Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 327–331
Jeyaraj et al. Fish Oil Supplementation in Hypercholesterolemic Subjects 329
marginally higher  than  that of  the subjects in the  test
group, but it was not statistically significant, whereas the
mean weight was  almost same in both the groups. The
height of the control and test group subjects ranged from
154 to 162 cm and  from 148 to 161 cm, respectively. The
body weight ranged from 48 to 66 kg in the control group
and from 40 to 77 kg in the test group.
Sedentary lifestyle which increases the risk of CAD was
reported by 62.5% of the subjects in the test group versus
75%  in the control group. Sixty-three per cent of  subjects
in the test group and 25% in the control group belonged to
the low income group, whereas 25% and 50% of subjects
in the test and control groups, respectively, belonged to the
very low income group.
Smoking was reported by 60% and 50% of men in the
test and control groups, respectively. Alcohol consumption
was reported by   20% and 50  % of  men in  the test and
control groups,  respectively.  Lack  of  regular physical
exercise was reported by majority of subjects in both the
groups. A family history of CAD was reported  by 12.5%
subjects in the test and 25% of the subjects in the control
group, respectively. Diabetes was reported by 37.5% of the
subjects in the test group compared to 50.0% in the control
group.  Hypercholesterolemia was reported  by 12.5% of
subjects  in  both the groups. Regarding dietary pattern,
25.0% of  subjects were vegetarians in the test  group as
against 37.5% in the control group. A large proportion of
subjects in the test (75.0%) and control group (62.5%) used
palm oil for cooking purposes. Groundnut oil was used by
25.0%  of  the subjects in  both the groups. A  smaller
percentage (12.5%) of subjects in the control group used
gingelly oil for cooking purposes.
Serum lipid  profile  of  the  control group (Table 2):
The percentage reduction / increment in all the parameters
after 60 days of the study period in the control group were
as follows : serum TC was increased by 1.8%, LDL by 3.4%
and TC-HDL ratio by 3.2%, whereas HDL was decreased by
1.6%, triglyceride by 0.9% and VLDL by 1.3% after 60 days
of  the study period.
Serum lipid profile of  the test group (Table  3):  The
percentage reduction / increment in all the lipid  parameters
after 60 days of supplementation in the test group were as
follows  : serum TC  was  reduced by 20%, LDL  by  21%,
triglyceride  by  37%,  VLDL by  36.7%, TC-HDL ratio by
23.4% and HDL was increased by 5.1% after 60 days  of
supplementation.
Table 2. The mean serum lipid parameters of  hypercho-
lesterolemic subjects in the control group  before and after
the study period
Parameters
Initial
61st day
p-value*
mean±SD
mean±SD
Total cholesterol (mg/dl) 240.25 ±12.86
244.63 ± 13.91
<0.001
LDL (mg/dl)
163.13 ± 11.79
168.63 ± 13.68
<0.001
HDL (mg/dl)
38.88 ± 3.16
38.25 ± 2.35
NS
Triglyceride (mg/dl)
191.13 ± 23.20
189.25 ± 21.53
0.004
VLDL (mg/dl)
38.25 ± 4.55
37.75 ± 4.31
0.002
TC-HDL ratio
6.16 ± 0.49
6.40 ± 0.52
0.004
*Test of significance was paired t test
LDL: low-density lipoprotein; HDL: high-density lipoprotein; VLDL: very low-density
lipoprotein; TC: total cholesterol; NS: not significant
Table 3. The mean serum lipid parameters of  hypercho-
lesterolemic subjects in the test group before and after fish
oil and garlic pearls supplementation
Parameters
Initial
61st day
p value*
mean±SD
mean±SD
Total cholesterol (mg/dl)
249.63 ± 18.74
200.00 ± 21.83
<0.001
LDL (mg/dl)
167.88 ± 21.47
132.63 ± 16.55
<0.001
HDL (mg/dl)
39.50 ± 5.06
41.63 ± 3.96
0.004
Triglyceride (mg/dl)
211.38 ± 59.77
133.00 ± 38.82
<0.001
VLDL (mg/dl)
42.25 ± 11.95
26.75 ± 7.79
<0.001
TC-HDL ratio
6.41 ± 1.09
4.85 ± 0.84
<0.001
*Test of significance was paired t  test
LDL: low-density lipoprotein; HDL: high-density lipoprotein; VLDL: very low-density liprotein;
TC: total cholesterol
Comparison  of   changes  in  serum  lipid  profile
between  the  two  groups  (Table  4):  Significant
reductions were seen in all the lipid parameters in the test
group (except HDL increase) compared to that of the control
group. The serum TC had decreased by 49.63±14.06 mg/
dl as against an increase of 4.38±3.46 in the control group.
LDL-c had significantly reduced by 35.25±15.83 mg/dl in
the test  group and increased  by 5.50±4.29 mg/dl in the
control group. The  serum  triglyceride  was drastically
reduced by 78.38±56.16 mg/dl in the test group as against
1.88 mg/dl in the control group. The VLDL had decreased
by 15.50 ±11.12 mg/dl in the test group and by 0.50±0.52
Table  4.  Comparison  of   changes  in  the  mean  lipid
parameters between the test group and the control  group
before and after the study period
Parameters
Test group
Control group       p value*
mean±SD
mean±SD
Total cholesterol (mg/dl)
-49.63 ±14.06
4.38 ±3.46
<0.001
LDL (mg/dl)
-35.25 ± 15.83
5.50 ± 4.29
<0.001
HDL (mg/dl)
2.13 ± 2.50
-0.63 ± 1.54
<0.001
Triglyceride (mg/dl)
-78.38 ± 56.16
-1.88 ± 2.22
<0.001
VLDL (mg/dl)
-15.50 ± 11.12
-0.50 ±0.52
<0.001
TC-HDL ratio
-1.56 ± 0.65
0.24 ± 0.28
<0.001
*Test of significance was independent t test
LDL: low-density lipoprotein; HDL: high-density lipoprotein; VLDL: very low-density
lioprotein; TC: total cholesterol
IHJ-843-05.p65
11/15/2005, 4:22 PM
329
C# convert pdf to tiff - Library software class:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
www.rasteredge.com
C# convert pdf to tiff - Library software class:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
330 Jeyaraj et al. Fish Oil Supplementation in Hypercholesterolemic Subjects
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 327–331
Library software class:C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Please copy the following C#.NET demo code to have a quick TIFFDocument doc = new TIFFDocument(inputFilePath); // Convert loaded TIFF file to PDF document
www.rasteredge.com
Library software class:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
›› C# PDF: Convert PDF to Jpeg. C# PDF - Convert PDF to JPEG in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF to JPEG Converting & Conversion Control. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
Library software class:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Convert PDF to HTML. C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to HTML in C#.NET. How to Use C# .NET XDoc.PDF
www.rasteredge.com
Library software class:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
This is a C# programming example for converting PDF The magnification of the original PDF page size Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified resolution
www.rasteredge.com
division  of   a  severely  hypertensive duct  are
Library software class:C# Convert: PDF to Word: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Microsoft
RasterEdge.XDoc.TIFF.dll. inputFilePath = @"**pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"**docx"; // Convert PDF to Word. C#: Advanced PDF to Word Conversion Options.
www.rasteredge.com
Library software class:Online Convert PDF file to Tiff. Best free online PDF Tif
Using this .NET PDF to TIFF conversion control, C# developers can render and convert PDF document to TIFF image file with no loss in original file quality.
www.rasteredge.com
Fig. 2. Sorin embolectomy catheter deployed through the arterial route used to
occlude patent ductus arteriosus in the same patient as in Fig. 1.
Fig. 1. Aortogram in left lateral view using a pigtail catheter shows a large Type
A patent ductus arteriosus.
Fig 3. Amplatzer duct occluder (8 × 6) used to close the patent ductus arteriosus
in the same patient as in Figs 1 and 2.
obtained while pulling on the balloon catheter.The decision
to proceed with device closure was based on a combination
of  the following parameters: (i) resting left-to-right shunt
>1.5:1, (ii) PVRI  on  oxygen  < 5 U/m
2
, (iii) difference of
IHJ-821-05(BR).p65
11/15/2005, 4:21 PM
333
Library software class:C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Tiff
from Excel; C#: Create PDF from PowerPoint; C#: Create PDF from Tiff; C#: Convert PDF to Word; C#: Convert PDF to Tiff; C#: Convert PDF
www.rasteredge.com
Library software class:C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Tiff
from Excel; C#: Create PDF from PowerPoint; C#: Create PDF from Tiff; C#: Convert PDF to Word; C#: Convert PDF to Tiff; C#: Convert PDF
www.rasteredge.com
334 Roy et al. Amplatzer Duct Occluder for Severely Hypertensive Ducti
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 332–336
are at a right angle unlike the origin and insertion
of the
ductus from the  aorta into  the pulmonary artery that is
angled and therefore there is a chance of LPA obstruction.
Also, in young children the  larger rim  on the  aortic side
may  extend too
far into the aorta and cause significant
obstruction. The AMVSDO is a bulky device and requires
larger sheaths for device delivery that may limit its use in
smaller children. The AMVSDO is nearly double the cost of
the ADO and thus use of  the latter leads to significant cost
saving.
To  our knowledge, this is the first  series  reporting
successful closure of PDA with severe PAH with an ADO.
7. Shyamkrishnan KG, Singh M, Tharakan JM, Dal A. A ten-year post-
surgical assessment of pulmonary hypertension in adults with patent
ductus arteriosus. Indian Heart J 1996; 48: 249–251
hocardiography
Fig. 1. Transesophageal echocardiography (transgastric short axis view) shows
diffuse thickening of the right ventricular free wall measuring 27 mm.
Fig. 2. Transesophageal echocardiography (mid esophageal long axis view)
shows a thickened right ventricular outflow tract measuring 14 mm. Pulmonary
valves are normal.
IHJ-931-05(BR).p65
11/15/2005, 4:26 PM
337
338 Mullasari et al. Lipomatous Hypertrophy of RV
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 337–338
revealed altered signal intensity  with loss of myocardial
hypointensity of the right ventricular  free wall. The wall
was thickened and the length of  the  altered signal  was
6.7 cm.
The  coronary arteries were  normal.  A transvenous
endomyocardial biopsy was  performed. Multisite biopsy
samples were taken  from the  right  ventricle.  Histo-
pathological examination revealed  lipocytic  infiltration
separating  the cardiomyocytes. These  lipocytes  were
mature  without  any evidence of  sarcomatous  changes.
Congo Red and PAS for amyloid and storage disorders were
negative. Collection of histocytes and other blood cells with
a few  interspread of  fat globules were seen  making  the
presence of “macrophage incidental cardiac excrescence”.
Cardiocytes were unremarkable (Figs 3 and 4).
Discussion
Lipomatous hypertrophy of the interatrial septum was first
described in a postmortem in 1964.
2
With the widespread
use of  echocardiography, this condition is now increasingly
recognized. Often described  in the middle  aged obese
individuals, this is essentially a benign condition.
On  echocardiography, lipomatous hypertrophy of  the
interatrial septum appears as a dumb-bell shaped thickened
septum, both cephalad and caudal with sparing of the fossa
ovalis.   Shirani and Roberts
studied  91 patients with
lipomatous hypertrophy of the atrial septum.  Of these 80
had an atrial septum measuring >20 mm. Atrial arrhyth-
mias were more common in patients with a thicker atrial
septum.
The nomenclature for this condition is still controversial.
While the term 'lipomatous hypertrophy of the interatrial
septum' is commonly used, an alternative descriptive phrase
Fig. 3. Endomyocardial biopsy (H and E stain) shows blood clots, histocytes,
fat globules and occasional monocytes (MICE) (× 40).
Fig. 4. Endomyocardial biopsy (H and E stain) shows infiltrates of lipocytes
interspersed between cardiomyocytes. Cardiocytes are morphologically
unremarkable (× 40).
'massive  fatty  deposits in  the  atrial  septum'  has  been
suggested.
3
These masses  are considered  to represent
lipomatous infiltration rather than true lipomas since they
usually lack encapsulation.  They may be considered as
hyperplasia  of  adipose tissue that infiltrates the  atrial
septum.  The reason  for a strong  propensity to afflict the
atrial septum alone is not known.
This  patient was  referred to  us  with a suspicion of
cardiac malignancy.  Echocardiography had failed to reveal
a typical bilobed appearance of the atrial septum.  Since
lipomatous  hypertrophy  of the atrial septum was not a
diagnosis we had considered, the atrial  septum  was not
biopsied.   While  lipomatous  hypertrophy  of  the  right
ventricle alone is not known, this could also be a secondary
fatty infiltrate of the right ventricular wall.  While adipose
depositions over the  right ventricular wall  and atrio-
ventricular sulci  have been  described, these are mainly
subepicardial and  not  diffuse.   The right  ventricle of our
patient was diffusely thickened mainly along the free wall
and the outflow tract.
We believe this is a rare case of a lipomatous hypertrophy
of  the right ventricle.
References
1. Nadra I, Dawson D, Schmitz SA, Punjabi PP, Nihoyannopoulos P.
Lipomatous hypertrophy of the interatrial septum: a commonly
misdiagnosed mass often leading to unnecessary cardiac surgery.
Heart 2004; 90: e66
2. Prior JT. Lipomatous hypertrophy of cardiac interatrial septum:
a lesion resembling hibernoma, lipoblastomatosis and infiltrating
lipoma. Arch Pathol  1964; 78: 11–15
3. Shirani J, Roberts WC. Clinical, electrocardiographic and morpho-
logic features of massive fatty deposits (“lipomatous hypertrophy”)
in the atrial septum. J Am Coll Cardiol 1993; 22: 226–238
IHJ-931-05(BR).p65
11/15/2005, 4:26 PM
338
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested