533
UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES OF NET 
NEUTRALITY REGULATION 
R
OBERT
E. L
ITAN
*
&H
AL
J. S
INGER
**
Policymakers are in the midst of an active debate over how best to 
accelerate the build-out of next-generation broadband networks. The 
U.S. economy has a significant economic stake in the outcome. It is 
increasingly apparent in the global economy linked together by the 
Internet  that  the  future  competitiveness  of  individual  firms,  and 
indeed  entire  economies,  depends  heavily  on  state-of-the-art 
networks. Next-generation broadband networks will be significantly 
more expensive than earlier versions. In the U.S. alone, the required 
investment to deploy such networks ubiquitously could exceed $140 
billion. This investment will not occur unless those who supply the 
funds for it are compensated with a rate of return commensurate with 
the risk. In virtually all private-sector markets, firms that undertake 
investments have sufficient freedom to fashion the way in which they 
offer the products and services those investments make possible, and 
to price them in ways that meet demands and optimize returns. In the 
broadband Internet access market, however, advocates of proposed 
network neutrality (“net neutrality”) regulation would restrict those 
planning to build out next-generation networks from these freedoms. 
This paper examines one particular aspect of the “net neutrality” 
proposals:  “non-discrimination”  requirements  relating  to  the 
provision of network quality of service (“QoS”) to content providers. 
The paper concludes that such requirements, however innocuous they 
may seem, would be detrimental to the objectives that all Americans 
seemingly  should  want—namely,  the  accelerated  construction  of 
next-generation networks, and the lower prices, broader consumer 
choices, and innovations these networks would bring. The paper also 
concludes that under the best of circumstances, even if networks are 
significantly upgraded in the  presence of net  neutrality  rules, the 
proposed non-discrimination provisions would provide incentives for 
those who would build and operate networks to offer “blended” QoS 
levels that are “too high” for some applications and “too low” for 
others. Mediocrity in broadband service is hardly an objective that 
policymakers in the United States should be trying to achieve.
*
Senior Fellow, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution and Vice President 
of Research and Policy, Kauffman Foundation
**
President,  Criterion  Economics.  We  thank  Robert  Hahn  and  Evan  Leo  for  helpful 
comments, and AT&T Inc. for research funding. The views expressed here are solely our own.
How to convert pdf into tiff format - SDK Library service:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
www.rasteredge.com
How to convert pdf into tiff format - SDK Library service:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
534 
J. ON TELECOMM. & HIGH TECH. L. 
[Vol. 5
I.  I
NTRODUCTION AND 
P
OLICY
B
ACKGROUND
..................................535
A. The ABCs of QoS......................................................................535
B. Various Forms of “Net Neutrality” ...........................................536
C. A Guide to the Debate...............................................................541
II. N
ET
N
EUTRALITY 
P
ROPONENTS
A
SSUME 
I
NCORRECTLY
T
HAT
E
NHANCED
Q
O
SO
FFERINGS 
C
URRENTLY ARE 
H
YPOTHETICAL
AND
W
ILL BE 
U
SED FOR 
A
NTICOMPETITIVE
R
EASONS 
O
NLY
........544
A. Enhanced QoS Offerings Are Prevalent in the Marketplace 
Because They are Valuable to Some (But Not All)  
Consumers.................................................................................545
1. Examples of Tiered QoS Offerings for End-Users............545
2. Examples of Tiered QoS Offerings for Content  
Providers ...........................................................................546
B. Because Enhanced QoS is Costly to Provide, and Because a 
Managed Network Produces Consumer Benefits, the Use of 
Tiered QoS Offerings is Motivated by Procompetitive  
Reasons......................................................................................549
1. Enhanced QoS is Costly to Provide ..................................549
2. A Network without QoS Management Would be 
Prohibitively Expensive for End-Users.............................550
C. Because Unaffiliated Content Providers Could not be  
Foreclosed from the Upstream Content Markets, the Use of 
Tiered QoS Offerings is Unlikely to be Motivated by 
Anticompetitive Reasons...........................................................551
1. Access Providers Lack the Incentive to Foreclose 
Unaffiliated Content Providers..........................................552
2. Access Providers Lack the Ability to Foreclose  
Unaffiliated Content Providers..........................................555
III. B
Y
R
EQUIRING 
N
ON
-D
ISCRIMINATION IN THE 
P
ROVISION OF 
Q
O
S, N
ETWORK 
N
EUTRALITY
P
ROPOSALS 
W
OULD
D
ESTROY 
THE
S
OCIAL
B
ENEFITS 
A
SSOCIATED WITH 
C
URRENT
T
IERED
Q
O
SO
FFERINGS
.............................................................................558
A. Consumer Welfare Effects: An Access Provider Would  
be Forced to Withdraw or Standardize Its Tiered QoS  
Offerings....................................................................................561
1. Consumer Losses Associated with Withdrawal  
of Current Tiered QoS Offerings.......................................561
2. Consumer Losses Associated with Standardized  
QoS Offerings ...................................................................566
B. Innovation Effects: Content Providers Will Divert  
Resources Away from QoS-Needy Applications and  
Towards Non-QoS-Needy Applications....................................569
C. Implications for U.S. Broadband Leadership............................570
SDK Library service:C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Description: Convert all the PDF pages to target format images and output into the directory. Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library service:VB.NET Image: Tutorial for Converting Image and Document in VB.NET
After you integrate these functions into your VB.NET project, you are able to convert image to byte array or stream and convert Word or PDF document to
www.rasteredge.com
2007] 
UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES 
535 
I.  I
NTRODUCTION AND 
P
OLICY
B
ACKGROUND
There is a broad consensus among policymakers  that it  is in the 
economic interest  of the United  States and  its  citizens that broadband 
penetration  not  only  increase,  but  that  the  next  generation  of  “high 
bandwidth” broadband be built out as rapidly as possible. More advanced 
broadband networks not only will make the services and products offered 
over the Internet more attractive, but will accelerate  innovation in the 
development of new content. There is one issue, however, which up to 
now has divided those who want a better and faster Internet: the assertion 
by some that consumers and content providers would be better off if the 
communications companies that will build the next-generation networks 
are  subject  to  a  series  of  “neutrality”  restrictions.  In  particular, 
proponents  of  various  forms  of  “net  neutrality”  argue  that  broadband 
network providers be prohibited from discriminating in any way in the 
provision of quality of service (“QoS”) to content providers. 
This  seemingly  innocuous  requirement  in  fact  would  have  far-
reaching—and we believe demonstrably negative—implications for the 
U.S. broadband industry. In this introduction, we preview the issues and 
then examine them in-depth in subsequent sections. We show how net 
neutrality  requirements  very  likely  would  lead  to  net  mediocrity  in 
service offerings, an outcome totally inconsistent with the desire of many 
end-users of the Internet and those offering many goods and services on 
the Internet. Such an outcome is clearly inconsistent with the objectives 
of policymakers to make the U.S. broadband networks and services the 
world  leaders  in  technology, utilization,  and customer  value.  There is 
much investment at stake in designing the optimal regulatory framework, 
as  next-generation  broadband  networks  will  be  significantly  more 
expensive than earlier versions. In the United States, the cost per home of 
deploying these advanced facilities could reach $1,400,
1
which implies 
that  the  required  investment  to  deploy  next-generation  networks 
ubiquitously could exceed $140 billion (equal to the product of $1,400 
per home and 100 million U.S. homes). 
A.  The ABCs of QoS 
Broadband networks are used to move data packets from one place 
on the network to another. Unfortunately, many bad things can happen to 
data packets as they travel across the Internet. For example, a packet may 
get dropped, may incur a delay, or may suffer from jitter. QoS is one 
antidote to such bad things. Internet applications differ in the extent to 
1.  V
ERIZON
C
OMMC
NS
I
NC
., F
I
OS B
RIEFING
S
ESSION
40  (2006),  available  at
http://investor.verizon.com/news/20060927/20060927.pdf (estimating net capital expenditure 
per home to be $1,434 for its planned FiOS deployment). 
SDK Library service:C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
In some situations, it is quite necessary to convert PDF document into SVG image format. Here is a brief introduction to SVG image.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library service:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size. 0.1f
www.rasteredge.com
536 
J. ON TELECOMM. & HIGH TECH. L. 
[Vol. 5
which they are “QoS-needy”—that is, the level of QoS they require to 
function  properly.
2
The  most  popular QoS-needy applications  include 
streaming  multimedia,  online  gaming,  voice-over-Internet  protocol 
(“VoIP”),  video  teleconferencing,  alarm  signaling,  and  safety-critical 
applications such  as remote  surgery.  In the  future,  there  will  be even 
more  QoS-needy  applications.  Under the  current regulatory regime,  a 
content provider can contract for a certain level of QoS from an access 
provider by entering  into  a  Service Level Agreement  (“SLA”), which 
provides a guaranteed level of QoS. 
Under a broad definition, QoS supplied by an access provider can 
take  many  forms and can  be provided at several different layers  of  a 
broadband  network,  from  the  transmission  media  layer  (“layer  one”) 
through the IP packet layer (“layer three”) all the way up to the service 
application  layer. For example,  an access  provider can  cache  external 
Internet  content  within  its  network  in  close  proximity  to  end-users, 
thereby providing  an enhanced  performance for  content providers  and 
their  customers.  Access  providers  can  also  offer  content  providers 
enhanced hosting services at Internet data centers (“IDCs”) deployed at 
strategic  nodes  of  their  networks,  thereby  bypassing  possible 
intermediate bottlenecks between content servers and customer locations. 
A business with multiple office locations can purchase a virtual private 
network (“VPN”) to secure a preferred level of service for all of its data 
traffic  (including  Internet-bound  traffic)  that  traverses  the  access 
provider’s network. 
Alternatively, QoS can be defined more narrowly to apply only to 
layer three capability built into the routers and the IP packet header. For 
example,  a customer  (including  content  providers)  could  buy Internet 
access with QoS options that would ensure that any traffic the customer 
marked  as  high  priority  would  get  priority  treatment  on  the  access 
provider’s network. Or a VoIP provider can buy QoS to give its packet 
streams preference through an access provider’s network. 
B.  Various Forms of “Net Neutrality” 
Non-discrimination  typically  implies similar  treatment  for similar 
types of customers or traffic. For example, a non-discrimination or duty-
to-deal requirement  could  mandate  that  if  an access provider  offers a 
certain level of QoS to one content provider at a given price, then it must 
offer the same level of QoS to all content providers at the same price. 
Alternatively, an access provider could be prohibited from charging more 
2.  The technical term  for content that  requires a  certain level  of  QoS to function 
properly is “inelastic.” Because the term elastic has a different meaning for an economist 
(namely, the sensitivity of demand for a service in response to a change in prices or income), 
we use the term “QoS-needy” for ease of exposition. 
SDK Library service:C# TIFF: TIFF Editor SDK to Read & Manipulate TIFF File Using C#.
Convert Tiff file to bmp, gif, png, jpeg, and scanned PDF files to Tiff, like Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF, and images. to add XImage.OCR for .NET into C# Tiff
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library service:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Empty) PDF Page or Pages from a Supported File Format. to inserting a new PDF page into existing PDF from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel
www.rasteredge.com
2007] 
UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES 
537 
for  a  steady  50  kbps  VoIP  stream than  for  a  steady  50  kb/s  gaming 
application where the QoS requirements—that is, the incremental cost of 
providing QoS to the two content providers—are the same.
3
But  under  each  of  the  net  neutrality  bills  in  Congress,  non-
discrimination in the supply of QoS means something more extreme: if a 
broadband  provider  offers  enhanced  QoS  to  any  individual  content 
provider,  then  it  must  offer  the  same  enhanced  QoS  to  all  content 
providers for free. The apparent motivation for such a restriction is to 
stymie  efforts  by any content  provider to secure  enhanced  QoS from 
broadband  providers,  and  instead  to  force  all  contracting  for  QoS  to 
occur between broadband providers and end-users.
4
These bills generally 
do  not  distinguish  between  broadband  services  offered  by  access 
providers versus those offered by backbone networks, and they would 
presumably  impose  their  net  neutrality  restrictions  on  both  types  of 
networks.  Because  of  the  unquestioned  lack  of  market  power  in 
backbone services—for example, even a combination of the backbone of 
Verizon  (including  MCI’s  backbone)  and  AT&T  (including  the  old 
SBC’s backbone) would account for less than 30 percent of all Internet 
traffic,  while  combining  the  top  seven  backbones  would  account  for 
roughly  65  percent  of  total  Internet  traffic—there  is  certainly  no 
competitive  virtue  in  imposing  non-discrimination  restrictions  on 
backbone networks.
5
If this non-discrimination objective has any sense, 
it  must relate to competitive  issues in the access network. Hence,  we 
discuss the implications of net neutrality for broadband access networks. 
One  net  neutrality  bill  in  the  House,  H.R.  5273,  explains  in  its 
preamble that “a network neutrality policy based upon the principle of 
nondiscrimination  is  essential  to  ensure  that  broadband 
telecommunications  networks,  including  the  Internet,  remain  open  to 
independent service and content providers.”
6
With respect to end-users, 
H.R.  5273  would  require  that  access  providers  “not  block,  impair, 
degrade, discriminate against, or interfere with the ability of any person 
3.  See Jon M. Peha, The Benefits and Risks of Mandating Network Neutrality, and the 
Quest for a Balanced Policy, 34
TH
T
ELECOMM
.P
OL
Y
R
ES
.C
ONF
.,at 17 (2006), available at
http://web.si.umich.edu/tprc/papers/2006/574/Peha_balanced_net_neutrality_policy.pdf. 
4.  See, e.g., Net Neutrality: Hearing Before the S. Comm. on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation,  109th  Cong.  2  (2006)  (statement  of  Lawrence Lessig, Professor  of  Law, 
Stanford Law School) (“To oppose access tiering [with content providers], however, is not to 
oppose  all  tiering.  I  believe,  for  example,  that  consumer-tiering  should  be  encouraged. 
Network providers need incentives to build better broadband services. Consumer-tiering would 
provide those incentives.”). 
5.  See Opinion of the Cal. Attorney Gen. on Competitive Effects of Proposed Merger 
of Verizon Commc’ns, Inc. & MCI, Inc., Cal. PUC Dkt No. 05-04-020 (2005), available at
http://www.cpuc.ca.gov/word_pdf/news_release/49697.pdf. Thus, this analysis will focus only 
on the potential effects of imposing such restrictions on access networks. 
6.  H.R. 5273, 109th Cong. § 2(10) (2006) [hereinafter H.R. 5273]. 
SDK Library service:C# TIFF: How to Convert TIFF File to PDF Document in C# Project
buttons, form fields and video can be inserted into a PDF file attachments can be added to existing PDF document and Convert TIFF to Adobe PDF in C#.NET Demo.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library service:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
converting PDF document file into HTML webpage new PDFDocument(@"C:\input.pdf"); pdf.ConvertToVectorImages(ContextType Description: Convert to html/svg files and
www.rasteredge.com
538 
J. ON TELECOMM. & HIGH TECH. L. 
[Vol. 5
to utilize their broadband service.”
7
With respect to content providers, 
the bill would require that access providers “not discriminate in favor of 
itself  in  the  allocation,  use,  or  quality  of  broadband  services  or 
interconnection  with  other  broadband  networks.”
8
In  addition,  access 
providers must ensure that unaffiliated content is delivered “at least equal 
to  the  speed  and  quality  of  service  that  the  operator’s content, 
applications, or service is accessed and offered, and without interference 
or surcharges on the basis of such content, applications, or services.”
9
Finally,  “if  the  broadband  network  provider  prioritizes  or  offers 
enhanced quality of service to data of a particular type, [then it must] 
prioritize or  offer  enhanced  quality of  service  to  all  data  of that  type 
(regardless of the origin of such data) without imposing a surcharge or 
other consideration for such prioritization or quality of service.”
10
The 
bill defines a “broadband network provider” as “a person or entity that 
owns,  controls,  or  resells,  facilities  used  in  the  transmission  of  a 
broadband  service  and  includes  any  affiliate,  joint venture  partner,  or 
agent of such provider.”
11
Note that there is no distinction between an 
access provider and a backbone provider—both backbone networks and 
access networks are comprised of “facilities used in the transmission of a 
broadband service.” Hence, enhanced QoS provided at either the access 
level  or  the  backbone  level  for  a  fee  by  an  access  provider  would 
presumably be prohibited under this bill. Indeed, because the bill defines 
“broadband  service”  as  “two-way  transmission  capability  that  . . . 
enables the user to access content, applications, and services,”
12
the bill 
could implicate any supplier along the bit stream, including a supplier of 
enhanced  QoS  like  Akamai.  An  important  exception  to  the  non-
discrimination provision contained in H.R. 5273 is that access providers 
may  “offer  varying  levels  of  transmission  speed  or  bandwidth,”
13
presumably to both end-users and content providers. Nonetheless, under 
H.R. 5273, access providers  cannot offer different  levels of  QoS,  and 
they cannot set a price for enhanced QoS. 
Another “net neutrality” bill, S. 2360, similarly would prevent an 
access provider from discriminating in the provision of QoS to content 
providers,
14
and it would ban any charges for QoS.
15
But S. 2360 also 
7.  Id. § 4(a)(2). 
8.  Id. § 4(a)(5) (emphasis added). 
9.  Id. § 4(a)(6) (emphasis added). 
10.  Id. § 4(a)(7) (emphasis added). 
11.  Id. § 4(e)(1). 
12.  H.R. 5273, 109th Cong. § 4(e)(2) (2006). 
13.  Id. § 4(b)(2). 
14.  S. Res. 2360, 109th Cong. § 4(a)(6) (2006) (An access provider must “treat all data 
traveling over or on communications in a non-discriminatory way”). 
15.  Id. § 4(a)(4) (An access provider must “offer communications such that a subscriber 
can access, and a content provider can offer, unaffiliated content or applications or services in 
2007] 
UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES 
539 
would  deny  an  access  provider  from  discriminating  against  either  a 
content provider or  end-user with respect to bandwidth.
16
Another net 
neutrality  bill,  S.  2917,  would  prevent  an  access  provider  from 
discriminating against a content provider with respect to bandwidth or 
QoS.
17
Access providers could offer prioritization to end-users but could 
not impose a fee for such service.
18
In  December  2006,  the  FCC  approved  an  $86  billion  merger 
between AT&T and BellSouth, two large providers of DSL service in 
non-overlapping  territories.
19
Two  FCC  commissioners  would  not 
approve  the  merger  unless  AT&T  promised  to  abide  by  several 
conditions,  one  of  which  concerned  network  neutrality.  Under  the 
network  neutrality  condition,  AT&T  agreed  to  conduct  business  in 
accordance with the principles set out in the FCC’s Policy Statement for 
a period of 30 months.
20
In particular, the condition required that AT&T 
not provide or sell any service that “privileges, degrades or prioritizes 
any  packet  transmitted  over  AT&T/BellSouth’s  wireline  broadband 
Internet access service based on its source, ownership or destination.”
21
Three provisions in the merger commitments narrowed the scope of 
the network neutrality conditions. First, the requirement did not apply to 
service  available  only  to  enterprise  customers,  including  VPN  and 
managed-IP services.
22
Second, the requirement applied only from “the 
network side of the customer premise equipment up to and including the 
Internet Exchange Point closest to the customer’s premise . . . .”
23
This 
implies  that  the  merged  entity  has  the  right  to  offer  prioritization  to 
content providers at portions of its network just beyond the network side 
of the customer premise equipment such as edge services.
24
Third, the 
the  same  manner  that  content  of  the  network  operator  is  accessed  and  offered,  without 
interference or surcharges”). 
16.  Id. § 4(a)(2) (An access provider must “not discriminate in favor of itself or any 
other person, including any affiliate or company with which such operator has a business 
relationship in—(A) allocating bandwidth”). 
17.  S. Res. 2917, 109th Cong. § 12(a)(4)(A) (2006) [hereinafter S. 2917]. 
18.  Id. § 12(a)(5). 
19.  Press  Release,  FCC,  FCC  Approves  Merger  of  AT&T  Inc.  and  Bellsouth 
Corporation 
(Dec. 
29, 
2006), 
available 
at 
http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DOC-269275A1.pdf. 
20.  Letter  from Robert  W.  Quinn  Jr., Senior  Vice  President, AT&T  Servs. Inc. to 
Marlene H. Dortch, Sec’y FCC, in Response to Notice of Ex Parte Communication in Review 
of AT&T Inc. and BellSouth Corp. Application for Consent to Transfer of Control, WC Dkt. 
No. 
06-74 
(Dec. 
28, 
2006), 
available 
at
http://www.fcc.gov/ATT_FINALMergerCommitments12-28.pdf. 
21.  Id. at 8. 
22.  Id. at 9. 
23.  Id. at 8. 
24.  See, e.g.,  FTC  Able  to  Address  Broadband  Discrimination,  Majoras  Says,  TR
D
AILY
, Jan. 9, 2007 (“The network geography to which this applies is between the end user 
and the first network server reached . . . . Things that happen upstream [under agreements with 
540 
J. ON TELECOMM. & HIGH TECH. L. 
[Vol. 5
commitment  does  not  apply  to  AT&T’s  Internet  Protocol  television 
service, which is expected to compete against cable television and direct 
broadcast satellite service.
25
FCC  Chairman  Kevin  Martin  supported  the  AT&T-BellSouth 
merger, but not the concessions relating to network neutrality. In his joint 
statement  of dissent  with Commissioner Deborah Taylor  Tate, Martin 
supported the merger for enabling a wider array of IP-enabled services 
for customers and faster speed of broadband deployment in the BellSouth 
region.
26
But  Martin  argued  that  the  condition  involving  network 
neutrality  was  not  merger-related  and  he  expressed  concern  that  the 
network  neutrality  condition  might  deter  facilities  investment,  thus 
creating  a  major  obstacle  to  the  FCC’s  key  goal  of  broadband 
deployment to all Americans.
27
Martin also explained that the provision 
would in  no  way  bind the  FCC  in future  decisions  regarding Internet 
policy.
28
Following on the heels of the merger approval and AT&T’s merger 
commitments, on January 6, 2007, Senators Byron Dorgan and Olympia 
Snowe  reintroduced  network  neutrality  legislation.
29
According  to 
Senator Snowe, “[t]he reintroduction of this legislation and the FCC’s 
imposition  of  net  neutrality  conditions  as  part  of  the  merger  are 
significant  victories  in  the  fight  to  ensure  nondiscrimination  on  the 
Internet.”
30
The  reintroduced  bill  was  identical  to  the  original  bill 
introduced in 2006. Thus, the bill would prevent any contracting between 
access  providers and content providers.   That provision would greatly 
expand the common meaning of “non-discrimination,” which typically 
would  require  that  an  offering  to  an  affiliated  content  provider  be 
extended  to  non-affiliated  content  providers.
31
 Moreover,  the 
reintroduced bill appeared to ignore the limitations in the scope of the 
network  neutrality  provisions  contained  in  the  AT&T  merger 
commitments. 
carriers] are fair game.”). 
25.  Quinn, supra note 20, at 9. 
26.  See  Press  Release,  FCC  Joint  Statement  of  Chairman  Kevin  J.  Martin  and 
Commissioner Deborah Taylor Tate in AT&T Inc. and  BellSouth Corporation Application for 
Transfer  of  Control,  WC  Dkt.  No.  06-74  (Oct.  29,  2006),  available  at
http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DOC-269275A2.pdf. 
27.  Id. at 2. 
28.  Id.
29.  Dorgan, Snowe Take Another Stab at Net Neutrality Legislation, TR D
AILY
, Jan. 9, 
2007.
30.  Id.
31.  See, e.g., ‘Nondiscrimination’ Will Become Focus of Net Neutrality Debate, Martin 
Says, TR D
AILY
, Jan. 10, 2007 (explaining that the FCC traditionally has meant by “‘non-
discrimination’  that  a  carrier  had  to  offer the  same  deal  to all  customers,  but some  net 
neutrality advocates seem to use the term to mean that broadband Internet access providers 
cannot charge content providers” any price). 
2007] 
UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES 
541 
Thus,  the  reintroduced  network  neutrality  legislation  is  more 
restrictive than the  AT&T  merger  commitments  in  the  sense  that  the 
legislation  forbids  an  access  provider’s  contracting  with  content 
providers  at  any  portion  of  the  network,  whereas  the  AT&T  merger 
commitments  tolerate  an  access  provider’s  contracting  with  content 
providers  beyond the Internet exchange  point nearest to the  customer. 
This  is  not  to  say  that  the  merger  commitments  relating  to  network 
neutrality  will  not  impose  costs  on  AT&T  and  society.  Efficient 
contracting for prioritization that could occur between “the network side 
of  the  customer  premise  equipment  up  to  and  including  the  Internet 
Exchange Point closest to the customer’s premise”
32
—and the associated 
welfare gains that could flow from such contracting—will be prohibited 
under the merger commitments. The mere fact that, at the time of merger 
approval, such contracting had yet to occur at that portion of the access 
provider’s network (yet had occurred beyond that portion of the network) 
does not imply that such contracting could not occur in the subsequent 30 
month period. 
C.  A Guide to the Debate 
According to net neutrality proponents, any surcharge for enhanced 
QoS would impair an unaffiliated content provider’s ability to compete 
in the upstream content market.
33
For example, an unaffiliated content 
provider might be denied the same QoS as that offered to an affiliated 
provider, or an unaffiliated content provider might be offered the same 
QoS at a higher price than that offered to an affiliated content provider.
34
Net neutrality proponents also argue that surcharges for enhanced QoS 
would deter entry among upstart content providers by reducing expected 
profits.
35
We analyze those anticompetitive claims in Part II.C. 
Finally, net neutrality proponents argue that the  mere offering  of 
enhanced  QoS to  any content provider (affiliated or not)  implicitly or 
explicitly  degrades  the  effective  QoS  received  by  all  other  content 
providers.
36
This position, of course, could be correct only to the extent 
32.  Quinn, supra note 20, at 8. 
33.  See, e.g., Lawrence Lessig & Robert W.  McChesney,  No Tolls on the Internet,
W
ASH
.P
OST
, June 8, 2006, at A23. 
34.  It  generally  does  not  matter  to net  neutrality  proponents  whether the  affiliated 
provider  offers  content  that competes with the unaffiliated content.  They  argue that  QoS 
preference for any traffic necessarily discriminates against all other traffic.
35.  Ben Klemens, Net Neutrality Fosters Competition Between Technologies, S
CRIPPS 
H
OWARD 
N
EWS 
S
ERVICE
,
Aug. 
17, 
2006,
http://www.shns.com/shns/g_index2.cfm?action=detail&pk=NET-NEUTRALITY-08-17-06. 
36.  Net  Neutrality:  Hearing  Before  the  S.  Comm.  on  Commerce,  Science,  and 
Transportation,  109th  Cong.  8  (2006)  (statement  of  Lawrence Lessig, Professor  of  Law, 
Stanford University) (“Thus, working with the network provider, large video companies could 
secure sufficient provisioning to enable their content to be served while leaving insufficient 
542 
J. ON TELECOMM. & HIGH TECH. L. 
[Vol. 5
that overall broadband network capacities  are  constant and no content 
application ever tries to absorb more than its fair share of capacity—both 
counterfactual assumptions. Broadband access network capacities have 
been growing rapidly over the past several years,
37
and many popular 
applications seek to absorb all available access bandwidth.
38
Thus, the 
analogy of unaffiliated content providers being relegated to the “digital 
equivalent of a winding dirt road”
39
is hyperbole. Such providers likely 
will continue to have more and more access to bandwidth available to 
them year after year. And for the same reason as painting a stripe down 
the middle of a road to create two lanes is likely to speed all traffic (no 
driver  is  permitted  to  hog  both  lanes  by  driving  down  the  middle), 
offering  enhanced QoS  to some  content providers  at  a  surcharge may 
even benefit content providers that decline the option. 
Against  these  alleged  costs,  one  must  weigh  the  social  benefits 
associated  with  permitting access providers to offer enhanced QoS  to 
content providers at a positive price.
40
Net neutrality proponents speak of 
enhanced  QoS  as  if  it  were  a  hypothetical  offering  that  would  be 
employed  by  an  access  provider  for  anticompetitive  reasons  only.  In 
reality, enhanced QoS offerings at certain layers of the networks for both 
end-users  (primarily  enterprise  customers)  and  content  providers  are 
already prevalent in the marketplace, presumably because some (but not 
all)  customers  value  those  services.  Access  providers  are  considering 
extending QoS offerings more broadly through their networks.
41
Because 
these  QoS offerings  at  service  application layers  of the  network have 
bandwidth to other competitors.”). 
37.  Cable Broadband Prices Stable; Video Rates Increase, C
OMM
.D
AILY
, Oct. 2, 2006 
(“Transmission speeds rose at major operators. Cablevision raised download speeds 50% for 
Optimum  Online customers  this year to  15 Mbps and doubled upload speeds to 2 Mbps 
maximum . . . . Prices haven’t risen in 3 years, said a Cablevision spokesman. Road Runner 
download speeds top out at 10 Mbps, compared with 1.5 Mbps in 1996, TW said. Comcast 
increased online speeds 4 times and added many features at no charge the past 3 years, said a 
spokeswoman.”). 
38.  For a discussion of how Skype supernodes may saturate users’ connections, see
Juha  Saarinen,  Skype  Supernodes  Sap  Bandwith,  C
OMPUTERWORLD
, Oct.  25,  2005,   
http://www.computerworld.co.nz/news.nsf/news/7AB67323D6305E49CC2570A1001698C0; 
Posting  of  Om  Malik  to GigaOM,  http://gigaom.com/2006/01/10/skype-the-bandwidth-hog 
(Jan. 10, 2006). 
39.  Lessig & McChesney, supra note 33. 
40.  Other  articles  have  examined  the  consumer welfare  effects  associated with  net 
neutrality provisions. See, e.g., J. Gregory Sidak, A Consumer-Welfare Approach to Network 
Neutrality Regulation of the Internet, 2 J. C
OMPETITION
L. & E
CON
. 349 (2006), available at 
http://jcle.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/2/3/349;  L
ARRY
D
ARBY
 A
M
. C
ONSUMER
I
NST
.,
C
ONSUMER
W
ELFARE
, C
APITAL
F
ORMATION  AND 
N
ET
N
EUTRALITY
: P
AYING FOR 
N
EXT 
G
ENERATION 
B
ROADBAND
N
ETWORKS
(2006), 
available 
at
http://www.theamericanconsumer.org/Net%20Neutrality%20Study.pdf. 
41.  Net neutrality proponents generally have not attacked current QoS offerings, but 
they express immense concern for any expansion of QoS. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested