2007] 
UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES 
553 
only.
79
Critical to this model, however, is the requirement that the firm 
be a monopolist in the tying market.
80
Applied here, proponents of net neutrality typically suggest that the 
local  access  market is  not  competitively  supplied and  that  as a result 
there  is  a  threat  that  the  access  provider  could  foreclose  the 
complementary  content  market.
81
But  although  access  providers  have 
some  power  to  set  price  (that  is,  some  market  power),  there  is  clear 
evidence from marketplace that access providers lack significant power 
over  prices  (that  is,  substantial  market  power  or  monopoly  power). 
Consider, for example, that the price of DSL service from Verizon has 
decreased  from  $49.95  per  month  for  768  kbps  download  speed  in 
2001
82
to $19.99 per month for the same download speed in 2007.
83
The 
price of cable modem service, adjusted on a per Mbps basis, also has 
declined significantly over the same time period.
84
With such substantial 
price declines, it is not reasonable to conclude that access providers have 
significant power to control access prices. Accordingly, a hypothetical 
claim  involving  an  access  provider’s  discriminatory  pricing  of  QoS 
would not likely withstand antitrust scrutiny. 
Another indicator of substantial market power or monopoly power 
is the ability to exclude rivals. But evidence of entry makes clear that this 
market power test  also fails.  According to the  latest broadband report 
issued  by  the  Federal  Communications  Commission  (“FCC”),  cable 
modem  providers,  the  most  popular  form  of  broadband  access 
79.  See Dennis W. Carlton, A General Analysis of Exclusionary Conduct and Refusal to 
Deal - Why Aspen and Kodak Are Misguided, 68 A
NTITRUST
L.J.659,664-65(2001). 
80.  To explain his theory, Carlton used as an example the case of a monopoly resort 
owner. Id. at 667-68.  Guests at the resort, who are required to purchase all meals at the resort, 
are fully exploited by the monopolist. But to the extent that the resort can hold unaffiliated 
restaurants on the island below some minimum viable scale (condition 1) by requiring that 
resort guests purchase all meals at the resort, those unaffiliated restaurants will be forced to 
exit, and the island natives who did not demand a hotel room (condition 2) will be subjected to 
a monopolist in the supply of meals. Notice how Carlton’s model requires that the firm be a 
monopolist  in  the  resort  market,  else  the  resort  would  not  be  able  to  hold  unaffiliated 
restaurants below some minimum viable scale because resort-goers who wanted to eat at those 
restaurants could simply go and stay at another resort without the limitation. 
81.  See  H.R.  5273,  109th  Cong.  §  2.8  (2006)  (“The  overwhelming  majority  of 
residential  consumers  take  broadband  service  from  one  of  only  two  wireline  providers, 
namely, from the cable operator or the local telephone company.”). 
82.  Tom Spring, Verizon Joins Broadband Price Hike Parade, PCW
ORLD
.
COM
, May 2, 
2001, http://www.pcworld.com/resource/article/0,aid,48945,00.asp. 
83.  Verizon 
High 
Speed 
Internet, 
Plans, 
http://www22.verizon.com/ForHomeDSL/channels/dsl/packages/default.asp  (last  visited Feb. 
15, 2007). 
84.  Jim Hu, Comcast to Raise Broadband Speed, CNET N
EWS
.
COM
, Jan. 16, 2005, 
http://news.com.com/2100-1034_3-5537306.html.  Comcast  cable  modem  customers  with 
download speeds of 3 Mbps experienced an increase to 4 Mbps for no additional charge. 
Comcast customers with download speeds of 4 Mbps experienced an increase to 6 Mbps for no 
additional charge. 
Pdf to multi page tiff - Library software component:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
www.rasteredge.com
Pdf to multi page tiff - Library software component:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
554 
J. ON TELECOMM. & HIGH TECH. L. 
[Vol. 5
technology, accounted for just 57.5 percent of all residential high-speed 
lines in the United States as of December 2005, down from 63.2 percent 
in  December 2003.
85
Although these data are gathered  at  the  national 
level,  they  can  be  used  to  roughly  characterize  competition  in  a 
representative or average local broadband market.
86
The rapid decline in 
market share over a span of just two years implies that cable operators 
lack  the  ability  to  exclude  rivals  and  thereby  lack  substantial  market 
power.  Cable  providers  lost  share  primarily  to  DSL  providers,  who 
upgraded  their  networks  and  slashed  prices.  Other  broadband  access 
methods  are  also  growing,  with  satellite  and  wireless  providers 
accounting for over half-a-million broadband connections according to 
the  FCC’s  survey.
87
Moreover,  new  access  technologies,  such  as 
Worldwide  Interoperability  for  Microwave  Access  (“WiMAX”)  and 
broadband over  powerline  (“BPL”), emerged in the  past  few years to 
challenge incumbent broadband providers. WiMax technology began to 
develop  in earnest in August 2006, when Sprint Nextel announced its 
plans to develop and deploy the first fourth generation (“4G”) nationwide 
broadband  mobile  network,  which  will  use  the  mobile  WiMAX 
technology  standard.
88
Working  together  with  Intel,  Motorola,  and 
Samsung,  “Sprint  Nextel  will  develop  a  nationwide  network 
infrastructure . . . that will support advanced wireless broadband services 
for  computing,  portable  multimedia,  interactive  and  other  consumer 
electronic devices.”
89
“The Sprint Nextel 4G mobility network will use 
the  company’s  extensive  2.5GHz  spectrum  holdings,  which  cover  85 
percent of the households in the top 100 U.S. markets .  . . .”
90
Regarding 
BPL, the FCC counted over 5,000 BPL lines as of December 2005
91
—an
impressive number, considering the technology’s brief existence in the 
market.
Most  importantly,  proponents  of  net  neutrality  fail  to  grasp  the 
nexus that compelling content drives the demand for broadband access. 
If real-time applications fail to emerge, then access providers will not be 
able  to  sell  faster  and  more  expensive  (such  as  fiber-to-the-home) 
85.  W
IRELINE
C
OMPETITION
B
UREAU
, F
ED
. C
OMMC
NS
C
OMM
N
, H
IGH
-S
PEED 
S
ERVICES FOR 
I
NTERNET
A
CCESS
:S
TATUS AS OF 
D
ECEMBER
31, 2005 tbl.2 (2006), available 
at  http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DOC-266596A1.pdf  [hereinafter  FCC 
High-Speed Services]. 
86.  Of course, there are some local markets that are served by only one broadband 
provider, in which case national shares are not a good measure of the degree of competition. 
87.  FCC High-Speed Services, supra note 85, at tbl.3. 
88.  Press Release, Sprint Nextel,  Sprint  Nextel Announces  4G Wireless Broadband 
Initiative  with  Intel,  Motorola  and  Samsung  (Aug.  8,  2006),  available  at
http://www2.sprint.com/mr/news_dtl.do?id=12960. 
89.  Id.
90.  Id.
91.  FCC High-Speed Services, supra note 85, at tbl.6. 
Library software component:C# TIFF: C# Code for Multi-page TIFF Processing Using RasterEdge .
com aims at developing professional multi-page Tiff processing SDK adding & deleting Tiff file page, merging and commonly used file formats, like PDF, Bmp, Jpeg
www.rasteredge.com
Library software component:VB.NET Image: Multi-page TIFF Editor SDK; Process TIFF in VB.NET
VB.NET Imaging - Multi-page TIFF Processing in VB. VB.NET TIFF Editor SDK to Process Multi-page TIFF Document Image. Visual C#. VB.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
2007] 
UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES 
555 
connections to end-users. And as we demonstrate below, even if access 
providers were somehow convinced that their profits could be increased 
through  foreclosure,  access  providers  lack  the  ability  to  induce 
unaffiliated content providers to exit the industry or to operate at a less 
efficient scale. 
2.  Access Providers Lack the Ability to Foreclose 
Unaffiliated Content Providers 
Even if they wanted to, access providers cannot easily monopolize, 
let  alone  effectively  compete in, content  markets.  In  this  section,  we 
focus on  the most  likely  content  markets  that access  providers  might 
attempt  to  monopolize—namely,  content  markets  that  are  currently 
profitable  to  serve.  Perhaps the  most  important  submarket  among  the 
profitable Internet content markets is the market for advertiser-supported 
search  engines.  Other  profitable  submarkets  include  online  payment 
systems,  online games,  and  video-sharing websites.  It  bears  emphasis 
that broadband access providers generally have not attempted to enter 
any  of  these  three  Internet  content  submarkets.  The  current  industry 
leaders  for  search  engines  include  Google,  Yahoo!,  Microsoft 
(“MSN.com”),  and  IAC/Interactive  (“Ask.com”).  Google  offers 
advertisers  AdWords,  which  places  advertising  links  next  to  relevant 
search results and  charging  for  clicks  and for  keywords. Google also 
offers AdSense, a system that places “sponsored” links on the web pages 
of newspapers and other publishers that sign up to be part of Google’s 
network. “AdWords and AdSense produced $6.1 billion in revenues for 
Google  [in  2005].”
92
Yahoo!  entered  this  submarket  by  purchasing 
Overture  in  2003  for  $1.6  billion.
93
Microsoft  built  adCenter,  which 
serves  as  the  advertising  system  for  searches  on  MSN.
94
As  of  June 
2006,  The  Economist  estimated  Google’s  market  share  in  search  at 
roughly 50 percent.
95
Online search is characterized by high barriers to 
entry: “[b]ut because barriers to entry in the search business are high—
the engineering talent is limited and data centres that can simultaneously 
support millions of searches are expensive—most analysts think that the 
four big search engines will stay ahead of the tiny ones.”
96
The fact that 
America  Online  (“AOL”),  once  a  leader  in  dial-up  Internet  access, 
permanently outsourced its search technology to Google  indicates that 
barriers to entry in search can impede even established and well-funded 
92.  The Ultimate Marketing Machine, E
CONOMIST
, July 8, 2006, at 61-62.
93.  Id.
94.  Id.
95.  The Un-Google, E
CONOMIST
, June 17, 2006, at 65.
96.  Id.
Library software component:.NET Multipage TIFF SDK| Process Multipage TIFF Files
on Windows Forms applications, upload to SharePoint and save to PDF documents View, edit, insert, delete and mark up pages in multi-page TIFF files; Annotate and
www.rasteredge.com
Library software component:C# TIFF: How to Delete Page(s) from Multi-page TIFF File Using
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET RasterEdge.com offers an advanced multi-page Tiff editing utility, XDoc.Tiff for .NET, which allows
www.rasteredge.com
556 
J. ON TELECOMM. & HIGH TECH. L. 
[Vol. 5
Internet firms.
97
Likewise, Google’s  stock price as  of  March  2007  in 
excess of $450 per share (and resulting market capitalization in excess of 
$140 billion) implies that the barriers to entry to search engines are not 
easily  surmountable.
98
These  barriers  to  entry  would  extend  to  all 
potential entrants in the search submarket, including access providers. 
In addition to the high entry barriers in the content markets, local 
access  providers  have  no  leverage  over national  (and  in  many  cases, 
international) content providers, further undermining the prospect of an 
access provider monopolizing the content markets. At least one of the 
authors has been cited for support of the proposition that Internet content 
providers  are  vulnerable  to  vertical  foreclosure  strategies  in  the  net 
neutrality  debate.
99
But  this  application  of  the  theory  of  vertical 
foreclosure  assumes  incorrectly  that  a  content  provider  is  offering 
content that is particular to a given locality and therefore requires access 
to  a  single  broadband  provider’s  subscribers.  The  vast  majority  of 
Internet content appeals to all U.S. residents, not just the residents of a 
particular  locality.  Thus,  the  relevant  geographic market  for assessing 
hypothetical  foreclosure  strategies  in  broadband  is  conservatively  the 
United States, and more realistically, the world. Because Comcast, the 
largest broadband service provider in the United States, controls access 
to only 23 percent of all broadband subscribers, Comcast lacks the ability 
to induce a content provider from exiting the industry or even operating 
at  an  inefficient  scale.
100
The  next  largest  providers  are  AT&T  and 
Verizon, each with roughly 14 percent of the U.S. market.
101
Moreover, the unique relationship between an unaffiliated Internet 
content provider and an access provider is not conducive to foreclosure 
97.  AOL to Use Google Searches, W
ASH
.P
OST
, May 2, 2002, at E2. 
98.  Yahoo! 
Finance, 
GOOG: 
Summary 
for 
Google,,http://finance.yahoo.com/q?s=GOOG (last visited Mar. 26, 2007). 
99.  See, e.g., Barbara van Schewick, Towards an Economic Framework for Network 
Neutrality Regulation, 5 J.
ON 
T
ELECOMM
.& H
IGH
T
ECH
. L. 329, 334 n.13 (2007) (citing 
Daniel L. Rubinfeld & Hal J. Singer, Vertical Foreclosure in Broadband Access?, 49 J.I
NDUS
.
E
CON
.299 (2001)). 
100. W
IRELINE
C
OMPETITION
B
UREAU
, F
ED
. C
OMMC
NS
C
OMM
N
, H
IGH
-S
PEED 
S
ERVICES FOR 
I
NTERNET 
A
CCESS
:S
TATUS AS OF 
J
UNE
30, 2006 tbl.2 (2007) (providing total 
broadband subscribers), available at http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DOC-
270128A1.pdf;  R
ICHARD
A. B
ILOTTI  ET  AL
., M
ORGAN
S
TANLEY 
R
ESEARCH
,
C
ABLE
/S
ATELLITE
: L
OOKING  INTO 
3Q06
AND 
2007: C
AUTIOUS  ON 
T
OP
L
INE
, C
APITAL
E
XPENDITURES
,
AND 
L
OFTY 
V
ALUATIONS
(2006) (providing Comcast’s subscribers for year 
end 2006). 
101. Press Release, Verizon Investor Relations, Verizon’s 4Q 2006 Results Cap Strong 
Year  of  Organic Growth  in Wireless,  Broadband  and  Business Markets  (Jan.  29,  2007), 
available  at  http://investor.verizon.com/news/view.aspx?NewsID=813;  AT&T  I
NVESTOR 
B
RIEFING
,AT&TP
OSTS
S
TRONG 
T
HIRD
-Q
UARTER
E
ARNINGS
G
ROWTH
;R
ESULTS 
D
RIVEN BY 
W
IRELESS
R
EVENUE
G
AINS  AND 
M
ARGIN
E
XPANSION
, M
ERGER
I
NTEGRATION
P
ROCESS
,
I
MPROVED
B
USINESS
T
RENDS
16 
(2006), 
available 
at
http://www.att.com/Investor/Financial/Earning_Info/docs/3Q_06_IB_FINAL.pdf. 
Library software component:VB.NET TIFF: VB.NET Sample Code to Process & Manage TIFF Page
TIFF pages into a new multi-page TIFF document file VB.NET programming, this TIFF page processing control add & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
Library software component:Process Multipage TIFF Images in Web Image Viewer| Online
images into one; Swap two pages' position in multi-page TIFF images; Convert multi-page TIFF image into scannable PDF; Convert TIFF to
www.rasteredge.com
2007] 
UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES 
557 
strategies. With a few exceptions (such as ESPN360), Internet content is 
not  acquired  by  access  providers  at  a  certain  cost  per  subscriber  per 
month, as is the case with traditional video programming. Setting aside 
the seldom used leased access rules, unaffiliated video content providers 
cannot reach a video distributor’s customers unless the distributor has 
acquired the content from that content provider. By contrast, unaffiliated 
Internet  content  providers  do  not  need  to  reach  an  agreement  with  a 
broadband  access  provider  to  reach  that  access  provider’s  broadband 
customers. Hence, access providers and unaffiliated content providers are 
not likely to get into a carriage dispute arising over price or affiliation. 
Although such disputes are common in the video programming industry, 
and  Congress  has  given  the  FCC  powers  to  prevent  discriminatory 
practices,
102
because Internet content providers do not depend on access 
providers to reach end-users in the same way that video programmers 
depend  on cable  or  DBS  providers,  video  programming is  the  wrong 
framework  for  analyzing  discriminatory  strategies  in  Internet  content 
markets. Even if an access provider were to refuse to supply enhanced 
QoS to an unaffiliated content provider, the only content providers that 
could be affected would be real-time content providers. But even here, 
the refusal to supply enhanced QoS would have to be coordinated across 
multiple  access  providers  to  have  any  meaningful  foreclosure  effect. 
Internet content markets are inherently national in scope. Thus, a content 
provider does not depend on a single local access provider to achieve 
critical  economies  of  scale.  (Contrast  this  with  localized  content  in 
traditional video markets, such as sports programming, that depends on a 
handful of downstream providers to reach critical scale.) Without such 
coordination among broadband access providers, the foreclosed content 
provider could still achieve its efficiencies from the customers of other 
access providers. 
Given the barriers to entry in the Internet content market, the caliber 
of the  firms that currently supply  Internet content (which  implies that 
foreclosure would be very costly), and the unique relationship between 
Internet content providers and access providers, it is difficult to conceive 
how an access provider could leverage its alleged power in broadband 
access  into  the  content  market  by  imposing  a  surcharge  on  content 
providers for enhanced QoS. The last time an Internet service provider 
(“ISP”)  with downstream  market  power (in  this  case, dial-up Internet 
access) tried to build a “walled garden” to leverage its customer base into 
the upstream content market it met with unmitigated disaster.
103
To be 
102. See 47 U.S.C. § 536 (a) (2000). 
103. Wikipedia,  AOL,  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AOL  (last  visited  Feb.  13,  2007) 
(“[AOL] has since attempted to reposition itself as a content provider similar to companies 
such as Yahoo! as opposed to an Internet service provider which delivered content only to 
Library software component:Online Convert PDF file to Tiff. Best free online PDF Tif
C# developers can render and convert PDF document to TIFF image file with no loss in original file quality. Both single page and multi-page Tiff image files
www.rasteredge.com
Library software component:C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Easily manipulate multi-page PDF document file with page inserting, deleting and re-ordering
www.rasteredge.com
558 
J. ON TELECOMM. & HIGH TECH. L. 
[Vol. 5
fair, AOL’s attempt to extend it power into the content market was not 
helped  by  the  ubiquitous  deployment  and  adoption  of  broadband 
technologies, which rendered unaffiliated ISPs less valuable.
104
But even 
before the advent of broadband, AOL failed to extend its considerable 
market power in dial-up Internet access into content markets. There is no 
reason to expect a different outcome for broadband access providers. In 
summary,  access providers  lack  the incentive  and  ability  to foreclose 
unaffiliated content providers. Tiered QoS offerings cannot be motivated 
by anticompetitive reasons. 
III. B
Y
R
EQUIRING 
N
ON
-D
ISCRIMINATION IN THE 
P
ROVISION OF 
Q
O
S,
N
ETWORK
N
EUTRALITY
P
ROPOSALS 
W
OULD
D
ESTROY THE 
S
OCIAL
B
ENEFITS 
A
SSOCIATED WITH 
C
URRENT
T
IERED
Q
O
SO
FFERINGS
In  this  section,  we  provide  a  non-technical  discussion  of  how 
consumer  welfare  could be  decreased  by access providers’ attempt to 
comply  with  the  non-discrimination  provisions  of  the  net  neutrality 
proposals. A technical analysis of the welfare reduction is provided in 
sections  A  and  B.  Readers  who  are  not  technically  inclined  can 
understand  the  mechanism  by  which  consumers  would  be  harmed  in 
what immediately follows. 
Consumers voluntarily purchase enhanced  QoS because the value 
created through this feature exceeds the incremental price. The difference 
between a customer’s willingness to pay for  a feature and  its  price is 
called consumer surplus.  Consumer welfare  is the sum of the  surplus 
across  all  consumers  in  the  market.  In  this  section,  we  examine  the 
consumer  welfare  effects  that  would  flow  from  an  access  provider’s 
likely  response  if  required  to  comply  with  the  non-discrimination 
provisions in the net neutrality proposals. As  explained earlier, online 
video games, streaming multimedia, VoIP, video teleconferencing, alarm 
signaling,  and  safety-critical  applications  such  as  remote  surgery  may 
require  some  level  of  QoS.  For  ease  of  exposition,  we  focus  on  the 
consumer  welfare  effects  for  one  of  the  most  popular  QoS-needy 
applications—online gaming. The same analysis could be applied to any 
other QoS-needy application. 
We consider the consumer welfare effects of an access provider’s 
attempts to comply  with  the  non-discrimination  provisions  relating  to 
QoS under two scenarios. In the first scenario, access providers attempt 
to  comply  with  the  non-discrimination  provision  by  (1)  withdrawing 
their  enhanced  QoS  offerings  entirely  and  (2)  relying  entirely  on 
subscribers in what was termed a ‘walled garden.’”). 
104. See, e.g., Robert W. Crandall & Hal J. Singer, Life Support for Unaffiliated ISPs?,
28 R
EG
.46,49 (2005). 
Library software component:C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
Using this C# .NET PDF rotate page control SDK, you can easily select any page from a multi-page PDF document file, rotate selected PDF page to special
www.rasteredge.com
2007] 
UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES 
559 
bandwidth to accommodate the growth in demand  for Internet traffic. 
This scenario assumes that an access provider could not embed the price 
of some “blended” QoS in a complementary product purchased by the 
content  provider  (the  basis  of  the  second  scenario).  By  withdrawing 
enhanced  QoS  from  the  marketplace,  many  QoS-needy  applications 
would not  function properly,  and  thus  the demand for  those  products 
(and  the  consumer  welfare  associated  with  enjoying  those  products) 
would disappear. In the extreme case, the demand for such applications 
would either disappear entirely or fail to develop. As explained above, 
the proposals define a broadband network provider so broadly that they 
could  limit  QoS  offerings  at  positive  prices  by  non-network  QoS 
suppliers such as Akamai. Even if some non-network QoS suppliers were 
immune  from  the  regulation,  the  demand  for  QoS-needy  applications 
would still shift inwards to the extent that network suppliers can offer 
some level of QoS beyond that offered by non-network suppliers or the 
price  of enhanced  QoS would  increase to  monopoly levels  or both.
105
The effect  would  be  to largely eliminate any  welfare  that is currently 
enjoyed by customers of QoS-needy applications. 
Next, by  relying entirely on an unmanaged network, the monthly 
cost per subscriber would rise to levels that could not be sustained in the 
marketplace. If the cost per subscriber of an unmanaged network were to 
increase to $47 per month, then the monthly subscription fee would need 
to  increase  even  further,  thereby  inducing  a  significant  portion  of 
broadband customers to disconnect from the Internet or seek less costly 
alternatives.  Based  on  estimates  of  the  elasticity  of  demand  for 
broadband  access,  we  attempt  to  estimate  the  percentage  of  existing 
broadband subscribers who would disconnect their services in response 
to such a price increase. 
In the second scenario, we posit that access providers would attempt 
to comply with the non-discrimination provisions by offering a blended, 
one-size-fits-all  QoS offering  to  all content  providers. Because  access 
providers could not explicitly charge for QoS, they would likely provide 
a blended level of QoS  that came standard alongside a (slightly more 
expensive) purchase of Internet access or hosting products—that is, an 
access  provider  would  embed  the  price  of  blended  QoS  in  some 
complementary product. But a uniform level of QoS—even at a lower 
price—would  harm  QoS-needy  content  providers  such  as  Sony  and 
Blizzard by depriving them of the QoS needed to make their applications 
function  properly.  Even  worse,  a  blended  QoS  would  harm  the  vast 
majority of content providers that have no demand for QoS but would 
105. With enhanced QoS capabilities at both the access level and the backbone level, 
however, an access provider could set its content distribution service apart from Akamai’s 
offering. 
560 
J. ON TELECOMM. & HIGH TECH. L. 
[Vol. 5
now  be forced to  pay for  it.  The  theoretical  underpinnings  of  such a 
reaction  (and  the  resulting  reduction  in  consumer  welfare)  have  been 
recently provided by Professors Michael Katz and Benjamin E. Hermalin 
of the University of California at Berkeley.
106
In particular, they examine 
the effects of product-line restrictions in a duopoly (a market supplied by 
two  firms).
107
They  demonstrate  that  a  restriction  of  the  number  of 
products that each firm can offer (applied here, the levels of QoS that can 
be associated with access or hosting service) may lead firms to choose 
the same quality of service (high or low), or it may lead them to choose 
non-overlapping products (high  and low) where they would otherwise 
have engaged in head-to-head competition across all product variants.
108
They  show  that  the  resulting  loss  of  competition  can  harm  both 
consumers  and  economic  efficiency,
109
and  provide  the  following 
intuition:
[t]here  are  two  mechanisms  through  which  a  single-product 
restriction harms  welfare in  our  duopoly  model.  In the  unrestricted 
equilibrium,  both  firms  offer  both  products.  In  the  restricted 
equilibrium,  the  firms  sometimes  offer  identical  products  and 
sometimes  offer  vertically  differentiated  products.  When  the  firms 
offer identical products, the single-product restriction reduces welfare 
by  eliminating  what  would  have  been  efficient  variety.  When  the 
firms  offer  vertically  differentiated  products  the  loss  of  direct 
competition  leads  to  inefficient  reductions  in  consumption  levels. 
Consequently, both consumer and total surplus fall.
110
In summary, total surplus is higher when the two firms compete without 
a single-product restriction than under three  plausible  outcomes (each 
firm chooses high quality, each firm chooses low quality, or one firm 
chooses high and the other choose low) with a single-product restriction. 
The section concludes with a non-technical discussion of the effect 
of a non-discrimination provision on  a content provider’s incentive to 
innovate and on an access provider’s incentive to deploy next-generation 
broadband networks. We  discuss  the implications  of such  competitive 
responses on our nation’s leadership in the broadband industry. 
106. Benjamin  E.  Hermalin  &  Michael  L.  Katz,  The  Economics  of  Product-Line 
Restrictions With an Application to the Network Neutrality Debate (Inst. of Bus. & Econ. 
Research Competition Policy Center, Working Paper No. CPC06-059, 2006), available at
http://repositories.cdlib.org/iber/cpc/CPC06-059/. 
107. Id. at 24-28. 
108. Id. at 28-33. 
109. Id. at 33-34. 
110. Id. at 35. 
2007] 
UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES 
561 
A.  Consumer Welfare Effects: An Access Provider Would be 
Forced to Withdraw or Standardize Its Tiered QoS Offerings 
We posit that an access provider would attempt to comply with a 
non-discrimination provision in the supply of QoS by either withdrawing 
its enhanced QoS offering from the marketplace or by replacing its tiered 
QoS offerings with a one-size-fits-all or “blended” QoS offering. Under 
either  scenario,  consumer  welfare  associated  with  the  purchase  of 
enhanced  QoS  would  be  largely  eliminated.  To  make  our  analysis 
concrete,  we  consider  the  demand  for  enhanced  QoS  by  content 
providers that supply online multiplayer video games. A similar analysis 
could be performed for other content providers. 
1.  Consumer Losses Associated with Withdrawal of Current 
Tiered QoS Offerings 
The net neutrality proposals in Congress would effectively establish 
a market price of zero for enhanced QoS. To the extent that QoS can be 
considered  a  standalone  product  offering  (that  is,  a  complementary 
offering  to  hosting and access),  one can analyze an  access  provider’s 
decision  to  offer  QoS  under  the  standard  shut-down  decision  in 
economics.  According to the Markey  bill, if  an access  provider gives 
priority or  offers enhanced QoS “to  data of a  particular type,  [then it 
must] prioritize or offer enhanced quality of service to all data of that 
type (regardless of the origin of such data) without imposing a surcharge
or  other consideration  for such prioritization  or quality of service.”
111
Content providers that did not yet contract for QoS could demand free 
QoS from access providers.  Although  the  provision  would  not nullify 
existing  contracts  for  QoS  between  access  providers  and  content 
providers, a content provider that previously contracted for QoS would 
likely demand to renegotiate its terms after learning that its rivals were 
getting  the  same  QoS  for  free.  The  classic  shut-down  decision  in 
economics is to withdraw from supplying a service if the price is less 
than the average variable cost of supplying that service.
112
As explained 
above, the average variable cost of providing QoS is the opportunity cost 
of carrying a given traffic stream and thus exceeds zero.
113
Hence, it is 
111. H.R. 5273, 109th Cong. § 4(a)(7) (2006) (emphasis added).
112. D
ENNIS
W. C
ARLTON
& J
EFFREY 
M. P
ERLOFF
, M
ODERN
I
NDUSTRIAL 
O
RGANIZATION
60 (1990). 
113. These costs have been quantified. See Qiong Wang, Jon M. Peha & Marvin A. 
Sirbu, Optimal Pricing for Integrated Services Networks, in I
NTERNET 
E
CONOMICS
353-76 
(Joseph P. Bailey & Lee W. McKnight eds., 1997). See also Hermalin & Katz, supra note 106, 
at 19 (“Some participants in the network neutrality debate have argued that increased quality is 
essentially  costless,  at  least  up  to  some  point.  We  doubt  the  empirical  validity  of  this 
562 
J. ON TELECOMM. & HIGH TECH. L. 
[Vol. 5
reasonable to assume that an access provider would withdraw its QoS 
offering from the market entirely to comply with the non-discrimination 
provision.
114
F
IGURE
1: C
ONSUMER 
W
ELFARE
L
OSS OF 
O
NLINE 
G
AMERS 
A
SSOCIATED WITH 
E
LIMINATION OF 
E
NHANCED 
Q
O
SO
FFERING
$141 
Demand for Online Game 
with High QoS 
Annual  
Subscription 
Fee 
Supply of 
Online Gaming 
With High QoS 
10.2 
U.S. Online Game 
Subscribers 
(millions) 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested