generate pdf in mvc using itextsharp : How to convert pdf file to tiff format Library SDK class asp.net wpf azure ajax July%20Aug20050-part1540

Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 289-294
Kothari et al. Infective Endocarditis - An Indian Perspective 289
Infective Endocarditis – An Indian Perspective
SS Kothari, S Ramakrishnan, VK Bahl
Department of Cardiology, All India Institute of  Medical Sciences, New Delhi
Editorial
Correspondence: Dr VK Bahl, Professor of Cardiology
All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029
e-mail: vkbahl2002@yahoo.com
I
nfective endocarditis (IE) continues to remain a serious
challenge despite  several advances in its diagnosis  and
treatment.
1-4 
Neither the  incidence nor the mortality rate
of  IE has declined significantly, although the pattern of the
disease appears to be changing globally.
5-8
The changes in
the host, agent, and environment in this disease mandate
regular reappraisal of the management strategies. Further,
increasing  subspecializations  among  physicians have
created  barriers that are most evident in  diseases like IE.
Thus,  despite several published guidelines, errors are not
infrequent in the management of patients with IE even in
the Western world.
9-12
The situation in India is even more
complex because of a double burden of ‘traditional’ as well
as ‘modern’ IE. In India, a  typical ‘Oslerian IE’ patient with
clubbing, splenomegaly, prolonged fever and vegetation on
a rheumatic valve is not as uncommon as in the West. On
the other hand, IE in  the elderly, immunocompromised,
patients with renal failure or diabetes is being increasingly
encountered, and also perhaps often missed. Further, the
lack  of   optimal microbiological  support  encourages
empirical and sometimes unintelligent use of antibiotics
that  are widely and freely available. In such  a scenario,
guidelines based on Western patient population or Western
set ups are unlikely to be directly relevant to our country.
In this article, we highlight selected aspects of  IE and focus
mainly on  the errors in the management  with a view to
heighten their awareness. Detailed reviews on IE have been
published recently.
1-4
Infective Endocarditis in India
The estimated incidence of IE in  the Western population
has  remained  unchanged over the past  two decades  at
1.7 -  6.2 cases per  100,000 patient years,
13-14
but such
estimates are not available from India. Even assuming the
lowest incidence, at least 17,000 episodes  of  IE must be
occurring per year in India. From the published series,
15-18
it is apparent, as may be expected, that IE in India occurs in
relatively young patients with  underlying rheumatic  and
congenital heart diseases (Table 1). The blood culture is
negative in high proportion of cases, the diagnosis is often
delayed, and the mortality is substantial. How far the oft-
quoted changes in the face of endocarditis (i.e. changes in
the causative organisms, patient profile and outcomes) have
occurred in India is not clearly known.
Table 1. A comparison of  Indian and  Western  series of
infective endocarditis
Characteristics
Indian Series
Western Series
Choudhury
Garg et al.
15
Metanalysis 
2
EHS
12
et al. 16
Duration
1981-91
1992-2001
1993-2003
Apr – July
2001
Episodes
190
198
3784
159
Age (years)
25±1.2
27.6±12.7
36-69
56±17
Identifiable preceding
event (portal of entry)
(%)
15
16.6
NA
41-48
Predisposing condition
RHD (%)
42
46.9
NA
NA
CHD (%)
33
28.6
NA
NA
PVE (%)
1
10.4
7-25
26
IV drug abuse (%) 0.5
0
15
NA
Echo positive (%)
64
89.9
NA
82
Blood culture
positive (%)
47
67.7
90
86
Surgery for IE (%)
1
23
25-40
52
In-hospital
mortality (%)
25
21
16
12.6
EHS: European heart survey; RHD: rheumatic heart disease; CHD: congenital heart disease;
PVE: prosthetic valve endocarditis; IV: intravenous
Errors in the Diagnosis of  Infective Endocarditis
The errors in the diagnosis of IE largely stem from either
not thinking about  the disease comprehensively, or from
the lack  of  availability or misinterpretation of  laboratory
investigations on the part of physicians. Majority of patients
seen in  clinical  practice  do  not manifest  all the classical
signs of endocarditis. The diagnosis is often delayed when
the weight loss, anemia, joint pain or back ache etc., rather
than fever are the presenting complaints. Thus, a high index
of  clinical suspicion and early investigation of  those at risk
are required, though  surveys of  contemporary  practice
reveal consistent failure in this regard.
9-12
The major errors
are  the low use of  key  diagnostic  tools including echo-
cardiography and blood cultures, and  indiscriminate use
of  antibiotics prior to obtaining blood culture.
Blood  cultures:  Nearly  a  third  to  half   the  patients
presenting with previously diagnosed heart disease and
EDITORIAL.p65
11/15/2005, 4:19 PM
289
How to convert pdf file to tiff format - SDK control API:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
www.rasteredge.com
How to convert pdf file to tiff format - SDK control API:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
290 Kothari et al. Infective Endocarditis - An Indian Perspective
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 289-294
fever are prescribed antibiotics without a proper diagnostic
work-up,  even  in Europe.
9-12
A  higher  percentage  of
negative blood cultures in our patients is the result of prior
antibiotic use.
5-16
In patients already on antibiotics, the yield
of  blood cultures can be enhanced by diluting the culture
broth  and  adding  sodium  polyanetholsulfonate  or  a
dedicated adsorbent  resin,  both of  which  inactivate
antimicrobial effects.
19
A structured delay in the initiation
of  antibiotics for 3 - 5 days can increase the diagnostic yield
and improve the outcomes.
20 
However, such practices are
rarely followed. A negative  blood culture  not only delays
the diagnosis, but also misclassifies the patient precluding
appropriate antibiotics. The management approach  to a
patient with  negative  blood culture  resulting  from poor
microbiological techniques should be quite different from
that of a patient having culture negativity due to atypical
organisms.  In  negative blood  culture cases,  IE  due to
atypical organisms  should specially  be  considered  in
patients with  indwelling  venous lines,  prosthetic
valves,
pacemakers, renal failure, immunocompromised states and
during postpartum.
19
While IE with  unusual organisms
must be kept in  the  mind, one should also avoid wasting
resources and time in getting anaerobic and fungal cultures
routinely without  a clinical  background.  Also,  it  is
noteworthy  that despite a large  agricultural population,
and large livestock and zoonosis, IE with Coxiella, Brucella,
and  Salmonella typhimurium  are rarely  diagnosed  and
perhaps missed in India.
A false positive blood culture is also not uncommon and
leads  to  difficulties  in  diagnosis.  Bacteremia  in  the
hospitalized  patients  should be viewed  with  suspicion,
but per se does not diagnose IE in the absence of evidence
for endocardial involvement. Enterococcal and staphylococcal
bacteremia can occur in hospitalized patients in the absence
of  IE, but bacteremia  in  the  absence of  an  identifiable
focus is more likely to result from IE. Nearly 12% of  patients
with staphylococcal  bacteremia  develop IE in  adults and
children,
21, 22
but as  high as 50% of  the  patients with
staphylococcal bacteremia associated with prosthetic valve
ultimately develop IE and hence, all these patients should
be specifically screened for IE.
22, 23
The recent guidelines 
3
have included staphylococcal aureus bacteremia as a major
criterion even if the infection is nosocomially acquired and
even with a removable source of infection.
Echocardiography: Echocardiography remains central to
the diagnosis of IE, but is not immune to errors. Both false
positive and false negative diagnoses do occur. The common
differential diagnosis in our patients includes nodules due
to acute rheumatic fever, ruptured chordae, myxomatous
degeneration, and thrombus or sutures in  post-operative
patients. The other causes of  vegetation-like  structures
include neoplasia (atrial myxoma, marantic endocarditis,
papillary  fibroelastoma,  and  carcinoid), autoimmune
diseases  (systemic  lupus  erythematosus,  Wegener’s
granulomatosis,
24 
Behçet’s disease, and eosinophilic heart
disease)  and  even  normal  structures  like  Chiari
malformation, and Lambl’s excrescences.
3
On  the other
hand, vegetations  may  be missed because  of poor  echo
window,  small size of  vegetations  or after embolization.
Uncommonly, IE may cause ulcers, pseudoaneurysms etc.
but no vegetations.
25 
No investigation is 100% sensitive and
specific,  and generally the  sensitivity  of  transthoracic
echocardiography (TTE) is reported to be 40 - 63%.
26 
The
sensitivity of TTE depends on image quality,
echogenicity,
size and  location of  vegetation, presence
of   previous
valvular disease or valvular prosthesis, and the skill of the
echocardiographer.  Clearly,  transesophageal  echo-
cardiography (TEE) is superior with a reported sensitivity
of 90 -100%.
26 
The recent guidelines
have increased the
emphasis on TEE, but TEE is not as widely available in India.
An  approach  advocating  TTE  in  all  patients  with
intermediate or high clinical probability of IE, followed by
TEE in only patients with poor echo window or prosthetic
valves or a  negative TTE with  a high  index of  clinical
suspicions  seems  appropriate  for  our  country.  The
indiscriminate use of echocardiography is not cost effective
and may also lead to false positive diagnosis of IE.
27
Modified  Dukes  criteria:  The recent ACC guidelines
3
recommend the  use  of  modified  Dukes  criteria  as  the
primary scheme for the diagnosis of IE. The sensitivity of
these  criteria  has  never  been  tested  in  the  Indian
population. In  the  absence of positive blood cultures  and
limited echo  availability (two of  the major criteria),  the
utility of modified Duke’s criteria for the diagnosis of IE in
Indian  setting  is  likely to  be  diminished. Inclusion  of
elevated  erythrocyte  sedimentation  rate  or  C-reactive
protein (CRP), the presence of newly diagnosed clubbing,
splenomegaly, and microscopic hematuria as minor criteria
has been shown to increase the sensitivity by 10% without
significant loss of specificity in the Western setting.
28 
Such
inclusions  may  be  more  appropriate  in  our  patient
population  because  of  larger  number  of   patients
manifesting these criteria,
15 
but they have not been part of
modified Dukes criteria scheme.
Recent advances in the diagnosis: Several advances in
the identification of  causative organism in blood or tissues
by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), molecular methods
or immunological techniques have been reported, but are
generally not available in our country. 
2,3,29
Such tests are
EDITORIAL.p65
11/15/2005, 4:19 PM
290
SDK control API:How to C#: File Format Support
Concept. File Format Supported. Load, Save Document. Preview Document. Conversion. Convert PowerPoint to PDF. Convert PowerPoint to HTML5. Convert PowerPoint to
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control API:C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
forms, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET load a program with an incorrect format", please check use this sample code to convert PDF file to Png
www.rasteredge.com
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 289-294
Kothari et al. Infective Endocarditis - An Indian Perspective 291
particularly useful for atypical organisms like  C burnetii,
Brucella, Bartonella, Chlamydia, Mycoplasma, and Legionella.
Histological  examination  of  valve  tissue  occasionally
identifies completely unsuspected IE, and  has been reported
in  nearly 1%  of   all resected  valves.
30 
Interestingly,  a
biochemical test for IE, like brain natriuretic peptide (BNP)
for  heart  failure, is being  envisaged.  Procalcitonin,  a
circulating calcitonin precursor, has been  shown  as  a
marker of  systemic
bacterial infections including  IE. A
single estimated level of  >  2.3 ng/ml of  procalcitonin
among patients with suspected IE had a sensitivity of 81%
and a specificity of  85% in diagnosing definite IE.
31
Errors in the Treatment of Infective Endocarditis
The major lacuna in the treatment of IE is usually the less
than optimal application of comprehensive expertise in the
routine  care  of  an individual  patient.  Wrong  choice of
antibiotics,  delay  in  identifying  the  complications,
procrastinating for surgical treatment, and not attending
to the portal of entry of infection are among the commonly
seen clinical errors. Known complications of IE should be
anticipated and preempted as much as possible. The issues
of hemodynamic deterioration, extension of infection, and
risks of  embolic events should be prospectively addressed,
at least in the mind.
Choice  of  antibiotics:  In  the absence of  information
regarding the bacterial sensitivity to antibiotics, minimum
inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the drugs, or prevailing
antibiotic resistance patterns in the community, empirical
choice of  antibiotics has to be made. This should be based
on thoughtful individual assessment, and not as a ‘sledge
hammer’ approach with combination of newer agents. A
tentative  guess  about  the  causative  organism  and
appropriately tailored therapy should be planned keeping
in mind that 85% of IE is caused by streptococci, staphylococci
or  enterococci.
1-3 
The  knowledge,  such  as  penicillin
resistance in  streptococcus viridans requiring higher doses
of penicillin for the treatment, or vancomycin resistance
in  enterococci  requiring  linezolid,
32 
need continuous
updating and close liaison with microbiologists or infectious
disease experts.
Monitoring  of  the  therapeutic  response:   A close
monitoring of the trends of  the  disease  is vital to identify
the  complications early  and treat  them  optimally. A
responsive patient typically  becomes  afebrile in  3-4  days
and the blood cultures become negative within a week.
33
Persistent fever during the illness is a common problem that
tests the acumen  of  the  clinician.  It  may result  from
uncontrolled infection,  metastatic  abscesses,  mycotic
aneurysms, infected central lines,  organ infarction, drug
hypersensitivity, superinfection, or a misdiagnosis  (Table
2).
33 
Persistent fever in a patient infected  by an antibiotic
sensitive organism is usually due to a paravalvular abscess,
until
proved otherwise.
33
Table 2. Common causes of  fever during IE treatment 
3,33
Causes
Comment
Uncontrolled Infection
Wrong choice of antibiotics; virulent or resistant organism; lack of attention to portal of entry
Paravalvular abscess
Common cause; TEE and early surgery needed; Q fever to be ruled out if large abscess is associated with an
indolent course 34
Drug sensitivity
Often occurs in the third week of therapy; may be associated with skin rash or blood eosinophilia, but mostly
such manifestations are absent; and may necessitate a change in the prescribed antibiotic regimen
Mycotic aneurysms
Recognition in asymptomatic stage difficult; may occur after completion of treatment; aseptic
(cerebral, pulmonary)
meningitis common; coil embolization, clipping or resection may be required; right-sided IE may result in
pulmonary mycotic aneurysms that are diagnosed by CT angiography
Splenic abscess
Splenic infarcts common (40% of left-sided IE), but abscess rare (< 5%); often asymptomatic; left flank, back,
or left upper quadrant pain suggestive; CT or MRI abdomen diagnostic; requires splenectomy (either open or
laparoscopic)
Infected central lines
Common cause of recurrence of fever; if suspected, lines to be removed and the tips sent for culture
sensitivity; appropriate additional antibiotics may be needed; recolonization with another organism may
rarely occur
Superinfection,
Unusual; may occur in intravenous drug abusers; intelligent microbiological analysis required;
multiple organisms
surgery may be considered
Immunological reasons
Manifests as progressive renal failure; blood cultures may be sterile and a change of antibiotic often does not
help; valve surgery leads to arrest in the progressive renal damage and often results in clinical
improvement35
Wrong/additional diagnosis
Autoimmune diseases, malignancy, infections like tuberculosis, or rarely IE and another illness together
TEE: transesophageal echocardiography; IE: infective endocarditis; CT: computerized tomography; MRI: magnetic resonance imaging
EDITORIAL.p65
11/15/2005, 4:19 PM
291
SDK control API:How to C#: File Format Support
to Start. Basic SDK Concept. File Format Supported. Load, Save Document. Preview Document. Conversion. Convert Word to PDF. Convert Word to HTML5. Convert Word
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control API:C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
to convert PDF document into SVG image format. Here is a brief introduction to SVG image. SVG, short for scalable vector graphics, is a XML-based file format
www.rasteredge.com
292 Kothari et al. Infective Endocarditis - An Indian Perspective
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 289-294
Complications  of   infective  endocarditis:  The
complications i.e. mycotic aneurysms  and  pulmonary
pseudoaneurysms in right-sided endocarditis, and splenic
abscess should be carefully considered during the course
of   the  illness.  Mycotic  aneurysms  result  from septic
embolization of vegetations to either the vasa vasorum or
the  intraluminal  space  of  any  artery,  but are mostly
recognized  in the  cerebral  circulation.
The  clinical
recognition  of  intracranial  mycotic  aneurysms
is very
difficult, as often there are no premonitory findings before
a  sudden  intracranial  hemorrhage.  A  high  index  of
suspicion is required and any headache in a patient of IE,
particularly  if  lateralized,  should be investigated.
1,3
The
incidence of  mycotic aneurysms  is  somewhat  higher in
India, due primarily to the  delay in the diagnosis of IE.
36
Magnetic  resonance  angiography  is  diagnostic,  but
conventional four-vessel  cerebral angiography is more
sensitive for aneurysms < 5 mm  in size and  remains the
gold standard.
1-3
Hemodynamic status: Hemodynamics may  deteriorate
precipitously in IE and should be carefully monitored on a
daily basis. Worsening heart failure may result from valve
destruction, obstruction,  perforations, paravalvular  or
myocardial  abscesses,  or  coronary  emboli  etc.,  and
commonly requires surgical intervention. Heart  failure
represents more than half the indications of surgery in IE.
The risk of heart failure is more in acute IE and is related to
the virulence of the organism. Staphylococcus aureus, beta
hemolytic streptococci, or streptococcus pneumoniae are more
often associated with heart failure, but any microorganism
may cause this complication if treatment is  delayed long
enough. 
37
Surgery  in infective  endocarditis: The indications of
surgery in IE  are relatively well  defined,
3,37,38
but many
patients in India still do not undergo such operation. The
major reasons are the lack of availability and affordability
of  cardiac surgery, and also the reluctance of cardiologists
and cardiac surgeons. Even though the risks of  surgery are
higher,  yet  the  benefits  are  enormous  and  usually
immediate. The operative mortality of surgery in active IE
is 5% to 10% in patients without heart failure and 15% to
35% in patients with heart failure 
39 
and the incidence of
reinfection of newly implanted valves is 2% to 3%.
40 
These
rates are far less than the mortality rates for IE with heart
failure without surgical therapy, which can be as high as
50%.
38 
The techniques of  surgery should be individualized
and would depend on the amount of destruction of valvular
and  paravalvular  tissues,  and  the  virulence  of   the
organism. Early valve preserving operation of the  mitral
valve i.e. repair of chordal rupture, vegetectomy, or repair
of  leaflet perforation, may be attempted in selected patients
with reasonable success and can circumvent the need for
prosthetic valve replacement.
3
When valve needs to be
replaced, there are no clear guidelines regarding the choice
of  prosthesis. The reinfection rate and long-term mortality
is  similar  with  mechanical  and  bioprosthesis,  but
bioprosthesis are associated with high valve failure  rates
especially in the young.
41
Hence, the choice should be based
on other factors relevant to the choice of  prosthesis such
as age. Homograft  replacement and radical  debridement
of  the infected aortic root is associated with a low recurrent
infection rate and good event-free survival for up to 17
years,
42
but is not routinely recommended in the absence
of extensive paraaortic abscess.
43
Homografts are available
only in selected centers in India.
Embolism: Predicting which vegetation will embolize in a
patient, has  been the  Achilles’ heel  of  IE management.
Though hypermobile vegetations, vegetations on anterior
mitral leaflet, and vegetations > 10 mm in size are identified
as predictors of embolism, it still occurs in 25% of patients
with IE and half of it to the central nervous system.
3, 44, 45
Early  surgery decreases  the risk  of  embolism,  but the
indications  of   surgery  to  prevent  embolism remains
contentious. The risk of  embolism is highest at the onset of
disease and the risk diminishes rapidly after the initiation
of  appropriate antibiotic therapy.
3,46
Hence, any surgery to
prevent embolism needs to be done, if at all, early after the
identification  of  vegetation at increased risk to  embolize.
An increase in the size of the vegetation after a few weeks
of  treatment suggests failure of  therapy and proclivity for
embolization.
3,46
The timing  of  surgery  after  a  major
embolic stroke remains controversial.
3,45
A few studies have
shown  that the  operative  mortality  is increased in the
presence  of  a pre-operative hemorrhage or hemorrhagic
infarct, but not with ischemic infarct.
47
In the absence of a
hemorrhagic  infarction,  valve  replacement  can  be
performed  at least 72 hours after the stroke, with  an
acceptable risk  of  perioperative  stroke.
48 
However, it is
prudent to postpone surgery for 2 -3 weeks after thrombotic
stroke  and  perhaps  for  a  longer  duration  after  an
hemorrhage, if the clinical condition allows.
49
The  portal  of   entry:   The  route  of entry  of infection
responsible for causing IE should be sought, and if possible,
treated. However, this is not commonly done as is evident
from available audits in IE. For instance, a French survey
indicated that a treatable portal of entry was not addressed
prior to discharge in 25% of their patients.
9
The importance
of regular clinical audits to identify suboptimal care and to
EDITORIAL.p65
11/15/2005, 4:19 PM
292
SDK control API:C#: How to Determine the Display Format for Web Doucment Viewing
VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET C# HTML5 Viewer: Choose File Display Mode on Web web document viewer for .NET can convert PDF, Word, Excel
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control API:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified zoom value and save it zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size. filePath, The output file path
www.rasteredge.com
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 289-294
Kothari et al. Infective Endocarditis - An Indian Perspective 293
strengthen healthy practices cannot  be  overemphasized.
Further,  a  team  work  involving  cardiologists,
microbiologists  and cardiac  surgeons should be involved
from the initial phase of illness, which will help in making
correct clinical decisions.
Infective Endocarditis in Different Patient Groups
It is important to be aware of  special aspects of IE in different
subsets  of   patients.  For  example,  IE  in  neonates  is
remarkable  for higher prevalence of  staphylococcal and
fungal  endocarditis,  and  for  atypical  presentations
including apneic episodes from pulmonary emboli in
otherwise normal hearts. IE in children  occurs mostly  in
patients  with  congenital  heart  disease before or  after
operations,  and is notable for the difficulties of  patients’
cooperation and decisions regarding reoperations.
50
An
elderly with salmonella endocarditis  may have infected
aortic aneurysm and may require modification of dosages
due to decreased creatinine clearance. Similarly, IE during
pregnancy requires  considerations of  optimal  dosing of
drugs (due to changes  in  the  volume  of distribution of
drugs)  and their  fetal  safety. The risk of  embolization of
large mobile vegetation may demand a cesarean section.
51
IE in prosthetic valves and drug abusers demands separate
management strategies.
Errors in Prevention
Clearly, more episodes of  IE can be prevented by attention
to oro-dental hygiene than  by chemoprophylaxis before
dental extraction. Yet regular  dental health screening  in
cardiac patients is not  generally pursued.  A small study
from India found an appalling  low  awareness about IE
prophylaxis  and  dental hygiene.
52
Only  11%  of  heart
disease patients referred for cardiac evaluation were aware
about IE prophylaxis. Hence, physicians  should reinforce
IE prophylaxis  and dental hygiene  at every contact with
susceptible patients. It is suggested that every patient with
heart disease must be provided  with  recommended IE
prophylaxis chart and instructed not to take antibiotics in
the absence of a focal infection, but obtain blood cultures
for any fever of more than 3 days duration.
11
Such practices
may allow appropriate identification and therapy, but have
not been evaluated for cost effectiveness. IE in some clinical
situations, for example  endocarditis following puerperal
sepsis, fungal  IE in  neonates,  and  IE  in immunocom-
promised patients should largely be preventable by adhering
to healthy clinical practices routinely.
Conclusions
There  is  a  scope  for  improvement  in  the  diagnosis,
treatment, and prevention of IE. A comprehensive clinical
approach  to diagnosis, anticipatory  guidance to patients
for its prevention, and healthy clinical practices including
clinical audits and team work in the management of IE can
possibly reduce the morbidity and mortality from IE.
References
1. Mylonakis E, Calderwood SB. Infective endocarditis in adults. N Engl
J Med 2001; 345: 1318–1330
2. Moreillon P, Que YA. Infective endocarditis. Lancet 2004; 363: 139–
149
3. Baddour LM, Wilson WR, Bayer AS, Fowler VG Jr, Bolger AF, Levison
ME, et al. Committee on Rheumatic Fever, Endocarditis, and
Kawasaki Disease. Infective endocarditis: diagnosis, antimicrobial
therapy, and management of  complications: a statement for
healthcare professionals, Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the
Young, and the Councils on Clinical Cardiology, Stroke, and
Cardiovascular  Surgery  and  Anesthesia,  American  Heart
Association: endorsed by the Infectious Diseases Society of America.
Circulation 2005; 111: e394–434
4. Horstkotte D, Follath F, Gutschik E, Lengyel M, Oto A, Pavie A, et al.
Task Force Members on Infective Endocarditis of the European
Society of Cardiology; ESC Committee for Practice Guidelines (CPG);
Document Reviewers. Guidelines on prevention, diagnosis and
treatment of  infective endocarditis executive summary; the task force
on infective endocarditis of the European society of cardiology. Eur
Heart J 2004; 25: 267–276
5. Watanakunakorn C, Burkert T. Infective endocarditis at a large
community teaching hospital, 1980-1990. A review of 210 episodes.
Medicine (Baltimore) 1993; 72: 90–102
6. Hoen B, Alla F, Selton-Suty C, Beguinot I, Bouvet A, Briancon S, et
al. Association pour l’Etude et la Prevention de l’Endocardite
Infectieuse (AEPEI) Study Group. Changing profile of infective
endocarditis: results of a 1-year survey in France. JAMA 2002; 288:
75–81
7. Cabell CH, Jollis JG, Peterson GE, Corey GR, Anderson DJ, Sexton DJ,
et al. Changing patient characteristics and the effect on mortality in
endocarditis. Arch Intern Med 2002; 162: 90–94
8. Prendergast BD. The changing face of infective endocarditis. Heart
2005 [Epub ahead of print]
9. Delahaye F, Rial MO, de Gevigney G, Ecochard R, Delaye J. A critical
appraisal of the quality of the management of infective endocarditis.
J Am Coll Cardiol 1999; 33: 788–793
10. Muhlestein JB. Infective endocarditis: how well are we managing our
patients? J Am Coll Cardiol 1999; 33: 794–795
11. Tornos P.  Infective endocarditis: Are we managing our patients well?
Rev Esp Cardiol 2002; 55: 789–790
12. Tornos P, Iung B, Permanyer-Miralda G, Baron G, Delahaye F, Gohlke-
Barwolf Ch, et al. Infective endocarditis in Europe: lessons from the
Euro heart survey. Heart 2005; 91: 571–575
13. Berlin  JA,  Abrutyn  E,  Strom  BL,  Kinman  JL,  Levison  ME,
Korzeniowski OM, et al. Incidence of infective endocarditis in the
Delaware Valley, 1988-1990. Am J Cardiol 1995; 76: 933–936
14. Hogevik H, Olaison  L, Andersson R,  Lindberg  J,  Alestig  K.
Epidemiologic aspects of  infective endocarditis in an urban
population. A 5-year prospective study. Medicine (Baltimore) 1995;
74: 324–339
EDITORIAL.p65
11/15/2005, 4:19 PM
293
SDK control API:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Why do we need to convert PDF document to HTML webpage using VB.NET programming code? But if you want to publish a PDF document file in web site
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control API:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
How to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to HTML5 Files in using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Note: When you get the error "Could not load file or assembly
www.rasteredge.com
294 Kothari et al. Infective Endocarditis - An Indian Perspective
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 289-294
15. Garg N, Kandpal B, Garg N, Tewari S, Kapoor A, Goel P, et al.
Characteristics of infective endocarditis in a developing country -
clinical profile and outcome in 192 Indian patients, 1992-2001. Int
J Cardiol 2005; 98: 253–260
16. Choudhury R, Grover A, Varma J, Khattri HN, Anand IS, Bidwai PS,
et al. Active infective endocarditis observed in an Indian hospital
1981-1991. Am J Cardiol 1992; 70: 1453–1458
17. Jalal S, Khan KA, Alai MS, Jan V, Iqbal K, Tramboo NA, et al. Clinical
spectrum of infective endocarditis: 15 years experience. Indian Heart
J 1998; 50: 516–519
18. Agarwal R, Bahl VK, Malaviya AN. Changing spectrum of clinical
and laboratory profile of infective endocarditis. J Assoc Physicians India
1992; 40: 721–723
19. Prendergast BD. Diagnostic criteria and problems in infective
endocarditis. Heart 2004; 90: 611–613
20. Koegelenberg CF, Doubell AF, Orth H, Reuter H. Infective endocarditis:
improving the diagnostic yield. Cardiovasc J S Afr 2004; 15: 14–20
21. Valente AM, Jain R, Scheurer M, Fowler VG Jr, Corey GR, Bengur AR,
et al. Frequency of infective endocarditis among infants and children
with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Pediatrics 2005; 115: e15–
19
22. Li JS, Sexton DJ, Mick N, Nettles R, Fowler VG Jr, Ryan T, et al. Proposed
modifications to the Duke criteria for the diagnosis of infective
endocarditis. Clin Infect Dis 2000; 30: 633–638
23. Fowler VG Jr, Li J, Corey GR, Boley J, Marr KA, Gopal AK, et al. Role of
echocardiography in evaluation of patients with Staphylococcus
aureus bacteremia: experience in 103 patients. J Am Coll Cardiol 1997;
30: 1072–1078
24. Ramakrishnan S, Narang R, Khilnani GC, Kurian S, Saxena A,
Sharma S, et al. Wegener’s granulomatosis mimicking prosthetic
valve endocarditis. Cardiology 2004; 102: 35–36
25. Lepidi H, Durack DT, Raoult D. Diagnostic methods current best
practices and guidelines for histologic evaluation in infective
endocarditis. Infect Dis Clin North Am 2002; 16: 339–361
26. Evangelista A, Gonzalez-Alujas MT. Echocardiography in infective
endocarditis. Heart 2004; 90: 614–617
27. Greaves K, Mou D, Patel A, Celermajer DS. Clinical criteria and the
appropriate use of transthoracic echocardiography for the exclusion
of infective endocarditis. Heart 2003; 89: 273–275
28. Lamas CC, Eykyn SJ. Suggested modifications to the Duke criteria for
the clinical diagnosis of native valve and prosthetic valve endo-
carditis: analysis of 118 pathologically proven cases. Clin Infect Dis
1997; 25: 713–719
29. Lisby G, Gutschik E, Durack DT. Molecular methods for diagnosis of
infective endocarditis. Infect Dis Clin North Am 2002; 16: 393–412
30. Shapira N, Merin O, Rosenmann E, Dzigivker I, Bitran D, Yinnon AM,
et al. Latent infective endocarditis: epidemiology and clinical
characteristics of patients with unsuspected endocarditis detected
after elective valve replacement. Ann Thorac Surg 2004; 78: 1623–
1629
31. Mueller C, Huber P, Laifer G, Mueller B, Perruchoud AP. Procalcitonin
and the early diagnosis of infective endocarditis. Circulation 2004;
109: 1707–1710
32. Archuleta S,  Murphy  B,  Keller  MJ.  Successful  treatment  of
vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium endocarditis with
linezolid in a renal transplant recipient with human immuno-
deficiency virus infection. Transpl Infect Dis 2004; 6: 117–119
33. Oakley CM, Hall RJ. Endocarditis: problems - patients being treated
for endocarditis and not doing well. Heart 2001; 85: 470–474
34. Palmer SR, Young SE. Q-fever endocarditis in England and Wales,
1975-81. Lancet 1982; 2: 1448–1449
35. Bayer AS, Theofilopoulos AN. Immunopathogenetic aspects of
infective endocarditis. Chest 1990; 97: 204–212
36. Santoshkumar B, Radhakrishnan K, Balakrishnan KG, Sarma PS.
Neurologic complications of infective endocarditis observed in a
south Indian referral hospital. J Neurol Sci 1996; 137: 139–144
37. Olaison L, Pettersson G. Current best practices and guidelines
indications for surgical intervention in infective endocarditis. Infect
Dis Clin North Am 2002; 16: 453–475
38. Sexton DJ, Spelman D. Current best practices and guidelines.
Assessment and management of  complications in infective
endocarditis. Infect Dis Clin North Am 2002; 16: 507–521
39. Delahaye F, Celard M, Roth O, de Gevigney G. Indications and optimal
timing for surgery in infective endocarditis. Heart 2004; 90: 618–
620
40. Mills J, Utley J, Abbott J. Heart failure in infective endocarditis:
predisposing factors, course, and treatment. Chest 1974; 66:
151–157
41. Moon MR, Miller DC, Moore KA, Oyer PE, Mitchell RS, Robbins RC,
et al. Treatment of endocarditis with valve replacement: the
question of tissue versus mechanical prosthesis. Ann Thorac Surg
2001; 71: 1164–1171
42. Yankah AC, Pasic M, Klose H, Siniawski H, Weng Y, Hetzer R.
Homograft reconstruction of the aortic root for endocarditis with
periannular abscess: a 17-year study. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg 2005;
28: 69–75
43. Gulbins H, Kilian E, Roth S, Uhlig A, Kreuzer E, Reichart B. Is there
an advantage in using homografts in patients with acute infective
endocarditis of the aortic valve? J Heart Valve Dis 2002; 11: 492–
497
44. Heiro M, Nikoskelainen J, Engblom E, Kotilainen E, Marttila R,
Kotilainen P. Neurologic manifestations of  infective endocarditis: a
17-year experience in a teaching hospital in Finland. Arch Intern
Med 2000; 160: 2781–2787
45. Sexton DJ, Spelman D. Current best practices and guidelines.
Assessment and management of  complications in infective
endocarditis. Cardiol Clin 2003; 21: 273–282
46. Vilacosta I, Graupner C, San Roman JA, Sarria C, Ronderos R,
Fernandez C, et al. Risk of embolization after institution of antibiotic
therapy for infective endocarditis. J Am Coll Cardiol 2002; 39: 1489–
1495
47. Ting W, Silverman N, Levitsky S. Valve replacement in patients with
endocarditis and cerebral septic emboli. Ann Thorac Surg 1991; 51:
18–21
48. Horstkotte D, Weist K, Ruden H. Better understanding of the
pathogenesis of prosthetic valve endocarditis - recent perspectives
for prevention strategies. J Heart Valve Dis 1998; 7: 313–315
49. Gillinov AM, Shah RV, Curtis WE, Stuart RS, Cameron DE,
Baumgartner WA, et al. Valve replacement in patients with
endocarditis and acute neurologic deficit. Ann Thorac Surg 1996;
61: 1125–1130
50. Ferrieri P, Gewitz MH, Gerber MA, Newburger JW, Dajani AS,
Shulman ST, et al. Committee on Rheumatic Fever, Endocarditis,
and Kawasaki Disease of the American Heart Association Council
on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young. Unique features of infective
endocarditis in childhood. Circulation 2002; 105: 2115–2126
51. Campuzano K, Roque H, Bolnick A, Leo MV, Campbell WA. Bacterial
endocarditis complicating pregnancy: case report and systematic
review of the literature. Arch Gynecol Obstet 2003; 268: 251–255
52. Chatterjee A, Das D, Kohli P, Das R, Kohli V. Awareness of  infective
endocarditis prophylaxis and dental hygiene in cardiac patients after
physician contact. Indian J Pediatr 2004; 71:184
EDITORIAL.p65
11/15/2005, 4:19 PM
294
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 295–303
Desai et al. Diabetes and Heart Failure 295
Diabetes and Heart Failure:
Epidemiology,  Pathophysiology and Management
Akshay S Desai, Patrick T O’Gara
Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, USA
Review Article
C
ardiovascular  disease  has  reached  epidemic
proportions worldwide, with  ischemic heart disease
and cerebrovascular disease together accounting for nearly
30% of  total deaths each  year.
1
The growing burden of
cardiovascular  disease  is  fueled  largely by a parallel
explosion  in the incidence  of Type 2  diabetes  mellitus.
Partly, it is the product of  disturbing global upward trends
in obesity and physical inactivity.
2
It is estimated that over
150 million adults worldwide currently suffer from Type 2
diabetes,  and  current projections forecast a  doubling of
this number by the year 2025 to over  5.4% of  the total
population.
3
Developing nations will bear a dispropor-
tionate burden of this increase, with an expected 170% rise
from 84 million  to 228 million affected individuals. This
trend is particularly ominous, as  those in the developing
nations tend to develop diabetes earlier in life (age 40-64
years)  than their  counterparts in the  developed  world
(
65 years), implying a longer duration of exposure during
the  most productive years and, therefore,  a potentially
greater  risk  of   diabetes-associated  morbidity  and
mortality.
3
Nowhere is  this  evolving  crisis more pressing than  in
India,  which harbors  a  larger number of  people  with
diabetes than any other  nation in the  world. By current
estimates,  there are nearly 23 million prevalent cases of
diabetes  in  India  alone, with a  projected growth to 57
million  (6.0%  of   the  population)  by  2025.  Serial
epidemiologic studies have suggested that Asian Indians are
particularly  vulnerable to diabetes  and its complications,
and to  coronary heart disease in particular.
4-6
While the
precise etiology of this enhanced susceptibility has not been
identified, the tendency to develop insulin resistance may
be related to low birth weight,
7
increased visceral fat and
abdominal obesity,
8
physical inactivity, and a diet rich  in
saturated fat and carbohydrates,
9
as well as an underlying
genetic  predisposition.
10
Pathophysiology of  Heart Failure in
Diabetes Mellitus
Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among
patients  with  diabetes,  accounting  for  over  60%  of
mortality.
11
While diabetes is uniformly recognized as an
important risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis
and its complications, it is perhaps less well-understood that
diabetes is a powerful and independent risk factor for the
development of  heart failure.
12
The Framingham Heart
Study  found  the  incidence  of  heart failure in men and
women with diabetes relative to those without diabetes to
be 2- and 5-fold greater, respectively, even after controlling
for additional risk factors;
13
this finding has been confirmed
in several subsequent trials.
14-16
Further, patients with
diabetes and ischemic cardiomyopathy are at higher risk
for progression from  asymptomatic  left  ventricular (LV)
dysfunction to symptomatic heart failure.
17
Finally, nearly
30%  of  patients  with  heart  failure  and preserved  LV
function (‘diastolic’ heart failure)  also have  diabetes.
18
Amongst  patients  with  symptomatic  heart failure or
asymptomatic LV dysfunction, diabetes further confers an
adverse prognosis, with a markedly increased risk  of  all-
cause mortality or hospitalization.
19
Recognition  of  the  key role that diabetes plays in  the
development and progression of heart failure has led the
American  College  of  Cardiology  and American Heart
Association to classify diabetic patients as having Stage A
heart failure, acknowledging  that even in the  absence  of
apparent structural heart disease, they are at high risk for
developing heart  failure.
20
This review focuses on the
mechanisms underlying this increased risk and examines
the role  of  pharmacologic  therapy in the primary and
secondary prevention of heart failure among patients with
Type 2 diabetes. While patients with Type 1 diabetes may
be  at similar  risk of  heart  failure,  they constitute the
minority of  the adult diabetic population,  and remain
outside the scope of this discussion.
Diabetes and coronary artery  disease (CAD): World-
wide,  CAD  and  its complications  account for the  vast
majority of cases of congestive heart failure. Fatal and non-
Correspondence:  Dr Patrick T O’ Gara, Cardiovascular Division
Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA
e-mail: adesai@partners.org
IHJ-891-05(Review).p65
11/15/2005, 4:25 PM
295
296 Desai et al. Diabetes and Heart Failure
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 295–303
fatal CAD events are increased two- to four-fold in patients
with diabetes.
21
Autopsy studies have suggested that relative
to non-diabetic patients, diabetic patients are prone to more
aggressive macrovascular atherosclerotic disease.
22
Among
patients with CAD, diabetes confers a three- to seven-fold
increase  in mortality,
23,24
and diabetic patients suffer a
worse immediate- and  long-term  prognosis  following
presentation with myocardial infarction (MI) or unstable
angina.
25,26
Despite comparable infarct size, patients with diabetes
are at substantially higher risk of developing heart failure
post-MI than those without diabetes.
27-29
As compared with
non-diabetics, patients with diabetes demonstrate impaired
recruitment of contractile reserve in non-infarct segments
and  greater  reduction  in  global  systolic  function
immediately following MI,
30, 31
changes which may, in part,
be  related  to  diminished  coronary  flow  reserve  and
microvascular  dysfunction.
32
Over the long-term, these
acute changes do not appear to be associated with a greater
propensity  for LV  cavity  dilation or  progressive  systolic
dysfunction.
33
Overall, the increased incidence of heart
failure in diabetic patients appears  to  be partly  related to
primary abnormalities  of  diastolic function,  perhaps a
consequence of hyperglycemia-associated ultrastructural
and metabolic abnormalities in the myocardium.
Diabetic cardiomyopathy: The notion of a cardio-myopathy,
peculiar  to  patients  with  diabetes,  has  been  widely
debated.
34
The coexistence of  hypertension and CAD in
many diabetic patients makes it difficult to isolate a diabetes-
specific metabolic, functional, or structural abnormality of
the myocardium. However, an increasing body of evidence
supports the  existence of morphological changes in  the
diabetic  heart that may  increase  susceptibility to  heart
failure.
Echocardiographic studies document increased LV wall
thickness and increased LV mass in patients with diabetes
even after  accounting for  differences in body-mass index
(BMI)  and blood pressure.
35
Increased echodensity of the
myocardial  wall  in  diabetic  patients
36
correlates with
findings  of   myocyte  hypertrophy,  interstitial  and
perivascular fibrosis, and increased deposition  of matrix
collagen on  histology.
37
Doppler studies reveal patterns
suggestive of impaired myocardial relaxation and diastolic
ventricular compliance that track with  the severity and
duration of  diabetes.
38
Evidence of such diastolic filling
abnormalities even early in the course of diabetes (prior to
the onset of hypertension, renal disease, vasculopathy, or
even  fasting  hyperglycemia)  suggests  that  diastolic
dysfunction is an effect of diabetes itself.
39
Finally, sensitive
indices of  contractile performance such as strain rate are
reduced  in patients with diabetes  even in  the absence  of
apparent structural heart disease, highlighting that systolic
function may also be affected early in the disease.
40
Hypertension  and diabetes may  conspire to promote
changes  in myocardial  structure  and  function  and  spur
heart failure progression.  Prevalence of hypertension is
approximately doubled in diabetic patients compared with
non-diabetic  controls,  perhaps  as  a  consequence  of
hyperinsulinemia, endothelial  dysfunction, and renal
injury.
41
Myocardial  fibrosis  and  interstitial  collagen
deposition are greater in patients with hypertension and
diabetes  than  either  entity in  isolation.
42 
Accordingly,
patients with diabetes  and hypertension  in combination
have more severe abnormalities of  LV relaxation than those
with either condition alone.
43 
Synergistic effects on neuro-
hormonal  activation  and oxidative stress may  promote
apoptotic  myocyte  loss,  initiating  a  transition from  a
subclinical,  compensated/hypertrophied state  to  overt
decompensated/dilated cardiomyopathy.
44 
At  least  one
study has documented an association between diabetes,
hypertension,  and the development  of  idiopathic, dilated
cardiomyopathy.
45
Mechanisms of  myocardial dysfunction  in diabetes mellitus:
Type  2  diabetes  is characterized  by  impaired  insulin
sensitivity and a resultant  dysregulation  of  glucose and
fatty acid metabolism. Circulating plasma levels of insulin,
glucose, and free fatty acids are increased, but the normal
reliance of the heart on fatty acid metabolism for energy
production is enhanced  due to significant  impairment  in
myocardial  glucose  utilization.
46
Enhanced fatty acid
turnover  results  in  increased  myocardial  oxygen
consumption, impaired glucose and pyruvate  utilization
due  to inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase, lactic  acid
accumulation,  and  accumulation  of  toxic  lipid
intermediates that may interfere with mitochondrial ATP
generation  and  cellular  calcium homeostasis,  thereby
impairing cardiac performance.
47
Chronic hyperglycemia
also leads to non-enzymatic glycation of matrix proteins in
the vascular wall and myocardium, producing  advanced
glycation end products (AGEs) and reactive oxygen species.
AGEs promote cross-linkage of adjacent collagen polymers,
leading to a loss of collagen elasticity  and subsequently,
diminished  compliance  of  the  blood  vessels  and
myocardium.
48
Several  other  mechanisms  might  contribute  to
myocardial dysfunction in patients with diabetes. Induction
of  the  fetal gene program leads to upregulation of the 
β
-
myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression and downregulation
of  
α
-MHC, in a pattern similar to that observed  in other
models of cardiac failure. In experimental animal models
IHJ-891-05(Review).p65
11/15/2005, 4:25 PM
296
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 295–303
Desai et al. Diabetes and Heart Failure 297
of diabetes,  these  changes are associated with  impaired
myocardial  contractility and ventricular hypertrophy.
49
Downregulation  of  sarcoplasmic  reticulum  calcium
ATPase  (SERCA)  expression  and  activity  may  impair
cellular  calcium  handling  and  promote  myocardial
relaxation abnormalities.
50
Endothelial dysfunction may
contribute  to  diminished  availability  of   nitric  oxide,
enhanced  atherosclerosis  progression,  diminished
collateral  formation,  worsening arterial  stiffness,  and
associated changes  in ventricular  load; together  these
changes may have important consequences for ventricular
remodeling and disease progression.
51-53
Finally, autonomic
neuropathy and associated alterations in sympathetic and
parasympathetic  activity  in  patients with diabetes have
been  associated with  impaired  systolic  and diastolic
performance,  and  may  have  a  role  in  myocardial
dysfunction in this population.
54
Prevention and Treatment of  Heart Failure in
Diabetic Patients
Glycemic  control: As already discussed, hyperglycemia
in patients with diabetes has important consequences for
myocardial  energetics  and  cardiac performance. Plasma
glucose  concentration  is  an  important  predictor  of
cardiovascular risk
55
and in observational studies, both the
degree of   abnormal  LV  relaxation
43
and  the  risk  of
developing subsequent heart failure
56
are closely correlated
to levels of hemoglobin A1c. In this context, it is tempting
to  infer  that improving  glycemic  control  should  have a
beneficial  effect on  overall  cardiovascular morbidity and
mortality and  on the progression of  heart  failure  in
particular.
This hypothesis, however, is not supported by the results
of  randomized  clinical trials  in  patients  with Type  2
diabetes. The largest  prospective study to date, the UK
Prospective  Diabetes  Study (UKPDS), failed  to show  a
significant benefit to a strategy of intensive blood glucose
control  with  insulin  or  sulfonylureas  on the  risk  of
developing macrovascular disease or heart failure, despite
significant reduction in hemoglobin A1c and microvascular
events.
57
However, it is interesting to note that the subgroup
of  overweight patients in the UKPDS randomized to therapy
with metformin did experience  a statistically significant
reduction in all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events
relative to both  control patients and those treated  with
sulfonylureas or insulin.
58
This  result  is  controversial,
particularly in  view of   increased mortality  in  UKPDS
patients  treated  simultaneously  with  metformin  and
sulfonylureas; however, since metformin acts as an insulin-
sensitizing  agent,  there is a suggestion  that  targeted
treatment of  insulin  resistance  may be of  comparable
importance to glycemic control in reducing cardiovascular
complications among patients with Type 2 diabetes.
Enhanced interest in management of  insulin resistance
has fueled expanded utilization of insulin-sensitizing agents
[including metformin  and  the  newer thiazolidinediones
(TZDs)] in the therapy of patients with established Type 2
diabetes mellitus and those at high risk of developing the
disease.
59
The TZDs,  are particularly  attractive  in this
regard, given the postulated  anti-atherosclerotic  benefits
secondary to beneficial effects on the lipid profile, markers
of   inflammation  and  thrombosis,  and  endothelial
function.
60
Amongst  patients  with heart failure,  use  of  both
metformin  and the TZDs pose theoretical risks. Due  to a
potentially  increased risk of lactic acidosis,  metformin is
formally contraindicated in patients with congestive heart
failure requiring pharmacologic therapy.
61
Similarly, usage
of TZDs in  patients with  heart failure is  controversial
secondary to perceived risk of heart  failure exacerbation
after  drug-associated  fluid retention.
62
According to the
package insert, both rosiglitazone and pioglitazone  are
contraindicated in patients with NYHA class  III-IV  heart
failure or those considered to be at high risk for heart failure
development due to the presence of multiple cardiovascular
risk factors.
63
Despite these concerns, however, all of these
agents are widely prescribed in the population of patients
with diabetes and heart failure.
64
Observational  studies  suggest  that the actual  risk of
heart  failure  in TZD-treated  patients is actually  quite
small,
65
and that TZDs may be safely used in patients with
compensated heart failure who  are  monitored closely for
symptoms  of  fluid  overload.
66
A  recently  published
retrospective analysis of US Medicare  data  suggests  that
usage of  both TZDs  and  metformin may be  actually
associated with reduced  mortality among older diabetic
patients.
67
This  finding,  while  provocative,  awaits
confirmation in a randomized, prospective clinical trial.
Blood  pressure  control:  As  noted,  hypertension
dramatically  potentiates the  detrimental cardiovascular
effects of diabetes. Consequently, an important component
of preventing complications in patients  with diabetes is
aggressive management  of blood pressure. The  UKPDS
examined the effects of  tight blood pressure control in
patients with Type 2 diabetes.
68
Patients with diabetes and
hypertension were randomly allocated to a strategy of tight
control  (aiming for a  blood  pressure  target < 150/85
mmHg), using  angiotensin-converting  enzyme  (ACE)
IHJ-891-05(Review).p65
11/15/2005, 4:25 PM
297
298 Desai et al. Diabetes and Heart Failure
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 295–303
inhibitors  or  beta-blockers, or less tight control  (blood
pressure target <  180/105  mmHg), using agents other
than ACE inhibitors or beta-blockers. In  that study, tight
control  of blood pressure was associated with a marked
reduction in cardiovascular  events and diabetes-related
mortality; specifically,  the  incidence  of  heart failure in
patients with more aggressively managed hypertension was
reduced by an impressive 56% (p=0.0043). As a result, the
Seventh  Report  of  the  Joint National  Commission  on
Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High
Blood  Pressure  (JNC VII)  has  encouraged  aggressive
management  of  blood pressure in patients with diabetes,
targeting  treatment  to a  blood  pressure  of  <  130/80
mmHg.
69
Prevention of renal disease: Worldwide, the incidence
of end-stage  renal disease among patients  with Type 2
diabetes is expected to double by 2010.
70
The risk of  death
from cardiovascular  causes is increased substantially in
patients with advanced renal disease, largely due to a high
incidence of MI and congestive heart failure.
71
Even those
with mild renal impairment, experience markedly increased
cardiovascular risk.
72,73
Recognition and treatment of
diabetic  nephropathy is therefore  quite  important  for
prevention  of   cardiovascular  disease.  The  basis  for
prevention of  renal disease  in diabetic  patients  is  the
treatment  of   known  risk factors  for its development
including hypertension,  hyperglycemia,  smoking,  and
dyslipidemia. Further,  limiting exposure  to nephrotoxic
agents, such  as iodinated contrast,  is  important. Where
angiography  or  contrast  exposure  is  unavoidable,
protection against contrast nephropathy requires adequate
pre-hydration (optimally, with intravenous 0.9% NaCl) and
usage of small quantities of  non-ionic, low or iso-osmolar
contrast agents. Pre-treatment with oral N-acetylcysteine
may  provide additional renal protection, particularly in
patients with established nephropathy.
74,75
Microalbuminuria is an early sign of renal disease and
predicts the onset of overt nephropathy and cardiovascular
complications  in  patients  with  diabetes.  Once
microalbuminuria  develops,  aggressive control of  blood
pressure becomes specially  important for  slowing  the
progression  of  renal disease.
76
Inhibition of  the renin-
angiotensin  system  with  ACE  inhibitors
77,78
and
angiotensin-receptor  blockers,
79
either  alone,  or  in
combination,
80
provides renal benefits independent of blood
pressure  control  by  improving  intraglomerular
hemodynamics  and  reducing  hyperfiltration.  As
emphasized  below,  these benefits  persist  even after the
development of macroalbuminuria  or overt renal failure.
Dietary protein restriction, while less studied in prospective
randomized trials,  may also be helpful in forestalling the
progression  of  renal  disease in  diabetic  patients  with
proteinuria.
81
ACE  inhibition:  Evidence  from  multiple prospective,
randomized, controlled, clinical  trials supports the use  of
ACE inhibitors as a cornerstone of treatment for patients
with symptomatic  heart failure and LV dysfunction.
82
A
pooled  analysis of  over 30  such trials  suggested a  23%
overall mortality reduction with ACE inhibitor treatment.
83
The anti-atherogenic, anti-ischemic, and hemodynamic
benefits of ACE  inhibitors are particularly important in
patients  with diabetes, in whom blockade of  the  renin-
angiotensin system also forestalls the progression of renal
dysfunction.
84,85
Retrospective analysis of major clinical
trials of ACE inhibitor therapy confirms that patients with
diabetes  and  heart  failure,  independent  of   severity,
experience mortality and morbidity reduction, similar  to
their non-diabetic counterparts (Table 1).
86
As a result, all
patients with diabetes and LV dysfunction should be treated
with an  ACE inhibitor, barring  contraindication or prior
intolerance
Table 1.  Effect of  ACE-inhibitors on mortality from heart failure in diabetic and non-diabetic patients
No. of patients
RR Analysis (95% CI)
Study name
Total
Non-
Diabetic
Non-diabetic
Diabetic
RRR
diabetic
CONSENSUS
253
197
56
0.64 (0.46-0.88)
1.06 (0.65-1.74)
1.67 (0.93-3.01)
SAVE
2,231
1,739
492
0.82 (0.68-0.99)
0.89 (0.68-1.16)
1.09 (0.79-1.50)
SMILE
1,556
1,253
303
0.79 (0.54-1.15)
0.44 (0.22-0.87)
0.56 (0.25-1.22)
SOLVD-Prevention
4,228
3,581
647
0.97 (0.83-1.15)
0.75 (0.55-1.02)
0.77 (0.54-1.09)
SOLVD-Treatment
2,569
1,906
663
0.84 (0.74.0.95)
1.01 (0.85-1.21)
1.21 (0.97-1.50)
TRACE
1,749
1,512
237
0.85 (0.74-0.97)
0.73 (0.57-0.94)
0.87 (0.65-1.15)
Random effects pooled estimate
10,188
2,398
0.85 (0.78-0.92)
0.84 (0.70-1.00)
1.00 (0.80-1.25)
Reproduced from Shekelle et al.86
IHJ-891-05(Review).p65
11/15/2005, 4:25 PM
298
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested