Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 339–342
Rao et al. Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation 339
Successful Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation of  Recurrent
Atrial Fibrillation due to Left Inferior Pulmonary Vein
Tachycardia
B Hygriv Rao, K Sharada, C Narasimhan
Division of Electrophysiology, Care Hospital, Hyderabad
Brief  Report
This report illustrates the case of a young lady evaluated for drug-refractory symptomatic paroxysmal atrial
fibrillation. Successful isolation of left inferior pulmonary vein was achieved by segmental ostial ablation and
circumferential Lasso mapping catheter. Patient is now free of symptoms and is off all anti-arrhythmic drugs.
(Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 339–342)
Key Words: Tachyarrhythmia, Atrial fibrillation, Radiofrequency ablation
Correspondence: Dr C Narasimhan, Director Electrophysiology
Care Hospital, Institute of  Medical Sciences, JN Road, Nampally
Hyderabad 500 001. e-mail: calambur@hotmail.com
P
ulmonary veins  are the established  foci  of  atrial
tachycardia and atrial fibrillation (AF). In  this case, a
young lady was evaluated for symptomatic paroxysmal AF,
which  was  drug-refractory.  Electrophysiological  study
showed  left  inferior pulmonary  vein (LIPV) tachycardia
degenerating  into  AF.  After isolation  of   LIPV using
segmental ostial ablation guided by three-dimensional (3D)
electroanatomical mapping and circumferential  Lasso
mapping catheter,  the patient is now free of  any symptoms
at 3 months of  follow-up, without any anti-arrhythmic
drugs.
Case Report
A  23-year-old  lady  was  referred  to  our  institute  for
evaluation of palpitations of one-year duration. She  had
undergone  successful  ablation  of   slow  pathway  for
atrioventricular  nodal reentry tachycardia  (AVNRT) an
year  and half  back and remained  asymptomatic for  6
months. She was reevaluated for recurrence of symptoms
of  episodic palpitations at rest. These were documented as
atrial tachycardia and AF by electrocardiogram (ECG). At
the time of evaluation she was receiving 50  mg  atenelol
and  400  mg  amiodarone  daily  apart  from  the  oral
anticoagulants. However, she continued to have recurrent
episodes of  tachyarrhythmia inspite of these medications.
Clinical examination  was unremarkable.  Routine
biochemistry  including thyroid profile was normal. Two-
dimensional (2D) echocardiogram  showed normal-sized
cardiac chambers with normal biventricular function and
normal valves. ECG showed normal sinus rhythm. Analysis
of  ECG  recorded  during the  symptomatic  tachycardia
showed atrial tachycardia with negative P waves in leads I
and aVL and positive P waves in lead V
1
suggesting left atrial
(LA) tachycardia.  After obtaining informed consent, she
was taken up for electrophysiological study with a plan for
radiofrequency  catheter  ablation. Oral  anti-coagulants
were withdrawn 48 hours prior  to the  procedure, while
amiodarone and  atenelol  were discontinued five  days
before.
Electrophysiological study: Electrophysiological study
was conducted in non-sedated and fasting state under local
anesthesia. The baseline intervals  were  within normal
limits.
A decapolar catheter was placed in the coronary sinus
(CS) by right internal  jugular  approach, a  quadripolar
catheter in  His bundle  location and  another quadripolar
catheter at  the apex of  right ventricle  (RV) was placed
through the right femoral vein. The RV catheter was moved
to right atrium (RA) when atrial stimulation was needed.
Antegrade  and retrograde  atrioventricular conduction
were assessed by atrial and ventricular pacing, respectively.
Baseline rhythm was sinus at a rate of 70 beats/min. During
the mapping procedure, a spontaneous  premature atrial
complex  consistently  initiated atrial tachycardia,  which
transiently  degenerated  to  AF.  Standard  electrophy-
siological criteria were used to diagnose atrial tachycardia.
Intracardiac electrograms during  tachycardia showed
organized  atrial  tachycardia  and  the  earliest  atrial
IHJ-932-05(BR).p65
11/15/2005, 4:26 PM
339
Pdf to tiff online - application control tool:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
www.rasteredge.com
Pdf to tiff online - application control tool:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
340 Rao et al. Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 339–342
activation with respect to surface P wave corresponded to
distal poles of the CS catheter. Hence, it was  decided  to
map the left atrium (LA). A transseptal puncture was done
by standard  technique and a 6  F  decapolar catheter was
advanced through  a  7 F Mullin’s  sheath into  the LA.
Another transseptal puncture was done in order to advance
the  7  F  quadripolar  mapping  and  ablation catheter
(Navistar, Biosense Webster, California, USA) through an
8  F  sheath.  Heparin  (100  IU/kg)  was  administered
intravenously after transseptal punctures and further doses
of heparin  were given guided by activated clotting  time
(ACT), which was maintained at 
250 ms throughout the
procedure.
As per the protocol in our laboratory for LA tachycardias,
pulmonary veins were mapped first. Mapping of the LIPV
during the atrial tachycardia showed a regular tachycardia
of  204 ms cycle length with distal to proximal activation
sequence (Fig. 1).
In contrast, the activation sequence in other pulmonary
veins  was  proximal  to  distal.  This  tachycardia  was
spontaneously initiated by a  premature atrial  complex
arising from the LIPV and a PV potential preceded each LA
electrogram during the tachycardia. It was decided to isolate
this vein by delivering circumferential radiofrequency (RF)
lesions around its ostium. Pulmonary artery angiogram
was done and studied in the levo phase to profile the ostia
of the pulmonary veins.
CARTO mapping: Electroanatomical  map  of  LA was
obtained by CARTO  mapping system (Biosense Webster,
California, USA). System  components  and  technical
principles  of   electroanatomical  mapping  have been
previously described in detail.
1
Briefly, a miniature magnetic
sensor is incorporated in the tip of  a 7 F mapping/ablation
catheter (NAVI-STAR,  Cordis Webster,  CA,  USA).  The
ablation catheter has  a 4  mm  tip electrode with 1 mm
interelectrode distance between the tip  and the first ring.
Three  ultralow magnetic field emitters  (using 3 different
transmission frequencies) are located beneath the patient
providing location and orientation of the mapping/ablation
catheter in 6 degrees of freedom (x, y, z, roll, pitch and yaw).
The reference  catheter  (REF-STAR, Cordis Webster, USA)
is  equipped with  an identical magnetic  sensor  and  is
externally  attached on the patient's back, directly behind
the heart.
Both, unipolar (filtered at 1-400 Hz) and bipolar (filtered
at 30-400 Hz) electrograms were recorded via the mapping
navigator  catheter, which was advanced into LA to map
this chamber.
Three-dimensional, electroanatomical  LA endocardial
maps were obtained during atrial tachycardia (Fig. 2). LA
geometry  was  created by collecting  mapping points with
the  navigating catheter  in  the  mitral annulus, the four
pulmonary veins, LIPV -LA junction and the LA appendage.
This catheter was advanced 2-4 cm into LIPV and slowly
pulled  back. During  pull back,  multiple locations were
recorded  to  tag the vein. The ostium  was  identified by
fluoroscopic visualization of  catheter  tip  entering the
cardiac silhouette with simultaneous appearance of atrial
potential. The complete PV ostium was mapped in order to
identify double or fragmented potentials in the bipolar local
electrogram. These local  electrogram sites are  labeled  by
Fig. 1. Panel A is the fluoroscopic image showing the decapolar catheter in the
LIPV and another decapolar catheter in the CS. Panel B shows the intracardiac
electrograms recorded during the tachycardia by the catheters shown in panel
A. The top two tracings are the ECG tracings from leads V2 and I, the next 3 are
the electrograms recorded by the catheter in CS. This is followed by the 4-
electrogram tracings recorded from proximal to distal electrodes of  the decapolar
catheter placed in LIPV (LIPV OST to LIPV D). The atrial activation sequence
in these electrograms demonstrates distal to proximal activation shown by the
line with arrowhead. Each electrogram of the tachycardia is preceded by a PV
pot.
LIPV: left inferior pulmonary vein; CS: coronary sinus; ECG: electro-
cardiogram; LIPV OST: left inferior pulmonary vein ostium; LIPV D: left
inferior pulmonary vein distal; PV pot: pulmonary vein potential
A
B
Fig. 2. The posterior view of the electroanatomic map of  left atrium obtained
by the CARTO system. The radiofrequency (RF) ablation lesions created around
the ostium of the left inferior pulmonary vein (LIPV) are shown.
IHJ-932-05(BR).p65
11/15/2005, 4:26 PM
340
application control tool:Online Convert PDF file to Tiff. Best free online PDF Tif
Online PDF to Tiff Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to Tiff. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button
www.rasteredge.com
application control tool:Online Convert PDF file to Word. Best free online PDF Conversion
Online Tiff to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a Tiff/Tif File to PDF. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button
www.rasteredge.com
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 339–342
Rao et al. Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation 341
color-coded dots in order to delineate the PV ostium. Thus,
identification of  PV ostium was achieved as well by the 3D
CARTO image as by the local electrogram characteristics.
Radiofrequency  catheter  ablation  (RFA):  After
characterization  of  the  LIPV  ostium,  RF  energy  was
delivered in unipolar mode by distal electrode of navigation
catheter to a cutaneous ground patch to create circular
lines of  conduction block. The temperature was set to 55°C
and 45W RF energy was applied for 120 s until the local
electrogram  amplitude  decreased to  80%. The  lesion
consisted of  contiguous focal lesions deployed around and
at a distance of 5 mm or more from the ostium. A total of
16 RF lesions were delivered at the end of which the rhythm
continued to  be  sinus. Following ablation,  circular Lasso
catheter (Biosense Webster, California USA) was advanced
through the Mullin’s sheath to LA and positioned to record
electrograms at the LIPV ostium (Fig. 3). This was used to
objectively  demonstrate  absence  of   pulmonary  vein
potentials in  this area. Standard  programmed electrical
stimulation protocol  was  carried out in the  right atrium
and right ventricle  with single, double and  triple extra
stimuli with and without increasing doses of intravenous
isoprenaline  infusion  followed by burst  atrial pacing but
tachycardia could not be induced. At discharge, patient was
in sinus rhythm.  She  was advised to  be on oral  anti-
coagulation for 6 months. Beta-blockers and amiodarone
were withdrawn.  At 3 months follow-up, the patient is
asymptomatic, and in sinus rhythm.
Discussion
This  case  illustrates  the presence  of   focal  organized
tachycardia in a patient localized to a single pulmonary vein
initiating  paroxysmal  AF.  Selective  mapping  of  the
pulmonary veins localized the origin of tachycardia to LIPV,
which  was  successfully  ablated  by  circumferential
pulmonary vein isolation guided by the 3D CARTO mapping
system. The ablation abolished the atrial tachycardia and
AF.
Focal atrial tachycardias are important to recognize, as
they are potentially curable. They may arise from various
sites in either atrium. In the left atrium, majority of atrial
tachycardia foci are inside or around the pulmonary vein
ostia, left atrial appendage base, and in close proximity to
the mitral annulus.
2
Organized atrial tachycardias initiated
by premature beats have been shown to occur at the onset
of  AF, which  are  more often  from  LA  in patients with
paroxysmal  AF.
3
The  distinction  between  origins  of
tachycardia from LA and PV is crucial and was resolved by
the distal  to proximal activation  pattern visualized in
mapping  the  LIPV,  which  would  be  reversed  in  the
tachycardia of LA origin. Apart from playing an important
role in genesis of AF, pulmonary veins are also known foci
of  origin of atrial tachycardia.
4,5
A distinction also needs to be made between pulmonary
vein tachycardia, which  is predominantly  ectopic atrial
tachycardia (PV-AT) where  AF is only a  consequence of
rapid atrial activation and a PV tachycardia, which triggers
AF (PV-AF). PV-AT has been relatively less described  and
its electrophysiological characteristics and management
strategies differ from PV-AF. In PV-AT, foci of tachycardia
lie closer to OS more frequently than deep in the vein, focal
ablation is associated with  a  higher  success rate  and
recurrences more often arise from the same site of ablation.
6
PV-AF, on the other hand, warrants more extensive ablation
involving isolation of all the four pulmonary veins. Ablation
strategies for pulmonary veins have varied from segmental
ablation,  circumferential  isolation  with  or  without
modification of LA substrate. The success rate achieved has
been over 70%.
7-10
However, a recent randomized trial has
questioned  the routine practice  of   isolating  all  four
pulmonary veins  and has advocated staged  isolation
starting  with  the  superior  veins  thus  reducing  the
fluoroscopy time and reducing the chances of pulmonary
vein stenosis.
11
This  is because  the superior pulmonary
veins have been shown to be more commonly the initiators
Fig. 3. The fluoroscopic image obtained after radiofrequency ablation procedure
with the Lasso catheter placed to record electrograms around the left inferior
pulmonary vein (LIPV) ostium.
IHJ-932-05(BR).p65
11/15/2005, 4:26 PM
341
application control tool:Online Convert Excel to PDF file. Best free online export xlsx
Online Excel to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a Excel File to PDF. Download and try RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF for .NET with online support. See pricing.
www.rasteredge.com
application control tool:C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Selection of turning tiff into searchable PDF or scanned PDF. Online demo allows converting tiff to PDF online. C# source codes are provided to use in .NET class
www.rasteredge.com
342 Rao et al. Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 339–342
of  AF. A recent series of 27  patients with PV-AT showed
superior pulmonary  veins to be the commonest site of
origin.
6
In our patient, we demonstrated the initiating focus
to be from the less common LIPV. The inferior pulmonary
veins are technically more difficult to map and ablation of
these veins is also associated with higher incidence of ostial
stenosis as their myocardial sleeves are thinner. Recent data
suggest that reentry mechanism in the pulmonary veins
may be responsible for initiating and sustaining paroxysmal
AF  (PAF).
12
Consistent  initiation of  tachycardia in this
patient by a premature complex arising from LIPV suggests
a reentrant mechanism for this tachycardia, which appears
to be responsible for PAF.
In view of young age of our patient and demonstrable
initiating tachycardia from LIPV, we decided to isolate only
the culprit pulmonary vein thus avoiding ablation of non-
involved pulmonary veins and the potential complications
of ablation.  Ablation  of focal  tachycardia  abolished  the
trigger for AF. Extensive ablation is reserved for recurrences
should they  occur  from  foci in other  pulmonary  veins.
Experience with ablation  of  focal  atrial  tachycardia in
patients  with coexisting AF  indicates  that a focal  trigger
may initiate both AT and AF and elimination of this trigger
may  alter  the electrophysiological  properties  of  atrial
substrate and hence, make occurrence of  AF less likely.
13
Nevertheless the likelihood  of AF recurrence  cannot be
reliably predicted in these patients warranting continuation
of oral anticoagulation for a few months. The utility of non-
fluoroscopic electroanatomical  mapping  in  ablation of
atrial arrhythmias is well-recognized.
14,15
CARTO mapping
shortened the fluoroscopy time,  guided the placement  of
RF lesions and ensured completeness of the circumferential
lesions.
References
1. Gepstein L, Hayam G, Ben-Haim SA. A novel method for non-
fluoroscopic catheter-based electroanatomical mapping of the heart.
In vitro and in vivo accuracy results. Circulation 1997; 95: 1611–1622
2. Gerstenfeld EP, Callans DJ, Dixit S, Zado E, Marchlinski FE. Incidence
and location of focal atrial fibrillation triggers in patients undergoing
repeat pulmonary vein isolation: implications for ablation strategies.
J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol 2003; 14: 685–990
3. Saksena S, Skadsberg ND, Rao HB, Filipecki A. Biatrial and three-
dimensional mapping of spontaneous atrial arrhythmias in patients
with refractory atrial fibrillation. J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol 2005;
16: 494–504
4. Anguera I, Brugada J, Roba M, Mont L, Aguinaga L, Geelen P, et al.
Outcomes after radiofrequency catheter ablation of atrial tachy-
cardia. Am J Cardiol 2001; 87: 886–890
5. Lesh MD, Van Hare GF, Epstein LM, Fitzpatrick AP, Scheinman  MM,
Lee RJ, et al. Radiofrequency catheter ablation of atrial arrhythmias.
Results and mechanisms. Circulation 1994; 89: 1074–1089
6. Kistler PM, Sanders P, Fynn SP, Stevenson IH, Hussin A, Vohra JK, et
al. Electrophysiological and electrocardiographic characteristics of
focal atrial tachycardia originating from the pulmonary veins: acute
and long-term outcomes of  radiofrequency ablation. Circulation
2003; 108: 1968–1975
7. Chen SA, Hsieh MH, Tai CT, Tsai CF, Prakash VS, Yu WC, et al.
Initiation of  atrial fibrillation by ectopic beats originating from the
pulmonary veins: electrophysiological characteristics, pharmaco-
logical responses, and effects of radiofrequency ablation. Circulation
1999; 100: 1879–1886
8. Oral H, Knight KP, Tada H, Ozaydin M, Chugh A, Hassan S, et. al.
Pulmonary vein isolation for paroxysmal and persistent atrial
fibrillation. Circulation 2002; 105: 1077–1081
9. Pappone C, Rosanio S, Oreto G, Tocchi M, Gugliotta F, Vicedomini G,
et al. Circumferential radiofrequency ablation of pulmonary vein
ostia. A new anatomic approach for curing atrial fibrillation.
Circulation 2000; 102: 2619–2628
10. Haissaguerre M, Shah DC, Jais P, Hocini M, Yamane T, Deisenhofer I,
et al.  Electrophysiological breakthroughs from the left atrium to the
pulmonary veins. Circulation 2000; 102: 2463–2565
11. Katritsis DG, Ellenbogen KA, Panagiotakos DB, Giazitzoglou E,
Karabinos I, Papadopoulos A, et al.  Ablation of  superior pulmonary
veins compared to all four pulmonary veins: a randomized clinical
trial. J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol 2004; 15: 641–645
12. Takahashi Y, Iesaka Y, Takahashi A, Goya M, Kobayashi A, Fujiwara
H, et al. Reentrant tachycardia in pulmonary veins of patients with
paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol 2003; 14:
927–932
13. Reithmann C, Dorwarth U, Fiek M, Matis T, Remp T, Steinbeck G, et
al. Outcome of ablation for sustained focal atrial tachycardia in
patients with and without a history of atrial fibrillation. J Interv Card
Electrophysiol 2005; 12: 35–43
14. Weiss C, Willems S, Risius T, Hoffmann M, Ventura R, Meinertz T.
Functional disconnection of arrhythmogenic pulmonary veins in
patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation guided by combined
electroanatomical (CARTO) and conventional mapping. J Interv Card
Electrophysiol 2002; 6: 267–275
15. Gurevitz OT, Glikson M, Asirvatham S, Kester TA, Grice SK, Munger
TM, et al. Use of advanced mapping systems to guide ablation in
complex cases: experience with non-contact mapping and electro-
anatomic mapping systems. Pacing Clin Electrophysiol 2005; 28:
316–323
IHJ-932-05(BR).p65
11/15/2005, 4:26 PM
342
application control tool:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Word, C# extract text from PDF, C# convert PDF to Jpeg, C# compress PDF, C# print PDF, C# merge PDF files, C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read
www.rasteredge.com
application control tool:VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF Demo▶: Convert PDF to Word; Convert PDF to Tiff; Convert PDF to HTML;
www.rasteredge.com
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 343–345
Manocha et al. Septal Dissection by ASOV Rupture 343
Aneurysm of  Sinus of  Valsalva Dissecting into
Interventricular Septum with Left Ventricular
Communication
S Manocha, NS Chouhan, S Mittal, AK Omar, Ravi R Kasliwal
Department of Non-invasive Cardiology, Escorts Heart Institute and Research Centre, New Delhi
Brief  Report
Septal dissection with left ventricular communication is a rare complication of aneurysm of sinus of Valsalva.
This report describes a case of aneurysm of sinus of Valsalva with septal dissection, almost in its entirety with
left ventricular communication – which is a very rare occurrence. (Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 343–345)
Key Words: Sinus of Valsalva aneurysm, Septal dissection, Echocardiography
Correspondence: Dr Ravi R Kasliwal, Director, Department of  Non-
invasive Cardiology, Escorts Heart Institute and Research Centre
New Delhi 110025. e-mail: rrkasliwal@hotmail.com
A
neurysms of sinus  of  Valsalva (ASOV) are rare and
account for only 1% of  congenital cardiac anomalies
with slightly higher incidence in Asian subcontinent. Septal
dissection  is  an  extremely  rare  complication  and left
ventricular communication is even rarer and to-date, only
eight such cases have been reported.
1,2
Case Report
A 33-year-old gentleman with no history of hypertension,
diabetes mellitus or rheumatic heart disease presented with
history of sudden onset retrosternal chest pain along with
dizziness on standing lasting for 15-20 min, 3 days prior to
admission.  General  physical  examination  revealed
tachycardia (pulse  rate 106 beats/min) with wide pulse
pressure (blood  pressure  146/56  mmHg in right arm,  in
supine  posture). The pulse was high  volume, normal in
character  and all peripheral  pulses  were  well palpable.
Precordial examination  revealed grade  III/VI  to and fro
murmur all over the  precordium. Twelve-lead surface
electrocardiogram  (ECG) and  24-hour Holter monitoring
did not reveal any atrioventricular conduction disturbance.
Two-dimensional transthoracic  and  transesophageal
echocardiography (TTE and TEE) revealed large aneurysm
of sinus of Valsalva of right coronary cusp burrowing into
the interventricular septum (IVS) (Fig. 1) causing septal
dissection, almost in its entirety with a small perforation
toward apical margin of the septal dissection resulting in a
communication with the left ventricular cavity (Figs 2 and
3). There was significant to and fro flow into the sinus of
Valsalva aneurysm (Figs 4 and 5). Mild aortic regurgitation
was also present.
The findings were confirmed intra-operatively. The defect
was  repaired  by  Dacron  patch  closure  of   mouth  of
aneurysm and subsequently the cavity became thrombosed
(Fig. 6). Post-operatively, the  patient had an uneventful
recovery  and was discharged on  post-operative  day 8.
The patient was asymptomatic on his  last  follow-up  at
30 days.
Fig. 1. 2D echo (Plax view) demonstrating aneurysm of sinus of Valsalva
dissecting into septum.  The arrow shows the entry point of septal dissection.
2D echo: two-dimensional echocardiography; LA: left atrium; LV: left
ventricle; An: aneurysm of sinus of Valsalva
IHJ-845-05.p65
11/15/2005, 4:23 PM
343
application control tool:VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Word, C# extract text from PDF, C# convert PDF to Jpeg, C# compress PDF, C# print PDF, C# merge PDF files, C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read
www.rasteredge.com
application control tool:RasterEdge XDoc.Tiff for .NET - SDK for Tiff Document Imaging
VB.NET developers and end-users have quick evaluation on our product, we provide comprehensive .NET sample codings online for reference. Convert Tiff to PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
344 Manocha et al. Septal Dissection by ASOV Rupture
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 343–345
Discussion
Aneurysms of  sinus of Valsalva  account for only 1% of
congenital cardiac  anomalies. Out of  these aneurysms,
70% arise  from right sinus of  Valsalva, 25%  from  non-
coronary sinus and only < 5% from the left coronary sinus.
1
Most common complications resulting from ASOV include
aortic  regurgitation,  coronary artery flow compromise,
atrioventricular conduction blocks, endocarditis and most
importantly,  rupture into  cardiac chambers.
2-4
Rupture
most commonly occurs into right ventricle (60%-90%) and
less commonly into right atrium (10%), left atrium (3%),
pericardium and  ventricular  septum (<1%).
5
Rupture  of
Fig. 2. 2D echo (Plax view) demonstrating the left ventricular communication
toward apical margin of dissected septum.
Ao: aorta; An: aneurysm of  sinus of  Valsalva; LV: left ventricle, LA: left
atrium
Fig. 3. Transesophagal echo (transgastric short axis view) showing rent in the
septum responsible for communication between aneurysm and left ventricle.
An: aneurysm of  sinus of Valsalva; LV: left ventricle
Fig. 4. Transesophageal color Doppler (long axis view) showing blood flow from
septal dissection to ascending aorta in systole.
Ao: aorta; LVOT: left ventricular outflow tract; An: aneurysm
Fig. 5. Transesophageal color Doppler view is showing blood flow into septal
dissection from ascending aorta in diastole.
Ao: aorta; LV: left ventricle; LA: left atrium; An: aneurysm of sinus of
Valsalva; IVS: interventricular septum; RV: right ventricle
ASOV into IVS is  exceedingly rare. This rare  condition  of
rupture of ASOV into IVS mostly involves right coronary
sinus with further communication into one or both of  the
ventricles, with significant aortic regurgitation, congestive
heart failure  and conduction disturbance. In the present
case also, ASOV  originated  from  right  coronary  sinus,
dissected into  IVS and  finally  opened into  left ventricle
through a small perforation in the IVS. To our knowledge,
only  eight  such  cases have been  so  far reported in the
literature.  However,  this  is  the  only  case  in  which
transthoracic,  transesophageal  and  post-operative
echocardiography images have been demonstrated.
Echocardiographic picture in such cases is diagnostic in
IHJ-845-05.p65
11/15/2005, 4:23 PM
344
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 343–345
Manocha et al. Septal Dissection by ASOV Rupture 345
Fig. 6. 2D echo (Plax view) during post-operative period showing patch repair
of aneurysm and thrombosed septum.
most instances. Demonstration of  the cavity within IVS,
communicating with both aneurysmally dilated sinus  of
Valsalva as well as left ventricle is virtually pathognomonic
of the disease entity. Traumatic dissection of IVS, congenital
aneurysm  of  IVS  and necrosis  within  intra-septal tumor
may present with a cavity within IVS. However, absence of
ASOV  and communication  of   the  cavity  with  it  will
differentiate these entities from the former one. On the other
hand,  aorta  to left ventricular  tunnel presents with  a
communication between aortic root and left ventricle but
in this condition, there is no cavity within IVS. Thus, an
accurate  diagnosis  of ASOV  rupture into  IVS  with  left
ventricular communication can  be  made  on  the basis  of
TTE and TEE to guide successful surgical repair.
References
1. Wells T, Byrd B, Neirste D, Fleurelus C. Sinus of Valsalva aneurysm
with rupture into the interventricular septum and left ventricular
cavity. Circulation 1999; 100: 1843–1844
2. Choudhary SK, Bhan A, Reddy SC, Sharma R, Murari V, Airan B, et
al. Aneurysm of sinus of  Valsalva dissecting into interventricular
septum. Ann Thorac Surg 1998; 65: 735–740
3. Choudhary SK, Airan B, Venugopal P. Dissecting aneurysm of the
interventricular septum. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg 2003; 23: 650–651
4. Wu Q, Xu J, Shen X, Wang D, Wang S. Surgical treatment of dissecting
aneurysm of the interventricular septum. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg
2002; 22: 517–520
5. Prian GW, Dieltrich EB. Sinus of Valsalva abnormalities: a specific
differentiation between aneurysm of and aneurysm involving the
sinus of Valsalva. Vasc Surg 1973; 7: 155–164
IHJ-845-05.p65
11/15/2005, 4:23 PM
345
346 Duggal et al. Covered Stents in Coarctation with Aneurysm
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 346–349
Covered Stents  Deployed for Coarctation of  Aorta with
Aneurysm
Bhanu Duggal, S Radhakrishnan, Atul Mathur, Poonam Khurana, Savitri Shrivastava
Department of Cardiology, Escorts Heart Institute and Research Centre, New Delhi
Brief   Report
Three patients presented to us with upper extremity hypertension and aortic coarctation. Aortic angiograms
and spiral computerized tomography delineated the anatomy at  the site of coarctation and the associated small
aneurysmal dilation.  They were taken up for percutaneous stenting of the coarctation segment with cheathum-
platinum covered stents. Post-deployment,  there  was a significant fall in  pullback gradients and exclusion  of
the aneurysms. (Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 346–349)
Key Words: Covered stent,  Hypertension, Coarctation of aorta
Correspondence: Dr Bhanu Duggal, Cardiac Catheterization
Laboratories. Escorts Heart Institute and Research Centre, Okhla Road
New Delhi 110025
H
istopathological specimens of the coarctation segment
have revealed focal increase in ground substance and
loss of elastic lamellae, and changes consistent with cystic
medial necrosis.
1
The  presence of associated aneurysmal
dilation is a manifestation of weakness of the arterial wall,
congenital or post-intervention.
2
Till recently, such patients
have been referred for  surgery. Endovascular procedures
using stent grafts  are  becoming  an  accepted mode of
treatment  for aneurysms  of  the thoracic  and abdominal
aorta in selected patients. We report our experience in three
patients of coarctation of aorta with small aneurysms at
the coarctation site in whom covered stents were deployed.
Case Reports
Between May 2004 and  September 2004, three patients
presented to us with coarctation of aorta. All three were
males in  the  age range from  16 to 35 years  and weights
ranging from 58 to 70 kg. The clinical profile of the patients
is given in Table 1.
All the patients presented with upper extremity hyper-
tension, reduced  femoral pulses, clinical and  echocardio-
graphic features of coarctation of  aorta. Patient 1 had been
in our  follow-up for the last  9  years.  He had undergone
balloon dilation at the age of five years and subsequently
developed a small  aneurysm  at the  coarctation  site.
Although serial magnetic resonance imagings (MRIs) did
not reveal any increase in the aneurysm size, it was decided
to intervene once he developed systemic hypertension. The
other  two patients had presented  de novo with systemic
hypertension and they were taken up for primary stenting.
All the patients were on anti-hypertensive treatment.
Written  informed  consent  was obtained. All  these
patients  had  undergone  aortic angiogram and  spiral
computerized tomographic angiography (CTA) to define the
anatomy of the coarctation segment. The diameters were
measured at the  isthmus, the  coarctation site  and the
descending  aorta  at  the  diaphragm.  As  there  was
aneurysmal dilation at the coarctation site (Figs 1a, 2a and
2b) and the coarctation segment was well beyond the origin
of the subclavian  artery, we opted for  the deployment  of
covered stents.
Cheathum-platinum  (CP)-covered  stents  (NuMed  Inc,
NY, USA) were custom made, and procured (Table 2). The
8 zig/row configuration CP stent, which can be dilated to
24 mm, was selected. The length was enough to cover both
the coarctation and the neck of the aneurysm, starting
distal to the left subclavian artery to about 15 mm beyond
the  coarct  site. The patients were  taken up for primary
stenting of the  coarctation segment. General anesthesia
was used during the procedure in two patients, and in one
the procedure was done under deep sedation (intravenous
fentanyl).
Table 1.  Clinical details of  patient
Patient Age
Weight
Previous
Upper limb blood
Drugs
No.
(years)
(kg)
intervention
pressure (mmHg)
1
16
70
Balloon
160/90
Atenolol
dilation × 1
2
24
60
None
170/100
Atenolol
3
35
58
None
180/90
Captopril,
atenolol
IHJ-863-05.p65
11/15/2005, 4:24 PM
346
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 346–349
Duggal et al. Covered Stents in Coarctation with Aneurysm
347
inner balloon  has  half the  diameter  of the outer balloon
and is 1 cm shorter than the outer balloon. The cheathum-
platinum  stent  is crimped over  the  BIB  balloon  and
advanced over  the extra-stiff  wire  and positioned.  Rapid
right ventricular  (RV) pacing was  done to decrease the
cardiac output for  accurate stent deployment. The  inner
balloon was inflated first, position checked, followed by a
rapid inflation  of  the larger  balloon, and stent  deployed.
After  the stent deployment, angiography  and pressure
measurements were repeated.  Persistence  of   residual
gradients with no evidence of aortic dissection called for a
repeat dilation using maximal pressures.  If it still did not
give way, a larger balloon was used but the stent diameter
did not exceed 3 times the size of the stenotic segment.
In patient 3, with severe coarctation and significant post-
stenotic dilation (Figs 2a and 2b), overdilation to achieve
dimensions similar to the distal (post-coarctation) segment
was not feasible as the recommended maximum diameter
of CP stents was 24 mm, and the necessary hemodynamic
Table 2. Descending aortogram and CT angiogram
dimensions
Patient Dia of
Descending aortogram
Spiral CT dimensions (mm)
No. CoA (mm)
dimensions  (mm)
Isthmus Dia of descen- Dia of
Isthmus Dia of descen-
Dia
ding aorta
CoA
Dia
ding aorta
1
9.3
13.43
12.47
7
13.2
13
2
9
18
16
6
16.6
16.2
3
8
16
17
4
14
17
Dia: diameter; CoA: coarctation of aorta
Fig. 1a.  Aortogram in right oblique view profiling the coarct segment and the
pre-coarct aneurysm.
Percutaneous access was  obtained from  the  right
femoral artery. The coarctation segment was crossed by an
endhole catheter on an exchange length Terumo wire and
the pressure gradient across the coarctation was obtained.
A  14 F Mullins  transseptal sheath was  passed  percuta-
neously, over an Amplatzer extra-stiff  wire placed across
the coarctation. The BIB (balloon-in-balloon) balloon was
selected to equal the size of the descending aorta or isthmus,
whichever  was  narrower.  The  BIB  balloon,  as  the
nomenclature goes, has an inner and an outer balloon. The
Fig. 1b. Post-stent deployment aortogram in the same view as Fig. 1a; the
aneurysm has been excluded.
IHJ-863-05.p65
11/15/2005, 4:24 PM
347
348 Duggal et al. Covered Stents in Coarctation with Aneurysm
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 346–349
changes  could  be  achieved  as  the  stent  extended
downstream excluding the post-stenotic segment.
3-5
Results
Stenting  for  co-existent coarctation and  aneurysm  was
done in 3 patients using CP stents of  length 45 mm inflated
to 14 to 18 mms. The mean difference in the peak systolic
gradient (PSG) was 30.3 mmHg and the mean increase in
the coarctation diameter was 7.2 mm (Table 3). In all cases
there was disappearance of the small aneurysmal dilation
with deployment of the covered stent (Figs 1b, 2c and 2d).
In  one patient  (Patient  3) the  extensive  network  of
periaortic collateral circulation got  acutely  obliterated
following the opening of the coarctation segment.
Patients were kept in the hospital for 48 hours to watch
for rebound hypertension and care of the access site. Chest
X-rays were done before discharge to reconfirm the position
of  the stent. The patients complained of  a peculiar chest
discomfort localized to left parsternal area in the immediate
post-operative period which settled down later.
In the follow-up period of 12 months the patients have
remained well. Though they continue to be hypertensive,
the requirement of antihypertensives has reduced. Chest
X-rays and echocardiograms confirmed the stent-position
and the  doppler gradient across the coarctation was less
than 10 mmHg.
Table 3. Data before and after stent implantation
BIB
PSG (mmHg)
Dia of  CoA (mm)
Increase in
Patient
balloon
Before
After
Before
After
CoA dia (mm)
No.
(mm)
dilation dilation
dilation dilation
after dilation
1.
14×4.5
30
10
14
9.3
4.7
2.
18×4
20
9
18
9
9
3.
14×4,
75
15
16
8
8
Tyshak
16×3
Dia: diameter; CoA: coarctation of aorta; PSG: peak systolic gradient
Fig. 2c & 2d. Post-stent deployment aortogram: well-opened coarct segment
with an excluded  aneurysm.
Fig. 2a & 2b. Aortogram in left and right oblique views profiling the coarct
segment, pre-coarct aneurysm and the post-stenotic dilation.
a
b
c
d
Complications: One patient, who was under intravenous
sedation, developed violent behavior after the procedure
which led to a large hematoma at the access site and severe
hypertension in  the first 24 hours requiring significant
doses  of intravenous nitroglycerine. He also had  severe
vomiting and a CT scan was done which did not reveal any
rupture or dissection.
Discussion
Due  to depletion  or disarray  of  the normally parallel
lamellae  of  elastic fibres  of  the aorta, it  can  become
emaciated. Balis et al.
6
described a ‘focal increase of  ground
substance’ and ‘loss of elastic lamellae’ in 27 coarctation
segments excised at surgery. This abnormality of the media
extends into the adjacent 'normal' coarctation segment.
Dunnill
7
documented  an  increase  in sulfated mucopoly-
saccharides with loss of  elastic lamellae proximal to  the
coarctation  segment  when  exposed  to  high diastolic
pressures.  Aneurysms observed in the  pre-coarctation
segment are a likely manifestation of this weakness in the
aorta. The aorta is continuously subjected to high pulsatile
pressure  and wall tension (Laplace’s Law: wall tension =
pressure×radius)  and  is  particularly  weak  at  the
aneurysmal site. All our 3 patients  had small aneurysms
at  the  coarctation site. Balloon  dilation, which relieves
obstruction by tearing the coarctation shelf with variable
and uncontrollable extension of  the tears into the media is
definitely precluded in this scenario. We  were concerned
about causing a dissection or enlargement of  the aneurysm
at the  site.  By  providing a scaffold for  the  weakened
segment,  stents  prevent  the  extension  of  any  tears
occurring during  balloon  dilation, maintaining  the
integrity of the vessel.
8
Previously these stents required >20
IHJ-863-05.p65
11/15/2005, 4:24 PM
348
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested