J R C   R E F E R E N C E   R E P O R T S
Joint
Research
Centre
Report EUR 25280 EN 
A Conceptual Model for Developing
Katalin Tóth, Clemens Portele, Andreas Illert,
Michael Lutz, Maria Nunes de Lima
2012
Interoperability
Specifications
in 
Spatial Data
Infrastructures
Convert pdf to tiff quality - software SDK project:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to tiff quality - software SDK project:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
European Commission
Joint Research Centre
Institute for Environment and Sustainability 
Contact information
Katalin Tóth
Address: Joint Research Centre, Via Enrico Fermi 2749, TP 262, 21027 Ispra (VA), Italy
E-mail: katalin.toth@jrc.ec.europa.eu 
Tel.: +39 0332 78 6491
Fax: +39 0332 78 6325
http://ies.jrc.ec.europa.eu
http://www.jrc.ec.europa.eu
This publication is a Reference Report by the Joint Research Centre
of the European Commission.
Legal Notice
Neither the European Commission nor any person acting on behalf of the Commission 
is responsible for the use which might be made of this publication.
Europe Direct is a service to help you find answers to your questions about the European Union
Freephone number (*): 00 800 6 7 8 9 10 11
(*) Certain mobile telephone operators do not allow access to 00 800 numbers or these calls may be billed.
A great deal of additional information on the European Union is available on the Internet.
It can be accessed through the Europa server http://europa.eu/.
JRC69484
EUR 25280 EN
ISBN 978-92-79-22552-9 (pdf) 
ISBN 978-92-79-22551-2 (print)
ISSN 1018-5593 (print)
ISSN 1831-9424 (online) 
doi:10.2788/21003
Luxembourg: Publications Office of the European Union, 2012
© European Union, 2012
Reproduction is authorised provided the source is acknowledged.
Printed in Italy
software SDK project:Online Convert PDF file to Tiff. Best free online PDF Tif
Using this .NET PDF to TIFF conversion control, C# developers can render and convert PDF document to TIFF image file with no loss in original file quality.
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK project:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
library component toolkit, C# developers can easily and quickly convert a large-size multi-page PDF document to a group of high-quality separate JPEG image
www.rasteredge.com
A Conceptual Model for Developing Interoperability 
Specifications in Spatial Data Infrastructures 
Tóth
, Katalin 
1
Portele
, Clemens 
2
Illert
, Andreas 
3
Lutz
, Michael 
1
Nunes de Lima
, Vanda 
1
European Commission, Joint Research Centre, 
2
interactive instruments Gesellschaft 
für Software-Entwicklung mbH, 
Bundesamt für Kartographie und Geodäsie 
Keywords
: spatial data infrastructure, interoperability, generic conceptual model, 
data specification development 
Executive summary 
Today, geographic information is being collected, processed, and used in domains as 
diverse as hydrology, disaster mitigation, statistics, public health, geology, civil 
protection,  agriculture,  nature  conservation,  and  many  others.  The  challenges 
regarding the lack of availability, quality, organisation, accessibility, and sharing of 
spatial information are common to a large number of policies and activities, and are 
experienced across the various levels of public authority in Europe. 
Directive 2007/2/EC
of the European Parliament and of the Council, adopted on 14 
March  2007,  takes  measures  to  address  these  challenges  by  establishing  an 
Infrastructure for Spatial Information in the European Community (
INSPIRE
) for 
environmental  policies, or policies and  activities that  have an  impact on  the 
environment. Moreover, Spatial Data Infrastructures (SDIs) are becoming more and 
more  linked  to  and  integrated  with  systems  developed  in  the  context  of  e-
Government. An important driver of this evolution is the Digital Agenda for Europe, 
which recommends “establishing a list of common cross-border services that allow 
businesses and citizens to operate independently or live anywhere in the EU” and 
“setting up systems of mutual recognition of electronic identities”
1
This report addresses the question of how the reuse of geographic and environmental 
information created and maintained by different organisations in Europe can be 
enabled and facilitated. The main challenge related to this task is how to deal with the 
heterogeneity of data and how to establish information flow between communities 
that use geographic information in various environmental fields. 
This report presents an integrated view of the data component of SDIs, highlighting 
the main features of the conceptual framework. We expect this document to be useful 
to 
1
http://europa.eu/rapid/pressReleasesAction.do?reference=MEMO/10/200&format=HTML&aged=0&lang
uage=EN&guiLanguage=en
software SDK project:C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
and decompression method, JPEG2000 compressing & decompression method, TIFF files compression Convert smooth lines to curves. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document.
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK project:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Able to Convert PDF to JPEG file in .NET WinForms and ASP Export high quality jpeg file from PDF in .NET
www.rasteredge.com
Decision makers responsible for the strategic development of SDIs who need 
to understand the benefits of using a conceptual framework and need to assess 
the complexity and the resources associated with this work, 
Leading civil servants from the Member State organisations that are legally 
mandated to implement INSPIRE, 
Scientists looking for a quick and comprehensive overview of the key 
elements of the data component in SDIs. 
Section 1
introduces Spatial Data Infrastructures (SDIs) and how they have developed 
as a logical consequence of technological advances and the associated societal and 
technological challenges. With the development of information and communications 
technology,  traditional  paper  maps  have  been  replaced  by  digital  geographic 
information and location-based services. This new digital technology could facilitate 
the reuse of geographic information, but is hampered by incomplete documentation, 
lack of compatibility among the spatial datasets, inconsistencies of data collection, 
and  cultural,  linguistic,  financial  and  organisational  barriers.  SDIs  propose 
organisational and technical measures to search, find, and reuse spatial data collected 
by other organisations. 
One of the core concepts of SDIs is 
interoperability
, which “means the possibility 
for spatial datasets to be combined, and for services to interact, without repetitive 
manual intervention, in such a way that the result is coherent and the added value of 
the datasets and services is enhanced”
2
. INSPIRE, which is used as the main SDI 
initiative from which this report draws its examples and best practices, is built on the 
existing standards, information systems and infrastructures, professional and cultural 
practices of the 27 Member States of the European Union in all the 23 official and 
possibly also the minority languages of the EU. 
Section 2
focuses on  geographic information  and details the 
challenges and 
inconsistencies
that SDI users may face when trying to combine or reuse data 
retrieved from diverse sources. These challenges are ultimately rooted in the diversity 
of how geographic data is defined as a partial abstraction of reality. Geographic data, 
like any data, is always an abstraction, always partial, and always just one of many 
possible views. As a consequence, rivers may be represented as polygons in one 
dataset and as lines in another, the lines representing roads on both sides of a national 
border may not meet, and water may appear to flow uphill when combining a 
hydrological and an elevation dataset. These and further challenges of data reuse in 
SDIs are illustrated and explained in this section. 
The main part of the report is found in 
section 3, 4, and 5
, which describe the 
framework for the development of data specifications that address a number of the 
challenges described above. These specifications define the interoperability targets 
and how existing data should be transformed in order to meet these targets. Section 3 
is split into two main parts, both of which largely build on INSPIRE experiences and 
best practices: 
The Generic Conceptual Model (GCM) defines 25 aspects or elements relevant to 
achieving data interoperability in an SDI, and proposes methods and tools to 
2
Art. 3(7) of Directive 2007/2/EC (INSPIRE) 
software SDK project:VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Convert smooth lines to curves. Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; 'create optimizing Compression = PDFCompression.DCTDecode 'set quality level, only
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK project:C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
PDF files are created from tiff with high quality using .NET PDF SDK for C#.NET. Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF with specified zoom value and save it on
www.rasteredge.com
address  them.  These  include,  for  example,  registries,  coordinate  reference 
systems, identifier management, metadata and maintenance, to name just a few. 
The description  of the methodology for developing  data  specifications for 
interoperability includes a detailed discussion of the relevant actors, steps and the 
overall workflow – from collecting user requirements to documenting and testing 
the specifications that emerge from this process. 
Together, both subsections explain the organisational and technical aspects of how the 
data component of an SDI can be established, and how interoperability arrangements, 
data standardisation and harmonisation contribute to this process. Since 2005, 
INSPIRE has been pioneering the introduction, development, and application of a 
conceptual framework for establishing the data component of an SDI. This experience 
shows that the conceptual framework described in this report is robust enough to 
reinforce interoperability across the 34 data specifications developed for the SDI. 
Moreover, because the framework is platform- and theme independent, can deal with 
cultural diversity, and is based on best practice examples from Europe and beyond, it 
may also provide solutions for SDI challenges in other environments. 
software SDK project:VB.NET Image: Robust OCR Recognition SDK for VB.NET, .NET Image
of images and documents. More and more companies are trying to convert printed business Images exported can be Png, Jpeg, Tiff, image-only PDF or Bmp.
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK project:VB.NET Image: RasterEdge JBIG2 Codec Image Control for VB.NET
control in VB.NET is capable of embedding compressed bitonal images into PDF files and decompress images from PDF files quickly with the smallest quality loss.
www.rasteredge.com
Contents 
Executive summary...................................................................................................................1 
Glossary.....................................................................................................................................5 
Foreword...................................................................................................................................6 
 Spatial Data Infrastructures – Setting the scene...............................................................7 
1.1 
From maps to Spatial Data Infrastructures...............................................................7 
1.2 
Examples of SDI initiatives.....................................................................................8 
1.3 
Interoperability and data harmonisation.................................................................11 
 Spatial data......................................................................................................................13 
2.1 
From real world to spatial data..............................................................................13 
2.2 
Issues of incompatibility and inconsistency of spatial data...................................16 
2.3 
The subject of SDIs................................................................................................19 
 The Conceptual Framework for Data Modelling in SDIs...............................................20 
 Generic Conceptual Model.............................................................................................25 
4.1 
Fundamentals.........................................................................................................25 
4.1.1 
Requirements.................................................................................................25 
4.1.2 
Reference model............................................................................................26 
4.1.3 
Architectural support for data interoperability..............................................26 
4.1.4 
Terminology..................................................................................................27 
4.1.5 
Multi-lingual text and cultural adaptability...................................................27 
4.1.6 
Use of ontologies...........................................................................................28 
4.1.7 
Coordinate referencing and units of measurement........................................28 
4.1.8 
Registers and registries..................................................................................29 
4.2 
Data modelling.......................................................................................................30 
4.2.1 
Object referencing.........................................................................................30 
4.2.2 
Spatial and temporal aspects.........................................................................30 
4.2.3 
Rules for application schemas and feature catalogues..................................31 
4.2.4 
Shared application schemas...........................................................................32 
4.2.5 
Consolidated model repository......................................................................32 
4.2.6 
Multiple representations................................................................................33 
4.2.7 
Extension points............................................................................................34 
4.3 
Data management...................................................................................................34 
4.3.1 
Identifier management...................................................................................34 
4.3.2 
Consistency between data.............................................................................35 
4.3.3 
Data and information quality.........................................................................36 
4.3.4 
Metadata........................................................................................................36 
4.3.5 
Conformance.................................................................................................37 
4.3.6 
Data capturing rules......................................................................................37 
4.3.7 
Data transformation model/guidelines..........................................................38 
4.3.8 
Rules for data maintenance...........................................................................38 
4.3.9 
Portrayal........................................................................................................39 
4.3.10 
Data delivery.................................................................................................39 
 Methodology for Data Specification Development........................................................40 
5.1 
Definition of the scope of the data themes.............................................................40 
5.2 
Principles of data specification development.........................................................41 
5.3 
The data specification development cycle.............................................................43 
5.4 
Maintenance of specifications................................................................................46 
5.5 
Cost-benefit considerations....................................................................................47 
5.6 
Actors in the data specification process.................................................................48 
5.7 
Supporting tools.....................................................................................................49 
 Conclusions....................................................................................................................50 
Acknowledgements.................................................................................................................52 
Bibliography............................................................................................................................53 
Glossary 
AFIS 
Amtliches  Festpunktinformationssystem  (Official  Fixed  Point 
Information System) 
ALKIS 
Amtliches Liegenschaftskataster Informationssystem (Official Real 
Estate Cadastre Information System) 
ATKIS 
Amtliches  Topographisch-Kartographisches  Informationssystem 
(Official Topographic Cartographic Information System) 
ATS 
Abstract Test Suite 
BAG 
Bathymetry Attributed Grid 
DNF 
Digital National Framework 
EC 
European Commission 
EU 
European Union 
GBIF 
The Global Biodiversity Information Facility 
GEOSS 
Global Earth Observation System of Systems 
GCM 
Generic Conceptual Model 
GIS 
Geographic Information Systems 
GML 
Geography Markup Language 
HY 
Hydrography, hydrology 
ICAO 
International Civil Aviation Organisation 
INSPIRE 
Infrastructure for Spatial Information in Europe 
ISO 
International Standards Organisation 
KML 
Keyhole Markup Language 
NUTS 
Nomenclature des unités territoriales statistiques (Nomenclature 
of territorial units for statistics) 
OGC 
Open Geospatial Consortium 
OWL 
Ontology Web Language 
SDI 
Spatial Data Infrastructure 
SI 
Système international d'unités (International system of units) 
SLD 
Styled Layer Descriptor 
SKOS 
Simple Knowledge Organization System 
SDI 
Global Spatial Data Infrastructure 
TAPIR 
Taxonomic Databases Working Group Access Protocol for 
Information Retrieval 
TC 
Technical Committee 
THREDDS 
Thematic Real-time Environmental Distributed Data Services 
TIFF 
Tagged Image File Format 
UK 
United Kingdom 
UML 
Unified Modelling Language 
UTC 
Universal Time Coordinates 
XML 
Extensible Markup Language 
WMS 
Web Mapping Service 
Foreword 
Geographic information, spatial data infrastructures (SDIs), interoperability, and 
shared  information  systems  are  notions  that  developers  in  information  and 
communications  technology,  decision  makers  responsible  for  public  sector 
information, as well as scientists, engineers, and public servants may come across 
daily – whether they are working in domains such as hydrology, disaster mitigation, 
statistics, public health, geology, civil protection, agriculture, nature conservation, or 
one of many other disciplines. 
Should they be concerned? Do they have an easy way to respond to the challenge of 
reading the ever growing, scattered, and sometimes highly technical documentation? 
Is  it  possible  to  understand  the  core  ideas  without  an  insight  into  policies, 
organisational aspects, workflows, and without prior knowledge of the subject matter 
and related technology? 
While the answer to the first question is a definite ‘yes’, for most people it is probably 
‘no’ for the other two. This report tries to address these questions by explaining the 
basic concepts and principles, summarising what interoperability means for the 
domain of geographic information and showing how SDIs can be key to solve the 
associated challenges. All of this will be explained from point of view of spatial data, 
touching upon the other components of SDIs
3
only to illustrate the connections. 
Readers that are familiar with the concept of SDIs may ask why such special attention 
is being devoted to the data component, when this is, perhaps, the component for 
which achieving interoperability is the most difficult. We list only a few reasons: 
The data component is the best for setting the scene as to why interoperability is 
needed, 
Spatial data is an asset that has been accumulated over a long period of time by 
many different organisations. They are rightfully concerned by the impact of SDIs 
on their work. An understanding of the spirit of interoperability can help clarify 
potential misunderstandings, 
Current users of geographic information spend 80 percent of their time collating 
and managing the information and only 20 percent analysing it to solve problems 
and generate benefits (Geographic Information Panel (2008). 
Human psychology: the name “Spatial 
Data
Infrastructure” implies the data 
subject. 
There are many SDI initiatives across the world. The authors, all actively involved in 
INSPIRE, inevitably take most references from this initiative. Nevertheless, they try 
to  emphasise those features of INSPIRE that are likely  to be valid in other 
environments, complementing them with references to other initiatives. 
The main objectives of this report is to explain the aspects of the framework necessary 
for development of information models and interoperability specifications in SDIs 
without going too deep into technicalities; allowing an “informed policy maker” 
possessing everyday IT literacy skills to understand them. In order to help the readers, 
basic definitions are given in green, while examples are given in light brown boxes. 
3
The definition and short description of SDIs will be given in section 1.1 
 Spatial Data Infrastructures – Setting the scene 
1.1 
From maps to Spatial Data Infrastructures 
Facts, stand-alone bits of data and pieces of information, however accurate they may 
be, can never achieve the same effect as when they are put in a context of time and 
spaces, which are the most frequently used data references. 
For thousands years of spatial observations
4
, the final products of this effort were 
maps which graphically presented the spatial context (Klinghammer, I. (1995). 
Ancient maps were used to accomplish the most important missions of the state: 
navigation, discovery and colonisation of new territories, taxation, warfare, etc. 
Possession of maps brought with it the power to monopolise and gain luxuries. After 
the diffusion of modern typography, some popular products such as city, road, and 
tourist maps, and geographical atlases became more widely used. 
However the majority of maps remained accessible to specialists only. Each type of 
map followed its own production line and thematic scope. The reuse of these maps 
was limited. Only topographic maps found wider diffusion as they gave general 
descriptions of the surface of the Earth and provided a geometrical basis for thematic 
mapping. 
With  the  development  of  information  and 
communications  technology,  traditional  paper  maps 
have been gradually replaced by digital geographic 
information from map digitisation, Earth observation 
satellites, in-situ digital sensors and global positioning 
systems. Paper maps are still used for visualisation, but 
computers and other hardware
5
have become the main 
arena for spatial analysis, engineering design, and location-based services. 
Spatial analysis is the process 
of extracting or deriving new 
information  by  modelling, 
assessing, understanding and 
evaluating natural and social 
phenomena in the context of a 
geographic location.  
Geographic Information  Systems  (GIS)  are integrated  collections of  computer 
software and data used to view and manage geographic information in order to 
analyse spatial relationships and to model spatial processes (Wade, T. and Sommer, S. 
(editors) 2006). The early implementations of GIS somewhat repeated the steps 
followed by analogue data processing, using data that was collected explicitly for the 
specific task to be solved and thereby missing out on benefiting from the potential 
reuse of digital data. 
The diffusion of the Internet and widespread computer literacy have opened a 
genuinely new paradigm in spatial data handling, promoting data sharing across 
different communities and various applications. The frameworks for data sharing are 
the Spatial Data Infrastructures (SDIs)
6
that can be interpreted as extensions of a 
4
Cartographic science goes back as far Eratosthenes and Ptolemy. 
5
Personal and portable computers, mobile phones and specific devices such as those used for 
navigation offer applications based on spatial data. 
6
Sometimes, SDIs are also referred to as “spatial information infrastructures” to highlight the fact that 
they usually provide access to data through (value-added) services. However, we use the more widely 
established term “spatial data infrastructure” in this report. 
desktop GIS (Craglia, M. (2010), where data collected by other organisations can be 
searched, retrieved and used according to well-defined access policies.  
According to the Global Spatial Data Infrastructure (GSDI) Association’s Cookbook 
(Nebert, D. D. (editor) 2004) “an SDI hosts geographic data and attributes, sufficient 
documentation (metadata), a means to discover, visualize, and evaluate the data 
(catalogues and Web mapping), and some method to provide access to the geographic 
data. Beyond this are additional services or software to support applications of the 
data. To make an SDI functional, it must also include the organisational agreements 
needed to coordinate and administer it on a local, regional, national, and or trans-
national scale”.  
The description of GSDI classifies SDI components as data, metadata, services 
(technology), and organisational agreements. According to Craglia et al. (2003), 
“Spatial Data Infrastructures (SDIs) encapsulate policies, institutional and legal 
arrangements, technologies, and data that enable sharing and effective usage of 
geographic information”. This definition adds an aspect of utmost importance – the 
effective usage of geographic data, which sets the requirement of interoperability. 
The degree of SDI development strongly correlates with the development of the 
information society in general, use of information technology by the population, and 
the diffusion of the Internet. An SDI can be established at global, supranational, 
national, regional, cross-border, or local levels. In the ideal case, these levels are 
interconnected, accommodating each other’s relevant components. 
1.2 
Examples of SDI initiatives 
The establishment of an SDI requires the collaboration of many parties. This 
collaboration can be based on voluntary agreements between the interested parties, or 
it can be more formally regulated, or even legally enforced, mandating the targeted 
organisations to fulfil the provisions of legal acts. Voluntary initiatives, such as GSDI 
and  some  national  SDIs,  are  often  coordinated  by  international  and  national 
associations or umbrella organisations.  
According to Longley at al. (2011) there are over 150 SDI initiatives described in the 
literature. The following examples mention only those that are referred to in context 
of this report. Two of these initiatives are established at the global level, one at the 
national level, and one at the supranational level in the European Union. 
GSDI
The Global Spatial Data Infrastructure Association was founded in 1998 to “promote 
international  cooperation  and  collaboration  in  support  of  local,  national  and 
international spatial data infrastructure developments that will allow nations to better 
address social, economic, and environmental issues of pressing importance”
7
. As an 
international voluntary organisation, the GSDI does not aim to establish a global 
spatial infrastructure, but rather focuses on raising awareness and exchanging best 
practice examples. 
7
http://www.gsdi.org/ 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested