mvc print pdf : Converting pdf to tiff file software application dll winforms html windows web forms KarlPolanyi_The-Great-Transformation_book2-part1661

14 
TH E  I N T E R N A T I O N A L  S Y S T E M 
[Ch.  1 
direction.  Consequently, there was never a time when the peace in-
terest was unrepresented in the councils of the Concert of Europe.  If 
wc add to this the growing peace interest inside every nation where the 
investment habit had taken root, we shall begin to see why the awful 
innovation of an armed peace of dozens of practically mobilized states 
could hover over Europe from 1871  to 1914  without bursting forth in 
a shattering conflagration. 
Finance—this  was  one  of  its  channels  of  influence—acted  as  a 
powerful moderator in the councils and policies of a number of smaller 
sovereign states.  Loans, and the renewal of loans, hinged upon credit, 
and  credit upon  good  behavior.  Since,  under  constitutional  govern-
ment  (unconstitutional ones were severely frowned upon), behavior is 
reflected in the budget and the external value of the currency cannot be 
detached  from  the  appreciation  of  the  budget,  debtor  governments 
were  well  advised  to  watch  their  exchanges  carefully  and  to  avoid 
policies which might reflect upon the soundness of the budgetary posi-
tion.  This useful maxim became a cogent rule of conduct once a coun-
try had adopted the gold standard, which limited permissible fluctua-
tions to  a  minimum.  Gold  standard  and  constitutionalism  were  the 
instruments which made the voice of the City of London heard in many 
smaller countries which had adopted these symbols of adherence to the 
new international order. The  Pax Britannica held its sway sometimes 
by the ominous poise  of  heavy ship's cannon, but more frequendy it 
prevailed by the timely pull of a thread in the international monetary 
network. 
The influence of haute finance  was ensured also through its unoffi-
cial  administration of the  finances of  vast  semicolonial regions  of  the 
world, including the decaying empires of Islam in the highly inflam-
mable zone of the Near East and North Africa.  It was here that the 
day's  work  of financiers touched  upon  the  subtle  factors  underlying 
internal  order,  and  provided  a de facto   administration  for  those 
troubled regions where peace was most vulnerable.  That  is how the 
numerous prerequisites of long-term capital investments in these areas 
could often be secured in the face of almost insuperable obstacles.  The 
epic of the building of railways in the Balkans, in Anatolia, Syria, Per-
sia, Egypt, Morocco, and China is a story of endurance and of breath-
taking turns reminiscent of a similar feat on the North American Con-
tinent.  The  chief  danger,  however,  which  stalked  the  capitalists  of 
Europe was not technological or financial failure, but war—not a war 
between small countries (which could be easily isolated)  nor war upon 
Converting pdf to tiff file - software application dll:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
www.rasteredge.com
Converting pdf to tiff file - software application dll:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
Ch. 
1] 
TH E  H U N D R E D  Y E A R S '  P E AC E 
15 
a small country by a Great Power  (a frequent and often convenient 
occurrence), but a general war between the Great Powers themselves. 
Europe was not an empty continent, but the home of teeming millions 
of ancient and new peoples; every new railroad had to thread its way 
across boundaries of varying solidity, some of which might be fatally 
weakened, others vitally reinforced, by the contact.  Only the iron grip 
of finance  on the  prostrate governments  of backward  regions  could 
avert catastrophe.  When Turkey defaulted on its financial obligations 
in 1875, military conflagrations immediately broke out, lasting from 
187 6 to  1 87 8 when the Treaty of Berlin was signed. For thirty-six years 
thereafter peace was maintained.  That astounding peace was imple-
mented by the Decree of Muharrem of 1881, which set up the Dette 
Ottomane in Constantinople. The representatives of haute finance  were 
charged  with  the  administration  of  the bulk  of Turkish  finance.  In 
numerous cases they engineered compromises between the Powers;  in 
others, they prevented Turkey from creating difficulties on her own; in 
others again, they acted simply as the political agents of the Powers; in 
all, they served the money interests of the creditors, and, if at all pos-
sible, of the capitalists who tried to make profits in that country.  This 
task was greatly complicated by the fact that the Debt Commission was 
not a body representative of the private creditors, but an organ of 
Europe's public law on which haute finance  was only unofficially repre-
sented.  But it was precisely in this amphibious capacity that it was able 
to bridge the gap between the political and the economic organization 
of the age. 
Trade had become linked with, peace.  In the past the organization 
of trade had been military and warlike; it was an adjunct of the pirate, 
the rover, the armed caravan, the hunter and trapper, the sword-bear-
ing merchant, the armed burgesses of the towns, the adventurers and 
explorers, the planters and conquistadores, the manhunters and slave 
traders, the colonial armies of the chartered companies.  Now all this 
was  forgotten.  Trade  was  now  dependent  upon  an  international 
monetary system which could  not function in  a  general war.  It de-
manded peace, and the Great Powers were striving to maintain it.  But 
the balance-of-power system, as we have seen, could not by itself ensure 
peace.  This was done by international finance, the very existence of 
which embodied the principle of the new  dependence of trade upon 
peace. 
We have become too much accustomed to think of the spread of 
capitalism as a process which is anything but peaceful, and of finance 
software application dll:Online Convert PDF file to Tiff. Best free online PDF Tif
XDoc.PDF) is a multifunctional PDF document converting tool, which can control, C# developers can render and convert PDF document to TIFF image file
www.rasteredge.com
software application dll:C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert TIFF Image File
controls. Visual C#.NET demo code for converting PDF document to Tiff image file is offered. How to Convert Jpeg Images to Tiff.
www.rasteredge.com
16 
THE  INTERNATIONAL  SYSTEM 
[Ch. 1 
capital as the chief instigator of innumerable colonial crimes and ex-
pansionist  aggressions.  Its  intimate  affiliation  with  heavy  industries 
made Lenin assert that finance capital was responsible for imperialism, 
notably for the struggle for spheres of influence,  concessions, extrater-
ritorial rights, and the innumerable forms in which the Western Powers 
got a stranglehold on backward regions, in order to invest in railways, 
public  utilities,  ports,  and  other  permanent  establishments  on  which 
their heavy industries made profits.  Actually, business and finance were 
responsible for many colonial wars, but also for the fact that a general 
conflagration  was  avoided.  Their  affiliations  with  heavy  industry, 
though really close only in Germany, accounted for both. Finance capi-
tal  as the roof organization  of heavy industry was  affiliated  with  the 
various branches of industry in too many ways to allow one group to 
determine its policy.  For every one interest that was furthered by war, 
there  were  a  dozen  that  would  be  adversely  affected.  International 
capital, of course, was bound to be the loser in case of war; but even 
national  finance  could  gain  only  exceptionally,  though  frequently 
enough to account for dozens of colonial wars, as long as they remained 
isolated.  Every war, almost, was organized by financiers; but peace also 
was organized by them. 
The precise nature of this strictly pragmatic system, which guarded 
with extreme rigor against a general war while providing for peaceful 
business amidst an endless sequence of minor ones, is best demonstrated 
by the changes it brought about in international law. While nationalism 
and industry distinctly tended to make wars more ferocious and total, 
effective safeguards were erected for the continuance of peaceful busi-
ness in wartime.  Frederick the Great is on record for having "by re-
prisal" refused, in  1752, to honor the Silesian loan due to British sub-
jects.
6
"No  attempt of this sort has been made  since," says Hershey. 
"The wars of the French Revolution furnish us with the last important 
examples of the confiscation of the private property of enemy subjects 
found  in belligerent territory  upon  the  outbreak  of hostilities."  After 
the outbreak of the Crimean War enemy merchantmen were allowed 
to leave port, a practice which was adhered to by Prussia, France, Rus-
sia, Turkey,  Spain, Japan, and the United  States during the fifty fol-
lowing years.  Since the beginning of that war a very large indulgence 
in commerce between belligerents was allowed.  Thus, in the Spanish-
American War,  neutral vessels, laden  with  American-owned cargoes 
8
 Hershey, A. S.,
Essentials  of  International
Public
Law  and  Organization, 
1
9
2
7
P
P
5
6
5
-
6
9
software application dll:Online Convert Excel to PDF file. Best free online export xlsx
Your Excel file is converted to look just the same as it does in your office software. Creating a PDF from xlsx/xls has never been so easy! Easy converting!
www.rasteredge.com
software application dll:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
is a C# programming example for converting PDF to Word inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf"; PDFDocument doc DocumentType.DOCX DocumentType.TIFF.
www.rasteredge.com
Ch. 
1] 
TH E  H U N D R E D  Y E A R S '  P E AC E 
17 
other than contraband of war,  cleared for Spanish  ports.  The view 
that eighteenth century wars were in all respects less destructive than 
nineteenth century ones is a prejudice.  In respect to the status of enemy 
aliens, the service of loans held by enemy citizens, enemy property, or 
the right  of enemy  merchantmen  to  leave  port,  the  nineteenth  cen-
tury showed a decisive turn in favor of measures to safeguard the eco-
nomic  system  in  wartime.  Only  the  twentieth  century  reversed  this 
trend. 
Thus  the  new  organization  of  economic  life  provided  the  back-
ground of the Hundred Years' Peace.  In the first period, the nascent 
middle classes were mainly a revolutionary force endangering peace as 
witnessed in the Napoleonic upheaval; it was against this new factor of 
national disturbance that the Holy Alliance organized  its reactionary 
peace.  In  the  second  period,  the new  economy  was victorious.  The 
middle classes were now themselves the bearers of a peace interest, much 
more powerful  than  that  of their  reactionary  predecessors had been, 
and nurtured by the national-international character of the new econ-
omy.  But  in both instances  the  peace interest  became  effective  only 
because it was able to make the balance-of-power system serve its cause 
by providing that system with social organs capable of dealing directly 
with the internal forces active in the area of peace.  Under the Holy 
Alliance these organs were feudalism and the thrones, supported by the 
spiritual  and  material  power  of the  Church;  under the  Concert  of 
Europe they were international finance and the national banking sys-
tems allied to it.  There is no need to overdo the distinction.  During 
the
Thirty Years'
Peace,
1 81 6-46 ,
Great
Britain was already pressing 
for peace and business, nor did the Holy Alliance disdain the help of the 
Rothschilds. Under the Concert of Europe, again, international finance 
had often to rely on its dynastic and aristocratic affiliations.  But such 
facts merely tend to strengthen our argument that in every case peace 
was  maintained  not  simply  through  the  chancelleries  of  the  Great 
Powers but with the help of concrete organized agencies acting in the 
service of general interests.  In other words, only on the background of 
the  new  economy  could  the  balance-of-power  system  make  general 
conflagrations avoidable. But the achievement of the Concert of Europe 
was incomparably greater than that of the Holy Alliance; for the latter 
maintained  peace  in  a  limited  region  in  an  unchanging  Continent, 
while the former succeeded in the same  task  on  a world scale while 
social and economic progress was revolutionizing the map of the globe. 
This great political feat was the result of the emergence of a specific 
software application dll:C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
This PDF document converting library component offers reliable C# image or document, or from PDF document to other file formats, like multi-page TIFF file.
www.rasteredge.com
software application dll:VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
a series of demo code directly for converting MicroSoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint document to PDF file in VB.NET application. Conversion of TIFF to PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
18 
THE  INTERNATIONAL  SYSTEM
[Ch. I 
entity, haute finance, which was the given link between the political and 
the economic organization of international life. 
It must be clear by this time that the peace organization rested upon 
economic organization.  Yet the two were of very different consistency. 
Only in the widest sense of the term was it possible to speak of a polit-
ical peace organization of the world, for the Concert of Europe was 
essentially not a system of peace but merely of independent sovereign-
ties protected by the mechanism of war.  The contrary is true of the 
economic organization of the world.  Unless we defer to the uncritical 
practice  of  restricting  the  term  "organization"  to  centrally  directed 
bodies acting through functionaries of their own, we must concede that 
nothing could be more definite than the universally accepted principles 
upon which this organization rested  and nothing more concrete than 
its factual elements.  Budgets and armaments,  foreign trade  and raw 
material supplies, national independence and sovereignty were now the 
functions of currency and  credit.  By the fourth  quarter of the nine-
teenth century, world commodity prices were the central reality in the 
lives of millions of Continental peasants; the repercussions of the Lon-
don money market were daily noted by businessmen all over the world; 
and governments discussed plans for the future in light of the situation 
on the world capital markets.  Only a madman would have doubted 
that  the international  economic  system  was  the  axis  of  the  material 
existence  of  the  race.  Because  this system  needed  peace  in  order to 
function, the balance of power was made to serve it.  Take this eco-
nomic system away and the peace interest would disappear from poli-
tics.  Apart from it, there was neither sufficient cause for such an inter-
est, nor a possibility of safeguarding it, in so far as it existed.  The suc-
cess of the Concert of Europe sprang from the needs of the new interna-
tional organization  of  economy,  and  would  inevitably  end  with  its 
dissolution. 
The era of Bismarck  (1861-90)  saw the Concert of Europe at its 
best.  In two decades immediately following Germany's rise to the status 
of a Great Power, she was the chief beneficiary of the peace interest. 
She had forced her way into the front ranks at the cost of Austria and 
France; it was to her advantage to maintain the status quo  and to pre-
vent a war which could be only a war of revenge against herself.  Bis-
marck deliberately fostered the notion of peace as a common venture of 
the Powers, and avoided commitments which might force Germany out 
of the position of a peace power.  He opposed  expansionist ambitions 
in the Balkans or overseas; he used the free trade weapon consistently 
against Austria, and even against France;  he thwarted Russia's and 
software application dll:VB.NET TIFF: TIFF Converter Control SDK; Convert TIFF to Image &
to PDF conversion without using external PDF document processing VB.NE TIFF to JPEG Converting Plugin, VB.NE conversion SDK is able to convert TIFF file to JPEG
www.rasteredge.com
software application dll:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Besides, this PDF converting library also makes PDF document visible and searchable on the Internet by converting PDF document file into HTML webpage.
www.rasteredge.com
Ch.
1
THE  HUNDRED  YEARS'  PEACE 
19 
Austria's Balkan ambitions with the help of the balance-of-power game, 
thus  keeping  in  with  potential  allies  and  averting  situations  which 
might involve Germany in war.  The scheming aggressor of
1863—70 
turned into the honest  broker of 1878,  and the deprecator of colonial 
adventures.  He  consciously  took  the  lead  in  what  he  felt  to  be  the 
peaceful  trend  of  the  time  in  order  to  serve  Germany's  national 
interests. 
However, by the end of the seventies the free trade episode  (1846-
79) was at an end; the actual use of the gold standard by Germany 
marked the beginnings of an era of protectionism and  colonial  expan-
sion.
6
Germany was now reinforcing her position by making a hard and 
fast alliance with Austria-Hungary and Italy; not much later Bismarck 
lost control of Reich policy.  From then onward Great Britain was the 
leader of the peace interest in  a  Europe  which  still  remained  a group 
of  independent  sovereign states  and  thus  subject  to  the  balance  of 
power.  In the nineties haute finance  was at its peak and peace seemed 
more secure than ever.  British and French interests differed in Africa; 
the British and the Russians were competing with one another in Asia; 
the Concert,  though limpingly,  continued  to  function;  in  spite of the 
Triple Alliance, there were still more than two independent powers to 
watch one another jealously.  Not for long.  In 1904, Britain  made  a 
sweeping  deal  with  France  over  Morocco  and  Egypt;  a  couple  of 
years later she compromised with Russia over Persia,  and the counter-
alliance was formed.  The Concert of Europe, that loose federation of 
independent powers, was finally replaced by two hostile power group-
ings ; the balance of power as a system had now come to an end.  With 
only two competing power groups left its mechanism ceased to function. 
There was no longer a third group which would unite with one of the 
other two to thwart whichever one sought to increase its power.  About 
the same time the symptoms of the  dissolution of the  existing  forms of 
world economy—colonial rivalry and competition for exotic markets— 
became acute.  The ability of haute finance  to avert the spread of wars 
was diminishing rapidly.  For another seven years peace dragged on but 
it was only a question of time before the dissolution of nineteenth cen-
tury  economic  organization  would  bring  the  Hundred  Years'  Peace 
to a close. 
In the light of this recognition the true nature of the highly artificial 
economic  organization  on  which  peace  rested  becomes of  utmost  sig-
nificance to the historian. 
•Eulenburg,  F., Aussenhandel und Aussenhandelspolittk.  In  "Grundriss  der 
Sozialokonoxnik," 
A b
t
V I I I , 
1
9 2 9 , 
p
209. 
CONSERVATIVE 
TWENTIES, 
REVOLUTIONARY 
THIRTIES 
THE BREAKDOWN
of the international gold standard  was the invisible 
link between the disintegration of world economy since the turn of the 
century  and  the transformation  of a  whole  civilization  in the  thirties. 
Unless the vital importance of this factor is realized, it is not possible 
to  see  rightly  either  the  mechanism  which  railroaded  Europe  to  its 
doom,  or  the circumstances  which  accounted  for  the  astounding  fact 
that  the  forms  and  contents  of  a  civilization  should  rest  on  so  pre-
carious foundations. 
The true nature of the international system  under which  we were 
living was not realized  until it  failed.  Hardly  anyone  understood the 
political  function  of  the  international  monetary  system;  the  awful 
suddenness  of  the  transformation  thus  took  the  world  completely  by 
surprise.  And yet the gold standard  was the  only  remaining  pillar  of 
the traditional world  economy;  when  it  broke,  the  effect was  bound 
to  be  instantaneous.  To  liberal  economists  the  gold  standard  was  a 
purely economic institution;  they refused  even to consider it as  a part 
of a social  mechanism.  Thus it  happened  that the  democratic  coun-
tries were the last to realize the true nature of the  catastrophe and the 
slowest to counter its effects.  Not even when the cataclysm was already 
upon  them  did  their  leaders see that  behind  the  collapse of  the  inter-
national  system  there  stood  a  long  development  within  the  most  ad-
vanced  countries  which  made  that  system  anachronistic;  in  other 
words, the failure of market economy itself still escaped them. 
The  transformation  came  on  even  more  abruptly  than  is  usually 
realized.  World  War I  and the postwar  revolutions  still  formed  part 
of the nineteenth  century.  The conflict  of  1914-18  merely  precipi-
tated and immeasurably aggravated a crisis that it did not create.  But 
the roots of the  dilemma could not be  discerned at the time;  and the 
horrors and devastations of the Great War seemed to the survivors the 
obvious source of the obstacles to  international  organization that  had 
20 
Ch  2] 
CONSERVATIVE  20'S,  REVOLUTIONARY  30'S  21 
so unexpectedly emerged.  For suddenly neither the economic nor the 
political system of the world would function,  and the terrible injuries 
inflicted  on the substance of the  race  by World  War  I  appeared to 
offer an explanation*  In  reality,  the postwar obstacles to  peace  and 
stability  derived  from  the  same  sources  from  which  the  Great  War 
itself  had  sprung.  The  dissolution  of  the  system  of  world  economy 
which had been in progress since 1900 was responsible for the political) 
tension  that  exploded  in  1914;  the  outcome  of  the  War  and  the 
Treaties had  eased  that  tension  superficially  by  eliminating  German 
competition while aggravating the causes of tension and thereby vastly 
increasing the political and economic impediments to peace. 
Politically, the Treaties harbored  a  fatal  contradiction.  Through 
the unilateral disarmament of the defeated nations they forestalled any 
reconstruction of the balance-of-power system, since power is an indis-
pensable requisite of such a system.  In vain did Geneva look towards 
the restoration of such a system in an enlarged and improved Concert 
of  Europe  called  the  League  of Nations; in   vain  were  facilities  for 
consultation and joint action provided in the Covenant of the League, 
for  the  essential  precondition  of  independent  power  units  was  now 
lacking.  The League could never be really established; neither Article 
16 on the enforcement of Treaties, nor Article   19 on their peaceful 
revision was ever implemented.  The only viable solution of the burn-
ing problem of peace—the restoration of the balance-of-power system 
—was thus completely out of reach; so much so that the true aim of 
the most  constructive  statesmen  of  the  twenties  was  not  even  under-
stood by the public, which continued to exist in an almost indescribable 
state of confusion.  Faced by the appalling fact of the disarmament of 
one group of nations, while the other group remained armed—a situa-
tion which  precluded  any  constructive  step  towards  the  organization 
of  peace—the  emotional  attitude  prevailed  that  the  League  was  in 
some mysterious way the harbinger of an era of peace which  needed 
only frequent verbal encouragement to become permanent.  In Amer* 
ica there was a widespread idea  that if only America  had joined the 
League,  matters would  have  turned  out quite  differently.  No  better 
proof than this could be adduced for the lack of understanding of the 
organic weaknesses of the so-called postwar system—so-called, because, 
if words have a meaning,  Europe was now without any political sys-
tem whatever.  A
bare
status
quo
such as this can last
only
as long as 
the physical  exhaustion of the parties lasts;  no  wonder that a return 
to the nineteenth century system appeared as the only way out.  In the 
22 
THE  INTERNATIONAL  SYSTEM 
[Ch. 2 
meantime  the  League  Council  might  have  at  least  functioned  as  a 
kind  of  European  directorium,  very  much  as  the  Concert  of  Europe 
did  at  its  zenith,  but  for  the  fatal  unanimity  rule  which  set  up  the 
obstreperous  small  state  as  the  arbiter  of  world  peace.  The  absurd 
device  of  the  permanent  disarmament  of  the  defeated  countries  ruled 
out  any  constructive  solution.  The  only  alternative  to  this  disastrous 
condition  of  affairs  was  the  establishment  of  an  international  order 
endowed  with  an  organized  power  which  would  transcend  national 
sovereignty.  Such a course,  however, was entirely beyond the horizon 
of the time.  No country in  Europe,  not to  mention  the United  States, 
would have submitted to such a system. 
Economically,  the policy  of  Geneva  was  much  more  consistent  in 
pressing for  the  restoration  of  world  economy  as  a  second  line  of  de-
fense  for  peace.  For  even  a  successfully  re-established  balance-of-
power  system  would  have  worked  for  peace  only  if  the  international 
monetary system was restored.  In the absence  of stable exchanges  and 
freedom  of  trade  the  governments  of  the  various  nations,  as  in  the 
past,  would  regard  peace  as  a  minor  interest,  for  which  they  would 
strive only as long as it  did not  interfere with  any of  their  major inter-
ests.  First among the statesmen of the time,  Woodrow  Wilson appears 
to have  realized  the  interdependence  of  peace  and  trade,  not  only  as 
a guarantee  of  trade, but also of peace.  No  wonder  that  the  League 
persistently  strove  to  reconstruct  the  international  currency  and  credit 
organization  as  the  only  possible  safeguard  of  peace  among sovereign 
states, and that the world relied  as never before on haute finance.  J.  P. 
Morgan  had  replaced  N.  M.  Rothschild  as  the  demiurge  of  a rejuve-
nated  nineteenth  century. 
According to the standards of that  century  the  first postwar decade 
appeared as a revolutionary  era;  in  the light  of our own  recent experi-
ence  it  was  precisely  the  contrary.  The  intent  of  that  decade  was 
deeply conservative and expressed the  almost  universal conviction that 
only  the  re-establishment  of  the  pre-1914  system,  "this  time  on  solid 
foundations,"  could  restore  peace  and  prosperity.  Indeed,  it  was  out 
of the failure  of this effort  to  return  to  the  past  that  the  transformation 
of the thirties sprang.  Spectacular though  the  revolutions and  counter-
revolutions  of  the  post-war  decade  were,  they  represented  either  mere 
mechanical reactions to military defeat or,  at most,  a re-enacting of the 
familiar liberal  and  constitutionalist  drama  of  Western  civilization  on 
the  Central  and  Eastern  European  scene;  it  was  only  in  the  thirties 
that entirely  new  elements entered  the  Dattern  of  Western  historv. 
Ch. 2]  CONSERVATIVE  20'S,  REVOLUTIONARY  30'S 
23 
The  Central  and  Eastern  European  upheavals  and  counterup-
heavals of
1917--20
in spite of their scenario were mefely  roundabout 
ways of recasting the regimes that had succumbed on the battlefields. 
When  the counterrevolutionary smoke dissolved,  the political systems 
in Budapest, Vienna, and Berlin were found to be not very far different 
from what they had been before the War.  This was true, roughly, of 
Finland,  the Baltic states,  Poland,  Austria,  Hungary,  Bulgaria,  and 
even  Italy and Germany, up to the middle of the twenties.  In some 
countries  a  great  advance  was  made  in  national  freedom  and  land 
reform—achievements  which  had  been  common  to  Western  Europe 
since 1789.  Russia, in this respect, formed no exception.  The tendency 
of the times was simply to establish  (or re-establish)  the system com-
monly associated with the ideals of the English, the American, and the 
French revolutions.  Not only Hindenburg and Wilson, but also Lenin 
and Trotzky were, in this broad sense, in the line of Western tradition. 
In the early thirties, change set in with abruptness.  Its landmarks 
were  the  abandonment  of  the  gold  standard  by  Great  Britain;  the 
Five-Year  Plans  in  Russia;  the  launching  of  the  New  Deal;  the 
National Socialist Revolution in Germany; the collapse of the League 
in favor of autarchist  empires.  While  at the  end  of the  Great  War 
nineteenth century ideals were paramount,  and their influence  domi-
nated the following decade, by 1940  every vestige of the international 
system had  disappeared  and,  apart  from  a  few enclaves,  the nations 
were living in an entirely new international setting. 
The root cause of the crisis, we submit, was the threatening collapse 
of the international economic system.  It had only haltingly functioned I 
since  the  turn  of  the  century,  and  the  Great  War  and  the  Treaties 
had  wrecked  it  finally.  This  became  apparent in  the  twenties  when 
there was hardly  an  internal  crisis  in  Europe  that  did  not  reach  its 
climax  on  an  issue  of  external  economy.  Students  of  politics  now 
grouped the various countries, not according to continents, but accord-
ing to the degree of their adherence to a sound currency.  Russia had 
astonished  the world  by  the  destruction  of  the  rouble,  the value  of 
which was reduced to nothing by the simple means of inflation.  Ger-
many repeated this desperate feat in order to give the lie to the Treaty; 
the expropriation of the rentier class, which followed in its wake, laid 
the foundation for the Nazi revolution.  The prestige of Geneva rested 
on its success in helping Austria and Hungary to restore their currencies, 
and Vienna became the Mecca of liberal economists on account of a 
brilliantly  successful  operation  on  Austria's
krone
which  the  patient, 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested