Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 295–303
Desai et al. Diabetes and Heart Failure 299
Recent data also support  the use of ACE inhibitors  in
the prevention  of  heart failure  amongst patients with
diabetes. The Heart  Outcomes  Prevention  Evaluation
(HOPE) trial studied the effect of  treatment with ramipril
in  9,297  patients  at  high  risk  for  cardiovascular
complications,  defined as  those  aged 
55 years  with
established vascular disease or diabetes and an additional
cardiovascular  risk factor. Relative to  placebo-treated
patients,  those  treated  with  ramipril  experienced
statistically significant reductions in death, MI and stroke,
as well as a 23% reduction in the risk of new-onset heart
failure; these benefits were robust in separate  analyses of
the subgroup of 3,577 patients with diabetes.
77
Although
lower-risk  patients  with  stable  CAD  may derive  less
benefit,
87
there is increasing evidence favoring the use of
ACE-inhibitors in both primary and secondary prevention
of  cardiovascular events amongst patients with diabetes.
Angiotensin-receptor blockade: Although the clinical
trial evidence is  more  limited, angiotensin II-receptor
blockers (ARBs) likely provide benefits comparable to ACE
inhibitors  in the prevention  of morbidity and mortality
associated with  heart failure. In  the Valsartan  in Heart
Failure Trial (VAL-HeFT), valsartan added to conventional
treatment  of   patients  with  heart  failure  due  to  LV
dysfunction  was  associated  with  a  significant  13.2%
(p=0.009) reduction in the combined end point  of  death
or heart failure morbidity relative to  placebo.
88
Similarly,
the Candesartan in Heart Failure Assessment of Reduction
in  Mortality  and  Morbidity  (CHARM)  program
demonstrated a 9% reduction in overall mortality among
heart failure  patients  treated  with  candesartan over
placebo, though this  result  was of  borderline  statistical
significance  (p=0.055).
89
For  the  subgroup  of  ACE
inhibitor-intolerant  patients,  candesartan treatment was
associated with a significant reduction of 23% in the risk
of cardiovascular death  or heart failure  hospitalization
(p=0.0004).
90
Though a minority of diabetic patients were
enrolled  in  both  CHARM  and  VAL-HeFT  trials,  the
treatment benefit appeared to be equivalent in this subset.
The subsequent Valsartan in Acute Myocardial Infarction
(VALIANT) trial examined the use of captopril, valsartan,
or the combination of both drugs in  patients with acute
MI  complicated  by  congestive  heart  failure  or  LV
dysfunction. In this trial, for both the diabetic subset and
the  population as  a  whole, valsartan  was equivalent  to
captopril and to combination therapy in preventing  the
combined end point of  cardiovascular death, MI, or heart
failure.
91
Overall,  given  an  increasing  evidence  base
supporting equivalent benefit, ARBs should be considered
as an alternative for patients with diabetes and symptomatic
heart failure who are unable to tolerate ACE inhibitors.
With  regard to  heart failure  prevention, at least  two
studies support the benefit of  ARBs in patients with Type 2
diabetes. In  the  Reduction of  Endpoints in Non-Insulin
Dependent Diabetes Mellitus with the Angiotensin  II
Antagonist  Losartan  (RENAAL) study, Type 2  diabetic
patients with nephropathy and no history of heart failure
were assigned to receive losartan or placebo in addition to
conventional antihypertensive therapy. Over four years of
follow-up, losartan-treated patients  experienced a  32%
reduction in the incidence of heart failure (p=0.005) and
slower  progression  of   renal  disease.
92
This  result  is
buttressed by the outcome of  the Losartan Intervention for
Endpoint reductions in hypertension (LIFE) study, in which
1195  patients  with  diabetes,  hypertension,  and  LV
hypertrophy were randomized to antihypertensive therapy
with  losartan or  atenolol. In addition to a  statistically
significant reduction in cardiovascular death, MI, or stroke,
losartan-treated patients experienced a  41% reduction in
heart  failure  hospitalizations (p=0.013).
93
ARBs are
therefore an alternative  to ACE inhibitors  for  primary
prevention of  heart failure in patients with Type 2 diabetes.
Aldosterone receptor antagonism: A growing body of
evidence supports the role of  mineralocorticoid  receptor
activation in the pathogenesis of myocardial and vascular
fibrosis and the progression of heart failure. Since enhanced
myocardial fibrosis is a hallmark of myocardial remodeling
in diabetes,  there is some interest  in  blockade  of  this
receptor as  a  mechanism for reducing or even  reversing
ventricular-vascular stiffening and enhancing outcomes in
patients with diabetes, hypertension, and heart failure.
94 ,95
Production  of   aldosterone,  a  potent  activator  of   the
mineralocorticoid receptor, is stimulated by activation  of
the renin-angiotensin  system  in heart  failure  and   its
incomplete suppression by ACE inhibition. As a result, there
is a compelling rationale for mineralocorticoid antagonism/
aldosterone blockade in patients with heart failure.
The Randomized Aldactone Evaluation Study (RALES)
randomly  allocated  1663 patients  with  symptomatic
(NYHA class III-IV) heart failure and LV ejection fraction
35%  to  therapy  with  the  aldosterone  antagonist,
spironolactone,  or placebo  in addition to standard heart
failure  therapy. At  a  mean  follow-up  of   24  months,
mortality in the spironolactone arm was reduced by 30%
(p  <  0.001)  relative  to  placebo.
96
A recent study of
eplerenone  in patients  with  LV  dysfunction and heart
failure  after  MI, the Eplerenone Post-Acute Myocardial
Infarction  Heart  Failure  Efficacy  and  Survival  Study
IHJ-891-05(Review).p65
11/15/2005, 4:25 PM
299
Online convert pdf to tiff - application software utility:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
www.rasteredge.com
Online convert pdf to tiff - application software utility:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
300 Desai et al. Diabetes and Heart Failure
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 295–303
(EPHESUS) showed similar results; all-cause mortality was
reduced by 15% in patients treated with eplerenone relative
to placebo (p=0.008).
97
While no separate data have been
reported for the subgroup  of  diabetic patients in RALES,
diabetic  and  non-diabetic patients  experienced  similar
benefit  with  mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism in
EPHESUS. In diabetic patients with advanced heart failure
and those with LV dysfunction immediately following MI,
addition of a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist to the
medical  regimen appears likely to reduce cardiovascular
morbidity and mortality. While it is tempting to believe that
aldosterone blockade might be beneficial even earlier in the
course of disease well before overt heart failure develops,
definitive evidence that this strategy prevents heart failure
progression (particularly among patients with diabetes)
remains lacking.
Beta-adrenergic receptor blockade: Although there are
theoretical concerns about the use of  
β
-adrenergic receptor
blocking  drugs in  patients with Type 2  diabetes  (i.e.,
impaired  insulin  sensitivity,  reduced  sensitivity  to
hypoglycemic symptoms),  there is  ample evidence that
diabetics with  established  heart failure derive  substantial
morbidity and mortality benefit from treatment with these
agents. The Carvedilol Prospective Randomized Cumulative
Survival  (COPERNICUS) study randomized  over  2200
patients with severe heart failure symptoms (NYHA class
IV) and an  ejection fraction  of  <25% to  therapy with
carvedilol or placebo. The study was terminated early due
to a profound 35% reduction in all-cause mortality with
carvedilol  (p=0.0014)  which  was  robust  across  all
subgroups, including the ~25% of enrolled patients with
diabetes.
98
Additional  evidence  of  benefit  in  diabetic
patients with less advanced heart failure was seen  in the
Metoprolol Controlled-release Randomized Intervention
Trial in Heart Failure (MERIT-HF). In this study, treatment
with controlled release metoprolol at a mean dose of 159
mg daily resulted in a mortality reduction of 34% relative
to  placebo in NYHA class II-III  patients with  EF<40%.
Amongst patients with diabetes in MERIT-HF, there was a
trend to improvement in  all-cause mortality  that did not
meet the threshold for statistical  significance.
99
A similar
non-significant trend to survival benefit amongst diabetics
with  mild-moderate  heart  failure  was  shown  with
bisoprolol in the Cardiac Insufficiency Bisoprolol Study II
(CIBIS II).
100
Meta-analysis of 6 prospective, randomized,
controlled clinical trials  of 
β
-blocker therapy  in patients
with heart  failure enrolling 3230  patients  with  diabetes
suggests that though potentially less effective than in non-
diabetics, 
β
-blocker therapy is nonetheless associated with
a  16%  reduction  in mortality  in the diabetic  patients
(p=0.011).
101
Despite this compelling evidence of benefit
and safety, 
β
-blockers continue to be underprescribed in the
diabetic population.
102
Which of the  many available 
β
-blockers to utilize for
patients with diabetes and heart failure remains a point of
discussion. Mortality benefit has been shown  for a broad
range of  drugs in this class with varying selectivity for the
cardiac 
β
1
receptors; only those with  intrinsic  sympatho-
mimetic activity are clearly contraindicated, due to their
association with increased mortality in the peri-infarct
period.
103 
A recent randomized  trial  has  demonstrated
enhanced insulin  sensitivity, diminished progression  to
microalbuminuria, and  more  favorable  effects  on  the
plasma lipid profile in hypertensive diabetic patients treated
with carvedilol rather than metoprolol
104
over 5-month
follow-up. These  metabolic  effects, coupled  with  the
favorable hemodynamic  consequences  of  
α
1
-adrenergic
blockade and the suggestion of enhanced survival amongst
heart failure patients treated with carvedilol rather than
short-acting  metoprolol
105,106
may make carvedilol the
optimal first-line choice for diabetic heart failure patients.
In fact, in the recently presented Carvedilol or Metoprolol
European  Trial (COMET),  patients  with  heart  failure
randomized to carvedilol showed a 22% reduction in new-
onset diabetes versus those  treated  with  metoprolol,
suggesting  an  important impact  of  carvedilol on insulin
sensitivity.
106
Conclusions
Diabetes is an important risk factor for the development of
heart failure, and those with diabetes who  develop  heart
failure  experience an exceptionally poor prognosis. As a
result of insulin resistance,  dysregulation of glucose  and
fatty acid metabolism contributes to accumulation of  toxic
lipid intermediates and AGEs that promote vascular stiffness
and  endothelial  dysfunction,  accelerate  systemic
atherosclerosis, and depress myocardial  performance.
Prevention and treatment  of  heart  failure in  diabetic
patients rests  on  aggressive control of  hyperglycemia,
hypertension and neuro-hormonal activation, with ACE-
inhibitors and ARBs forming the cornerstones of therapy.
Novel  agents  directed at  restoring  normal  myocardial
metabolism and limiting the downstream consequences of
insulin resistance are just entering clinical trials and offer
the  promise  of  better  outcomes for patients  with  heart
failure and diabetes. In the interim, however, strategies for
prevention of  diabetes and  its complications, including
promotion of regular physical activity, weight loss, and a
IHJ-891-05(Review).p65
11/15/2005, 4:25 PM
300
application software utility:Online Convert PDF file to Tiff. Best free online PDF Tif
Online PDF to Tiff Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to Tiff. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button
www.rasteredge.com
application software utility:Online Convert PDF file to Word. Best free online PDF Conversion
Online Tiff to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a Tiff/Tif File to PDF. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button
www.rasteredge.com
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 295–303
Desai et al. Diabetes and Heart Failure 301
healthy diet are critically important to stemming the rising
global tide of cardiovascular disease.
References
1. Murray CJ, Lopez AD. Mortality by cause for eight regions of the
world: Global Burden of  Disease Study. Lancet 1997; 349: 1269–
1276
2. Bonow RO, Gheorghiade M. The diabetes epidemic: a national and
global crisis. Am J Med 2004; 116: 2S-10S
3. King H, Aubert RE, Herman WH. Global burden of diabetes, 1995-
2025: prevalence, numerical estimates, and projections. Diabetes
Care 1998; 21: 1414–1431
4. McKeigue PM, Shah B, Marmot MG. Relation of  central obesity
and insulin resistance with high diabetes prevalence and cardio-
vascular risk in South Asians. Lancet 1991; 337: 382–386
5. Sadikot SM, Nigam A, Das S, Bajaj S, Zargar AH, Prasannakumar
KM, et al. The burden of  diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance
in India using the WHO 1999 criteria: prevalence of diabetes in
India study (PODIS). Diabetes Res Clin Pract 2004; 66: 301–307
6. Raji  A,  Gerhard-Herman  MD,  Warren  M,  Silverman  SG,
Raptopoulos V, Mantzoros CS, et al. Insulin resistance and vascular
dysfunction in nondiabetic Asian Indians. J Clin Endocrinol Metab
2004; 89: 3965–3972
7. Bhargava SK, Sachdev HS, Fall CH, Osmond C, Lakshmy R, Barker
DJ, et al. Relation of serial changes in childhood body-mass index
to impaired glucose tolerance in young adulthood. N Engl J Med
2004; 350: 865–875
8. Anjana M, Sandeep S, Deepa R, Vimaleswaran KS, Farooq S,
Mohan V. Visceral and central abdominal fat and anthropometry
in relation to diabetes in Asian Indians. Diabetes Care 2004; 27:
2948–2953
9. Willett W, Manson J, Liu S. Glycemic index, glycemic load, and
risk of type 2 diabetes. Am J Clin Nutr 2002; 76: 274S–280S
10. Radha V, Vimaleswaran KS, Deepa R, Mohan V. The genetics of
diabetes mellitus. Indian J Med Res 2003; 117: 225–238
11. American Diabetes Association. National Diabetes Fact Sheet,
2002. Accessed online at http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-
statistics/national-diabetes-fact-sheet.jsp on 14 February 2005
12. Nesto R. Pharmacological treatment and prevention of heart
failure in the diabetic patient. Rev Cardiovasc Med 2004; 5: 1–8
13. Kannel WB, Hjortland M, Castelli WP. Role of diabetes in congestive
heart failure: the Framingham study. Am J Cardiol 1974; 34:
29–34
14. Parker AB, Yusuf S, Naylor CD. The relevance of subgroup-specific
treatment effects: the Studies of Left Ventricular Dysfunction
(SOLVD) revisited. Am Heart J 2002; 144: 941–947
15. Arnold JM, Yusuf S, Young J, Mathew J, Johnstone D, Avezum A, et
al. Prevention of heart failure in patients in the Heart Outcomes
Prevention Evaluation (HOPE) study. Circulation 2003; 107:
1284–1290
16. Gottdiener JS, Arnold AM, Aurigemma GP, Polak JF, Tracy RP,
Kitzman DW, et al. Predictors of congestive heart failure in the
elderly: the Cardiovascular Health Study. J Am Coll Cardiol 2000;
35: 1628–1637
17. Das SR, Drazner MH, Yancy CW. Effects of diabetes mellitus and
ischemic heart disease on the progression from asymptomatic left
ventricular  dysfunction  to  symptomatic  heart  failure:  a
retrospective analysis from the Studies of  Left Ventricular
Dysfunction (SOLVD) Prevention trial. Am Heart J 2004; 148:
883–888
18. O’Connor CM, Gattis WA, Shaw L, Cuffe MS, Califf RM. Clinical
characteristics and long-term outcomes of patients with heart
failure and preserved systolic function. Am J Cardiol 2000; 86:
863–867
19. Shindler DM, Kostis JB, Yusuf S, Quinones MA, Pitt B, Stewart D, et
al. Diabetes mellitus, a predictor of  morbidity and mortality in the
Studies of Left Ventricular Dysfunction (SOLVD) Trials and Registry.
Am J Cardiol 1996; 77: 1017–1020
20. Hunt SA, Baker DW, Chin MH, Cinquegrani MP, Feldman AM,
Francis GS, et al. ACC/AHA guidelines for the evaluation and
management of chronic heart failure in the adult: executive
summary. J Am Coll Cardiol 2001; 38: 2101–2113
21. Lowe LP, Liu K, Greenland P, Metzger BE, Dyer AR, Stamler J.
Diabetes, asymptomatic hyperglycemia, and 22-year mortality in
black and white men. The Chicago Heart Assocation Detection
Project in Industry Study. Diabetes Care 1997; 20: 163–169
22. Waller BF, Palumbo PJ, Lie JT, Roberts WC. Status of the coronary
arteries at necropsy in diabetes mellitus with onset after age 30
years. Analysis of 229 diabetic patients with and without clinical
evidence of  coronary heart disease and comparison to 183 control
subjects. Am J Med 1980; 69: 498–506
23. Pekkanen J, Linn S, Heiss G, Suchindran CM, Leon A, Rifkind BM,
et al. Ten-year mortality from cardiovascular disease in relation to
cholesterol level among men with and without pre-existing
cardiovascular disease. N Engl J Med 1990; 322: 1700–1707
24. Rosengren A, Welin L, Tsipogianni A, Wilhelmsen L. Impact of
cardiovascular risk factors on coronary heart disease and mortality
among middle-aged diabetic men: a general population study. BMJ
1989; 299: 1127–1131
25. Malmberg K, Yusuf S, Gerstein H, Brown J, Zhao F, Hunt D, et al.
Impact of diabetes on long-term prognosis in patients with unstable
angina and non-Q-wave myocardial infarction. Results of  the
OASIS (Organization to Assess Strategies for Ischemic Syndromes)
registry. Circulation 2000; 102: 1014–1019
26. Aguilar D, Solomon SD, Kober L, Rouleau JL, Skali H, McMurray
JJ, et al. Newly diagnosed and previously known diabetes mellitus
and 1-year outcomes of  acute myocardial infarction: the Valsartan
In Acute myocardial iNfarcTion (VALIANT) trial. Circulation 2004;
110: 1572–1578
27. Jaffe AS, Spadaro JJ, Schechtman K, Roberts R, Geltman EM, Sobel
BE. Increased congestive heart failure after myocardial infarction
of  modest extent in patients with diabetes mellitus. Am Heart J
1984; 108: 31–37
28. Stone PH, Muller JE, Hartwell T, York BJ, Rutherford JD, Parker CB,
et al. The effect of diabetes mellitus on prognosis and serial left
ventricular function after myocardial infarction: contribution of
both coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction to
the adverse prognosis. The MILIS study group. J Am Coll Cardiol
1989; 14: 49–57
29. Solang L, Malmberg K, Ryden L. Diabetes mellitus and congestive
heart failure. Further knowledge needed. Eur Heart J 1999; 20:
789–795
30. Takahashi N, Iwasaka T, Suigura T, Hasegawa T, Tarumi N, Kimura
Y, et al. Left ventricular regional function after acute myocardial
infarction in diabetic patients. Diabetes Care 1989; 12: 630–635
31. Iwasaka T, Takahashi N, Nakamura S, Sugiura T, Tarumi N, Kimura
Y, et al. Residual left ventricular pump function after acute
myocardial infarction in diabetic patients. Diabetes Care 1992; 15:
1522–1526
32. Nahser PJ Jr, Brown RE, Oskarsson H, Winniford MD, Rossen JD.
Maximal  coronary  flow  reserve  and  metabolic  coronary
vasodilation in patients with diabetes mellitus. Circulation 1995;
91: 635-640
33. Solomon SD, St John Sutton M, Lamas GA, Plappert T, Rouleau JL,
Skali H, et al. Ventricular remodeling does not accompany the
development of heart failure in diabetic patients after myocardial
infarction. Circulation 2002; 106: 1251–1255
34. Bell DS. Diabetic cardiomyopathy: a unique entity or a complication
of coronary artery disease? Diabetes Care 1995; 18: 708–714
IHJ-891-05(Review).p65
11/15/2005, 4:25 PM
301
application software utility:Online Convert Excel to PDF file. Best free online export xlsx
Online Excel to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a Excel File to PDF. Drag and drop your excel file into the box or click
www.rasteredge.com
application software utility:VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Word, C# extract text from PDF, C# convert PDF to Jpeg, C# compress PDF, C# print PDF, C# merge PDF files, C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read
www.rasteredge.com
302 Desai et al. Diabetes and Heart Failure
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 295–303
35. Devereux RB, Roman MJ, Paranicas M, O’Grady MJ, Lee ET, Welty
TK, et al. Impact of diabetes on cardiac structure and function: the
strong heart study. Circulation 2000; 101: 2271–2276
36. Di Bello V,  Talarico L, Picano E, Di Muro C, Landini L, Paterni M, et
al. Increased echodensity of myocardial wall in the diabetic heart:
an ultrasound tissue characterization study. J Am Coll Cardiol 1995;
25: 1408–1415
37. Hardin NJ. The myocardial and vascular pathology of diabetic
cardiomyopathy. Coron Artery Dis 1996; 7: 99–108
38. Perez JE, McGill JB, Santiago JV, Schechtman KB, Waggoner AD,
Miller JG, et al. Abnormal myocardial acoustic properties in diabetic
patients and their correlation with the severity of disease. J Am
Coll Cardiol 1992; 19: 1154–1162
39. Fang ZY, Prins JB, Marwick TH. Diabetic cardiomyopathy: evidence,
mechanisms and therapeutic implications. Endocr Rev 2004; 25:
543–567
40. Fang ZY, Yuda S, Anderson V, Short L, Case C, Marwick TH.
Echocardiographic detection of early diabetic myocardial disease.
J Am Coll Cardiol 2003; 41: 611–617
41. Sowers  JR,  Epstein  M.  Diabetes  mellitus  and  associated
hypertension, vascular disease, and nephropathy. An update.
Hypertension 1995; 26: 869–879
42. van Hoeven KH, Factor SM. A comparison of the pathological
spectrum of hypertensive, diabetic, and hypertensive-diabetic heart
disease. Circulation 1990; 82: 848–855
43. Liu JE, Palmieri V, Roman MJ, Bella JN, Fabsitz R, Howard BV,
et al. The impact of diabetes on left ventricular filling pattern in
normotensive and hypertensive adults. The Strong Heart Study. J
Am Coll Cardiol 2001; 37: 1943–1949
44. Taegtmeyer  H,  McNulty  P,  Young  ME.  Adaptation  and
maladaptation of the heart in diabetes: Part I: general concepts.
Circulation 2002; 105: 1727–1733
45. Coughlin SS, Pearle DL, Baughman KL. Wasserman A, Tefft MC
Diabetes mellitus and the risk of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.
The Washington, DC Dilated Cardiomyopathy Study. Ann Epidemiol
1994; 4: 67–74
46. Hayat SA, Patel B, Khattar RS, Malik RA. Diabetic cardiomyopathy:
mechanisms, diagnosis, and treatment. Clin Sci 2004; 107: 539–
557
47. Rodrigues B, Cam MC, McNeill JH. Metabolic disturbances in
diabetic cardiomyopathy. Mol Cell Biochem 1998; 180: 53–57
48. Zieman S, Kass D. Advanced glycation end product cross-linking:
pathophysiologic role and therapeutic target in cardiovascular
disease. Congest Heart Fail 2004; 10:144–149
49. Depre C, Young ME, Ying J, Ahuja HS, Han Q, Garza N, et al.
Streptozotocin-induced changes in cardiac gene expression in the
absence of severe contractile dysfunction. J Mol Cell Cardiol 2000;
32: 985–996
50. Golfman L, Dixon IM, Takeda N, Chapman D, Dhalla NS. Differential
changes in cardiac myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic reticular gene
expression in alloxan-induced diabetes. Mol Cell Biochem 1999;
200: 15–25
51. Cockcroft  JR,  Webb  DJ,  Wilkinson  IB.  Arterial  stiffness,
hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. J Hum Hypertens 2000; 14:
377–380
52. Beckman JA, Creager MA, Libby P. Diabetes and atherosclerosis:
epidemiology, pathophysiology, and management. JAMA 2002;
287: 2570–2581
53. Katz SD, Hryniewicz K, Hriljac I, Balidemaj K, Dimayuga C,
Hudaihed A, et al. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and mortality
risk in patients with chronic heart failure. Circulation 2005; 111:
310–314
54. Zola B, Kahn JK, Juni JE, Vinik AI. Abnormal cardiac function in
diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy in the absence of
ischemic heart disease. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 1986; 63:208–214
55. Coutinho M, Gerstein H, Wang Y, Yusuf S. The relationship between
glucose and incident cardiovascular events. A metaregression
analysis of published data from 20 studies of 95,783 individuals
followed for 12.4 years. Diabetes Care 1999; 22: 233–240
56. Iribarren C, Karter AJ, Go AS, Ferrara A, Liu JY, Sidney S, et al.
Glycemic control and heart failure among adult patients with
diabetes. Circulation 2001; 103: 2668–2673
57. UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) Group. Intensive blood-
glucose control with sulphonylureas or insulin compared with
conventional treatment and risk of complications in patients with
type 2 diabetes (UKPDS 33). Lancet 1998; 352: 837–853
58. UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) Group. Effect of intensive
blood-glucose control with metformin on complications in
overweight patients with type 2 diabetes (UKPDS 34). Lancet 1998;
352: 854–865
59. Knowler WC, Barrett-Connor E, Fowler SE, Hamman RF, Lachin
JM, Walker EA, et al. Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group.
Reduction in the incidence of  type 2 diabetes with lifestyle
intervention or metformin. N Engl J Med 2002; 346: 393-403
60. Parulkar AA, Pendergrass ML, Granda-Ayala R, Lee TR, Fonseca
VA. Nonhypoglycemic effects of thiazolidinediones. Ann Intern Med
2001; 134: 61-71
61. Product Information: Glucophage(R), metformin. Bristol-Myers
Squibb, Princeton, NJ, 1999
62. Nesto RW, Bell D, Bonow RO, Fonseca V, Grundy SM, Horton ES, et
al. Thiazolidinedione use, fluid retention, and congestive heart
failure: a  consensus statement  from  the American Heart
Association and American Diabetes Association. October 7, 2003.
Circulation 2003; 108: 2941–2948
63. Actos (pioglitazone hydrochloride) [package insert]. Lincolnshire,
Ill: Takeda Pharmaceuticals America, Inc; 2002; Avandia
(rosiglitazone maleate) [package insert]. Philadelphia, Pa:
GlaxoSmithKline Pharmaceuticals; 2000
64. Masoudi FA, Wang Y, Inzucchi SE, Setaro JF, Havranek EP, Foody
JM, et al. Metformin and thiazolidinedione use in Medicare patients
with heart failure. JAMA 2003; 290: 81–85
65. Karter AJ, Liu JY, Moffet HH, et al. Pioglitazone utilization and
congestive heart failure among diabetic patients initiating new
diabetes therapies. Presented by Karter AJ at: The American
Diabetes Association and American Heart Associations’ Working
Group on Glitazones and Heart Disease; July 2002; Chicago, Ill
66. Tang WH, Francis GS, Hoogwerf BJ, Young JB. Fluid retention after
initiation of thiazolidinedione therapy in diabetic patients with
established chronic heart failure. J Am Coll Cardiol 2003; 41: 1394–
1398
67. Masoudi FA, Inzucchi SE, Wang Y, Havranek EP, Foody JM,
Krumholz HM. Thiazolidinediones, metformin, and outcomes in
older patients with diabetes and heart failure: an observational
study. Circulation 2005; 111: 583-590
68. UK Prospecitve Diabetes Study Group. Tight blood pressure control
and risk of macrovascular and microvascular complications in type
2 diabetes. UKPDS 38. BMJ 1998; 317: 703–713
69. Chobanian A, Bakris GL, Black HR, Cushman WC, Green LA, Izzo
JL Jr, et al. The seventh report of the Joint National Commission on
the Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High
Blood Pressure. JAMA 2003; 289: 2560–2572
70. Mitch WE. Treating diabetic nephropathy: are there only economic
issues? N Engl J Med 2004; 351: 1934–1936
71. Ruilope LM, van Veldhuisen DJ, Ritz E, Luscher TF.  Renal function:
the Cinderella of cardiovascular risk profile. J Am Coll Cardiol 2001;
38: 1782–1787
72. Sarnak MJ, Levey AS, Schoolwerth AC, Coresh J, Culleton B, Hamm
LL, et al. Kidney disease as a risk factor for development of
cardiovascular disease: a statement from the American Heart
Association Councils on Kidney in Cardiovascular Disease, High
IHJ-891-05(Review).p65
11/15/2005, 4:25 PM
302
application software utility:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
Word, C# extract text from PDF, C# convert PDF to Jpeg, C# compress PDF, C# print PDF, C# merge PDF files, C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read
www.rasteredge.com
application software utility:XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, Zero Footprint AJAX Document Image
View, Convert, Edit, Sign Documents and Images. Online Demo See the HTML5 Viewer SDK for .NET in powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
www.rasteredge.com
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 295–303
Desai et al. Diabetes and Heart Failure 303
Blood Pressure Research, Clinical Cardiology, and Epidemiology
and Prevention. Circulation 2003; 108: 2154–2169
73. Anavekar NS, McMurray JJV, Velazquez EJ, Solomon SD, Kober L,
Rouleau JL, et al. Relation between renal dysfunction and
cardiovascular outcomes after myocardial infarction. N Engl J Med
2004; 351: 1285–1295
74. Maeder M, Klein M, Fehr T, Rickli H. Contrast nephropathy: review
focusing on prevention. J Am Coll Cardiol 2004; 44: 1763–1771
75. Lin J, Bonventre JV. Prevention of radiocontrast nephropathy. Curr
Opin Nephrol Hypertens 2005; 14: 105–110
76. Gross JL, de Azevedo MJ, Silveiro SP, Canani LH, Caramori ML,
Zelmanovitz T. Diabetic nephropathy: diagnosis, prevention, and
treatment. Diabetes Care 2005; 28:164–176
77. Heart Outcomes Prevention Evaluation (HOPE) Study Inves-
tigators. Effects of ramipril on cardiovascular and microvascular
outcomes in people with diabetes mellitus: results of the HOPE
study and MICRO-HOPE substudy. Lancet 2000; 355: 253–259
78. The ACE Inhibitors in Diabetic Nephropathy Trialist Group.
Should all patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and micro-
albuminuria receive angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors? A
meta-analysis of individual patient data. Ann Intern Med 2001;
134: 370–379
79. Parving HH, Lehnert H, Bröchner-Mortensen J, Gomis R, Andersen
S, Arner P. The effect of irbesartan on the development of diabetic
nephropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes. N Engl J Med 2001;
345: 870–878
80. Jacobsen P, Rossing K, Parving HH. Single versus dual blockade of
the renin-angiotensin system (angiotensin-converting enzyme
inhibitors and/or angiotensin II receptor blockers) in diabetic
nephropathy. Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens 2004; 13: 319–324
81. Hansen HP, Tauber-Lassen E, Jensen BR, Parving HH. Effect of
dietary protein restriction on prognosis in patients with diabetic
nephropathy. Kidney Int 2002; 62: 220–228
82. Braunwald E. ACE inhibitors - a cornerstone of the treatment of
heart failure. N Engl J Med 1991; 325: 351–353
83. Garg R, Yusuf S. For the Collaborative Group on ACE Inhibitor
Trials. Overview of randomized trials of angiotensin-converting
enzyme inhibitors on mortality and morbidity in patients with
congestive heart failure. JAMA 1995; 273: 1450–1456
84. Lewis EJ, Hunsicker LG, Bain RP, Rhode RD.  For the Collaborative
Study Group. The effect of  angiotensin-converting enzyme
inhibition on diabetic nephropathy. N Engl J Med 1993; 3219:
1456–1462
85. Barnett AH, Bain SC, Bouter P, Karlberg B, Madsbad S, Jervell J, et
al. Angiotensin-receptor blockade versus converting-enzyme
inhibition in type 2 diabetes and nephropathy. N Engl J Med 2004;
351: 1952–1961
86. Shekelle PG, Rich MW, Morton SC, Atkinson CS, Tu W, Maglione
M, et al. Efficacy of ACE inhibitors and beta-blockers in the
management of left ventricular systolic dysfunction according to
race, gender, and diabetic status: a meta-analysis of major clinical
trials. J Am Coll Cardiol 2003; 41: 1529–1538
87. Braunwald E, Domanski MJ, Fowler SE, Geller NL, Gerch BJ, Hsia J,
et al. The PEACE Trial Investigators. Angiotensin-converting
enzyme inhibition in stable coronary artery disease. N Engl J Med
2004; 351: 2058–2068
88. Cohn JN, Tognoni G. For the Valsartan Heart Failure Trial
Investigators. A randomized trial of  the angiotensin-receptor
blocker valsartan in chronic heart failure. N Engl J Med 2001; 345:
1667–1675
89. Pfeffer MA, Swedberg K, Granger CB, Held P, McMurray JJ,
Michelson EL, et al. Effects of candesartan on mortality and
morbidity in patients with chronic heart failure: the CHARM-
Overall programme. Lancet 2003; 362: 759–766
90. Granger CB, McMurray JJ, Yusuf  S, Held P, Michelson EL, Olofsson
B, et al. Effects of candesartan in patients with chronic heart failure
and reduced left-ventricular systolic function intolerant to
angiotensin-converting-enzyme  inhibitors:  the  CHARM-
Alternative trial. Lancet 2003; 362; 772–776
91. Pfeffer MA, McMurray JJ, Velazquez EJ, Rouleau JL, Kober L,
Maggioni AP, et al. For the Valsartan in Acute Myocardial Infarction
Trial Investigators. Valsartan, captopril, or both in myocardial
infarction complicated by heart failure, left ventricular dysfunction,
or both. N Engl J Med 2003; 349: 1893–1906
92. Brenner BM, Cooper ME, de Zeeuw D, de Zeeuw D, Keane WF, Mitch
WE, et al. Effects of losartan on renal and cardiovascular outcome
in patients with type 2 diabetes and nephropathy. N Engl J Med
2001; 345: 861–869
93. Lindholm LH, Ibsen H, Dahlof B, Devereux RB, Beevers G, de Faire
U, et al. Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with
diabetes in the Losartan Intervention For Endpoint reduction in
hypertension study (LIFE): a randomised trial against atenolol.
Lancet 2002; 359: 1004–1010
94. Weber KT, Anversa P, Armstrong PW, Brilla CG, Burnett JC Jr,
Cruickshank JM, et al. Remodeling and reparation of the
cardiovascular system. J Am Coll Cardiol 1992; 20: 3–16
95. Pitt B, Stier CT Jr, Rajagopalan S. Mineralocorticoid receptor
blockade: new insights into the mechanism of action in patients
with cardiovascular disease. J Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone Syst
2003; 4: 164–168
96. Pitt B, Zannad F, Remme WJ, Cody R, Castaigne A, Perez A, et al.
For the Randomized Aldactone Evaluation Study Investigators. The
effect of spironolactone on morbidity and mortality in patients with
severe heart failure. N Engl J Med 1999; 341: 709–717
97. Pitt B, Remme W, Zannad F, Neaton J, Martinez F, Roniker B, et al.
Eplerenone, a selective aldosterone blocker, in patients with left
ventricular dysfunction after myocardial infarction. N Engl J Med
2003; 348: 1309–1321
98. Packer M, Coats A, Fowler MB, Katus HA, Krum H, Mohacsi P, et
al. Effect of carvedilol on survival in severe chronic heart failure.
N Engl J Med 2000; 344: 1651–1658
99. Merit-HF Study Group. Effect of Metoprolol CR/XL in chronic heart
failure: Metoprolol CR/XL Randomized Intervention Trial in
Congestive Heart Failure (MERIT-HF). Lancet 1999; 353: 2001-
2007.
100. CIBIS II Investigators and Committees. The Cardiac Insufficiency
Bisoprolol Study (CIBIS II): a randomized trial. Lancet 1999; 353:
9–13
101. Haas SJ, Vos T, Gilbert RE, Krum H. Are beta-blockers as efficacious
in patients with diabetes mellitus as in patients without diabetes
mellitus who have chronic heart failure? A meta-analysis of large-
scale clinical trials. Am Heart J 2003; 146: 848–853
102. Younis N, Burnham P, Patwala A, Weston PJ, Vora JP. Beta blocker
prescribing differences in patients with and without diabetes
following a first myocardial infarction. Diabet Med 2001; 18: 159–
161
103. Anonymous. The effect of pindolol on two years mortality after
complicated myocardial infarction. Eur Heart J 1983; 4: 367–375
104. Bakris G, Fonseca V, Katholi RE, McGill JB, Messerli FH, Phillips
RA, et al. Metabolic effects of carvedilol vs metoprolol in patients
with type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension: a randomized
controlled trial. JAMA 2004; 292: 2227–2236
105. Fonarow GC. Managing the patient with diabetes mellitus and
heart failure: issues and considerations. Am J Med 2004; 116: 76S–
88S
106. Poole-Wilson PA, Swedberg K, Cleland JG, Di Lenarda A, Hanrath
P, Komajda M, et al. Comparison of carvedilol and metoprolol on
clinical outcomes in patients with chronic heart failure in the
Carvedilol Or Metoprolol European Trial (COMET): randomised
controlled trial. Lancet 2003; 362: 7–13
IHJ-891-05(Review).p65
11/15/2005, 4:25 PM
303
application software utility:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
NET library to batch convert PDF files to jpg image files. Turn multiple pages PDF into single jpg files respectively online.
www.rasteredge.com
application software utility:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF Demo▶: Convert PDF to Word; Convert PDF to Tiff; Convert PDF to HTML;
www.rasteredge.com
304 Puri et al. NT-ProBNP as a Predictor in AMI
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 304–310
N-Terminal ProBrain Natriuretic Peptide as a Predictor of
Short-Term Outcomes in Acute Myocardial Infarction
Aniket Puri, Varun S Narain, Sanjay Mehrotra
, Sudhanshu K Dwivedi, Ram K Saran, Vijay K Puri
Department of  Cardiology, King George Medical University, Lucknow
Original Article
Background: Risk  stratification  and prediction  of  high risk for mortality in  patients  with  acute coronary
syndromes is based on clinical evaluation, electrocardiogram, biochemical markers and various risk assessment
scores.  There is emerging evidence that N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide possesses several characteristics
of  an ideal biomarker. In this study we looked into the role of N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide in risk
stratification and prediction of  short-term events including mortality in patients presenting with acute coronary
syndrome.
Methods and  Results: A  total of 120 consecutive patients admitted with a diagnosis of acute myocardial
infarction, including both ST elevation myocardial infarction (n=80) and non-ST elevation myocardial infarc-
tion (n=40) were enrolled.  Serum N-terminal  probrain  natriuretic  peptide  was  measured  using electro-
chemiluminiscence  assay  (Roche  Diagnostics),  on  the  Elecsys  2010  system.  On  two-dimentional
echocardiography, modified Simpson’s technique  was  used to measure the ejection fraction  along with end-
systolic volume. Various other demographic variables, echocardiographic parameters and risk scores were also
assessed. Follow-up at  day 30 included a two-dimentional echocardiographic  evaluation and assessment for
worsening heart failure, recurrent ischemia, and repeat hospitalization. Death due to cardiovascular cause by
30 days was also noted. The mean value of N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide for the whole cohort was
2307±2287  pg/ml (271.4±269.1 pmol/L).  For the purpose  of  comparative analysis,  the median  value was
determined [1403 pg/ml (165 pmol/L)]. In patients having N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide above me-
dian, the end-systolic volume was higher while ejection fraction was significantly lower at baseline (p<0.05).
At 30 days follow-up, there was a further decline in ejection fraction from 47.7±11.4 to 43.9±9.9 (p<0.05),
and clinical outcomes were worse in this group. There was a 5% mortality in the entire study group and all
patients who died had N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide above median. On multivariate logistic regres-
sion analysis, N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide above median (OR=32.79, 95% CI 8.74 - 123.1, p<0.001)
emerged as the strongest predictors of adverse outcomes, including 30-day mortality (p<0.001).
Conclusions:  N-terminal  probrain natriuretic  peptide emerged as a  strong prognostic tool across the spec-
trum of acute myocardial infarction and had the strongest predictive value for short-term  adverse outcomes
including death. (Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 304–310)
Key Words: N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide, Acute myocardial infarction, Coronary artery disease
Correspondence: Dr Aniket Puri, B-58 Sector A, Mahanagar, Lucknow
226006. e-mail: aniket1@sancharnet.in
R
isk stratification of patients presenting with acute ST
elevation myocardial  infarction (STEMI) or non-ST
elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI), is fundamental
in determining  prognosis and choosing  appropriate care.
Currently, risk  prediction is based  on clinical evaluation,
electrocardiogram (ECG), biochemical markers and various
risk  assessment  scores.  Recently  there  has  been
considerable  interest  in  the measurement  of  plasma
neurohormones as  indicators of left ventricular (LV) dys-
function.  There is emerging evidence that these neuro-
hormones, mainly  natriuretic peptides  possess several
characteristics of  an ideal  biomarker. Brain natriuretic
peptide (BNP) and  its N-terminal fragment  (NT-proBNP)
aid in the diagnosis and prognostication of patients with
congestive   heart failure (CHF).
1
Evidence is  forthcoming
on the correlation of BNP and NT-proBNP levels with LV
dilation,  remodeling, ventricular dysfunction, and death
among  patients  presenting  with  acute  myocardial
infarction (AMI).
2,3
Elevated levels of BNP and NT-proBNP
directly reflect the degree of ventricular dysfunction  and
may indicate the extent or severity of the ischemic insult
IHJ-800-05(OA).p65
11/15/2005, 4:21 PM
304
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 304–310
Puri et al. NT-ProBNP as a Predictor in AMI 305
correlating with adverse outcomes.  In this study we looked
at  the  value  of   NT-proBNP  in  predicting short-term
outcomes in patients with STEMI and NSTEMI.
Methods
A total of 120 patients admitted to the coronary care unit in
our hospital with AMI, including both STEMI and NSTEMI
were enrolled for the study, from August 2003 to July 2004.
Diagnosis of STEMI was based as per the current ACC/AHA
guidelines, on  the presence of  ischemic  chest  pain,  ST
elevation 
0.1  mv on  ECG  in  more  than one lead and
increased markers of myocardial necrosis, namely creatinine
kinase (CK) MB and troponin-T.  Diagnosis of NSTEMI was
made for  patients 
18 years of age admitted with typical
angina within the preceding 24 hours, a positive troponin-
T test (>0.10 ng/ml) along with at least one of the following:
ST segment depression (
0.05 mv), T inversion (
0.1 mv) in
2 leads, or angiographically documented coronary disease
in the past.
4
Patients  presenting with a history of renal
failure, chronic heart failure or cardiogenic shock at the time
of entry were excluded from the study. The age, sex, detailed
clinical history including that of diabetes mellitus, smoking,
hypertension, family history of coronary artery disease
(CAD), hospitalization for CAD or ischemic heart disease were
noted. A thorough clinical examination including measuring
the body weight (Wt), pulse rate (PR), systolic blood pressure
(SBP), determination of Killip class  and ECG was done. TIMI
risk scores, separate for STEMI,
5
NSTEMI,
6
and the PREDICT
7
score were  also assessed. The PREDICT score  is a more
thorough clinical and ECG  score  which also  includes the
Charlson’s index for co-morbidities such as the presence of
diabetes, liver disease, cancer etc.
An informed consent for
participating in the study was taken from all patients.
Blood sampling: The best predictive value for NT-proBNP
was reported from  blood sampling between  72  and 120
hours in the  STEMI groups  and within 8  hours in the
NSTEMI group.
8,9
In our subgroup  of  STEMI,  blood was
drawn in a fasting state at a mean of 85 hours after the
event, while in the NSTEMI subgroup it was taken within
8 hours  of onset of symptoms with a mean of 6.1 hours.
Sample volumes of 20 µL were collected in EDTA vials and
assayed  using the  Elecsys  2010  NT-proBNP  electro-
chemiluminiscence sandwich assay kit provided by Roche
Diagnostics, at an ISO 9001:2000-certified  laboratory.
This test  is a  2  polyclonal  antibody directed against NT-
proBNP and has a measuring range of 5-35000 pg/ml. The
total leucocyte count (TLC) was also ascertained for each
patient.
All patients were  subjected to a detailed  echocardio-
graphy  (Echo)  and  Doppler  evaluation  at  day  7  or
pre-discharge.  Follow-up  two-dimensional  echo-
cardiography (2D Echo) was  done at day 30. Qualitative
and  quantitative  assessment of  segmental  and  global
LV function was done in all patients with a Hewlett Packard
Sonos 5500  machine and Hewlett Packard  calculation
program.  Modified Simpson’s  technique  was  used  to
determine  the  end-diastolic  volume  (EDV),  end-systolic
volume (ESV)  and  ejection fraction (EF).  Mitral inflow
velocities, E and A waves as well as the deceleration time
(DT) were recorded.
Clinical  end points  of  worsening  heart  failure,  re-
current  ischemia,  repeat  hospitalization  for  cardio-
vascular (CV) causes and CV deaths during these 30 days
were  recorded.  Worsening  heart failure  was defined as a
deterioration in  Killip’s  class of  > 1  grade. Recurrent
ischemia was defined as  one with a worsening of NYHA
functional  class  of  > 1  grade  during  the 30  days  and
required a step-up of anti-anginal therapy. Those who could
not  be  stabilized  on  medical  therapy  and  required
hospitalization either for recurrent ischemia or worsening
heart  failure  were  included  in  the  group  of   repeat
hospitalizations. The entire study was cleared by the ethics
committee  of  the  university  and  conformed  to  the
guidelines set for good clinical practice.
Statistical  analysis:  SPSS 11.5  software  was used for
analysis of the  data  obtained. The student's t test,  fisher
exact  test and    chi-square  test were  used to  test  the
significance between the study groups. Risk analysis was
carried  out by  calculating the odds ratio (OR) and  95%
confidence interval (CI). Patients were grouped according
to the median value of NT-proBNP into the above median
and  below median  cohorts, respectively. A  univariate
analysis was done followed by multivariate binary logistic
regression analysis. This was done to take into account the
confounding, multiplicative effects of the presence of more
than one factor in each patient. The receiver operator curve
(ROC)  and  area  under  the  curve  (AUC)  were  also
ascertained  to test the  significance  of  the results. The
number of patients in the subgroups (STEMI and NSTEMI)
were adequately represented for statistical significance. The
body weight, pulse rate, SBP,  Killip class, TLC, TIMI score
and  PREDICT  score  were  analyzed  in  each  group.
Comparison of  all parameters with echo indices (i.e. ESV,
EF, DT) was  performed.
Results
Eighty patients presenting with STEMI and 40 patients
with NSTEMI were enrolled. The mean age of the patients
IHJ-800-05(OA).p65
11/15/2005, 4:21 PM
305
306 Puri et al. NT-ProBNP as a Predictor in AMI
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 304–310
was 55±11 years, and 80% of them  were males. The entire
cohort included  diabetics  (30%),  hypertensive  (41.2%),
dyslipidemic (53.3%), smokers (61%), obese (31%), those
with  a  positive family history of CAD (28.3%)  and those
having previous  MI (5%).  All  patients  of  STEMI  were
thrombolyzed and patients with NSTEMI were managed
with aggressive medical therapy including heparin for up
to 7  days. All patients were treated  as per  the standard
guidelines set for medical treatment and this was left to the
discretion of the physician on an intention-to-treat basis.
NT pro-BNP  levels:  NT-proBNP levels in the full cohort
ranged from 21  to 13490 pg/ml.  The  mean levels were
2307±2287  pg/ml (271.4±269.1  pmol/L)  with  the
median  NT-proBNP  as  1403 pg/ml (165 pmol/L). The
conversion factor from pmol/L to  pg/ml is approximately
8.5. Within this cohort the levels were higher in the STEMI
subgroup with the median value being 1738 pg/ml (mean
2650±2760) versus NSTEMI where    median level  was
1034 pg/ml (mean 1626±1915 pg/ml).
Baseline characteristics and variables in patients above
and below median are shown in Table 1. ESV was higher
while EF and DT were lower  in the above median group;
TLC was also significantly higher in this group (p<0.05).
No significant difference between the two groups was noted
with  respect to other  variables. These  differences were
notably  maintained  at  day  30 but in those with above
median levels of  NT-proBNP, a further significant decline
in EF was noted (p<0.05). A non-significant decline in EF
was noted in the below median group also (Table 2). The
number of patients having EF below 40% was significantly
more in the above median group (
χ
2
= 16.88, OR= 10.23,
95% CI 2.63 – 46.48) ( p<0.01).
At 30-day clinical follow-up there was a significantly
higher  incidence  of     recurrent  ischemia  (p<0.001),
worsening heart failure (p=0.02) and repeat hospitalizations
(p=0.002)  in the above median  group. There was a  5%
mortality at  30-day  follow-up (Table 3). The mean  NT-
proBNP level in patients who  died  was  extremely high
[7049±2998 pg/ml (median  7149 pg/ml)] compared to
patients who survived [OR: 5.27 (p<0.001)] (Table 4).
Subgroup  analysis -  STEMI:  The mean levels  of  NT-
proBNP were 2650±2760 pg/ml and the median was 1738
pg/ml. Baseline characteristics showed that ESV was higher
while EF was lower in the above median group (p<0.01).
Killip class and TLC  were also significantly higher in this
group (p<0.05).  2D Echo at day 30 revealed that difference
in ESV and EF was maintained  with a further decrease in
Table 1.  Baseline variables in groups having NT-proBNP
above median and below median (1403 pg/ml)
Below  median
Above median
p value
(n=60)
(n=60)
Age (years)
54.0 ± 11.0
55.40 ±11.0
0.45
Index diagnosis:
STEMI
33 (55%)
47 (78.3%)
0.006*
NSTEMI
27 (45%)
13 (21.7%)
0.006*
Smokers (n=73, 61%)
34 (56.6%)
39 (65%)
0.36
Obese (n=37, 31%)
21 (35%)
16 (26.7%)
0.32
Hypertensive (n=54, 41.2%)
27 (45%)
27 (45%)
NS
Dyslipidemia (n=64, 53.3%)
34 (56.6%)
30 (50%)
0.69
Family history (n=34, 28.3%)
17 (28.3%)
17 (28.3%)
0.46
Previous MI (n=4.3%)
0
4 (6.6%)
NS
ESV (ml)
47.0±22.0
63.0±27.0
0.043*
EF (%)
57.8 ± 9.9
47.7 ± 11.4
0.001*
DT (seconds)
140.3 ± 35.6
127.4 ± 35.4
0.05*
Wt (kg)
63.0 ± 8.0
60.9 ± 8.0
0.20
SBP (mmHg)
127.0 ± 21.6
125.5 ± 21.4
0.70
Pulse rate (beats/min)
85.0 ± 17.5
84.0 ± 19.0
0.60
TLC
10173 ± 2210
12000 ± 3082
0.001*
* statistically significant
In the above median cohort ESV was significantly higher (p = 0.043), EF was signifi-
cantly lower  (p < 0.001), DT was significantly lower (p < 0.05) and TLC was signifi-
cantly higher (p < 0.001). No statistical difference was seen with respect to age,
smoking, obesity, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, family history, SBP, PR and
body weight in the two groups
NT-proBNP: N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide; STEMI: ST elevation myocar-
dial infarction; NSTEMI: non-ST elevation myocardial infarction; MI: myocardial in-
farction; ESV: end-systolic volume; EF: ejection fraction; DT: deceleration time; Wt:
body weight; SBP: systolic blood pressure; TLC: total leucocyte count; PR: pulse rate
Table 2.   Comparison of  echocardiographic variables at baseline and at 30 days
NT-proBNP below median (1403 pg/ml)
NT-proBNP above median (1403 pg/ml)
Comparison of
(n=60) (mean ± SD)
(n=60) (mean ± SD)
echo index at 30 days
Baseline
30 days
p value
Baseline
30 days
p value
p value
ESV
47.0 ± 22.0
50.0 ± 18.8
0.40
63.0 ± 27
68.5 ± 30.5
0.30
<0.001*
EF
57.8 ± 9.9
55 ± 8.6
0.10
47.7 ± 11.4
43.9 ± 9.9
0.05*
<0.001*
DT
140.3 ± 35.6
141.6 ± 34.5
0.85
127.4 ± 35.4
134.4 ± 37.7
0.30
0.30
* statistically significant
Worsening of EF at 30 days reached a significant trend (p=0.05) in patients with NT-proBNP above median
Comparison of 30-day echo indices between two groups showed that ESV is significantly higher (p<0.001) and EF is significantly lower (p < 0.001)  in patients with NT-BNP
above median
NT-proBPN: N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide; ESV: end-systolic volume; EF: ejection fraction; DT: deceleration time
IHJ-800-05(OA).p65
11/15/2005, 4:21 PM
306
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 304–310
Puri et al. NT-ProBNP as a Predictor in AMI 307
EF  noted in the above median group (p<0.01). In the latter
group,  30-day  clinical  follow-up  also  revealed  a
significantly higher  incidence of  recurrent  ischemia
(p<0.01), worsening heart failure and Killip class (p<0.05),
while no difference  was  noted in  repeat hospitalizations
(p=0.10) and mortality (p=0.65).
Subgroup  analysis-NSTEMI: The mean levels  of  NT-
proBNP were 1626±1915 pg/ml and the median was 1034
pg/ml. As in STEMI, the baseline characteristics  showed
higher  ESV  and lower  EF  in  the  above median  group
(p<0.05). Also, 30-day 2D Echo revealed that difference in
ESV and EF was maintained  with a further decrease in EF
in the above median  group (p<0.05). Thirty-day  clinical
follow-up showed a higher incidence of recurrent ischemia,
worsening  heart  failure,  repeat  hospitalizations and
mortality  in the above median  group but  none  reached
statistical  significance.
Regression  analysis:  In  the  full  study  cohort,  on
univariate analysis and estimation of  the 
β
-coefficient,
NT-proBNP  above median and  EF  <  40% emerged as
strong predictors  of worsening heart  failure,  recurrent
ischemia, repeat hospitalization  and death  at 30  days
post-event. While TLC was not a  predictor  of  death,  it
was significantly associated with other adverse outcomes.
Amongst  all the  parameters  studied,  only  NT-proBNP
below median  emerged as a strong predictor for freedom
from  adverse  events (Table 5).  On multivariate logistic
regression analysis,  NT-proBNP  above median (OR  =
32.79, 95%  CI 8.74  -  123.1,  p<0.001) emerged  as  a
strong predictor of 30-day adverse outcomes. NT-proBNP
above  median was also statistically significant (p<0.001)
for  30-day  mortality  (Table 6). It is  also  important to
note that neither the TIMI score nor the  PREDICT  score
reached any  statistical  significance  to predict  adverse
outcomes  or mortality at  30 days  in both  STEMI  and
NSTEMI subgroups. The ROC  data showed that the AUC
for NT-proBNP above median was 0.835 (95% CI: 0.880 -
0.970)  and  0.763 (95% CI:  0.792 -  1.026)  for adverse
events and death, respectively.
Discussion
The  mechanism of  production of natriuretic  peptides in
myocardial ischemia is unclear. Myocardial ischemia may
increase regional ventricular  wall  stretch  owing to local
Table 4. Comparison of  baseline variables among patients who died (n=6) and who survived (n=114) at the end of  30
days in the cohort
Death  (n=6)
Alive (n=114)
t test
p value
Mean ± SD
Mean ± SD
Age (years)
57.8±10.42
54.6±11.30
0.68
0.50
Wt (kg)
57.50±4.60
62.20±8.30
1.37
0.20
SBP (mmHg)
118.0±34.40
126.6±24.5
0.82
0.40
PR (beats/min)
73.0±33.9
85.3±19.2
1.46
0.15
TLC
11533±3220
11063±3093
0.36
0.70
ESV (ml)
98.3±44.2
52.7±24.4
4.26
<0.001*
EF (%)
35.3±3.7
53.6±11.0
4.05
<0.001*
DT (seconds)
134.2±38.52
133.8±35.9
0.03
0.99
NT-proBNP (pg/ml)
7049±2998
2057±2223
5.27
0.001*
(Median 7149)
(Median 1325)
* statistically significant
Patients who died had a significantly higher NT-proBNP levels and ESV and lower EF
Wt: weight; SBP: systolic blood pressure; PR: pulse rate; TLC: total leucocyte count; ESV: end-systolic volume; EF: ejection fraction; DT: deceleration time
Table 3. 30-day clinical follow-up
Full cohort n=120
NT-proBNP
NT-proBNP
p value
Odds ratio (95% CI )
above median
below median
(1403 pg/ml) (n=60)
(1403 pg/ml) (n=60)
Recurrent ischemia
n=39 (33)
n=32  (53)
n=7 (12)
0.001*
8.65 (3.13 – 24.81)
Repeat hospitalization
n=18 (15)
n=15  (25)
n=3  (5)
0.002*
6.33 (1.58 – 29.49)
Death
n=6 (5)
n=6  (10)
n=0
0.014*
OR undefined
* statistically significant
Figure in parentheses show precentage
The number of adverse events including death were more in patients with NT-proBNP above median; NT-proBNP: N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide
IHJ-800-05(OA).p65
11/15/2005, 4:21 PM
307
308 Puri et al. NT-ProBNP as a Predictor in AMI
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 304–310
depression of  myocardial contraction. Mechanical stretch
can activate the JAK/STAT pathway stimulating BNP/NT-
proBNP  secretion  and  augment  the messenger  RNA
expression.
10,11
, BNP has been used to provide  prognostic
information in patients with  acute coronary syndrome
(ACS).
12-14 
Current knowledge indicates that NT-proBNP
may be a more sensitive and an effective prognostic tool in
these  patients.
3,15-17
In  the  present  study  we  have
demonstrated that NT-proBNP is a powerful  predictor of
adverse  outcomes including mortality at 30 days in  the
group of patients presenting with AMI.  On  multivariate
analysis, NT-proBNP  was found to  be  as  predictive of
mortality and morbidity as  the gold standard of  low EF.
Using  the  multivariate regression  analysis, NT-ProBNP
emerged as the only predictor of absence of adverse events
at 30-day follow-up after the acute event and this relation
was  equally  strong  across  the  entire spectrum of  AMI
patients.
The  interpretation  of   early  natriuretic  peptide
measurement in ACS patients can be difficult since levels
of BNP and NT-proBNP vary  according to index diagnosis
and rise continuously during  the first 24 hours after the
onset of ischemia.
8,18
Concentrations increase very rapidly
and steeply during the first day after the onset of myocardial
ischemia,  making the  comparison  of   concentrations
difficult.
In our study the mean time to sample collection
was 85 hours in the STEMI subgroup and 6.1 hours in the
NSTEMI  subgroup.
Recent studies  have  provided  information  on  the
sampling times  that provide  the best predictive  value for
NT-proBNP in patients presenting with AMI.
8,9
Measuring
NT-proBNP in STEMI, Talwar et al.
8
declared that samples
collected  between 72 and 120 hours provided  maximal
prognostic value. In studies  on NSTEMI, Jernberg et al.
19
measured NT-proBNP on admission and James  et al.
20
measured NT-proBNP   at  a  median of 9.5  hours from
symptom onset. However, it has lately been shown that NT-
proBNP is a strong predictor of  mortality irrespective of
sampling time, even up to 4 weeks after the index event.
21
The results of  all these studies clearly  showed  that  NT-
proBNP is a strong predictor of  mortality irrespective of
sampling time as was also concluded in a subsequent meta-
analysis.
22
It is challenging to derive any prognostic cut-off value,
implying that a single cut-off level cannot be used for NT-
proBNP  in  the  AMI  population.  In  clinical  studies,
Table 5. Prediction of  death and adverse  outcomes  (heart failure, recurrent ischemia, repeat hospitalization) and
prediction of  freedom from adverse outcomes at 30 days
Variables
Death
Adverse outcomes
No adverse outcomes
β 
coefficient
p value
β
coefficient
P value
β
coefficient
p value
Age
0.0067
0.87
0.0062
0.95
0.1274
0.13
PR (beats/min)
0.0621
0.20
-0.0564
0.45
-0.0758
0.51
SBP (mmHg)
-0.0175
0.76
0.1196
0.19
-0.0064
0.95
TLC
-0.0209
0.63
0.4705
0.001*
0.0020
0.98
EF<40%
0.2743
0.01*
0.3988
0.003*
-0.1683
0.30
High risk TIMI score
0.0656
0.25
0.2074
0.07
-0.0242
0.83
NT-proBNP pg/ml
-0.1139
0.03*
0.2589
0.04*
0.2635
0.007*
* Statistically significant
NT-proBNP and EF<40% were strong predictors of death and adverse outcomes at 30 days. Baseline TLC also attained significance for adverse outcome. For absence of adverse
outcomes only NT-proBNP below median attained significance.
PR: pulse rate; SBP: systolic blood pressure; TLC; total leucocyte count; EF; ejection fraction
Table 6. Multivariate logistic regression for adverse outcomes
Coefficient
Std Error
Wald
OR (CI)
p value
Age >60 years
0.66
0.61
1.19
1.94 ( 0.71 – 5.29)
0.28
SBP <110 mmHg
0.18
0.79
0.05
1.20 (0.32 -4.45)
0.82
PR >100 beats/min
-0.52
0.86
0.37
0.59 (0.15 -2.44)
0.55
TLC >11000
-1.35
0.74
3.32
0.26 (0.08 -0.88)
0.07
Killip class>1
0.35
0.72
0.23
1.42 (0.44 -4.62)
0.63
TIMI score
0.37
0.81
0.21
1.45 (0.38 – 5.47)
0.65
NT-proBNP >Median
3.49
0.80
18.85
32.79 (8.74- 123.1)
<0.001*
ESV >60 ml
0.62
0.70
0.80
1.87 (0.59 -5.88)
0.37
EF <40 %
-0.33
1.43
0.05
0.72 (0.07 -7.58)
0.82
Predict >12
-1.31
0.64
4.15
0.27 (0.09 -0.78)
0.04*
* Statistically significant
NT-proBNP above median - a strong predictor adverse outcomes at 30 days (p<0.001) and Predict score >12 (p=0.04)  also attained significance. ESV >60ml, EF <40% and NT-
proBNP above median also reached statistical significance (p<0.001) when multiple logistic regression for death was carried out separately
SBP: systolic blood pressure; PR; pulse rate; TLC: total leucocyte count; ESV: end-systolic volume; EF: ejection fraction
IHJ-800-05(OA).p65
11/15/2005, 4:21 PM
308
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested