Ch. 13] BIRTH OF THE LIBERAL CREED (Continued) 
155 
nomic but the social interests of different cross sections of the popula-
tion  were  threatened  by  the  market,  persons  belonging  to  various 
economic strata unconsciously joined forces to meet the danger. 
The spread of the market was thus both advanced  and  obstructed 
by the action of class forces.  Given the need of machine production for 
the establishment of a market system, the trading classes alone were in 
the position to take the lead in that early transformation.  A new class 
of entrepreneurs came into being out of the remnants of older classes, in 
order to take charge of a development which was consonant with the 
interests of the community as a whole.  But if the rise of the industrial-
ists,  entrepreneurs,  and  capitalists  was  the  result  of their leading role 
in the expansionist movement, the defense fell to the traditional landed 
classes and the nascent working class.  And if among the trading com-
munity  it  was the  capitalists'  lot to stand  for  the  structural  principles 
of  the market system,  the  role of  the  die-hard  defender  of the social 
fabric was the portion  of the feudal  aristocracy  on the one  hand,  the 
rising industrial proletariat  on  the other.  But while the landed classes 
would naturally seek the solution for all evils in the maintenance of the 
past, the workers were, up to  a point, in the position to transcend the 
limits of a market society and to borrow solutions from the future.  This 
does  not  imply  that  the  return  to  feudalism  or  the  proclamation  of 
socialism was amongst the possible lines of action; but it does indicate 
the entirely different directions in which agrarians and urban working-
class forces tended to seek for relief in an emergency.  If market economy 
broke  down,  as in  every  major  crisis it  threatened  to  do,  the  landed 
classes might attempt a return to a military or feudal regime of pater-
nalism, while the factory workers would see the need for the establish-
ment of a co-operative commonwealth of labor.  In a crisis "responses" 
might  point  towards  mutually  exclusive  solutions.  A  mere  clash  of 
class interests,  which otherwise would have been met by compromise, 
was invested with a fatal significance. 
All this should warn us against relying too much on the economic 
interests of given classes in the explanation of history.  Such an approach 
would tacitly imply the givenness of those classes in a sense in which 
this is possible only in  an indestructible society.  It leaves outside its 
range those  critical phases of history,  when  a civilization has broken 
down or is passing through a transformation, when as a rule new classes 
are formed, sometimes within the briefest space of time, out of the ruins 
of older classes, or even out of extraneous elements like foreign adven-
turers or outcasts.  Frequently, at a historical juncture new classes have 
Pdf to tiff conversion - Library application class:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
www.rasteredge.com
Pdf to tiff conversion - Library application class:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
156 
RISE  AND  FALL  OF  MARKET  ECONOMY 
[Ch. 13 
been called into  being simply by virtue of the  demands  of the hour. 
Ultimately, therefore, it is the relation of a class to society as a whole 
which maps out its part in the drama; and its success is determined by 
the breadth and variety of the interests, other than its own, which it is 
able to serve.  Indeed, no policy of a narrow class interest can safeguard 
even  that  interest  well—a  rule  which  allows  of  but  few  exceptions. 
Unless the alternative to the social setup is a plunge into utter destruc-
tion, no crudely selfish class can maintain itself in the lead. 
In  order  to  fix  safely  the  blame  on  the  alleged  collectivist  con-
spiracy, economic liberals must ultimately deny that  any need for the 
protection of society had arisen. Recently they acclaimed views of some 
scholars  who  had  rejected  the  traditional  doctrine  of the  Industrial 
Revolution according to which a catastrophe broke in upon the unfor-
tunate laboring classes of England about the 1790 's.  Nothing in the 
nature  of  a  sudden  deterioration  of  standards,  according  to  these 
writers,  ever  overwhelmed  the  common  people.  They  were,  on  the 
average, substantially better off after than before the introduction of the 
factory system,  and,  as  to  numbers,  nobody  could  deny  their  rapid 
increase.  By the accepted yardsticks of economic welfare—real wages 
and population  figures—the  Inferno  of  early  capitalism,  they main-
tained,  never  existed;  the  working  classes,  far  from  being exploited, 
were economically the gainers and to argue the need for social protec-
tion against a system that benefited all was obviously impossible. 
Critics of liberal capitalism were baffled.  For some seventy years, 
scholars and Royal Commissions alike had denounced the horrors of 
the Industrial Revolution, and a galaxy of poets, thinkers, and writers 
had branded its cruelties.  It was deemed an established fact that the 
masses were being sweated and starved by the callous exploiters of their 
helplessness;  that  enclosures  had  deprived  the  country  folk  of  their 
homes and plots, and thrown them on the labor market created by the 
Poor Law Reform;  and that the authenticated tragedies of the small 
children who were sometimes worked to death in mines and factories 
offered  ghastly  proof  of  the  destitution  of  the  masses.  Indeed,  the 
familiar explanation of the Industrial Revolution rested on the degree 
of exploitation made possible by eighteenth century enclosures; on the 
low wages offered  to homeless workers which accounted for the high 
profits  of  the  cotton  industry  as  well  as  the  rapid  accumulation  of 
capital in the hands of the early manufacturers.  And the charge against 
them was exploitation, a boundless exploitation of their fellow citizens 
Library application class:Online Convert PDF file to Word. Best free online PDF Conversion
In addition to PDF to Tiff conversion, our .NET PDF document imaging SDK also supports conversion from Tiff image to PDF document in C# class.
www.rasteredge.com
Library application class:Online Convert PDF file to Tiff. Best free online PDF Tif
to TIFF converting library control (XDoc.PDF) is a multifunctional PDF document converting tool, which can perform high-fidelity PDF to TIFF conversion in an
www.rasteredge.com
Ch. 13]  BIRTH  OF  THE  LIBERAL  CREED (Continued) 
157 
that was the root cause  of so much misery and debasement.  All this 
was now apparently refuted.  Economic historians proclaimed the mes-
sage that the black shadow that overcast the early decades of the fac-
tory system had been dispelled.  For how could there be social catas-
trophe where  there  was  undoubtedly economic improvement ? 
Actually, of course, a social calamity is primarily a cultural not an 
economic  phenomenon  that  can  be  measured  by  income  figures  or 
population statistics.  Cultural catastrophes involving broad strata of 
the common people can naturally not be frequent; but neither are cata-
clysmic events like the Industrial Revolution—an economic earthquake 
which  transformed within  less  than half  a  century vast masses of the 
inhabitants  of the  English  countryside  from  settled  folk  into  shiftless 
migrants.  But if such destructive landslides are exceptional in the his-
tory of classes, they are a common occurrence in the sphere of culture 
contacts between peoples of various races.  Intrinsically, the conditions 
are the same.  The difference is mainly that a social class forms part of 
a society inhabiting the same geographical area, while culture contact 
occurs  usually  between  societies  settled  in  different  geographical 
regions.  In both cases the contact may have a devastating effect on the 
weaker part.  Not  economic  exploitation,  as  often  assumed,  but  the 
disintegration  of  the  cultural  environment  of  the  victim  is  then  the 
cause of the degradation.  The economic process may, naturally, supply 
the vehicle of the destruction, and almost invariably economic inferior-
ity will make the weaker yield, but the immediate cause of his undoing 
is not for that reason economic; it lies in the lethal injury to the institu-
tions in which his social existence is embodied.  The result is loss of self-
respect and standards, whether the unit is a people or a class, whether 
the process springs from so-called "culture conflict
55
or from a change 
in the position of a class within the confines of a society. 
To the student of early capitalism the parallel is highly significant. 
The condition of some native tribes in Africa today carries an unmis-
takable resemblance to that of the English laboring classes during the 
early years of the nineteenth century.  The  Kaffir of  South Africa,  a 
noble savage,  than whom none felt socially more secure in his native 
kraal,
has been transformed into a human variety of half-domesticated 
animal dressed in the "unrelated, the filthy, the unsightly rags that not 
the most degenerated white man would wear,"
2
a nondescript being, 
without self-respect or standards, veritable human refuse.  The descrip-
tion recalls  the portrait Robert Owen  drew  of his  own work people, 
a
Millin, Mrs.  S. G., The South Africans* 1926. 
Library application class:C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert TIFF Image File
Online C# tutorial for high-fidelity Tiff image file conversion from MS Office Word, Excel, and PowerPoint document. Convert PDF to Tiff Using C#.
www.rasteredge.com
Library application class:C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
In addition to PDF to Tiff conversion, our .NET PDF document imaging SDK also supports conversion from Tiff image to PDF document in C# class.
www.rasteredge.com
158 
RISE  AND  FALL  OF  MARKET  ECONOMY 
[Ch. 13 
when  addressing  them  in  New  Lanark,  telling  them  to  their  faces, 
coolly and objectively as a social researcher might record the facts, why 
they had become the degraded rabble which they were;  and the true 
cause of their degradation could not be more aptly described than by 
their existing  in  a  "cultural  vacuum"—the  term  used  by  an  anthro-
pologist
3
to describe  the  cause of the  cultural  debasement of some  of 
the valiant black  tribes  of Africa  under the  influence of  contact  with 
white  civilization.  Their crafts have  decayed,  the  political  and  social 
conditions of their existence have been destroyed,  they  are  dying from 
boredom,  in  Rivers'  famous  phrase,  or  wasting  their  lives  and  sub-
stance in dissipation.  While their own culture offers them no longer any 
objectives  worthy  of  effort  or sacrifice,  racial  snobbishness  and  prej-
udice bar the way to their adequate participation in the culture of the 
white  intruders.
4
Substitute  social  bar  for  color  bar  and  the  Two 
Nations  of  the 1840's emerge,  the  Kaffir  having  been  appropriately 
replaced by the shambling slum dweller of Kingsley's novels. 
Some who would readily agree that life in a cultural void is no life 
at  all  nevertheless  seem  to  expect  that  economic  needs  would  auto-
matically fill that  void  and  make life  appear livable  under  whatever 
conditions.  This  assumption  is  sharply  contradicted  by  the  result  of 
anthropological research.  "The  goals for which  individuals will  work 
are culturally determined, and are not a response of the organism to an 
external culturally undefined situation,  like a simple scarcity of food," 
says  Dr.  Mead.  "The  process  by which  a  group  of  savages  is  con-
verted into gold miners or ship's crew or merely robbed of all incentive 
to  effort  and  left  to  die painlessly  beside  streams  still  filled  with fish, 
may seem so bizarre,  so alien  to the nature  of society  and  its normal 
functioning as to be pathological," yet, she adds, "precisely this will, as a 
rule, happen to  a people in the midst of violent externally introduced, 
or at least  externally  produced  change.  .  • 
She  concludes:  "This 
rude contact,  this uprooting of simple  peoples from  their
mores,
is too 
frequent to be undeserving of serious attention on the part of the social 
historian." 
However, the social historian fails to take the hint.  He still refuses 
to see that the elemental force of culture contact,  which is now revolu-
tionizing the colonial world, is the same which,  a century ago,  created 
the  dismal  scenes  of  early  capitalism.  An  anthropologist
5
drew  the 
Goldenweiser,
A.,
Anthropology,
1937* 
4
Goldcnweiser,  A., ibid. 
8
Thurnwald,  R.  C., Black and White in East Africa; The Fabric of a New 
Civilization, 1935. 
Library application class:.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF to images, like Tiff. Convert image files to PDF. File & Page Process. Create new file, load PDF from existing files.
www.rasteredge.com
Library application class:VB.NET Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF
Except PDF to Tiff conversion, RasterEdge SDK has related Tiff to PDF converting control, which supports conversion from Tiff image to PDF document in VB.NET
www.rasteredge.com
Ch. 13]  BIRTH  OF  THE  LIBERAL  CREED (Continued) 
159 
general inference:  "In spite of numerous divergencies there are at the 
bottom the same predicaments among the exotic peoples today as there 
were among us decades or centuries ago.  The new technical devices, 
the new knowledge, the new forms of wealth and power enhanced the 
social mobility, i.e., migration of individuals, rise and fall of families, 
differentiation of groups, new forms of leadership, new models of life, 
different valuations."  Thurnwald's penetrating mind recognized that 
the cultural catastrophe of black society today is closely analogous to 
that of a large part of white society in the early days of capitalism. 
The social historian alone still misses the point of the analogy. 
Nothing obscures our social vision as effectively as the economistic 
prejudice.  So persistently has exploitation been put into the forefront 
of the colonial problem that the point deserves special attention.  Also, 
exploitation in a humanly obvious sense has been perpetrated so often, 
so persistendy, and with such ruthlessness on the backward peoples of 
the world by the white man that it would seem to argue utter insensi-
bility not to accord it pride of place in any discussion of the colonial 
problem.  Yet, it is precisely this emphasis put on exploitation which 
tends to hide from our view the even greater issue of cultural degenera-
tion.  If exploitation is defined in stricdy economic terms as a perma-
nent inadequacy of  ratios  of  exchange,  it  is  doubtful  whether,  as  a 
matter of fact, there was exploitation.  The catastrophe of the native 
community is a direct result of the rapid and violent disruption of the 
basic institutions of the victim  (whether force is used in the process or 
not does not seem altogether relevant).  These institutions are disrupted 
by the very fact that a market economy is foisted upon an entirely dif-
ferently organized community; labor and land are made into commodi-
ties, which, again, is only a short formula for the liquidation of every 
and any cultural institution in an organic society.  Changes in income 
and  population  figures  are  evidently  incommensurable  with  such  a 
process.  Who, for instance, would care to deny that a formerly free 
people dragged into slavery was exploited, though their standard of life, 
in  some  artificial sense, may have  been  improved  in the  country  to 
which they  were sold  as compared with  what it was  in  their native 
bush ?  And yet nothing would be altered if we assumed that the con-
quered natives had been left free and not even been made to overpay 
the cheap cotton goods thrust upon them, and that their starvation was 
"merely
55
caused by the disruption of their social institutions. 
To cite the famous instance of India.  Indian masses in the second 
half of the nineteenth century did not die of hunger because they were 
exploited by Lancashire; they perished in large numbers because the 
Library application class:Online Convert Excel to PDF file. Best free online export xlsx
your C#.NET project, Microsoft Office like Word, Excel, and PowerPoint can be converted to PDF document. Generally speaking, following conversion types are
www.rasteredge.com
Library application class:C# TIFF: Easy to Convert PDF Document to TIFF Image File
Guide for Converting PDF File to TIFF Document in C#.NET Programming. C# TIFF Imaging: PDF to TIFF Conversion. C# Project: DLLs for Conversion from PDF to TIFF.
www.rasteredge.com
160 
RISE  AND  FALL  OF  MARKET  ECONOMY 
[Ch. 13 
Indian village community had been demolished.  That this was brought 
about  by  forces  of  economic  competition,  namely,  the  permanent 
underselling of hand-woven chaddar by machine-made piece goods, is 
doubtless  true;  but  it  proves  the  opposite  of  economic  exploitation, 
since dumping implies the reverse of surcharge.  The actual source of 
famines in the last fifty years was the free marketing of grain combined 
with local failure of incomes.  Failure of crops was, of course, part of 
the picture, but despatch of grain by rail made it possible to send relief 
to the threatened areas; the trouble was that the people were unable to 
buy  the  corn  at  rocketing  prices,  which  on  a  free  but  incompletely 
organized  market  were  bound  to  be  the  reaction  to  a  shortage.  In 
former times small  local stores had been  held  against  harvest  failure, 
but  these  had  been  now  discontinued  or  swept  away  into  the  big 
market.  Famine prevention for this reason now usually took the form 
of public  works  to  enable  the  population  to  buy  at  enhanced  prices. 
The  three  or  four  large  famines  that  decimated  India  under  British 
rule since  the Rebellion  were  thus  neither  a  consequence  of  the  ele-
ments, nor of exploitation, but simply of the new market organization 
of labor and land which broke up the old village without actually re-
solving its problems.  While under the regime of feudalism and of the 
village  community, noblesse oblige,  clan  solidarity,  and  regulation  of 
the  corn  market  checked  famines,  under  the  rule  of  the  market  the 
people could not be prevented from starving according to the rules of 
the game.  The term "exploitation"  describes but ill a situation which 
became  really  grave  only  after  the  East  India  Company's  ruthless 
monopoly  was  abolished  and  free  trade  was  introduced  into  India. 
Under the monopolists the situation had been fairly kept in hand with 
the help of the archaic organization of the  countryside, including free 
distribution  of  corn,  while  under  free  and  equal  exchange  Indians 
perished by  the millions.  Economically,  India may have been—and, 
in  the long  run,  certainly  was—benefited,  but  socially she  was  dis-
organized and thus thrown a prey to misery and degradation. 
In some cases at least, the opposite of exploitation, if we may say 
so, started  the  disintegrating  culture  contact.  The  forced  land  allot-
ment to the North American Indians, in 1887, benefited them individ-
ually, according to our financial scale of reckoning.  Yet the measure all 
but destroyed  the race in its physical  existence—the outstanding case 
of cultural degeneration on record.  The moral genius of a John Collier 
retrieved  the  position  almost  half  a  century  later  by  insisting  on the 
need for  a return to tribal landholdings:  today  the North  American 
Library application class:VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
plug-in embeds several image compression mechanisms, it can be used for multiple PDF to image converting applications, like PDF to tiff conversion, PDF to JPEG
www.rasteredge.com
Ch. 13]  BIRTH  OF  THE  LIBERAL  CREED (Continued) 
161 
Indian's is in some places, at least, a live community again—and not 
economic betterment, but social restoration  wrought the miracle.  The 
shock of a  devastating culture contact was  recorded  by the  pathetic 
birth of the famous Ghost Dance version of the Pawnee Hand Game 
about 1890, exactly at the time when improving economic conditions 
made the aboriginal culture of these Red Indians anachronistic.  Fur-
thermore, the fact that not even an increasing population—the other 
economic index—need exclude a cultural catastrophe is equally borne 
out by anthropological research. Natural rates of increase of population 
may actually be an index either of cultural vitality or of cultural degra-
dation.  The  original  meaning  of  the  word  "proletarian,"  linking 
fertility and mendicity, is a striking expression of this ambivalence. 
Economistic  prejudice  was  the  source  both  of  the  crude  exploi-
tation  theory  of  early  capitalism  and  of  the  no  less  crude,  though 
more  scholarly,  misapprehension  which  later  denied the  existence  of 
 social  catastrophe.  The  significant  implication  of  this  latter  and 
more recent interpretation of history was the rehabilitation of laissez-
faire economy. For if liberal economics did   not cause disaster, then 
protectionism, which robbed the world of the benefits of free markets, 
was  a  wanton  crime.  The  very  term  "Industrial  Revolution"  was 
now  frowned  upon  as  conveying  an  exaggerated  idea  of  what  was 
essentially  a slow  process  of  change.  No  more  had  happened,  these 
scholars insisted, than that a gradual unfolding of the forces of techno-
logical progress transformed the lives of the people; undoubtedly, many 
suffered in the course of the change but on the whole the story was one 
of continuous improvement.  This happy outcome was the result of the 
almost unconscious working of economic forces which did their bene-
ficial work in spite of the interference of impatient parties who exagger-
ated  the  unavoidable difficulties of the  time.  The  inference  was no 
less than  a denial  that  danger had  threatened  society  from the new 
economy.  Had the revised  history of the Industrial Revolution been 
true to fact, the protectionist movement would have lacked all objective 
justification and laissez-faire would have been vindicated.  The mate-
rialistic fallacy in regard to the nature of social and cultural catastrophe 
thus bolstered the legend that all the ills of the time had been caused 
by our lapse from economic liberalism. 
Briefly, not angle groups or classes were the source of the so-called 
collectivist movement, though the outcome was decisively influenced by 
the character of the class interests involved.  Ultimately, what made 
162 
RISE  AND  FALL  OF  MARKET  ECONOMY 
[Ch. 13 
things  happen  were  the  interests  of society  as a  whole,  though  their 
defense fell primarily to one section of the population in preference to 
another.  It appears reasonable to group our account of the protective 
movement not around class interests but around the social substances 
imperiled by the market. 
The danger points were given by the main directions of the attack. 
The competitive labor market hit the bearer of labor power, namely, 
man.  International free trade  was primarily  a threat  to  the largest 
industry dependent upon nature, namely, agriculture.  The gold stand-
ard imperiled productive organizations depending for their functioning 
on the relative movement of prices.  In each of these fields markets were 
developed, which implied a latent threat to society in some vital aspects 
of its existence. 
Markets for labor, land, and money are easy to distinguish; but it 
is not so easy to distinguish those parts of a culture the nucleus of which 
is formed by human beings, their natural surroundings, and productive 
organizations, respectively.  Man and nature are practically one in the 
cultural sphere; and the money aspect of productive enterprise enters 
only into one socially vital interest, namely, the unity and cohesion of 
the  nation.  Thus,  while  the  markets  for. the  fictitious  commodities 
labor,  land,  and  money  were  distinct  and  separate,  the  threats  to 
society which they involved were not always strictly separable. 
In spite of this an outline of the institutional development of West-
em society during the critical eighty years (1834-1914)  might refer 
to each  of these  danger  points in  similar terms.  For whether man, 
nature, or productive organization was concerned,  market  organiza-
tion grew into a peril, and definite groups or classes pressed for protec-
tion.  In each  case  the  considerable  time  lag between  English,  Con-
tinental, and American development had important bearings, and yet 
by the turn of the century the protectionist countermove had created an 
analogous situation in all Western countries. 
Accordingly,  we  will  deal  separately  with  the  defense  of  man, 
nature, and productive organization—a movement of self-preservation 
as the result of which a more closely knit type of society emerged, yet 
one which stood in danger of total disruption. 
14 
MARKET 
AND 
MAN 
To
SEPARATE LABOR
from other activities
of
life
and to
subject
it to 
the laws of the market was to annihilate all organic forms of existence 
and to replace them by a different type  of organization,  an  atomistic 
and individualistic one. 
Such a scheme of destruction was best served by the application of 
the principle  of freedom  of  contract  In  practice  this meant that the 
noncontractual organizations of kinship, neighborhood, profession, and 
creed were  to  be  liquidated since  they  claimed  the  allegiance  of  the 
individual and thus restrained his freedom.  To represent this principle 
as one of noninterference, as economic liberals were wont to do, was 
merely the  expression of an  ingrained  prejudice in favor of a  definite 
kind  of  interference,  namely,  such  as  would  destroy  noncontractual 
relations  between individuals  and  prevent  their spontaneous re-forma-
tion. 
This effect of the establishment of a labor market is conspicuously 
apparent  in  colonial  regions  today.  The  natives  are to  be  forced  to 
make a living by selling their labor.  To this end their traditional insti-
tutions must be destroyed, and prevented from re-forming, since,  as a 
rule, the individual in primitive society is not threatened by starvation 
unless the community as a whole is in a like predicament.  Under the, 
kraal-land system of the Kaffirs, for instance, "destitution is impossible: 
whosoever needs assistance receives it unquestioningly."
1
No Kwakiutl 
"ever ran the least risk of going hungry."
2
"There is no starvation in 
societies living on the subsistence margin."
3
The principle of freedom 
from want was equally acknowledged in the Indian village community 
and, we might add, under almost every and any type of social organiza-
tion  up  to  about  the  beginning  of sixteenth  century  Europe,  when 
* Mair, L. P., An African People in the Twentieth Century,  1934. 
a
Loeb,  E.  M., The Distribution and Function of Money in Early Society.  In 
"Essays in Anthropology/*  1936. 
3
Herskovits,  M.  J., The Economic Life of Primitive Peoples,  1940. 
163 
164 
RISE  AND  FALL  OF  MARKET  ECONOMY 
[Ch. 14 
the modern ideas on  the poor put forth by the humanist Vives were 
argued before the Sorbonne.  It is the absence of the threat of individual 
starvation which makes primitive society, in a sense, more human than 
market economy, and at the same time less economic.  Ironically, the 
white man's initial contribution to the black man's world mainly con-
sisted in introducing him to the uses of the scourge of hunger.  Thus the 
colonists may decide to cut the breadfruit trees down in order to create 
an artificial food scarcity or may impose a hut tax on the native to force 
him to barter away his labor.  In either case the effect is similar to that 
of Tudor enclosures with their wake of vagrant hordes.  A League of 
Nations  report  mentioned  with  due  horror  the  recent  appearance  of 
that ominous figure of the sixteenth century European scene, the "mas-
terless man,"  in the African bush.
4
During the late  Middle Ages he 
had  been  found  only in  the  "interstices"  of  society.
5
Yet he was the 
forerunner of the nomadic laborer of the nineteenth century.
Now, what the white man may still occasionally practice in remote 
regions today, namely, the smashing up of social structures in order to 
extract  the  element  of labor  from  them,  was  done  in  the  eighteenth 
century  to  white  populations  by  white  men  for  similar  purposes. 
Hobbes' grotesque vision of the State—a human Leviathan whose vast 
body  was  made  up  of  an  infinite  number  of  human  bodies—was 
dwarfed  by  the  Ricardian  construct of the  labor  market:  a  flow  of 
human lives the supply of which was regulated by the amount of food 
put at their disposal.  Although it was acknowledged that there existed 
a customary standard below which no laborer's wages could sink, this 
limitation also was thought to become effective only if the laborer was 
reduced to the choice of being left without food or of offering his labor 
in the market for the price it would fetch.  This explains, incidentally, 
an otherwise inexplicable omission of the classical economists, namely, 
why  only  the  penalty  of  starvation,  not  also  the  allurement  of  high 
wages,  was  deemed  capable  of  creating  a  functioning  labor  market. 
Here also colonial experience has confirmed theirs.  For the higher the 
wages the smaller the inducement to exertion on the part of the native, 
who unlike the white man was not compelled by his cultural standards 
to make as much money as he possibly could.  The analogy was all the 
more striking as the early laborer, too, abhorred the factory, where he 
4
Thurnwald, R. C, op. cit. 
5
Brinkmann, C,  "Das soziale  System des Kapitalismus," Grundriss der Soziae 
okonomik, 1924. 
•Toynbee, A., Lectures on the Industrial Revolution, 1887, P. 98. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested