Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 346–349
Duggal et al. Covered Stents in Coarctation with Aneurysm
349
F  sheaths  and  surgical  access  to the  iliac  vessels for
implantation. Our 3 cases were done using 14 F Mullins
sheath via the percutaneous route.
6
The  newly  designed  CP  stent  is made  of  platinum-
iridium alloy. These are ‘8-Zig’ stents where the wire is bent
to  form  an  eight  diamond-shaped  mesh  for  the
circumference.  As  each  mesh  is  11 mm  long, various
lengths may be manufactured by welding further segments.
Its  diameter  ranges  from  8-24  mm  with  minimal
shortening  on expansion. Its rounded  edges are  less
traumatic than Palmaz stents.
Various studies of stent deployment in coarctation have
reported the natural history of  aneurysms with uncovered
stents. There was either partial exclusion of  the aneurysm
or no change in size. Sometimes they required deployment
of coils through the stent mesh.
9
Covered stents, by excluding the aneurysm lead to flow
stasis in the aneurysmal pouch, promote the formation of
a stable thrombus. In our patients the aneurysmal dilation
was excluded and the aortic contour visualized conferred
to the stent contour. Covered CP stents have an expanded
PTFE membrane on the outside, and it provides the dilated
area  an additional seal  to  avoid possible  bleeding  from
arterial ruptures/tears. Few case reports are now available
for the percutaneous use of these stents in this setting.
3,10-
12
In one patient (Patient 3) with severe coarctation there
was significant post-stenotic dilation with large collaterals.
In this case, the coarctation segment was dilated to achieve
the size of the  isthmus.  A narrow waist was deliberately
left to prevent stent migration. There was disappearance
of  the periaortic collaterals with the relief of the pressure
gradient. Heath  and  Edwards
13
explained ‘post-stenotic
dilation’ as  evidence of  exposure  to  constantly high
pressures ‘the jet effect’.
13
Hemodynamic studies of  blood
flow in aortic  aneurysms have documented highest wall
shear stress [tau(w)] and wall shear stress gradient (WSSG)
downstream of the aneurysmal site.
14
Canine models, after
endovascular repair,  have recorded  a  marked decline in
aneurysmal pressure and velocities of blood flow at the sites
excluded by the graft.
13
These altered hemodynamics could
help in remodeling of the the distal area.
Spiral  CT  angiography  and  three-dimensional  (3D)
reconstructions used to profile the coarctation segment and
the  pre-  and  post-stenotic  aorta gave  measurements
comparable  to  those  derived by aortography.
18
Hence  it
could be used as a non-invasive modality to determine the
size and diameter of the stent required.
Anticoagulation was given in only one patient who had
severe post-stenotic  dilation  as  there  was  dead space
between the stent and the  aortic  wall which  was not
exposed to  the  high pulsatile  aortic  flow. It  was  not
considered  necessary  to give the same in the  first  two
patients because of the flow characteristics of the aorta.
Conclusions: We report our preliminary experience with
covered stents in patients  with coarctation of aorta with
aneurysm.  However,  long-term  follow-up  studies  are
required in larger series of patients  before covered stents
are recommended as  the treatment  of  choice in patients
with aneurysms at the coarctation site.
References
1. Isner JM, Donaldson RF, Fulton RD, Bhan I, Payne DD, Cleveland RJ.
Cystic medial necrosis in coarctation of  the aorta: a potential factor
contributing to adverse consequences observed after percutaneous
balloon angioplasty of  coarctation sites. Circulation 1987; 75:
689–695
2. Edwards JE. Aneurysms of  the thoracic aorta complicating
coarctation. Circulaton 1973; 48: 195–201
3. Ewert P, Schubert S, Peters B, Abdul-Khaliq H, Nagdyman N, Lange
PE. The CP stents – short, long, covered – for the treatment of  aortic
coarctation, stenosis of pulmonary arteries and caval veins, and
Fontan anastomosis in children and adults : an evaluation of 60
stents in 53 patients. Heart 2005; 91: 948–953
4. Marston WA, Criado E, Baird CA, Keagy BA. Reduction of aneurysm
pressure and wall stress after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic
aneurysm in a canine model. Ann Vasc Surg 1996; 10: 166–173
5. Becker C, Soppa C, Fink U, Haubner M, Muller Lisse U, Englmeier
KH, et al. Spiral CT angiography and 3D reconstruction in patients
with aortic coarctation. Eur Radiol 1997; 7: 1473–1477
6. Balis JV, Chan AS, Conen PE. Morphogenesis of human coarctation.
Exp Mol Pathol 1967; 6: 25–38
7. Dunnill MS. Histology of the aorta in coarctation. J Pathol Bacteriol
1959; 78: 203–207
8. Suarez de Lezo J, Pan M, Romero M, Medina A, Segura J, Lafuente M,
et al. Immediate and follow-up findings after stent treatment for
severe coarctation of aorta. Am J Cardiol 1999; 83: 400–406
9. Forbes T, Matisoff D, Dysart J, Aggarwal S. Treatment of  coexistent
coarctation and aneurysm of the aorta with covered stent in a
pediatric patient. Pediatr Cardiol 2003; 24: 289-291
10. Qureshi SA, Zubrzycka M, Brzezinska-Rajszys G, Kosciesza A, Ksiazyk
J. Use of covered Cheatham-Platinum stents in aortic coarctation
and recoarctation. Cardiol Young 2004; 14: 50-54.
11. Haas Na, Lewin MA, Knirsch W, Nossal R, Ocker V, Uhlemann F.
Initial experience using the NuMED Cheathum Platinum (CP) stent
for interventional treatment of coarctation of  the aorta in children
and adolescents. Z Kardiol 2005; 94: 113–120
12. Pedra CA, Fontes VS, Estever CA, Arrieta Sr, Braga SL, Justino H, et
al. Use of covered stents in the management of coarctation of the
aorta. Pediatr Cardiol 2004; 18
13. Heath D, Edwards JE. Configuration of elastic tissue of aortic media
in aortic coarctation. Am Heart J 1959; 57: 29–35
14. Finol EA, Amon CH. Blood flow in abdominal aortic aneurysms:
pulsatile flow hemodynamics. J Biomech Engg 2001; 123: 474– 484
IHJ-863-05.p65
11/15/2005, 4:24 PM
349
Pdf to tiff file - SDK software API:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
www.rasteredge.com
Pdf to tiff file - SDK software API:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
350 Patnaik et al. Spontaneous Dissection of Coronary Arteries
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 350–352
Spontaneous  Dissection of  Coronary Arteries
AN Patnaik, D Seshagiri Rao
Department of Cadiology, Nizam’s Institute of  Medical Sciences, Hyderabad
Brief  Report
Spontaneous dissection of  coronary arteries is an uncommon entity with varied presentation. It is commoner
in young patients, specially females. We present three cases encountered by us in recent past. There were two
males and the only female was in her post-partum period. All the three had diverse lines of management based
on the angiographic picture, clinical background and myocardium at risk. (Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 350–
352)
Key Words: Coronary artery disease, Dissection of  coronary arteries, Atherosclerosis
Correspondence: Dr D Seshagiri Rao, Department of Cardiology,
Nizam's Institute of  Medical Sciences, Hyderabad
S
pontaneous dissection of coronary arteries (SCAD) is
an infrequent cause of myocardial ischemia/infarction
with complex pathophysiology. The underlying etiology is
atherosclerosis in less than half  of the patients. The non-
atherosclerotic cases occur predominantly in young females
specially in pregnancy and peri-partum period. Rest of the
cases  can  be grouped as  idiopathic. Associations like
hypertension, fibromuscular hyperplasia,  Ehler-Danlos
syndrome,  cystic  medial  sclerosis, hypertrophic  cardio-
myopathy,  mitral stenosis, oral  pills and cocaine-use are
described in the later group. The clinical  picture can be
varied. On one extreme, it may be an  incidental  finding,
while on the other hand it  can manifest  as cardiogenic
shock or cardiac failure.
1,2
Sudden death  is common  and
nearly  69% of  the cases are diagnosed in post-mortem
studies.
3
The strategy of management is not always clear.
We are presenting three cases that came to us in the recent
past.
Case Reports
Case 1: A 37-year-old policeman sustained acute anterior
wall  myocardial infarction (MI) 10  days back and  was
thrombolyzed  with streptokinase within  6 hours. The
patient was referred to our instition due to persistent angina
of NYHA class II. He was non-smoker, non-diabetic and
normotensive.  Lipid  profile  was  in  normal  range.
Homocysteine  and  lipoprotein  A [Lp(A)]  were  within
normal limits. Echocardiogram revealed regional wall
motion abnormality in the left anterior descending artery
(LAD) territory with a global ejection fraction (EF) of 0.41.
Treadmill  test  with  Bruce-protocol showed  inducible
ischemia in stage II.
Selective  coronary angiogram revealed a 19 mm long
dissection  involving  the proximal  segment of  the LAD
(Fig. 1). It was type-B dissection with TIMI III distal flow.
All other vessels were normal. Multiple projections were
done to rule out linear intra-luminal thrombus. The options
of  angioplasty with stenting as well as bypass surgery were
offered to the patient. He underwent successful angioplasty
with stenting  achieving TIMI III distal  flow without any
residual  stenosis.  At a follow-up of  six  months, he was
asymptomatic, but refused a check angiogram.
Case 2: A 50-year-old businessman came to the outpatient
department of our institution with symptoms of  exertional
breathlessness of  3  months  duration. There was no past
history of acute MI  or  angina. He was a diabetic on oral
drugs and  moderate hypertensive,  well  controlled  on
medication.  He  was  an  occasional  smoker.  Clinical
examination was unremarkable. Electrocardiogram (ECG)
revealed Q waves in leads II, III and aVF.
Echocardiogram showed hypokinesia  of  the  inferior
segment with an overall EF of 0.48. The lipid profile showed
elevated total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein
cholesterol  (LDL-c)  and  low high-density lipoprotein
cholesterol (HDL-c). There was no cardiomegaly on chest
X-ray.
Selective coronary angiogram showed extensive  type-D
dissection of almost entire right coronary artery (RCA) (Fig.
2). The distal flow was TIMI III in RCA. The left coronary
artery  and  its major branches  were normal. Due to  the
single  vessel  involvement  with  extensive  dissection,
intensive medical therapy with close follow-up was offered
IHJ-814-05.p65
11/15/2005, 4:21 PM
350
SDK software API:Online Convert PDF file to Tiff. Best free online PDF Tif
Using this .NET PDF to TIFF conversion control, C# developers can render and convert PDF document to TIFF image file with no loss in original file quality.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software API:Online Convert PDF file to Word. Best free online PDF Conversion
Download Free Trial. Convert a Tiff/Tif File to PDF. Then just wait until the conversion from Tiff/Tif to PDF is complete and download the file.
www.rasteredge.com
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 350–352
Patnaik et al. Spontaneous Dissection of Coronary Arteries 351
as  management strategy.  He  was  asymptomatic at five
months follow-up.
Case 3: A 37-year-old female teacher was admitted with
central crushing chest pain of one-hour  duration. There
was no  history of   cardiac disease  or  any  identifiable
coronary risk factors. There was no history of use of any
oral pills or any connective tissue disorder in the past. The
patient had delivered  a  baby  4 weeks back. The ECG on
admission revealed acute anterolateral infarction and she
subsequently underwent thrombolysis with streptokinase.
Due to the persistence of  mild  chest  pain  and the ECG
changes, coronary angiography was done on day 10 of the
episode which  demonstrated type-B  dissection of  the
proximal to distal segment of the LAD (Fig. 3). The distal
flow was brisk (TIMI III). No other lesions were identified.
She was subjected to coronary artery bypass graft (CABG)
electively.  She  had  uneventful  recovery  and  was
asymptomatic on follow-up visits.
Discussion
Spontaneous dissection of  coronary arteries is a rare entity
with only about 300 cases reported worldwide. The possible
explanation is that there is primary abruption of the vaso-
vasorum and  subsequent  hemorrhage into  the media  of
the arterial wall. The exact etiology is unknown. Those
which show atherosclerosis constitute about  45%  and
perhaps their management is not much different from those
without  dissection.
1
The  non-atheromatous  group
Fig. 3. Coronary angiogram showing long dissection in the LAD in a female
patient in the post-partum period.
LAD: left anterior descending artery
Fig. 1. Coronary angiogram showing long dissection in the LAD in a young
male patient.
LAD: left anterior descending artery
Fig. 2. Coronary angiogram showing extensive dissection in RCA in a 50-year-
old man with coronary risk factors.
RCA: right coronary artery
IHJ-814-05.p65
11/15/2005, 4:21 PM
351
SDK software API:C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
TIFFDocument doc = new TIFFDocument(inputFilePath); // Convert loaded TIFF file to PDF document. doc.ConvertToDocument(DocumentType.PDF, outputFilePath);
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software API:Online Convert Excel to PDF file. Best free online export xlsx
Download Free Trial. Convert a Excel File to PDF. Your file will then be instantly converted to PDF and ready to download. The perfect conversion tool.
www.rasteredge.com
352 Patnaik et al. Spontaneous Dissection of Coronary Arteries
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 350–352
(idiopathic SCAD) is more common in pregnant females or
in post-partum stage or  those  on  oral  contraceptives.
Though the etiology is suspected on clinical grounds and
coronary arteriogram, the intravascular ultrasound can be
a more useful tool to confirm the atheromatous etiology.
Verma et al.
analyzed 266 reported cases and showed
that their mean age  of presentation  was 46  years and
women constituted about 63%.
First two of  our cases were
male  patients. The  first case  was more  likely  to  be  an
idiopathic variety due to the young age of  presentation and
absence  of  any coronary  risk  factors. The  second case
appeared to be secondary to atheromatous coronary artery
disease. The first case had long segment LAD involvement.
LAD  was the most frequently involved vessel, followed by
RCA and left circumflex (LCx). LAD is affected in 75% cases,
RCA in 20% of cases, LCx in about 4% and the left main
coronary artery  (LMCA)  in  1% cases.
2
Multiple vessel
involvement has also been reported.
The third case was a
woman in her post-partum period without any identifiable
coronary risk factors. Non-atheromatous SCAD is generally
reported in females during pregnancy or in the post-partum
period.  Variety  of   factors  like  hormonal  changes,
hypertension, hemodynamic stress of  pregnancy/labor and
certain  connective  tissue  disorders  can  alter  the
composition of arterial wall making it more susceptible to
dissection.
4,5
It is believed that excess progesterone during
pregnancy induces structural  abnormalities in coronary
vessel walls. 
.
One hypothesis of causation of post-partum
dissection is release of  a lytic protease from eosinophils and
formation of intimal tears.
6
Its  management is  mainly  decided based on  clinical
presentation, extent of dissection and amount of ischemic
myocardium at risk. CABG is often advocated in LMCA or
multi-vessel involvement. Angioplasty was attempted in
some lesions.
1
The passing of guidewire can be challenging
in complex dissection. Oral  anti-coagulants, anti-platelet
agents,  nitrates  and beta-blockers  are  the usual  initial
agents  used  for  medical  therapy.
7
In  one  report,
immunosuppressive therapy was advocated as a part of  the
medical therapy on the basis of eosinophilic inflammatory
infiltrates  found  in  some  cases.
8
In  a  recent  study  a
mortality of 18% was reported at a follow-up of 41 months
in patients who survived the acute attack.
9
Atherosclerosis
SCAD  has  a  better prognosis than  the  other  group.
3
Orthotropic heart  transplantation  and artificial heart
implantation are the last choices for desperate situations.
3
There is  limited  information  on  the  prognosis of  post-
partum dissection.
4,10
Conclusions:
The diagnosis of SCAD  should be strongly
considered in patients with myocardial ischemia/infarction
in young women or men without traditional risk factors.
References
1. Verma PK, Sandhu MS, Mittal BR, Aggarwal N, Kumar A, Mayank
M, et al. Large spontaneous coronary artery dissection. Angiology
2004; 55: 309–318
2. Jorgensen  MB,  Aharonian  V,  Mansukhani  P,  Mahrer  PR.
Spontaneous coronary dissection: a cluster of cases with this rare
finding. Am Heart J 1994; 127: 1382–1387
3. Shroff G, Rajani R. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection: an
uncommon problem with a common presentation. Indian Heart J
2003; 55: 655–657
4. Bac DJ, Lotgering FK, Verkaaik AP, Deckers JW. Spontaneous
coronary artery dissection during pregnancy and post-partum. Eur
Heart J 1995; 16: 136–138
5. Movsesian MA, Wray RB. Postpartum myocardial infarction. Br
Heart J 1989; 62: 154–156
6. Bucciarelli E, Frantini D, Gilardi G, Affronti G. Spontaneous dissecting
aneurysm of coronary artery in a pregnant woman at term. Pathol
Res Pract 1998; 194: 137–139
7. Almeda FQ, Barkatullah S, Kavinsky CJ. Spontaneous coronary
artery dissection (Review). Clin Cardiol 2004; 27: 377–380
8. Koller PT, Cliffe CM, Ridley DJ. Immunosuppressive therapy for peri-
partum type spontaneous coronary artery dissection. Clin Cardiol
1998; 21: 40–46
9. DeMaio SJ Jr, Kinsella SH, Silverman ME. Clinical course and long
term prognosis of spontaneous coronary artery dissection. Am J
Cardiol 1989; 64: 471–474
10. Klutstein MW, Tzivoni D, Bitran D, Mendzelevski B, Ilan M, Almagor
Y. Treatment of spontaneous coronary artery dissection: report of
three cases. Cathet Cardiovasc Diagn 1997; 40: 372–376
IHJ-814-05.p65
11/15/2005, 4:21 PM
352
SDK software API:VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Also able to uncompress PDF file in VB.NET programs. Offer flexible and royalty-free developing library license for VB.NET programmers to compress PDF file.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software API:C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Application. Best and professional adobe PDF file splitting SDK for Visual Studio .NET. outputOps); Divide PDF File into Two Using C#.
www.rasteredge.com
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 353–354
Marwah et al. Transposition of Great Arteries 353
Transposition of  Great Arteries with Aortopulmonary
Window: An Unusual Cause of  Prepared
Left Ventricle at 11 Months
Ashutosh Marwah, Sunita Maheshwari, PV Suresh, Amit Misri, Rajesh Sharma
Department of Cardiology, Narayana Hrudayalaya Institute of Cardiac Sciences, Bangalore
Brief   Report
In patients with transposition of great arteries, presence of aortopulmonary window is very uncommon and
associated with high morbidity and mortality. This report describes the case of an 11-month-old female patient
in which aortopulmonary window was restrictive, and protected the patient from developing pulmonary vascular
disease. The patient underwent successful arterial switch and repair of aortopulmonary window. (Indian Heart
J 2005; 57: 353–354)
Key Words: Transposition of great arteries, Aortopulmonary window, Congenital heart disease
Correspondence: Dr Ashutosh Marwah, Narayana Hrudayalaya
Institute of  Cardiac Sciences, No. 258/A, Bommasandra Industrial Area
Anekal Taluk, Bangalore 560099. e-mail: ashu_marwah@yahoo.com
C
hildren with  transposition of  great arteries (TGA)
presenting late in infancy often  have regressed left
ventricular mass. Surgical option in such patients is either
a Senning’s repair or a two-stage arterial switch. Both the
operations carry a  significant morbidity as  compared  to
single-stage arterial switch surgery. Rarely one may come
across  patients in late infancy in whom left ventricle (LV)
has not regressed. The  causes  of non-regression of  left
ventricle  are  ventricular  septal defect, patent  ductus
arteriosus and presence  of significant aortopulmonary
(AP)  collaterals.  An  AP  window,  when  present,
theoretically could  also  provide a  pressure-head  and
prevent left ventricle from regression.
1-3
Though arterial  switch is ideal  for these patients  but
residual  pulmonary hypertension is always  a challenge
when undertaking such surgery.
4,5
Case Report
An 11-month-old girl presented  with complaints of poor
weight gain and mild cyanosis. The echocadiographic data
showed  situs  solitus,  levocardia,  concordant  atrio-
ventricular  connection, discordant ventriculo-arterial
connection with an anterior-posterior relation of  great
arteries. A restrictive AP window was seen on the posterior
aspect of  the aorta, which  was communicating with the
main pulmonary artery. The defect measured 3.5 mm on
two-dimensional echocardiography (2D echo)  and there
was a 30 mmHg Doppler gradient across the AP window.
The left  ventricle  was  functioning  normally  and had
retained its shape. There was a 3 mm atrial septal defect in
the oval fossa. Oxygen saturation was recorded as 78% on
room air.
The  patient  subsequently  underwent  cardiac
catheterization for assessment of  left ventricular  pressure
which was found to be 60% of right ventricular pressure
(Table 1). Subsequently she underwent successful arterial
switch with repair of AP window.
Fig. 1. Echocardiogram showing  apical four-chamber view, and a well prepared
left ventricle.
LA: left atrium; LV: left ventricle; RA: right atrium; RV: right ventricle
IHJ-909-05(BR).p65
11/15/2005, 4:25 PM
353
SDK software API:VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Combine multiple specified PDF pages in into single one file. VB.NET Components to combine various scanned images to PDF, such as tiff, jpg, png, gif, bmp
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software API:VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Professional VB.NET PDF file splitting SDK for Visual Studio and .NET framework 2.0. Split PDF file into two or multiple files in ASP.NET webpage online.
www.rasteredge.com
354 Marwah et al. Transposition of  Great Arteries
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 353–354
Surgical  technique:   During  surgery it is  important to
avoid flooding of the pulmonary circulation through the
AP window. Both branch pulmonary arteries were snugged
and occluded after  going on  to cardiopulmonary bypass.
Fig. 2. Echocardiogram (suprasternal view) showing aortopulmonary window.
AP: aortopulmonary; PA: pulmonary artery
Fig. 3. Angiogram showing the aortic arch and the AP window (marked by arrow).
Asc Aorta: ascending aorta; AP: aortopulmonary
Table 1.  Hemodynamic data on cardiac catheterization
Site
Pressure (mmHg)
Saturation (%)
Right atrium
Mean 7
92
Right ventricle
90/8
-
Left atrium
Mean 9
99.5
Left ventricle
60/8
98.5
Aorta
94/47, 70
84
This helped in avoiding steal from systemic circulation and
flooding of the lungs. After clamping the aorta, with the
pulmonary arteries still occluded,  cardioplegia was given
into the aortic root. The aorta was opened by a transverse
incision anteriorly at the  level  of  the  AP window. The
opening of the AP window was visualized in the posterior
wall of the aorta. The ostium measured 4 mm in diameter.
The aortic transsection  was completed  including  the
opening of the AP window in the incision.  The rest of the
operation proceeded as per the routine.
1
Discussion
Regressed left ventricular muscle mass in patients with TGA
and intact interventricular septum (IVS) poses a significant
problem  in patients  presenting  late.  In such patients
Senning’s repair  has resulted in  inproved survival  with
acceptable mortality rates but at the cost of leaving right
ventricle as systemic ventricle and increased predisposition
to atrial arrhythmias. Occasionally one may come across
patients with intact ventricular septum and still a preserved
left  ventricle.  These  patients  warrant  a  detailed
echocardiogram looking  at  all  the  possible  causes  of
elevated pulmonary pressure.
Presence of  AP window in patients with TGA is a rare
combination  indeed.  Accelerated  pulmonary  vascular
disease has been described in patients with TGA, in presence
of  left-to-right shunt the course is further accelerated.
Previously described patients did not survive the post-
operative period and were found to be having pulmonary
vascular disease on autopsy.
1
In our  patient,  the  AP window  was restrictive  and
probably protected the patient from developing pulmonary
vascular disease and patient underwent successful arterial
switch and repair of AP window.
References
1. Krishnan P, Arian B, Sambamurthy, Shrivastava S, Rajani M, Rao
IM.  Complete  transposition  of   the  great  arteries  with
aortopulmonary window: surgical treatment and embryologic
significance. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 1991; 101: 749–751
2. Vanini V. Aortopulmonary window. In Kirklin JW, BarratBoyes BG,
(eds) Cardiac Surgery. New York: Churchill Livingstone, 1993: pp
1153–1157
3. Amato JJ. Complete transposition of  the great arteries with
aortopulmonary window. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 1992; 104: 1490–
1491
4. Hopkins RA, Bull C, Haworth SG, de Leval MR, Stark J. Pulmonary
hypertensive crisis following surgery for congenital heart defects in
young children. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg  1991; 5: 628–634
5. Kumar A, Taylor GP, Sandor GG, Patterson MW. Pulmonary vascular
disease in neonates with transposition of the great arteries and intact
ventricular septum. Br Heart J 1993; 69: 442–445
IHJ-909-05(BR).p65
11/15/2005, 4:25 PM
354
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 355–359
Bahl et al. Current Opinions on Usage and Regulation of Drug-Eluting Stents 355
Current Opinions on Usage and Regulation of  Drug-Eluting
Stents in India: Results of  a Nation-wide Survey
of  Indian Cardiologists
VK Bahl, R Narang
Department of Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Sciences Centre, All India Institute of  Medical Sciences, New Delhi
Current Perspective
Correspondence: Professor V K Bahl, Department of Cardiology
Cardiothoracic Sciences Center, All India Institute of Medical Sciences
New Delhi 110 029
e-mail: vkbahl2002@yahoo.com
D
rug-eluting  stents  (DES)  are  arguably  the  most
important  advance in  the  treatment of  coronary
artery disease (CAD) in the last decade. However, there are
 number  of   issues  and  concerns  regarding  their
widespread usage. Currently there are no well established
guidelines regarding  indications of  their use. The main
advantage of using DES is prevention of restenosis.
1
Several
studies have demonstrated the safety and efficacy of  DES. 
2
If cost is not a constraint, DES would probably be preferred
over bare  metal stents  (BMS)  in  all patients undergoing
percutaneous  coronary interventions (PCI).  However, in
view  of   high  cost  of   DES  compared  to  BMS,  cost-
effectiveness and  cost-benefit ratio  are important issues.
Hence use of DES for all type of lesions and in all subgroups
of coronary patients is likely to be contested. To resolve some
of these issues, we felt that a nationwide survey of Indian
cardiologists on various aspects of coronary interventions
approval system and specially DES usage is timely and will
be  useful in  providing a  data  base to formulate future
guidelines.
Methods
A questionnaire on various aspects of DES usage in India
was prepared. With each question, possible responses were
suggested for responders to  choose from. The  questions
related  mainly  to following aspects: (i)  Usage  of DES in
relation to current international  approval procedures,
(ii)  Role of   Indian  funding agencies  versus  treating
physicians in determining indications  of  DES, i.e. who
decides when, where, why and which stent to be used, (iii)
Possibility of a new committee to be formed to specifically
look into various aspects of DES usage in India, (iv) What
lesion  location and  types would  most benefit by DES, (v)
Implications of the different therapeutic agents coated on
DES.
All members of  Cardiological  Society of  India were
mailed  these  questionnaires.  A  total  of  2890
questionnaires were sent out in August 2005, with request
to return the filled in questionnaire  by end of September
2005.  A total  of  468 completed questionnaires  were
received, giving a response  rate of  16%. These responses
were analyzed and are being reported here.
Results
Forty-four percent  of the  respondents were  active inter-
ventional cardiologists performing coronary angioplasties
and another  7% were invasive cardiologists performing
coronary angiography. Remaining participant cardiologists
referred their patients to others for coronary interventions
and were not primary operators.
Cardiologists were asked to give their opinion on which
lesion locations should be approved for using DES specially
if  patients are to  be  reimbursed by funding  agencies like
Central Government Health Services (CGHS) or Employee
State Insurance (ESI) scheme (Table 1, Fig. 1). A positive
response rate was high for proximal left anterior descending
(LAD) artery (90%) lesions, mid LAD (80%), circumflex
(LCx)/large obtuse marginal (OM)(73%) and right coronary
artery (RCA) (63%) lesions. Only distal LAD lesions were
considered by a large majority (60%) not to be approved by
funding agencies for reimbursement purposes.
Similarly, opinion was sought on the lesion types to be
approved by funding agencies like CGHS and ESI (Table 2,
Fig. 2). Majority of cardiologists felt that long lesions (79%),
total occlusions (66%), ostial lesions (73%) and bifurcation
lesions  (62%) should be recommended DES. The opinion
was divided for small vessel disease and for diffusely diseased
arteries. All patients with diabetes mellitus, irrespective of
the lesion type and location, were preferred by most (72%)
to be approved for DES.
The opinion was divided on the question of whether the
funding agencies  like  CGHS and ESI should  formulate
guidelines to allow use of DES only for specific lesions (52%)
or  it should  be left  to  the  discretion  of  the  cardiologist
Current Perspective.p65
11/15/2005, 4:17 PM
355
356 Bahl et al. Current Opinions on Usage and Regulation of Drug-Eluting Stents
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 355–359
Table 1. Respondents' views regarding lesion locations
to be approved for drug-eluting stent
Question
Responses (%)
For patients funded by funding agencies like
CGHS or ESI, drug-eluting stents should be
permitted for use in:
(a) Proximal LAD lesions
Yes
90
No
4
Don’t know
6
(b) Mid LAD lesions
Yes
80
No
10
Don’t know
10
(c) Distal LAD lesions
Yes
23
No
60
Don’t know
17
(d) Circumflex / large OM lesions
Yes
73
No
14
Don’t know
12
(e) RCA / PD lesions
Yes
63
No
21
Don’t know
15
CGHS: Central Government Health Servies; ESI: Employees State Insurance; LAD: left anterior
descending artery; OM: obtuse marginal; RCA: right coronary artery; PD: posterior descending
Table 2. Responses relating to lesion types to be approved
for drug-eluting stent
Question
Responses (%)
For patients funded by funding agencies like
CGHS or ESI, drug-eluting stents should be
permitted for use in:
(a) Small vessel disease
Yes
48
No
41
Don’t know
10
(b) Long lesions
Yes
79
No
14
Don’t know
7
(c) Diffuse disease
Yes
46
No
43
Don’t know
11
(d) Total occlusions
Yes
66
No
21
Don’t know
13
(e) Ostial lesions
Yes
73
No
15
Don’t know
12
(f) Bifurcation lesions
Yes
62
No
19
Don’t know
20
(g) All diabetic patients
Yes
72
No
20
Don’t know
8
CGHS: Central Government Health Services; ESI: Employees State Corporation
performing angioplasty to decide the most suitable lesion
for DES (44%). Fifty-nine percent felt that if a patient can
afford through  private  means, DES might  be put  for  all
lesions, while 36% felt otherwise (Fig. 3).
There were four questions related to approval of DES in
India (Table 3).  Sixty-six percent of respondents were of
the opinion that a regulatory body should be set up in India
and only  DES  approved  by  such  authority  should  be
permitted  for  general  usage.  Twenty-six  percent  of
respondents agreed to general usage of  Food  and Drug
Administration (FDA)  or  European-CE marked  stents
without any further scrutiny by Indian agencies. General
use of all stents available in the Indian market was endorsed
by only 1% of  respondents. Fifty-five percent opined that
the cost would remain high if only FDA/CE-approved stents
are permitted to be used in India while remaining thought
the prices will anyway come down with time. Seventy-six
Fig. 1. Use of  drug-eluting stents for different locations.
LAD: left anterior descending artery; OM: obtuse marginal; RCA: right
coronary artery; PD: posterior descending
Fig. 2. Drug-eluting stents being used for different lesion types.
Current Perspective.p65
11/15/2005, 4:17 PM
356
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 355–359
Bahl et al. Current Opinions on Usage and Regulation of Drug-Eluting Stents 357
percent of respondents felt that those patients who cannot
afford FDA/CE-approved stents for  financial reasons may
be  given other  drug-eluting  stents  after  an  informed
consent. Only 28%  respondents felt that there was also
significant difference between FDA (USA agency)- and CE
(European agency)-approved stents, while 36%  felt  that
stents approved by any one  of  these  two agencies  can be
approved in India. In a related question, 40% respondents
observed  that sirolimus-eluting stents were better  than
paclitaxel-eluting stents, while  23% thought  that  the
former are not better than the latter.
Physicians were asked  3 questions regarding Indian
committee(s) to approve DES for  general use (Table 4). A
large majority (90%) felt that a committee could be formed
to formulate guidelines for usage and approval of DES  in
India. Forty-four percent felt that Cardiological Society of
India (CSI) should form this committee. Eight percent felt
Fig. 3. Should drug eluting stents be used for all lesions in privately funded
patients.
Table 3. Responses regarding existing international
approval systems
Question
Responses (%)
Which of  the following drug-eluting stents should
be permitted for general usage?
(a) Only FDA approved stents
6
(b) FDA or European CE approved stents
26
(c) All stents approved by a Regulatory body set up
in India
66
(d) All stents available in the market
1
If only FDA/CE approved stents are permitted, what do
you think are its implications on the cost of stents?
(a) The cost will be high and remain so for a long
time as there would be less competition amongst
manufacturers
55
(b) The cost will be high initially but will anyhow
come down with time
45
For the patients who cannot afford FDA/CE-approved
stents due to financial reasons, can other stents be used
with their consent.
(a) Yes
76
(b) No
16
(c) Don’t know
7
Do you think there is difference between FDA-approved
and European CE-approved stents:
(a) Yes
28
(b) No
36
(c) Don’t know
36
Do you think sirolimus eluting stents are better than
paclitaxel-eluting stents for Indian population:
(a) Yes
40
(b) No
23
(c) Don’t know
37
Table 4. Responses regarding Indian committee that can
decide approval
Question
Responses (%)
Can a committee formed in India decide on
which drug-eluting stents to be approved?
(a) Yes
90
(b) No
7
(c)  Don’t know
2
If you answered (a) above, who should form
this committee?
(a)  Ministry of Health & Family Welfare,
Government of India
8
(b) Cardiological Society of India
44
(c) Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR)
10
(d) Others
11
Multiple responses:
27
If a hospital ethics committee approves a drug-eluting
stent for a trial in a hospital, should that stent be
allowed for use in common patients.
(a) Yes
59
(b) No
33
(c) Don’t know
7
that Ministry of Health & Family Welfare (MoHFW) should
form it  while 10%  thought  Indian  Council of  Medical
Research (ICMR) to be the right agency for  this purpose.
Twenty-seven percent of all respondents felt that more than
one such body should get together to form this committee.
CSI with ICMR and CSI with MoHFW were most common
responses amongst this group.
Fifty-nine percent felt that if hospital ethics committee
approves a DES for a clinical trial, then such a stent should
also be allowed to be used in patients after informed consent,
pending its approval by regulatory authority.
Don't know
5%
No
36%
Yes
59%
Current Perspective.p65
11/15/2005, 4:17 PM
357
358 Bahl et al. Current Opinions on Usage and Regulation of Drug-Eluting Stents
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 355–359
Discussion
There are a number of issues and concerns regarding the
use of  DES. There  are no uniformly accepted guidelines
regarding their use. The high cost of these stents further
complicates the issue and brings in the need for economic
and  cost-benefit  analysis.  Drug-eluting stents are nearly
three times the cost of BMS. Moreover, meta-analysis of
studies has shown that DES reduce restenosis and overall
major adverse cardiac events (MACE) but provide neither
mortality benefit nor reduce incidence of future myocardial
infarctions.
Even in  western countries, coverage for  DES
and the  number of  such stents that will  be covered  per
procedure varies among insurance companies. The recently
published BASKET trial from Europe, also found that in real-
world setting, use of DES in all patients is less cost effective
than BMS.
The higher initial cost of DES compared to BMS
is not  offset  by  the  reduced  restenosis rate and thereby
repeat intervention. The  authors recommended  that use
of   DES  could  be  restricted  to  patients  in  high-risk
subgroups. This  trial was  not sponsored by  any  stent
company,  which  can potentially influence  the results,  in
contrast  to earlier similar analyses (SIRIUS  sub study),
which had shown DES to be cost-effective on follow-up due
to reduced re-intervention report.
Food  and Drug  Administration, USA,  classifies  DES as
combination product since they combine drug and device
components.
5
Moreover,  the device  component (metal
stent) is considered to provide the primary mode of action,
with drug acting as secondary mode to enhance the efficacy
of  device component. Hence, DES are considered devices
for  regulatory  purposes  and  only  two DES have  been
approved till date. Cypher
TM
sirolimus-eluting coronary
stent was the first DES to be approved by FDA, USA.
6
It was
approved on 24th April 2003. Subsequently, Taxus
TM
stent
of Boston-Scientific was also approved.  However, despite
rigorous evaluation by  FDA, both these stents have been
subject to controversy.
7
Surveys of physician preferences and usage patterns of
DES have been reported earlier.
8,9
However, this is the first
large  survey  on this issue in India. In  the present survey,
non-invasive  and invasive (mostly  interventional) cardio-
logists participated in equal proportion.
Society  for cardiovascular  angiography and  inter-
ventions (SCAI) conducted and reported such a survey in
later part of the year 2003.
8
A total of 535 SCAI members
responded to  the survey  (response rate 26%). Forty-four
percent  of  the respondents reported that guidelines  have
been formed in their hospital or practice regarding the
usage  of  DES. Twenty-one percent  reported that  their
hospital or practice has established internal policies limiting
the use of  DES. The most common amongst  these  were
restriction  on  the number of DES  that could be put in a
single case, and restrictions on the type of arteries, lesions
or patients where such  stents could be used. Eighty-nine
percent  responded that  they were using DES in  selected
patients (diabetes and small- to moderate-sized vessel being
most common selected criteria). Nine percent said that they
were using DES in all patients while 2% said that they were
not  using  these  in  any  patients.  Sixty-five  percent
respondents expressed medico-legal concerns of not using
DES in all patients.
Duke Clinical Research Institute also reported a similar
survey in  late  2004.
9
The data  was based on American
College  of  Cardiology, National Cardiovascular  Disease
Registry  from where  162,969  angioplasty  procedures
performed at 259  sites  over last 9 months of 2003 were
analyzed (averaging 70 procedures per site per  month).
Thirty-five percent of procedures involved one or more DES.
Duke  Clinical  Research  Institute  survey  found  that
although DES shave been adopted rapidly, their usage has
not been uniform. In one-third of the cases, the DES were
being  put  for indications  not  approved  by  FDA,  which
recommended indications based on early trials of DES. Age,
race and socio-economic factors were also found to affect
usage of  DES. Older  patients,  American-Africans  and
patients without insurance were less likely to receive DES.
In our survey, most  respondents  felt  that all lesion
locations except distal LAD should be approved for placing
DES. Proximal  LAD  was the  most accepted indication
(90%).  Complex lesion  subsets like  long  lesions,  total
occlusions, ostial lesions and bifurcation lesions were also
favored by most to be appropriate indications for DES. There
was no  clear consensus on  small  vessel disease  and for
diffusely diseased arteries. The data is similar to real-life
registries  like German Cypher  Registry where about half
the  patients had  DES implanted  in  lesions  that  were
generally excluded from randomized controlled  trials.
10
Recently trial data has also emerged in favor of using DES
sin several complex lesion subsets.
11,12
In a  recent  study presented  at Transcatheter Cardio-
vascular Therapeutics  (TCT) 2005, researchers  studied
usage and indications of DES in 486 patients, who received
807 DES.
13
In 54%, patients the use of DES was off-label.
The FDA approved indications for DES use is de novo lesions
<30 mm in native coronary arteries, >2.5 and <3.5 mm
in size, and maximum  of 2 DES per vessel. The  off-label
indications included acute  myocardial  infarction, multi-
vessel  disease,  saphenous vein  graft lesions,  bifurcation
lesions, in-stent restenosis, left main lesions, long lesions
Current Perspective.p65
11/15/2005, 4:17 PM
358
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested