Email Filter. Detects text in an email address format and 
converts it into an email link.
Emoticon Filters. Detects text that looks like an emoticon 
and turns it into an actual image.
The list of installed filters or interceptors shows you which filters 
are currently enabled and their order of execution. The order of 
filters or interceptors is important because the flow of control 
passes through them from the top down. 
Report Abuse Feature
This feature gives your users the ability to help police the commu-
nity by allowing them to report an offensive post to the moderator. 
A reported post can automatically be taken out of the thread when 
the number of users that report the post exceeds an administra-
tor-specified number. The post is put into a moderation queue, 
and must receive moderator approval before it can be placed back 
into the thread.
Design the Layout of Your Online Community
Include brand owners and marketing staff in the design process 
to make sure the look and feel of the community is serves as an 
extension of your corporate brand. Use our Themes feature to 
customize Jive Forums with your company logo, colors, font, navi-
gation, and layout. Design it. Your community members will pay 
back any investment you put into the design tenfold. Refer to the 
Administrator’s Guide for more information on customizing your 
community’s appearance.
Above all, people should easily be able to find the content, re-
spond to it, connect with other community members, and perform 
any activities in your community without a struggle. If you make it 
too hard, they’ll give up. Make it easy.
Congratulations, you’ve finished planning your online community, 
and you’re ready to launch it. The next section describes some 
things you should do once it’s up and running.  

Jive Software, 317 SW Alder St, Ste 500, Portland, OR 97204  www.jivesoftware.com  
Managing Your Community Once You’ve Launched
By good upfront planning for your community, you’ve eliminated 
most of the difficulties associated with managing it. From a main-
tenance and management standpoint, you’ll need to:
Check to see how you are doing against your measurable 
goals.
Ensure that community content aligns with your original 
purpose statement.
Manage content growth by splitting forums and categories 
as needed and retiring content when it becomes stale.
Manage user accounts and user issues.
Develop and seed the community with high-quality, stimu-
lating content until community members begin providing 
the majority of that content for you.
Review the community to identify what is working and what 
isn’t.
Continue marketing your community to attract visitors
Make sure that your reward system is indeed helping you 
build an active community membership with high-quality 
contributors.
Demonstrate Your Community’s Return on Investment
In addition to the above list, we recommend the following steps 
to proactively demonstrate to your organization’s executives the 
strong Return on Investment (ROI) from your online community 
implementation. 
Effectively Reuse Content Developed in Your Community 
Highly relevant and timely information generated by the discus-
sions amongst community members and between community 
members and your employees is captured and available in an eas-
ily searchable format for reference and re-use by your support, 
research and design, and marketing organizations. For example, 
customer support organizations, developer communities, and 
internal communities can edit thread contents, verify their accu-
racy, format them and add them to your knowledge base workflow 
or publish them as a knowledge base article. 
Although the value of using knowledge bases to retain content 
and drive support clients to that content is not readily evident, 
populating knowledge bases with timely and valuable content on 
a regular basis is a major initiative of most organizations. Include 
this activity as a regular part of your community management 
plan to increase management’s perception that your online com-
munity is generating a significant ROI.
Use Reports to Show Success through Activity Levels 
We provide 24 pre-configured reports with Jive that can be run for 
the entire community or for individual forums for specified date 
ranges. We recommend using the following reports to demon-
strate increased traffic levels and participation, and successful 
self-service resolution of issues:
Page views
User creation
Resolved questions
Average time to successful resolution
Track Participation in Your Customer Relationship 
Management (CRM) Application 
Research suggests that online communities boost brand aware-
ness and increase customer loyalty. For example, sites with com-
munities are nine times more likely to be revisited by users, and 
community participants purchase five times as much and twice as 
often as non-participants. Use your Customer Relationship Man-
agement (CRM) application to compare relevant activities, such as 
sales for customers who are community participants versus those 
who are not, and report on those differences. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested