Ch 12] 
BIRTH  OF  THE  LIBERAL  CREED 
145 
that the inherent absurdity of the idea of a self-regulating market sys-
tem would have eventually destroyed society, the liberal accuses the 
most various elements of having wrecked a great initiative.  Unable to 
adduce  evidence of any such  concerted  effort to  thwart  the  liberal 
movement,  he falls back on the practically irrefutable hypothesis of 
covert action.  This is the myth of the antiliberal conspiracy which in 
one  form  or  another is  common  to  all liberal  interpretations  of the 
events of the  i87o
,
s and  1880's.  Commonly the rise of nationalism 
and of socialism is credited with having been the chief agent in that 
shifting  of  the  scene;  manufacturers
5
associations  and  monopolists, 
agrarian interests and trade unions are the villains of the piece.  Thus 
in  its  most  spiritualized  form  the  liberal  doctrine  hypostasizes  the 
working  of  some  dialectical  law  in  modern  society  stultifying  the 
endeavors of enlightened reason, while in its crudest version it reduces 
itself to an attack on political democracy, as the alleged mainspring of 
interventionism. 
The testimony of the facts contradicts the liberal thesis decisively. 
The antiliberal conspiracy is a pure invention.  The great variety of 
forms in which the "collectivist" countermovement appeared was not 
due to any preference for socialism or nationalism on the part of con-
certed interests, but exclusively to the broader range of the vital social 
interests affected by the expanding market mechanism.  This accounts 
for the all but universal reactions of predominantly practical character 
called forth by the expansion of that mechanism.  Intellectual fashions 
played no role whatever in this process;  there was,  accordingly, no 
room for the prejudice  which  the liberal  regards  as  the ideological 
force behind the antiliberal development.  Although it is true that the 
1870*5 and  i88o's saw the end of orthodox liberalism,  and that all 
crucial problems of the present can be traced back to that period, it is 
incorrect to say that the change to social and national protectionism 
was due to any other cause than the manifestation of the weaknesses 
and perils inherent in  a self-regulating market system.  This can be 
shown in more than one way. 
First, there is the amazing diversity of the matters on which action 
was taken. This alone would exclude the possibility of concerted action. 
Let us cite from a list of interventions which Herbert Spencer compiled 
in 1884, when charging liberals with having deserted their principles 
for the sake of "restrictive legislation."
4
The variety of the subjects 
could hardly be greater.  In i860, authority was given to provide "ana-
4
Spencer, H., The Man vs. the State, 1884. 
Convert multipage pdf to multipage tiff - software Library cloud:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
www.rasteredge.com
Convert multipage pdf to multipage tiff - software Library cloud:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
146 
RISE  AND  FALL  OF  MARKET  ECONOMY 
[Ch. 12 
lysts of food and drink to be paid out of local rates" ; there followed an 
Act providing "the inspection of gas works"; an extension of the Mines 
Act "making it penal to employ boys under twelve not attending schools 
and unable to read or write."  In 1861, power was given "to poor law 
guardians to enforce vaccination";  local  boards were authorized "to 
fix rates of hire for means of conveyance" ; and certain locally formed 
bodies "had given them powers of taxing the locality for rural drain-
age and irrigation works, and for supplying water to cattle."  In 1862, 
an Act was passed making illegal "a coal-mine with a single shaft"; 
an Act giving the Council of Medical Education exclusive right "to 
furnish  a  Pharmacopoeia,  the  price  of  which  is  to be  fixed by  the 
Treasury."  Spencer,  horror-struck, filled several  pages with  an enu-
meration of these and similar measures.  In 1863, came the "extension 
of compulsory vaccination to Scotland and Ireland."  There was also 
an Act appointing inspectors for the "wholesomeness, or unwholesomc-
ness of food"; a Chimney-Sweeper's Act, to prevent the torture and 
eventual death of children set to sweep too narrow slots; a Contagious 
Diseases Act; a Public Libraries Act, giving local powers "by which a 
majority can tax a minority for their books."  Spencer adduced them 
as so much irrefutable evidence of an antiliberal conspiracy.  And yet 
each of these Acts dealt with some problem arising out of modern in-
dustrial conditions and was aimed at the safeguarding of some public 
interest against dangers inherent either in such conditions or, at any rate, 
in the market method of dealing with them.  To an unbiased mind they 
proved the purely practical and pragmatic nature of the "collectivism 
countermove.  Most  of  those  who  carried  these measures  were  con-
vinced supporters of laissez-faire, and certainly did not wish their con-
sent to the establishment of a fire brigade in London to imply a protest 
against  the  principles  of  economic  liberalism.  On  the  contrary,  the 
sponsors of these legislative acts were as a rule uncompromising op-
ponents of socialism, or any other form of collectivism. 
Second,  the  change  from  liberal  to  "collectivist"  solutions hap-
pened sometimes over night and without any consciousness on the part 
of those engaged in the process of legislative rumination.  Dicey ad-
duced the classic instance of the Workmen's Compensation Act deal-
ing with the employers' liability for damage done to his workmen in 
the course of their employment.  The history of the various acts em-
bodying this.idea, since  1880, showed consistent adherence to the in-
dividualist principle that the responsibility of the employer to his em-
ployee must be regulated in a manner strictly identical with that govern* 
software Library cloud:C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Split Multipage TIFF File
XDoc.Tiff ›› C# Tiff: Split Tiff. C# TIFF - Split Multi-page TIFF File in C#.NET. C# Guide for How to Use TIFF Processing DLL to Split Multi-page TIFF File.
www.rasteredge.com
software Library cloud:Process Multipage TIFF Images in Web Image Viewer| Online
Convert TIFF to other30+ formats supported by .NET imaging page TIFF image to a PDF; More image viewing & displaying functions. Multipage TIFF Processing.
www.rasteredge.com
Ch.
12] 
BIRTH  OF  THE  LIBERAL  CREED 
ing his responsibility to others, e.g., strangers.  With hardly any change 
in opinion, in 1897, the employer was suddenly made the insurer of his 
workmen against any damage incurred in the course of their employ-
ment, a "thoroughly collectivistic legislation," as Dicey justly remarked. 
No better proof could be adduced that no change either in the type of in-
terests involved, or in the tendency of the opinions brought to bear on the 
matter, caused the supplanting of a liberal principle by an antiliberal 
one, but exclusively the evolving conditions under which the problem 
arose and a solution was sought. 
Third, there is the indirect, but most striking proof provided by a 
comparison  of the development in various  countries of a widely dis-
similar political and ideological configuration.  Victorian England and 
the Prussia of Bismarck were poles apart, and both were very much 
unlike the France of the Third Republic or the Empire of the Haps-
burgs.  Yet each of them passed through  a period of free trade and 
laissez-faire, followed by a period of antiliberal legislation in regard to 
public health, factory conditions, municipal trading, social insurance, 
shipping  subsidies,  public  utilities,  trade  associations,  and  so  on.  It 
would be easy to produce a regular calendar setting out the years in 
which  analogous  changes  occurred  in the  various  countries.  Work-
men's  compensation was enacted  in  England  in 1880   and 1897,  in 
Germany in 1879, in Austria  in 1887,  in  France in 1899;  factory 
inspection was introduced in England in 1833, in Prussia in 1853, in 
Austria in 1883; in France in 1874  and 1883; muncipal trading, in-
cluding  the  running  of  public  utilities,  was  introduced  by  Joseph 
Chamberlain,  a  Dissenter  and  a  capitalist,  in  Birmingham  in  the 
1870's by the Catholic "Socialist" and Jew-baiter,
Karl
Lueger, in the 
Imperial Vienna of the 18go 's; in German and French municipalities 
by a variety of local coalitions.  The supporting forces were in some 
cases violently reactionary and antisocialist as in Vienna, at other times 
"radical imperialist" as in Birmingham, or of the purest liberal hue as 
with the Frenchman, Edouard Herriot, Mayor of Lyons.  In Protestant 
England, Conservative and Liberal cabinets labored intermittently at 
the completion of factory legislation.  In Germany, Roman Catholics 
and Social  Democrats took part in its achievement; in Austria,  the 
Church and its most militant supporters;  in  France,  enemies of the 
Church and ardent anticlericals were responsible for the enactment of 
almost identical laws.  Thus under the most varied slogans, with very 
different motivations a multitude of parties and social strata put into 
effect  almost  exactly  the  same  measures  in  a  series  of  countries  in 
software Library cloud:Process Multipage TIFF Images in .NET Winforms | Online Tutorials
Convert multipage TIFF files into other 30+ formats supported by Swap a Page in a Multipage TIFF Image. Tiff Processing; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode
www.rasteredge.com
software Library cloud:C# TIFF: C# Code for Multi-page TIFF Processing Using RasterEdge .
process, convert, annotate, and save various image and document file formats. Most commonly, images and documents like Tiff, Jpeg, Bmp, Png, Gif, PDF, Word
www.rasteredge.com
148 
RISE  AND  FALL  OF  MARKET  ECONOMY 
[Ch. 12 
respect to a large number of complicated subjects.  There is, on the 
face of it, nothing more absurd than to infer that they were secretly 
actuated  by  the  same  ideological  preconceptions  or  narrow  group 
interests as the legend of the antiliberal conspiracy would have it.  On 
the contrary, everything tends to support the assumption that objective 
reasons of a stringent nature forced the hands of the legislators. 
Fourth, there is the significant fact that at various times economic 
liberals  themselves advocated  restrictions on  the freedom of contract 
and on
laissez-faire
in a number of well-defined cases of great theoreti-
cal and practical importance.  Antiliberal prejudice could, naturally, 
not have been their motive.  We have in mind the principle of the asso-
ciation of labor on the one hand, the law of business corporations on 
the other.  The first refers to the right of workers to combine for the 
purpose of raising their wages; the latter, to the right of trusts, cartels, 
or other forms of capitalistic combines, to raise prices.  It was justly 
charged  in  both  cases  that  freedom  of  contract  or
laissez-faire
was 
being used in restraint of trade.  Whether workers* associations to raise 
wages, or trade associations to raise prices were in question, the prin-
ciple of
laissez-faire
could be  obviously  employed  by  interested parties 
to  narrow  the market  for  labor  or  other  commodities.  It  is  highly 
significant that in either case consistent liberals from Lloyd George and 
Theodore Roosevelt to Thurman Arnold and Walter Lippmann sub-
ordinated
laissez-faire  to
the  demand  for  a  free  competitive  market; 
they pressed for regulations and restrictions, for penal laws and com-
pulsion, arguing as any "collectivist" would that the freedom of con-
tract was being "abused" by trade unions, or corporations, whichever 
it was.  Theoretically,
laissez-faire
or  freedom  of contract  implied  the 
freedom  of  workers  to  withhold  their  labor  either  individually  or 
jointly, if they so decided; it implied also the freedom of businessmen 
to concert on selling prices irrespective of the wishes of the consumers. 
But in practice such freedom conflicted with the institution of a self-
regulating  market,  and
in  such  a  conflict  the  self-regulating
market
was 
invariably
accorded  precedence.
In  other words,  if the  needs of  a
self-
regulating  market  proved  incompatible
with
the  demands  of
laissez-
faire,
the economic liberal turned  against
laissez-faire
and preferred— 
as any antiliberal would have done—the so-called collectivist methods 
of  regulation  and  restriction.  Trade  union  law as  well  as antitrust 
legislation sprang from this attitude.  No more conclusive proof could 
be offered of the inevitability  of  antiliberal  or "collectivist"  methods 
under the conditions of modern  industrial society than the fact  that 
software Library cloud:VB.NET Image: Multi-page TIFF Editor SDK; Process TIFF in VB.NET
imaging SDK owns rich APIs, using which developers can easily load, save, view, edit, annotate, manipulate, convert and compress source TIFF document image
www.rasteredge.com
software Library cloud:.NET Multipage TIFF SDK| Process Multipage TIFF Files
to work with .NET development environments, this Multipage TIFF Processing SDK on the Web, open and view TIFF files on to SharePoint and save to PDF documents.
www.rasteredge.com
Gh. 12] 
BIRTH  OF  THE  LIBERAL  CREED 
149 
even  economic  liberals  themselves  regularly  used  such  methods  in 
decisively important fields of industrial organization. 
Incidentally,  this  helps  to  clarify  the  true  meaning  of  the  term 
"interventionism" by which economic liberals like to denote the oppo-
site of their own policy, but merely betray confusion of thought.  The 
opposite of interventionism is laissez-faire  and we have just seen that 
economic liberalism cannot be identified with laissez-faire  (although in 
common parlance there is no harm  in using them interchangeably). 
Strictly, economic liberalism is the organizing principle of a society in 
which industry is based on the institution of a self-regulating market. 
True, once such a system is approximately achieved, less intervention 
of one type is needed.  However,  this is far from saying  that market 
system and intervention are mutually exclusive terms.  For as long as 
that system is not established, economic liberals must and will unhesi-
tatingly call for the intervention of the state in order to establish it, and 
once  established, in  order to maintain  it.  The  economic liberal can, 
therefore, without any inconsistency call upon the state to use the force 
of law; he can even appeal to the violent forces of civil war to set up 
the  preconditions  of  a self-regulating  market.  In  America  the  South 
appealed to the arguments of laissez-faire to justify slavery; the North 
appealed to the intervention of arms to establish a free labor market. 
The accusation of interventionism on the part of liberal writers is thus 
an empty slogan, implying the denunciation of one and the same set of 
actions according to whether they happen to approve of them or not. 
The  only  principle  economic  liberals  can  maintain  without  incon-
sistency is that of the self-regulating market,  whether it involves them 
in interventions or not. 
To  sum  up.  The  countermove  against  economic  liberalism  and 
laissez-faire
possessed  all  the  unmistakable  characteristics  of  a  spon-
taneous reaction.  At innumerable disconnected points it set in without 
any traceable links between the interests directly affected or any ideo-
logical conformity between them.  Even in the setdement of one and the 
same  problem  as  in  the  case  of  workmen's  compensation,  solutions 
switched  over  from  individualistic  to  "collectivistic,"  from  liberal  to 
antiliberal,  from
"laissez-faire"
to  interventionist  forms  without  any 
change in the economic interest, the ideological influences or political 
forces in play, merely  as a result of the increasing realization of the 
nature of the problem in question.  Also it could be shown that a closely 
similar change from
laissez-faire
to "collectivism" took place in various 
countries at a definite stage of their industrial development, pointing to 
software Library cloud:C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
NET control able to batch convert PDF documents to image Create image files including all PDF contents, like Turn multipage PDF file into single image files
www.rasteredge.com
software Library cloud:C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Add multiple images to multipage PDF document in .NET WinForms. Support various image formats, like Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif, Bmp, Tiff and other bitmap images.
www.rasteredge.com
150 
RISE  AND  FALL  OF  MARKET  ECONOMY 
[Ch. ia 
the depth and independence of the underlying causes of the process so 
superficially credited by economic liberals to changing moods or sundry 
interests.  Finally,  analysis reveals that not  even  radical  adherents of 
economic liberalism could escape the rule which makes laissez-faire in-
applicable to advanced industrial conditions; for in the critical case of 
trade  union law  and  antitrust  regulations  extreme  liberals  themselves 
had  to  call for manifold  interventions  of the state, in order to  secure 
against monopolistic compacts the preconditions for the working  of  a 
self-regulating  market.  Even  free trade  and  competition  required  in-
tervention to be workable. The liberal myth of the "collectivist" con-
spiracy of the i87o's and i88o's is contrary to all the facts. 
Our  own  interpretation  of  the  double  movement  is,  we find, 
borne out by the evidence.  For if market economy was a threat to the 
human and natural components of the social fabric, as we insisted, what 
else  would one expect than an urge  on the part of a great variety of 
people to press for some sort of protection?  This was what we found. 
Also,  one would expect this to happen without  any theoretical or in-
tellectual  preconceptions  on  their  part,  and  irrespective  of  their  atti-
tudes towards the principles underlying a market economy.  Again, this 
was the case.  Moreover, we suggested that comparative history of gov-
ernments might  offer quasi-experimental  support  of  our  thesis  if  par-
ticular interests could be shown to be independent of the specific ideol-
ogies present in a number of different countries.  For this also we could 
adduce striking evidence.  Finally,  the behavior of liberals themselves 
proved  that the  maintenance of freedom  of trade—in our terms,  of a 
self-regulating market—far from excluding intervention,  in effect,  de-
manded such  action,  and  that  liberals themselves  regularly called  for 
compulsory action on the part of the state as in the case of trade union 
law and antitrust laws.  Thus nothing could be more decisive than the 
evidence of history as to which of the two contending interpretations of 
the double movement was correct:  that of the economic liberal who 
maintained that his policy never had  a chance,  but was strangled  by 
shortsighted trade unionists,  Marxist intellectuals,  greedy  manufactur-
ers, and reactionary landlords;  or that of his critics, who can point to 
the  universal  "collectivist"  reaction  against  the  expansion  of  market 
economy  in  the  second  half  of  the  nineteenth  century  as  conclusive 
proof of the peril to society inherent in the Utopian principle of a self-
regulating  market. 
13 
BIRTH 
OF 
THE 
LIBERAL 
CREED 
(Continued)  : 
CLASS 
INTEREST 
AND 
SOCIAL 
CHANGE 
THE
LIBERAL MYTH
of the
collectivist conspiracy must
be
completely 
dissipated  before the true basis of nineteenth century policies can be 
laid bare.  This legend has it that protectionism was merely the result 
of sinister interest of agrarians, manufacturers, and trade unionists, who 
selfishly wrecked the automatic machinery of the market.  In another 
form,
and, of
course, with
an
opposite
political  tendency,  Marxian 
parties argued in equally sectional terms.  (That the essential philosophy 
of Marx centered on the totality of society and the noneconomic nature 
of man is irrelevant here.
1
 Marx himself followed Ricardo in defining 
classes in economic terms, and economic exploitation was undoubtedly 
a feature of the bourgeois age. 
In popular Marxism this led to a crude class theory of social devel-
opment.  Pressure  for  markets  and  zones  of  influence  was  simply 
ascribed to the profit motive of a handful of  financiers.  Imperialism 
was  explained  as  a  capitalist  conspiracy  to  induce  governments  to 
launch  wars in the interests  of big  business.  Wars were held  to be 
caused by  these  interests  in  combination  with  armament firms who 
miraculously  gained  the  capacity  to  drive  whole  nations  into  fatal 
policies, contrary to their vital interests.  Liberals and Marxists agreed, 
in effect, in deducing the protectionist movement from the force of sec-
tional interests; in accounting for agrarian tariffs by the political pull 
of  reactionary  landlords;  in  making  the  profit  hunger  of  industrial 
magnates accountable for the growth of monopolistic forms of enter-
prise ; in presenting war as the result of business rampant. 
The  liberal  economic  outlook  thus  found  powerful  support in  a 
narrow  class  theory.  Upholding  the  viewpoint  of  opposing  classes, 
liberals and Marxists stood for identical propositions.  They established 
a watertight case for the assertion that nineteenth century protectionism 
1
Marx, K.., Nationals konomi* una* Philosophic* In "Der Historische Material 
itmus," 1
9
3
2
IS* 
152 
RISE  AND  FALL  OF  MARKET  ECONOMY 
[Ch. 13 
was the result of class action, and that such action must have primarily 
served the economic interests of the members of the classes concerned. 
Between them they all but completely obstructed an over-all view of 
market society, and of the function of protectionism in such a society. 
Actually, class interests offer only a limited explanation of long-run 
movements in  society.  The  fate of  classes is much more often  deter-
mined by the needs of society than the fate of society is determined by 
the  needs  of  classes.  Given  a  definite  structure  of  society,  the  class 
theory works; but what if that structure itself undergoes change ?  A class 
that has become functionless may disintegrate and be supplanted over-
night by a new class or classes.  Also, the chances of classes in a struggle 
will  depend  upon  their ability to  win support from  outside their own 
membership,  which  again  will  depend  upon  their fulfillment  of tasks 
set by interests wider than their own.  Thus,  neither the birth nor the 
death of classes, neither their aims nor the degree to which they attain 
them;  neither their co-operations nor their antagonisms can be under-
stood apart from the situation of society as a whole. 
Now, this situation is created, as a rule, by external causes, such as 
a change in climate, in the yield of crops, a new foe, a new weapon used 
by an old foe, the emergence of new communal ends, or, for that mat-
ter, the discovery of new methods of achieving the traditional ends.  To 
such  a total situation  must  sectional  interests  be  ultimately  related  if 
their function in social development should become clear. 
The essential role played by class interests in social change is in the 
nature of things.  For any widespread form of change must affect the 
various  parts of  the  community  in  different  fashions,  if for  no  other 
reason  than  that of  differences  of geographical  location,  and  of eco-
nomic and cultural equipment.  Sectional interests are thus the natural 
vehicle  of  social  and  political  change.  Whether  the  source  of  the 
change be war or trade, startling inventions or shifts in natural condi-
tions, the various sections in society will stand for different methods of 
adjustment  (including  forcible  ones)  and  adjust  their  interests  in  a 
different way from those of other groups to whom they may seek to give 
a lead;  hence  only  when  one  can  point  to  the  group  or groups  that 
effected a change is it explained how  that change has taken place.  Yet 
the ultimate cause is set by external forces, and it is for the mechanism 
of the change only  that society relies on  internal  forces.  The  "chal-
lenge" is to society as a whole; the "response" comes through groups, 
sections, and classes. 
Mere
class interests cannot offer,  therefore, a satisfactory explana-
Gh. 
BIRTH  OF  THE  LIBERAL  CREED (Continued) 
153 
tion for any long-run social process.  First, because the process in ques-
tion may decide about the existence of the class itself; second, because 
the  interests  of  given  classes  determine  only  the  aims  and  purposes 
toward which those classes are striving, not also the success or failure of 
such  endeavors.  There  is  no  magic  in  class  interests  which  would 
secure to members of one class the support of members of other classes. 
Yet  such  support  is  an  everyday  occurrence.  Protectionism,  in  fact, 
is an  instance.  The  problem  here  was  not  so  much  why  agrarians, 
manufacturers,  or  trade  unionists  wished  to  increase  their  incomes 
through protectionist action, but why they succeeded in doing so; not 
why businessmen and workers wished to establish monopolies for their 
wares,  but why they attained their end;  not why some groups wished 
to act in  a similar fashion  in  a  number of  Continental  countries,  but 
why  such  groups  existed  in  these  otherwise  dissimilar  countries  and 
equally achieved their aims everywhere; not why those who grew corn 
attempted  to  sell  it  dear,  but  why  they  regularly  succeeded  in  per-
suading those who bought the corn to help to raise its price. 
Second,  there  is  the  equally  mistaken  doctrine  of  the  essentially 
economic nature of class interests.  Though human society is naturally 
conditioned by economic factors, the motives of human individuals are 
only exceptionally determined  by the  needs of  material  want-satisfac-
tion.  That nineteenth century society was organized on the assumption 
that such  a motivation  could  be  made  universal was  a  peculiarity  of 
the  age.  It was therefore  appropriate  to  allow  a  comparatively  wide 
scope  to the  play  of  economic  motives  when  analyzing  that  society. 
But we must guard against prejudging the issue,  which is precisely to 
what extent such an unusual motivation could be made effective. 
Purely economic matters such as affect want-satisfaction are incom-
parably less relevant to class behavior than questions of social recogni-
tion.  Want-satisfaction may be, of course,  the result of such  recogni-
tion,  especially  as its  outward  sign  or  prize.  But  the  interests  of  a 
class most  directly  refer  to standing  and  rank,  to  status  and security, 
that is, they  are primarily not economic but social. 
The classes and groups which intermittently took part in the  gen-
eral movement towards protectionism after  1870 did not do so primar-
ily on account of their economic interests.  The "collectivism measures* 
enacted in the critical years reveal that only exceptionally was the in-
terest of any single class involved, and if so, that interest could be rarely 
described as economic.  Assuredly no "shortsighted economic interests" 
were served by an Act authorizing town authorities to take over neglected 
154 
RISE  AND  FALL  OF  MARKET  ECONOMY 
[Ch. 13 
ornamental spaces; by regulations requiring the cleaning of bakehouses 
with hot water and soap at least once in six months; or an Act making 
compulsory the testing of cables and anchors.  Such measures simply 
responded to the needs of an industrial civilization with which market 
methods were unable to cope.  The great majority of these interventions 
had no direct, and hardly more than an indirect, bearing on incomes. 
This was true practically of all laws relating to health and homesteads, 
public amenities and libraries, factory conditions, and social insurance 
No less was it true of  public  utilities,  education,  transportation,  and 
numberless other matters.  But even where money values were involved, 
they were secondary to other interests.  Almost invariably professional 
status, safety and security, the form of a man's life, the breadth of his 
existence, the stability of his environment were in question.  The mone-
tary importance of some typical interventions, such as customs tariffs, 
or workmen's compensation, should in no way be minimized.  But even 
in these cases nonmonetary interests were inseparable  from monetary 
ones.  Customs tariffs which implied profits for  capitalists and  wages 
for workers meant, ultimately, security against unemployment, stabiliza-
tion of regional conditions, assurance against liquidation of industries, 
and, perhaps most of all, the avoidance of that painful loss of status 
which inevitably accompanies transference to a job at which a man is 
less skilled and experienced than  at his own. 
Once we are rid of the obsession that only sectional, never general, 
interests  can become  effective,  as  well  as of the twin  prejudice of re-
stricting the interests of human groups to their monetary income, the 
breadth  and  comprehensiveness  of  the  protectionist  movement  lose 
their mystery.  While monetary interests are necessarily voiced solely by 
the persons to whom  they  pertain,  other interests  have  a  wider  con-
stituency.  They  affect individuals in innumerable  ways  as neighbors, 
professional  persons,  consumers,  pedestrians,  commuters,  sportsmen, 
hikers,  gardeners,  patients,  mothers,  or  lovers—and  are  accordingly 
capable of representation by almost any type of territorial or functional 
association such as churches, townships, fraternal lodges, clubs, trade 
unions, or, most commonly, political parties based on broad principles of 
adherence.  An all too narrow conception of interest must in effect lead 
to a warped vision of social and political history, and no purely mone-
tary definition of interests can leave room for that vital need for social 
protection, the representation of which commonly falls to the persons in 
charge of the general interests of the community—under modern con-
ditions,  the  governments  of  the  day.  Precisely  because  not  the  eco-
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested