-
Thematic  (domain)  expertise  (knowledge  of  the  data  to  be  used  in  the 
representative use cases), 
-
SDI  expertise:  knowledge  about the  underpinning  policies  and  the  standard  SDI 
architecture, 
-
Network services expertise (knowledge about data access), 
-
Software  expertise:  expertise  about  the  implementation  and  deployment  of  the 
relevant specifications. 
For effective  work  organisation, specific 
roles  are  foreseen  in  the  expert  groups. 
The 
group  leader
schedules  the  work, 
distributes the tasks among the members, 
and  mediates  the  discussions  with  the 
experts  in  the  group  and  the  external 
partners.  In  the  conceptual  framework 
development  phase  the  group  should 
have  a  good  overview  of  SDI 
developments  and  demonstrate  a  strong 
background  in  information  modelling 
and  standardisation.  In  the  data 
specification  phase  the  emphasis  is  on 
domain  expertise  and  the  knowledge  of 
the conceptual framework. 
In  INSPIRE,  the  coordination  body  is  called 
“Consolidation  Team”,  which  is  composed  of 
employees of  the European Commission. For the 
data  component  two  types  of  expert  groups  are 
distinguished:  the  Data  Specification  Drafting 
Team,  which  is  responsible  for  the  development 
and maintenance of the conceptual framework, and 
the Thematic Working Groups that are responsible 
for  developing  the  interoperability  target 
specifications for each data theme. The members 
of  these  expert  groups  are  delegated  by  the 
communities  of  stakeholders.  Stakeholders  also 
participate  in  reviews  and  testing.  The  legally 
mandatory part of the specifications is adopted by 
the  INSPIRE  Committee,  which  is  composed  of 
official representative of the Member States of the 
European Union. 
The results of the specification work are documented by the 
editor
, according to pre-
defined  templates.  The  editor  must  be  a  good  technical  writer,  who  prepares  the 
narrative  documentation  and  masters  the  selected  conceptual  schema  language  to 
present the data models in machine-readable format. 
5.7 
Supporting tools 
Many different stakeholders are involved in the data specification development phase. 
The outcome of their work must be comparable. Each data specification should follow 
the same structure in the documentation, which facilitates communication between the 
expert groups and the uptake by the user communities. The expert groups responsible 
for  technical  drafting  should  be  helped  by  tools  and  templates  that  guide  the  work, 
keep the results coherent, and help to share knowledge from the very beginning of the 
process. 
The  tools  can  be  classified  as  shared  document  templates,  document  repositories, 
internet-based  discussion  fora,  and  registers.  Shared  document  templates  reinforce 
harmonised documentation and ensure that all the  aspects that have to be  considered 
are covered in the same way. In INSPIRE the most prominent example of templates is 
the data specification template, which is based on ISO 19131. In order to facilitate the 
work, other  templates and checklists  (e.g.  for  use case description and  analysing the 
reference materials) can also be provided. 
Document repositories help to share reference materials and working drafts primarily 
amongst  the  members  of  the  expert  groups.  Making  the  drafts  visible  to  all  groups 
helps  to  foster  coherence  between  the  data  themes.  Version  control  systems  of 
document  repositories  give  the  opportunity  to  return  to  a  previous  proposal  in  any 
Pdf to tiff converter online - application software tool:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
www.rasteredge.com
Pdf to tiff converter online - application software tool:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
time.  In  addition,  keeping  records  of  changes  makes  the  process  traceable  and 
transparent. 
 Conclusions 
The  wealth  of  digital  spatial  data  accumulated  over  the  past  30-40  years  and  the 
advances  of  information  and  communications  technology  have  opened  new 
perspectives  for  analysing  our  physical  and  societal  environment.  Spatial  analysis, 
decision  support,  and  location-based  services  frequently  reuse  data  that  has  been 
originally  created  for  other  purposes,  achieving  considerable  economies  in  system 
development. 
Integrating  spatial  data  from  disparate  sources  is  often  jeopardised  by  limited  data 
sharing  and the lack  of  interoperability.  Spatial  data infrastructures  provide a means 
for overcoming these obstacles by offering online services for discovering, evaluating, 
retrieving  and  transforming  data.  One  of  the  causes  of  limited  interoperability  is 
inconsistency and incompatibility. In most cases, data has to be transformed to share 
common characteristics and thereby achieve interoperability. 
Without an SDI, these transformations are performed by the users on an ad-hoc basis. 
In  SDIs,  interoperability  is  enabled  at  the  source;  data  providers  should  supply  the 
data according to pre-defined and agreed norms. The technical presentations of these 
norms  are  the  interoperability  target  specifications,  frequently  referred  as  data 
specifications. 
The interoperability gap in the context of spatial data can be bridged in two ways: by 
using interoperability arrangements, which comprise technological and organisational 
solutions, and data harmonisation. In an SDI the preferred solution is the first, because 
data providers do not need to change their original data structures. They may deploy 
technology  (e.g.  batch  or  on-the-fly  data  transformation)  to  meet  interoperability 
requirements.  However,  current  technology  does  not  always  fully  cover  the 
interoperability  gap.  Data  harmonisation  brings  the  data  structures  of  the  different 
providers  closer  in  line  with  each  other.  Experience  shows  that  the  combination  of 
these two approaches provides the best solution. 
An  SDI  is  a  collection  of  several  data  themes.  The  interoperability  target  has  to  be 
defined  for  each  of  them  in  the  form  of  interoperability  (or  data)  specifications.  In 
order  to  achieve  cross-theme  interoperability,  a  robust  framework  is  needed  that 
reinforces  common  technical  measures,  efficient  information  exchange,  and 
standardised  methodology  for  data  specification  development  across  the 
infrastructure.  This  is  the  conceptual  framework.  Based  on  the  experience  of 
INSPIRE, this framework has two components: the generic conceptual model and the 
specification development methodology. 
The  generic  conceptual  model  (GCM)  turns  interoperability  arrangements  and  data 
harmonisation  into  a  set  of  interoperability  elements,  matching  them  with  the 
corresponding  elements  of  information  modelling  and  geospatial  technology. 
Containing  the  shared  concepts,  the  GCM  is  the  principal  tool  for  reinforcing 
interoperability across all the data themes included in the infrastructure. 
application software tool:Online Convert PDF file to Tiff. Best free online PDF Tif
Online PDF to Tiff Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to Tiff. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button
www.rasteredge.com
application software tool:XDoc.Converter for .NET, Support Documents and Images Conversion
Tiff to image. Convert Dicom to image. Convert Word, Excel and PDF to image. Next Steps. Download Free Trial Download and try Converter for .NET with online support
www.rasteredge.com
The  GCM  approach  has  been  rigorously  implemented  in  INSPIRE,  paying  special 
attention to continuous sharing of the results of technical work. The publicly available 
registries  and  the  use  of  the  consolidated  model  repository  mark  an  innovative 
approach to establishing the data component of an SDI. “In the future, this conceptual 
model is expected to influence, in many cases, modelling activities for spatial data at 
national  level,  because  it  adds  value  to  the  national  spatial  data  infrastructure  and 
simplifies  transformation  to  the  INSPIRE  data  specifications”  (Portele  C.  (editor), 
2010a). The technological convergence of the data providers is a key element of SDI 
initiatives. 
As  part  of  the  conceptual  framework,  the  specification  development  methodology 
reinforces  the  requirement  that  the  general  principles  of  the  infrastructure  such  as 
reuse,  feasibility,  and  proportionality  be  followed.  The  safeguards  built  into  the 
process  ensure that  all  the necessary steps  and  actions  are completed  in  each  of the 
themes  included in the  infrastructure. The  methodology  has  to  provide a  predictable 
and repeatable development process, which leads to feasible and mutually satisfactory 
solutions. The methodology should also describe the roles  that the stakeholders play 
during the different stages of the process.  
The  legislative  framework  of  INSPIRE  has  established  a  strong  precedent  for  an 
incrementally  growing  SDI  based  on  stakeholders’  commitment.  This  experience 
shows that such methodology can deliver tangible results even when the scope of the 
SDI is  broad,  hundreds  of  stakeholders from  more  than  30 countries
39
are  involved, 
and the technical work has to be prepared in a relatively short time
40
. That is why the 
data specification methodology proposed by INSPIRE has been adopted by the United 
Nations Spatial Data Infrastructure (Atkinson, R. and Box, P., 2008). 
The  particular  value  of  the  conceptual  framework  described  in  this  report  is  that  it 
collects  the  best  practices  of  ongoing  initiatives.  Both  the  methodology  for 
specification development and the generic conceptual model have been tested in real-
life  conditions  in  the  course  of  the  development  of  the  data  specifications.  Even 
though  this  development  process  resulted  in  the  9  finalised  and  the  25  draft 
interoperability  specifications  it  should  be  noted  that  their  implementation  is  still 
underway and users’ benefits can be properly assessed only in the future. 
The data specifications that have been carefully reviewed, tested, and endorsed by the 
stakeholders’ communities, prove the viability of the approach, crystallising collective 
knowledge  from Europe and  beyond.  The ever growing participation  in  the  process, 
the advances in the legal reinforcement, and the broad feedback received as a result of 
the  testing  and  implementation  process  signify  that  a  similar  conceptual  framework 
might also be a success factor in other initiatives. 
39
Besides the Member States of the European Union, stakeholders from the European Economic Area, 
Switzerland, USA, and EU candidate countries also joined the process.  
40
The technical work on the INSPIRE data component started in 2005 and is expected to be finished in 
April 2012. 
application software tool:C#: How to Use SDK to Convert Document and Image Using XDoc.
You may use our converter SDK to easily convert PDF, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Tiff, and Dicom files to raster images like Jpeg, Png, Bmp and Gif.
www.rasteredge.com
application software tool:Online Convert PDF file to Word. Best free online PDF Conversion
Online Tiff to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a Tiff/Tif File to PDF. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button
www.rasteredge.com
Acknowledgements 
The  authors  would  like  to  acknowledge  the  work  of  numerous  experts  and 
stakeholders  that  contributed  to the  development  of  the technical  guidelines and the 
implementing rules  of  the  INSPIRE  Directive. We especially appreciate  the work  of 
the  INSPIRE  Data  Specification  Drafting  Team,  which  has  systematically  and 
meticulously  put  together  and  documented  the  conceptual  framework  of  INSPIRE. 
We also thank INSPIRE stakeholders who, with their comments, testing and queries, 
tirelessly contributed to improving the work of the experts. 
We  would  equally  thank  our  reviewers  from  the  JRC,  Max  Craglia,  Michel  Millot, 
and  Katalin  Bódis,  who  helped  the  authors  not  to  get  lost  in  the  technical  details. 
Their  comments  were  very  useful  in  removing  assumptions  and  ambiguities,  and  in 
filling  the  gaps  with  information  that  hopefully  made  the  heavy  technical  subject 
digestible. They played the role of “informed policy maker” excellently! 
Our  external  reviewers,  Siri  Jodha  Khalsa,  Zdisław  Kurczyński,  Stefano  Nativi,  and 
Daniele  Rizzi,  helped  us  to  take  a  step  back  from  our  data-  and  INSPIRE  oriented 
view  and  to  put  the  report  in  a  broader  perspective.  They  had  a  decisive  role  in 
shaping the report in its final, hopefully better structured and homogenous form. 
application software tool:VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
An advanced PDF converter tool, which supports to be integrated in .NET project, and compatible Export multiple pages PDF document to multi-page Tiff file.
www.rasteredge.com
application software tool:C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Best and free C# tiff to adobe PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. Selection of turning tiff into searchable PDF or scanned PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
Bibliography 
Atkinson R. and Box, P. (2008): United Nations Spatial Data Infrastructure (UNSDI) 
Proposed Technical Governance Framework v1.1 (pp. 4-52). Retrieved from 
http://www.ungiwg.org/docs/unsdi/TechnicalGov/Proposed_UNSDI_Tech_Gov_Frame
work_v1.1.doc 
Chief Technology Officer Council (2011): Designing URI Sets for Location. A report from 
the Public Sector Information Domain of the CTO Council’s cross Government 
Enterprise Architecture, and the UK Location Council.Version 1.0
(pp. 1-18). Retrieved 
from http://location.defra.gov.uk/wp-
content/uploads/2011/09/Designing_URI_Sets_for_Location-V1.0.pdf 
Craglia M. et al. (2003): Spatial data infrastructures. GI in the Wider Europe (pp. 19-20). 
European Commission. Retrieved from http://www.ec-gis.org/ginie/doc/ginie_book.pdf 
Craglia M. et al. (2008): Next-Generation Digital Earth. A position paper from the Vespucci 
Initiative for the Advancement of Geographic Information Science. 
International 
Journal of Spatial Data Infrastructures Research
Vol
.
3
, 146-167. 
Craglia, M. (2010): Building INSPIRE: The Spatial Data Infrastructure for Europe. 
ARC 
News
, 5-7. Redlands, California. Retrieved from 
http://www.esri.com/news/arcnews/spring10articles/building-inspire.html 
Craglia, M. and Nowak J., editors (2006): Report of International Workshop on Spatial Data 
Infrastructures “Cost-Benefit / Return on Investment” (pp. 3-61). Luxembourg. 
Retrieved from http://www.ec-
gis.org/sdi/ws/costbenefit2006/reports/report_sdi_crossbenefit .pdf 
European Commission (2008a): Commission Regulation (EC) No 1205/2008 of 3 December 
2008 implementing Directive 2007/2/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council 
as regards metadata. 
Official Journal of the European Union
L 326
, 12–30. European 
Commission. Retrieved from http://eur-
lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=CELEX:32008R1205:EN:NOT 
European Commission (2008b): European Interoperability Framework v 2.0 (pp. 1-79). 
Retrieved from http://ec.europa.eu/idabc/servlets/Docb0db.pdf?id=31597 
European Commission (2009a): COMMISSION DECISION of 5 June 2009 implementing 
Directive 2007/2/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council as regards 
monitoring and reporting. 
Official Journal of the European Union
148
, 18-26. 
Retrieved from http://eur-
lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2009:148:0018:0026:EN:PDF  
European Commission (2009b): Commission Regulation (EC) No 976/2009 of 19 October 
2009 implementing Directive 2007/2/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council 
as regards the Network Services. 
Official Journal of the European Union
L 148
, 18-26. 
Retrieved from http://eur-
lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2009:148:0018:0026:EN:PDF 
European Commission (2010a): Commission Regulation (EU) No 1088/2010 of 23 
November 2010 amending Regulation (EC) No 976/2009 as regards download services 
application software tool:RasterEdge XDoc.Tiff for .NET - SDK for Tiff Document Imaging
VB.NET developers and end-users have quick evaluation on our product, we provide comprehensive .NET sample codings online for reference. Convert Tiff to PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
application software tool:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
An advanced PDF converter tool, which supports to be integrated in .NET project, and compatible Export multiple pages PDF document to multi-page Tiff file.
www.rasteredge.com
and transformation services. 
Official Journal of the European Union
L 323
, 1-10. 
Retrieved from http://eur-
lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2010:323:0001:0010:EN:PDF 
European Commission (2010b): Communication from the Commission to the European 
Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the 
Committee of the Regions. A Digital Agenda for Europe. 
Official Journal of the 
European Union
. Retrieved from http://eur-
lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=COM:2010:0245:FIN:EN:PDF 
European Commission (2010c): Commission Regulation (EU) No 1089/2010 of 23 
November 2010 implementing Directive 2007/2/EC of the European Parliament and of 
the Council as regards interoperability of spatial data sets and services. 
Official Journal 
of the European Union
L 323
, 11-102. Retrieved from http://eur-
lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2010:323:0011:0102:EN:PDF 
European Commission (2010d): Commission Regulation (EU) No 268/2010 of 29 March 
2010 implementing Directive 2007/2/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council 
as regards the access to spatial data sets and services of the Member States by 
Community institutions and bodies. 
Official Journal of the European Union
L 83
, 8-9. 
Retrieved from http://eur-
lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2010:083:0008:0009:EN:PDF 
European Commission (2011): Commission Regulation (EU) No 102/2011 of 4 February 
2011 amending Regulation (EU) No 1089/2010 implementing Directive 2007/2/EC of 
the European Parliament and of the Council as regards interoperability of spatial data 
sets and services. 
Official Journal of the European Union
L 31
, 13-34. Retrieved from 
http://eur-
lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2011:031:0013:0034:EN:PDF 
European Committee for Standardisation (2011): CEN/TR 15449:2011 Geographic 
information - Standards, specifications, technical reports and guidelines, required to 
implement Spatial Data Infrastructures 
European Parliament and European Council (2003): Directive 2003/98/EC of the European 
Parliament and of the Council of 17 November 2003 on the reuse of public sector 
information. 
Official Journal of the European Union
L 345
, 90-96. Retrieved from 
http://eur-
lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2003:345:0090:0096:EN:PDF 
European Parliament and European Council (2007) Directive 2007/2/EC of the European 
Parliament and of the Council of 14 March 2007 establishing an Infrastructure for 
Spatial Information in the European Community (INSPIRE) . 
Official Journal of the 
European Union
(108), 1-14. Retrieved from http://eur-
lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2007:108:0001:0014:EN:PDF 
GEO Task ST-09-02 Committee (2010): A GEO Label: Informing Users About the Quality, 
Relevance and Acceptance of Services, Data Sets and Products Provided by GEOSS 
(pp. 1-12). Retrieved from 
http://www.iiasa.ac.at/Research/FOR/downloads/ian/Egida/geo_label_concept_v01.pdf 
GEOSS (2005a): The Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) 10-Year 
Implementation Plan. Retrieved from http://www.earthobservations.org/documents/10-
Year Implementation Plan.pdf 
GEOSS (2005b): GEOSS 10-Year Implementation Plan Reference Document (pp. 3-209). 
Noordwijk. Retrieved from http://www.earthobservations.org/documents/10-Year Plan 
Reference Document.pdf 
Geographic Information Panel (2008): Place Matters: the Location Strategy for the United 
Kingdom (pp. 8-39). London. Retrieved from 
http://www.communities.gov.uk/documents/communities/pdf/locationstrategy.pdf 
Illert, A. (editor) (2008a): INSPIRE Definition of Annex Themes and Scope (pp. 1-132). 
Retrieved from 
http://inspire.jrc.ec.europa.eu/reports/ImplementingRules/DataSpecifications/D2.3_Defi
nition_of_Annex_Themes_and_scope_v3.2.pdf 
Illert, A. (editor) (2008b): INSPIRE Methodology for the development of data specifications 
(pp. 1-123). Retrieved from 
http://inspire.jrc.ec.europa.eu/reports/ImplementingRules/DataSpecifications/D2.6_v3.0.
pdf 
INSPIRE Data and Service Sharing Drafting Team (2010): INSPIRE Good practice in data 
and service sharing (pp. 1-66). Retrieved from 
http://inspire.jrc.ec.europa.eu/documents/Data_and_Service_Sharing/INSPIRE_GoodPr
actice_ DataService Sharing_v1.pdf 
INSPIRE Metadata Drafting Team (2009): INSPIRE Metadata Implementing Rules: 
Technical Guidelines based on EN ISO 19115 and EN ISO 19119 (pp. 1-74). Retrieved 
from 
http://inspire.jrc.ec.europa.eu/reports/ImplementingRules/metadata/MD_IR_and_ISO_2
0090218.pdf 
INSPIRE Network Services Drafting Team (2008): INSPIRE Network Services Architecture 
(pp. 1-30). Retrieved from 
http://inspire.jrc.ec.europa.eu/reports/ImplementingRules/network/D3_5_INSPIRE_NS_
Architecture_v3-0.pdf 
ISO TC 211 (2000): ISO 19105 Geographic information - Conformance and testing (pp. 1-21) 
ISO TC 211 (2002: ISO 19108 Geographic information - Temporal schema (pp. 1-48) 
ISO TC 211 (2003a): ISO 19107 Geographic information - Spatial schema (p. 166) 
ISO TC 211 (2003b): ISO 19115 Geographic information - Metadata (pp. 1-140) 
ISO TC 211 (2005a): ISO/TS 19103 Geographic information - Conceptual schema language 
(pp. 1-67) 
ISO TC 211 (2005b): ISO 19109 Geographic information - Rules for application schema (pp. 
1-81) 
ISO TC 211 (2005c): ISO 19110 Geographic information - Methodology for feature 
cataloguing (pp 1-55) 
ISO TC 211 (2005d): ISO 19123 Geographic information - Schema for coverage geometry 
and functions (pp. 1-65). 
ISO TC 211 (2005e): ISO 19128 Geographic information - Web map server interface (pp. 1-
76) 
ISO TC 211 (2005f): ISO/NP 19135-1 Geographic information - Procedures for item 
registration 
ISO TC 211 (2007a): ISO 19131Geographic information - Data product specifications (pp. 1-
40) 
ISO TC 211 (2007b): ISO 19136 Geographic information - Geography Markup Language 
(GML) (pp. 1-394) 
ISO TC 211 (2007c): ISO 19131 Geographic information - Data product specifications (pp. 1-
40) 
ISO TC 211 (2007d): ISO 19111 Geographic information - Spatial referencing by coordinates 
(pp. 1-78) 
ISO TC 211 (2008): ISO TS 19101 Geographic information - Reference model- Part 1: 
Fundamentals (pp. 1-40) 
ISO TC 211 (2010): ISO 19142 Geographic information - Web Feature Service (pp. 1-238) 
ISO TC 211 (2011): ISO 19118 Geographic information - Encoding (pp. 1-69) 
Klinghammer I. (1995): A térképészet tudománya. Membership inauguration lecture at the 
Hungarian Academy of Science. Retrieved from 
http://lazarus.elte.hu/hun/tantort/2005/szekfoglalo/klinghammer-istvan.pdf 
Lasschuyt, E. and van Hekken, M. (2001): Information Interoperability and Information 
Standardisation for NATO C2 – A Practical Approach (pp. 1-20). The Hague. Retrieved 
from http://ftp.rta.nato.int/PubFullText/RTO/MP/RTO-MP-064/MP-064-05.pdf 
Longley, P. A., Goodchild, M. F., Maguire, D. J., & Rhind, D. W. (2011): Geographic 
Information. Systems & Science (Third edition, pp. 1-525). Hoboken: John Wiley & 
Sons, Inc. 
Nebert, D. D. (editor) (2004): GSDI Cookbook (pp. 1-250). Retrieved from 
http://memberservices.gsdi.org/files/?artifact_id=655 
Open Geospaial Consortium (2005): OpenGIS Implementation Specification for Geographic 
information - Simple feature access - Part 1:Common architecture (pp. 1-51). Retrieved 
from 
http://portal.opengeospatial.org/files/?artifact_id=13227&passcode=pcq7e0gzzeat5n7er
whr 
Open Geospatial Consortium (2007a): Geospatial Digital Rights Management Reference 
Model (GeoDRM RM) (pp. 1-130). Retrieved from 
http://portal.opengeospatial.org/files/?artifact_id=14085&passcode=pcq7e0gzzeat5n7er
whr 
Open Geospatial Consortium (2007b): Styled Layer Descriptor profile of the Web Map 
Service Implementation Specification (pp. 1-53). Retrieved from 
http://portal.opengeospatial.org/files/?artifact_id=22364&passcode=pcq7e0gzzeat5n7er
whr 
Open Geospatial Consortium (2007c): Sensor Observation Service (pp. 1-104). Retrieved 
from 
http://portal.opengeospatial.org/files/?artifact_id=26667&passcode=pcq7e0gzzeat5n7er
whr 
Open Geospatial Consortium (2008): Web Coverage Service (WCS) Implementation 
Standard (pp. 1-133). Retrieved from 
http://portal.opengeospatial.org/files/?artifact_id=27297&passcode=pcq7e0gzzeat5n7er
whr 
Portele, C. (editor) (2010a): INSPIRE Generic Conceptual Model (pp. 1-137). Retrieved from 
http://inspire.jrc.ec.europa.eu/documents/Data_Specifications/D2.5_v3_3.pdf 
Portele, C. (editor) (2010b): INSPIRE Guidelines for the encoding of spatial data
(pp. 1-38). 
Retrieved from 
http://inspire.jrc.ec.europa.eu/documents/Data_Specifications/D2.7_v3.2.pdf 
Rackham, L. (2010): Digital National Framework (DNF) – Overview v3.0 (pp. 5-47). 
Retrieved from 
http://www.dnf.org/images/uploads/guides/DNF0001_3_00_Overview_1.pdf 
Tóth, K. (2010): Tér-tudatos információs társadalom. 
Információs társadalom
X
(2), 7-16. 
Tóth, K. and Tomas, R. (2011): Quality in Geographic Information – Simple Concept with 
Complex Details. Proceedings of the 25th International Cartographic Conference (pp. 1-
11). Paris: International Cartographic Association. 
Tóth, K. and Smits, P. (2009): Cost-Benefit Considerations in Establishing Interoperability of 
the Data Component of Spatial Data Infrastructures. Proceeding of the 24th International 
Cartographic Conference - The World`s Geo-Spatial Solutions, Vol. XXIV. (pp. 1-10). 
Santiago de Chile: International Cartographic Association. Retrieved from 
http://icaci.org/files/documents/ICC_proceedings/ICC2009/ 
Wade, T. and Sommer, S. (editors) (2006): A to Z GIS. An illustrated dictionary of 
geographic information science (2nd edition pp. 1-265). Redlands: ESRI Press. 
Woolf A. et al. (2010): GEOSS AIP-3 Contribution - Data Harmonization (pp. 1-40). 
Retrieved from http://www.thegigasforum.eu/cgi-bin/download.pl?f=545.pdf 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested