mvc print pdf : Online pdf to tiff conversion control SDK platform web page wpf html web browser ifdp10260-part162

Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System 
International Finance Discussion Papers 
Number 1026 
August 2011 
The Revealed Competitiveness of U.S. Exports 
Massimo Del Gatto 
Filippo di Mauro  
Joseph Gruber 
Benjamin R. Mandel 
NOTE: International Finance Discussion Papers are preliminary materials circulated to stimulate 
discussion and critical comment. References to International Finance Discussion Papers (other 
than an acknowledgement that the writer has had access to unpublished material) should be 
cleared  with  the  author  or  authors.  Recent  IFDPs  are  available  on  the  Web  at 
www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/ifdp/. This paper can be downloaded without charge from Social 
Science Research Network electronic library at www.ssrn.com. 
Online pdf to tiff conversion - control SDK platform:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
www.rasteredge.com
Online pdf to tiff conversion - control SDK platform:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
The Revealed Competitiveness of U.S. Exports* 
Massimo Del Gatto (G.d'Annunzio University and CRENoS) 
Filippo di Mauro (European Central Bank) 
Joseph Gruber (Federal Reserve Board) 
Benjamin R. Mandel (Federal Reserve Board) 
Abstract 
The U.S. share of world merchandise exports has declined sharply over the last decade. Using 
data at the level of detailed industries, this paper analyzes the decline in U.S. share against the 
backdrop of alternative measures of the competitiveness of the U.S. economy.  We document the 
following facts: (i) only a few industries contributed to the decline in any meaningful way, (ii) a 
large part of the drop was driven by the changing size of U.S. export industries and not the size 
of U.S. sales within those industries, (iii) in a gravity framework, the majority of the decline in 
the U.S. export share within industries was due to the declining U.S. share of world income, and 
(iv) in a computed structural measure of firm productivity, average U.S. export productivity has 
generally maintained its high level versus other countries over time.  Overall, our analysis 
suggests that the dismal performance of the U.S. market share is not a sufficient statistic for 
competitiveness. 
Keywords:  Trade competitiveness, gravity model, firm productivity 
JEL classification: F14, F17 
* Division of International Finance, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Washington, D.C. 20551 
U.S.A. m.delgatto@unich.itFilippo.diMauro@ecb.intJoseph.W.Gruber@frb.govBenjamin.R.Mandel@frb.gov.  
The authors thank Brian  Andrew for excellent research assistance. The  views in this paper are solely  the 
responsibility of the authors and should not be interpreted as reflecting the views of the Board of Governors of the 
Federal Reserve System, any other person associated with the Federal Reserve System, or the European Central 
Bank. 
control SDK platform:Online Convert PDF file to Tiff. Best free online PDF Tif
Online PDF to Tiff Converter. Download Free Trial. Then just wait until the conversion from PDF to Tiff is complete and download the file.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:Online Convert PDF file to Word. Best free online PDF Conversion
Online Tiff to PDF Converter. Convert a Tiff/Tif File to PDF. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button or drag-and-drop your Tiff or Tif file into
www.rasteredge.com
The Revealed Competitiveness of U.S. Exports
Massimo Del Gatto
Filippo di Mauro
Joseph Gruber
Benjamin R. Mandel
This version: March 18, 2011
G.d’Annunzio University andCRENoS. m.delgatto@unich.it.
European Central Bank. Filippo.diMauro@frb.gov
Federal Reserve Board. Joseph.W.Gruber@frb.gov.
Federal Reserve Board. Benjamin.R.Mandel@frb.gov.
1 Introduction
The U.S. share of world merchandise exports has declined sharply over the last decade. Using
data at the level of detailed industries, this paper analyzes the decline in U.S. share against the
backdropofalternative measures of the competitivenessof the U.S. economy.
Usual suspects for a given country’s decline in export share might include: unfavorable rela-
tive price movements, crowding out from the proliferation of low-cost exporters from developing
countries, uneven reductions in trade costs and barriers around the world, or possibly the dete-
rioriating productivityof exporting rms comparedto foreign rivals. Disentangling these factors
presentsseveral complications. First, relative prices are only weakly correlated with U.S. market
share, and are thus not veryhelpful in explaining its recent dynamics. This is evidenced by the
accelerating dropin share during the 2000’s amidsta decline inthe value ofthe broadreal dollar.
Second, in many instances, and particularly for international comparisons, trade costs and rm
productivity are dicult to measure directly.
1
Andthird, export shares may additionally re ect
the idiosyncratic composition of the U.S. export bundle, which may have little to do with the
abilityofU.S. exporters within a given industryto compete.
To tackle these issues, Section 2 begins by decomposing the decline in share into detailed
industry groups; we nd that only a few of these industries contributed to the decline in any
meaningfulway. Moreover,a large partofthedropwasdriven bythe changing size ofU.S.export
industries and notthe size of U.S. sales within those industries. This meansthatU.S. exporters
arespecializedinindustriesthathappento have been growing relativelyslowlyasa share ofworld
trade. These observations oer ourrstsuggestion thatthe fall in aggregate U.S. share haslittle
to do with the underlying productivity of U.S. exporting rms.
The authors thank Brian Andrew for excellent research assistance. The views in this paper are solely the
responsibilityoftheauthorsandshouldnotbeinterpretedasre ectingtheviewsoftheBoardofGovernorsofthe
FederalReserve System, any other person associated with theFederal ReserveSystem,or theEuropean Central
Bank.
1
Measures of aggregate tfp, comparable across countries, are usually obtained as the residual component of
GDP growth that cannot be explained by thegrowth of production inputs. Oneof the drawbacks of the growth
accountingapproachisthattheroleofthesectoralcompositionofoutputisruledoutbyassumption. By assuming
that GDP isproducedby a singlesector, onecannotdisentangletfp dierences (across countries) duetosectoral
specializationfromtfp dierences dueto otherfactors.
1
control SDK platform:Online Convert Excel to PDF file. Best free online export xlsx
Online Excel to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Your file will then be instantly converted to PDF and ready to download. The perfect conversion tool.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
In addition, .NET programming examples for all these functions are provided online. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF to images, like Tiff.
www.rasteredge.com
We thenpresenttwomeasuresoftrade competitivenesswhich, insofarastheyareinferredfrom
actual trade  ows, we refer to as revealed competitiveness. The rst measure, in Section 3, is
derived as a residual froma standard gravityequation. The objective of the exercise is to purge
bilateral trade  ows of the eect of national income and geography, wherein the residual contains
information about the relative productivity and unmeasured trade costs of exporters. We nd
that the majority of the decline in the U.S. export share is in fact due to the declining share of
U.S. income in the world. The residual, which we view as a ‘purer’ measure of competitiveness,
is declining butnotasdramatically.
Our second approach, in Section 4, is derived from a structural model and builds on the
multi-country, multi-sector version of Melitz-Ottaviano (2008).
2
In that framework, the overall
competitivenessof a countryin a given sectoris the outcome of a processof rm selection driven
by: (1) the degree of ’accessibility’ (i.e. trade costs) of the country and the size of its domestic
market, as well as (2) the exogenous ability of the country to generate low cost rms, which
depends on structural and technological factors. We extend previous empirical applications of
that model by using richer product level detail, and additionally employ an innovative approach
byNovy(2009)tocomputecompetitivenessindicatorswhicharecomparableovertime. Consistent
with our gravity residual exercise we nd that, notwithstanding signicant heterogeneity across
sectors,U.S. exportproductivityhasgenerallymaintaineditshighlevelversusothercountriesover
time. Overall, our analysis suggests that the dismal performance of the U.S. marketshare is not
asucient statistic forcompetitiveness.
2 The state of U.S. export share
From 1980 to 2009 the U.S. share of world exports fell byalmost one third, declining fromabout
11 percent to just over 8 percent of world exports. In this section we examine the decline in the
U.S. share using NBER-UN bilateral trade data from Feenstra, Lipsey, Deng, Ma and Mo (2005).
As shown in Figure 1, the United States’ share of world merchandise exports rose slightly
from 1986 to 1999, increasing from about 10
1
2
to 12
1
2
percent of world exports, before falling 4
percentagepointsbetween1999and2009. Thebilateraltradedatarunthrough2004and,inFigure
2, we observe thateveryindustrygroup atSITC 1-digitaggregation registered adecrease overthe
period from 1984 to 2004, with many of the larger changes occuring in the early 2000’s. The
largest declines in share were recorded among the basic materials categories (SITC 0 through 4),
whichaccountforapproximately25 percent ofU.S. exports, andin machineryand transportation
equipment (SITC 7), which account for almost half ofU.S. export sales. Itis interesting to note
thatthe timing ofthedecline inU.S.share diers overSITC categories. Thefallinbasic material
sharesisgradualandpersistent,while decline in machinery&transportationequipmentisabrupt,
primarily occurring after 1999.
The decline in market share is machinery and transportation equipment is particular notable
giventhe importance ofthissectorforoverallU.S. exports. Thefallinthe U.S.share ofmachinery
andtransportationequipmentisexaminedfurtherinTable1,whichbreaksthe categoryintoSITC
2-digitsubcategories. Althoughthe declineinU.S.shareisapparentacrossmost2-digitmachinery
categories,thefall intheU.S. shareofoce machine andcomputerexportsisparticularlystriking,
with U.S.share of world exports fallingfroma thirdofthe total tojustunder one tenth. Aswith
overall exports, thereissome dispersionin the timingofthe decline in sharesacrosssubcategories.
Whereas the fall in computers is steep and steadyover the entire period, in mostother categories
of machinery the U.S. was able to maintain or expand export share through 1999 before shares
plummeted sharply.
2
Thatmodelwasrstbroughtto thedataby Del Gatto,MionandOttaviano(2006)andfurther developedby
Ottaviano,TaglionianddiMauro(2009).
2
control SDK platform:C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Online demo allows converting tiff to PDF online. C# source codes are provided to use in .NET class. In addition to PDF to Tiff conversion, our .NET PDF
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:VB.NET Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF
online. Source codes are provided to use in VB.NET class. Free library and components for downloading and using in .NET framework. Except PDF to Tiff conversion
www.rasteredge.com
Amore meaningfulwayofdecomposing the declineinthe aggregate exportshareistocompute
the appropriately weighted contribution from disaggregate categories of goods. The change in
aggregate export share can be expressed asthe sum ofchanges across product categories (i) as a
ratio of the change in worldexports:
X
US
X
WORLD
=
X
i
X
i
US
X
WORLD
Figure 3 depicts the contributions to the change in aggregate export share for each 1 digit SITC
code over the period from 1984 to 2004. Food & live animals provided the largest contribution
to the decline in share, accountingfor almostone fourthofthe aggregate decline. Almost as large
were the contributions of machinery &transportationand crude materials, also eachcontributing
about one fourth to the overall decline inshare. The importance of raw materials for the decline
in U.S.share raises anote ofcaution in interpreting aggregate exportshare statistics. Commodity
pricesfellovermostthe periodunderconsideration,and since the exports oftheUnited Statesare
relatively commodity intensive, so didthe U.S. share ofworld exports.
The importance of commodities is further illustrated in Figure 4, which depicts the top 10
contributors to the aggregate decline among 4-digit SITC codes. Cornand soybeanscontribute a
combined one sixth ofthe overall decline. However, the 4-digitdata also revealsthat a number of
categoriesofmanufacturedgoodsalsocontributedtothedecline,includingmotorvehiclepartsand
digitalprocessingunits(computers). Thetakeawaymessageisthatatruemeasureofdevelopments
in U.S. competitiveness is more likely to be found bylooking at U.S. export performance within
relatively narrowlydened categories.
The importance of foods for the explaining the overall decline in U.S. share is somewhat sur-
prising given foods relatively small share in U.S. exports and, as shown in Figure 2, the lack of
an abnormally large fall in the U.S. share of food specic exports. However, it is important to
note that the contribution of each individual category to the fall in the U.S. aggregate share oc-
curs along both an intensive and an extensive margin. The decline in the U.S. aggregate share
re ects both an intensive decline in market share within each category, as well as an extensive
decline stemming from changes in the size of each category in world exports. For instance, corn
(SITC0440)contributestothe decline inU.S. aggregate sharebothastheU.S. capturesasmaller
proportion of the corn-specic export market and also as corn’s share of overall world exports
declines.
One establishedmethodofassessing the importance ofcomposition forchangesintradeshares
is constant market share analysis (see ECB (2005) for a detailed description).
3
Constant market
share analysis separates changes in aggregate market share into two components, a commodity
eect and competitivenesseectdened asfollows:4
X
i
US
X
WORLD
=
X
i
X
i
US
X
i
WORLD
:
X
i
WORLD
X
WORLD
|
{z
}
+
X
i
X
i
US
X
i
WORLD
:
X
i
WORLD
X
WORLD
|
{z
}
Commodity Eect
Competitiveness Eect
The commodity eect measures the eect of composition on the change in the aggregate export
share, by weighting the change in the composition of world exports by the initial composition of
3Constantmarketshareanalysisisbesetbyanumberofwelldocumentedtheoreticalproblems(seeRichardson
(1971)foranoverview). However,theapproachremainsillustrativeandsimpletoimplementevenifinterpretation
iscomplicatedby relativepricechangesandotherissues.
4Theconstant market shareapproachoftenincludes anadditional\market eect"related tothegeographical
pattern of trade. For easeof exposition wehavefocused only on the commodity eect, in a sense wrapping the
market eect into ourmeasurement of thecompetitiveness eect. With declining tradecosts it is likely that the
marketeecthasbecomea less pronounceddeterminateofaggregatesharein any case.
3
control SDK platform:C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert TIFF Image File
Online C# tutorial for high-fidelity Tiff image file conversion from MS Office Word, Excel, and PowerPoint document. Convert PDF to Tiff Using C#.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
plug-in embeds several image compression mechanisms, it can be used for multiple PDF to image converting applications, like PDF to tiff conversion, PDF to JPEG
www.rasteredge.com
the U.S. export bundle. The competitiveness eect measures the portion of the change in the
aggregate share thatisdue to changes inthe withincategoryshare of U.S. exports.
Figure 5 decomposes the contribution of each 1-digit SITC export category to the change
in the aggregate export share (the blue bars) into components due to commodity (the green
bars) and competitiveness (the red bars) eects over the 1984 to 2006 period. The large negative
contributionsoffoodand live animalsandcrude materialslargelyre ectthe decliningimportance
of these goods in world exports (signied by negative commodity eects), although U.S. exports
alsosueredanegativecompetitivenesseectineachcase. Incontrastthenegativecontributionto
the aggregate recorded by the machineryand transportationsector is completely due to a decline
in U.S. competitiveness, as the sector has greatly increased its weight in the world exports over
the time frame under consideration.
Insummary, interpreting the decline in the U.S. export share is complicated by compositional
eects. The primary drivers of the decline in aggregate U.S. share were raw commodities, with
negative contributionsthat largely derived fromtheirdeclining weightin the worldexportbasket.
Thatsaid, the U.S.didexperience alarge declineintheshareinthemachineryandtransportation
sector, which was not re ected in the composition of U.S. exports but rather declines within
detailed sub-categories. Here the evidence of a fall in U.S. competitiveness is more compelling.
Againstthisbackground, the followingsectionsfocusonU.S. exportperformancewithinindustries
and attmept to identifyits drivers. We suggest two alternative empirical methodologies to parse
out a narrower denition of competitiveness: exporter productivity purged of geographical and
relative market size considerations. This strategy is termed, "revealed competitiveness," which
derives from the fact thatit is inferred fromobservable trade  ows.
3 Reduced Form Revealed Competitiveness
One possible explanationforthe declineinU.S.exportshare issimplythatthe U.S. now accounts
for a smaller share of global output. As China and other emerging economies expand rapidly
and become more integrated into the global economy, it is natural that the U.S. share of world
exports wouldfall withoutnecessarilyindicatinganydecline in the productivityofU.S. exporters.
As shown in Figure 6, the fall in the U.S. share of global exports of about 4 percentage points
over the past decade corresponds to a decrease in the U.S. share of global output of about3 1/2
percentage points on a PPP basis. The relatively tight correlation between export share and
income holdstrue for manyother countriesaswell. Acrossthe G7, France, Italy, and Japan have
experienceddeclinesinexportsharethatbroadlymatchtheirdeclining share ofworldoutput. On
the other hand, Germany hasmore lessmaintained exportshare even as its share ofworldincome
hasdeclined,whileCanadaand the UKhave sueredmuchsteeperfallosinexportsthanincome.
In percentage terms, the export share growth of China has outpaced its income share, and the
same holds for India.
Figure 6 strongly suggests that changes in market share may be con ating competitiveness
eects with income dynamics. Specically, countrycharacteristics suchassize maybe in uencing
marketshare buthave little to dowiththe underlyingabilityofa country’s exporters to compete.
To control forsuchcharacteristics, ourrstapproach istonon-parametricallyestimate trade  ows
minus the contribution of country size, geography and certain trade costs. A derivative of the
gravity equation is a natural candidate to do so. Previous studies such as Baier and Bergstrand
(2001),and morerecentlyWhalleyandXin(2009)andNovy(2009), use gravitytodecomposethe
levelsofbilateral trade  ows into contributions from income, trade costs orotherwise. Eachnds
that exporter and importer income plays a substantial, even dominant, role in explaining trade.
Our approach extends this logic to the case of relative trade performance, where the gravity
equation is ‘folded’ by dividing through by a reference exporter. In the particular case where
the reference country is the entire world, the gravity equation converts neatly into an expression
4
control SDK platform:XDoc.Converter for .NET, Support Documents and Images Conversion
Convert Adobe PDF to image. Convert Tiff to image. Convert Word, Excel and PDF to image. Next Steps. Download and try Converter for .NET with online support.
www.rasteredge.com
for marketshare intermsofrelative exporter size, relative geographic characteristics and relative
productivity.
Ourapproachto‘decomposing’ the share intofactorsthathave todowithcompetitivenessand
those that don’t involves simply looking at the time variation in the residual of a panel gravity
estimation. The intuitionisthatifa countryisincreasinglyoutperformingthe average exporter’s
performance (i.e., a country exports more relative to its own size and more to distant countries
overtime)then its residual will grow over time. We positthat this residual containsinformation
about changes in the underlying productivity of exporters. In this section, we do not apply a
structuralinterpretationto thatproductivity, itismerelycontainedinthe residual. In the section
that follows, we applya structure that allows for more specic interpretation ofthe residual and,
moreover, is consistent with the reduced form gravity equation herein.
To be concrete, dene Tlh
s
ascountryl’s exports to countryh in sectors ina given periodt:
T
lh
st
=D
l
t
D
h
t
r
l
st
r
h
st
lh
s
t
(1)
Equation (1) correspondsto ageneric gravitymodel, where bilateral trade isafunction ofcountry
size(D),latentcountry-specicmultilateralresistance(r),geographiccharacteristics()andglobal
shocks (). Exploiting the multiplicative form of the equation, we cancel out importer-specic
terms bydividing through bytotal exports to countryh in industry s.
T
lh
st
P
l
T
lh
st
=
D
l
t
r
l
st
lh
s
P
l
D
l
t
r
l
st
lh
s
(2)
The intuition for thisreducedformisthat the change in a givenimporter’s income ormultilateral
resistance willaectthe level ofthatcountry’simportsbutnothowthe newimportsare allocated
across exporters. Moreover, a global shock aecting all exporters will not aect their relative
performanceand hence the termscanceloutaswell. The method oftaking ratiosofthe gravity
equationhasthree ostensiblebenets. First,forourpurposeofrelatingthe shareofU.S. exportsto
underlying productivity measures, equation(2) is expressedin the correct unitsofshare owing to
income, trade costs andproductivity. Second, the size ofthe data matrixused in the estimation is
reduced byfoldinginthe importer-specic terms. Third, multilateral resistance terms(asdened
in Anderson and van Wincoop (2003)) associated with importers cancel out, sparing the need to
approximate themusing xed eects.
5
Denoting the geometric mean ofa givenvariable by
X=
Q
l
X
1
n
,taking logs, andallowing for
amean-zero perturbation ("), we can rewrite the above expression as:
6
ln
T
lh
st
P
l
T
lh
st
=ln
1
n
s
+ln
D
l
t
D
t
+ln
lh
s
h
s
+ln
r
l
st
r
st
+"
lh
st
(3)
The log of country l’s market share in destination market h is a positive function of its rel-
ative income, its geographic proximity and its relative productivity. Again, this specication is
isomorphic to a standard gravity model, though specied in relative terms. With the additional
assumptionsthat and n are constantovertime, variationin exportermultilateral resistance and
productivityisidentiedasthe residual ofa model withexporterrelativeincome andcountry-pair
xedeectsonthe right-handside. Thatis, the actualmarketshare changes over time relative to
the changes in the gravity model prediction contains information about the evolution of relative
5
Otherexamples ofcancelling out theimporter xed eects in a gravity framework include: Head and Mayer
(2000),Martin,Mayer and Thoenig (2008)andHead,Mayer andRies(2010).
6
Expression(3)imposesseparabilityacrossright-handsideratioswiththeassumptionthatln
P
T =
P
lnT. In
practice,thismay havetheeectofoverestimating theshareofeachexporter(i.e.,sincethesharesasdecomposed
ontheright-handsidewilladduptomorethan1),but littleimpactontherelativesizeof theshares.
5
exporter productivity. This is what we will refer to as the share-to-model ratio, or simply the
growthin the model residual byexporting country, averaged acrossindustries:
4ln
rl
t
r
t
=
4ln
Tlh
st
P
l
T
lh
st
4ln
\
Tlh
st
P
l
T
lh
st
!
(4)
The assumption of a time-invariant  is similar to standard gravity approaches using variables
such as distance, common border and common language that don’t tend to change much. The
implication of this assumption, however, is that decreases in trade costs due to changing trade
policy will also be captured in the residual term. In our implementation we add dummies for
signicant shifts in policy (e.g., NAFTA, EMU) as well as over the course of our sample to try
to control for changing trade costs, but nonetheless the residual likelycaptures elements offalling
trade costsinadditiontorelativeproductivity. Assuch,inthissectionwe jointlyestimate relative
performancedue to these factors, bothofwhich tinto areasonable, ifbroad, denitionofexport
competitiveness; in the following section we use a structural model to parse the residual more
nely.
Theassumptionofaconstantnumberoftradingpartnersperimporter (n)maybe lessbenign.
Due to the seminal workof Feenstra (1994), there hasbeenmuch studyof the increase inproduct
varietywithinevennarrowlydenedproductcategories. We addressthisempiricallyin twoways.
First, every specicationbelow contains time xed eectswhichwould soak up a seculartrend in
varieties. Secondly, most specications contain country-pair xed eects or exporter-time xed
eectswhichwouldpickupatleastaportionofthe leveldierencesinnbycountry. Wenote that
adisproportionate rise in relative product variety to certain countries over time would decrease
the termln(1=n)and hence workagainstthe ndingofrisingproductivityinthe residual. Forthe
mostprolictradersin termsoftheirnumberoftradingpartners, whichincludesthe U.S., we thus
take our estimates of the rising residual as an underestimate of the true change in productivity
and trade costs.
3.1 Reduced form revealed competitiveness: data & specication
The data used in the estimation are bilateral trade  ows as described in the previous section,
nominal GDP data from the Penn World Table which are converted into international dollars at
PPPexchange rates,dummyvariablesforNAFTA,EU andEMI trade  ows, the distance between
capital cities, as well as common border and common language dummies. We follow previous
studies bytruncating the data at $10,000 per annual bilateral  ow to avoid potential distortions
fromerrorsofunitsinthedata andimplausiblysmall tradevalues. Weruneachgravityregression
at the SITC 4-digit level and constrain ourselves to products with over 1,000 exporter-importer-
yearobservations. The amountofdatalostduetoconcordanceissuesforincomeanddistance data
willvarybyspecication since the useofxed eectsoftenobviatesthe use ofthosevariables, but
the most punitive cut of the data still accounts for over 83 percent of global trade value between
1980 and 2004.
OurestimatorisOLSonthelog-linearspecicationof(3). Cognizantofthe factthatthere are
manydierentways to specify thatequation, we try an array ofve dierent panel specications
withvaryingdegreesofcontrolformultilateralresistanceterms. Again,ourobjectiveistocompute
various indexes ofthe change in the residual (4) which will be informative of the portion of U.S.
share decline not explained by gravity controls such as income and geography. The dierences
amongthese veregressionsarethetreatmentofthe terms(whichinsome casesarecountry-pair
xed eects and in others are the standard distance, borderand language controls), the measure
of country-specic variables D, as well as the subsetof data used forthe estimation.
The specications are described in Table 2. In specication (i), we regress the exporter’s
share of global sales in each SITC product on the exporter’s relative nominal income (recall that
6
the importer-specic terms cancel by dividing by a reference exporter), exporter-importer xed
eects, year xed eects, and dummies for NAFTA and EMU. An actual measure of income is
used to control for the trends described in the previous section. The exporter-importer FE is
astatic measure of trade costs which wipes out variation in border, distance and language, and
arguablyincludesmanymoreunmeasured(andunchanging)barriersto trade. Tocontrolforsome
large policy changes during our sample which we do not view as endogenous to competitiveness,
dummiesforpost-NAFTAandpostEuroyearsareincludedforthe appropriate countries. Finally,
year xed eects soak up seculartrends in n.
Specication(ii)usesthesameregressorsas(i),butonasubsetofthedatathathasobservations
for atleast 20 of the 25 yearsin the sample (i.e., within each exporter-importer-SITC cell). It is
informative to constrain ourselves to the subset ofbilateral trade  owsthat are balanced overthe
course of the sample forat least two reasons. First, the average results statistics reported across
products may be skewed bycompositional changes over time in the unbalancedpanel. Secondly,
our linear-in-logs specication potentially introduces selection bias by dropping the observations
withzerotrade ows. Onepossiblewaytoassessthesensitivityofthe resultsto looseningthe data
truncation at zero would be to tighten it further; that is, any selection bias caused by dropping
zero valueswould be enhancedby dropping sporadic ones.
Specication(iii) usesexporter-yearxed eects in the place ofGDP. Since these xed eects
also approximate changestothe multilateral resistance terms of the exporter, theymayinfactbe
soaking up some of the information on competitiveness intended to be measured. As such, the
robustnessoftheresultconsistsofasimilarproleofresidual changesin specications(i)through
(iii), due to the following trade-o: inthe rsttwo there islikelysome omitted variable bias since
implicit indexes of multilateral resistance (as dened in Anderson and van Wincoop (2003)) are
themselvesa function of geographic variables included in the regression. On the other hand, the
appropriate control formultilateralresistance removesfromthe residual atleastsome information
on the relative performance of exporters. Specications (iv) and (v) check the robustness of
the results to more standard gravity specications, by unfolding (3) into levels and incorporating
conventional measures of static trade costs. Specication (vi) uses a an alternative data source
on bilateral international trade  ows aggregated into broader ISIC 2-digit sectors.7
3.2 Reduced form revealed competitiveness: results
After controlling for model factors in several alternative formulations of the gravity model, we
nd that the U.S. export share is only in slight decline. In our benchmark specication (i), the
majorityoftheroughly20 percentdeclineinaggregate U.S.exportshareisexplainedbythe model
with about a 6 percentdecline in the residual.
8
Table 3 shows the estimates of control variables for (3) estimated across all products.
9
As
expected, exporter GDP share is positively related to export share, with a 1 percent decrease in
relative income decreasing exportshare byroughly0.4-0.6 percent. These magnitudes are similar
to the coecients on GDP in the level regressions and slightly lower than those using the ISIC
data. The eect of NAFTA and the introduction of the euro are both positive and signicant,
with coecients ranging from 0.4-1.5 and 0.1-0.5, respectively. Measures of distance, language
and border have the expected sign.
7
Specication(vi)conrmstheconsistencyofthereducedformresultswiththeempiricalexerciseinthefollowing
section. WhilethereducedformregressionsusetheFeentraetal. (2005)datadescribedabove,themethodology in
thenextsection additionally requiresdataonsectoralintra-nationaltrade,whichnecessitatesusing analternative
data set. Thosedataaredescribedbelow.
8ResultsfortheremainingvespecicationscanbefoundinAppendixB.
9
Asmentioned,thegravityresidualsareestimatedattheSITC4-digit levelfor specications(i)-(v) andatthe
ISIC 2-digit level for specication (vi). In the table, due to computational constraints on such a large dataset,
wepresent aggregate control variables estimated without product xed eects. As such, the coecients can be
interpretedas simpleaveragesacrossSITCproducts,orinthecaseof specication(vi),ISICproducts.
7
Anindexofmarket share changesforthe U.S., along with an index of model predicted values,
are shown in Figure 7. The index in each year is a geometric mean of share changes across U.S.
destinationcountries andproducts, where each change in share isweightedby the SITC-importer
value in the year 2000.
10
Despite a widening of the gap between the two indices in the early
period, the model prediction broadly follows the share trend. Since there are not many time-
varying regressors in our gravity estimation, this result is closely related to the observation in
Figure 6 thatU.S. income share and trade share have similar dynamics.
To construct a statistic for the overall percent change in market share due to the gravity
residual, the ratio ofactual to predicted share is averagedacross time periodsin the earlypart of
the sample (1980-1992)andthe latter part(1993-2004)and the log-dierence ofthese tworatiosis
taken foreach exporter-importer-SITC group. The average of those statistics acrossdestinations
and 4-digit product groups is shown in Figure 8 for the G20 plus Singapore, Taiwan and Hong
Kong.11 Across all products, the U.S. is in the middle of the packwith decreases in its residual
of 6 percent. This can be interpreted as a decrease in U.S. export market share of 6 percent
thatisnotaccountedforbythe dynamicsofincome,and is notablysmallerthan the overallshare
declineofapproximately20percentoverthatperiod. ThissuggeststhatU.S.relativeproductivity
competitiveness,albeitinslightdeclinebythismeasure,didnotdecline bynearlyasmuchasitsfall
in share mightsuggest. Thisresultisconsistentacrossproductcategories, shown in Table 4, even
for SITC 7 (machineryand transportation) where U.S. share performance wasparticularlygrave,
as well as for other specications shown in Appendix B. For other exporters, clear winners and
losersemerge. Indonesia,China,IndiaandMexicohadamongthehighestincreasesintheirgravity
residual bya large margin, astheirexportgrowthfaroutpaced the increaseintheirincomeshares.
On the otherhand, certain large Asian exporters had dramatic fallsin theirresiduals presumably
dueto the rise ofChina andlarge increasesinMexicanexportsto the U.S.overthesample period.
European countries and Canada had more moderate changes in their export performance and,
with a few exceptions, tended to lag behind the rest ofthe world.
Insummary,thisreducedformexercisestronglysupportsthestorythatexporterincomeshares
areanimportantdeterminantoftradeshares. Beyondthat,however,itisdiculttoknowwhether
the gravityresidual re ectsthe actual evolutioninthe underlying productivityofexportersrather
than other factors, such as evolving trade costs. In the following section we take a dierent
approach to identifying relative cost competitiveness across countries by modelling the micro-
foundations of trade shares explicitly.
4 Structural Revealed Competitiveness
In this section we build on a multi-country multi-sector version of the Melitz-Ottaviano (2008)
model to obtain a (computable)structural equation forthe relative competitivenessof a country.
Afull description ofthe reference model is reported in Corcos et al. (FEEM, 2010), although its
main propertiesare summarizedin Appendix A.
Themodelyieldsthefollowingexpressionforaggregatebilateraltradefromcountryl tocountry
10For the sakeof comparability, the predicted and actualmarket sharechanges areaggregatedover exactlythe
sameSITC-destination pairs. Theindex ofsharechangedoes notexactly match that inFigure1,since:(a) itis
ageometricindex, whereas simply adding up shareacross products as in Figure 1 is analogous to an arithmetic
mean,and(ii)becausetheindexismatchedineachperiod(i.e.,thetrade owhadtooccurinbothtimetandt-1
forittobeincluded),thecompositionofitemsintheFigure2indexwillbeasubsetofthoseinFigure1. Overall,
the magnitudeof thedropofthegeometricindex seems reasonably closetotheaggregatedropandthedynamics
of contractionsintheearly 1980’sand2000’s paralleloneanother.
11
Thislistcorrespondswellwiththetoptwenty exportersbysizein1980. Inthetable,thecategory‘OtherEU’
includes:Austria,Belguim,Denmark,Finland,Ireland,Netherlands,PortugalandSweden.
8
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested