Ch. 16] MARKET AND PRODUCTIVE ORGANIZATION 
195 
This precisely was one of the functions of the central bank.  The 
broad pressure of its discount and open-market policy forced domestic 
prices down more or less equally,  and enabled "export-near" firms to 
resume or increase exports, while only the least efficient firms would 
have to liquidate.  "Real" transfer would thus have been achieved at 
the  cost  of  a much  smaller  amount  of  dislocation than  would  have 
been needed to attain the same export surplus by the irrational method 
of  haphazard  and  often  catastrophic  shocks  transmitted  through  the 
narrow  channels of  "transactional  deflation." 
That in spite of these devices to mitigate the effects of deflation, the 
outcome was, nevertheless, again and again a complete disorganization 
of business and consequent mass unemployment, is the most powerful 
of all the indictments of the gold standard. 
The case of money showed a very real analogy to that of labor and 
land.  The application of the commodity fiction to each of them led to 
its effective inclusion into the market system, while  at  the same time 
grave dangers to  society developed.  With  money,  the  threat was to 
productive enterprise, the existence of which was imperiled by any fall 
in the price level caused by use of commodity money.  Here also pro-
tective measures had to be taken,  with the result that the self-steering 
mechanism of the market was put out of action. 
Central banking reduced the automatism of the gold standard to a 
mere pretense.  It meant a centrally managed currency;  manipulation 
was substituted for the self-regulating mechanism of supplying credit, 
even though the device was not always deliberate and conscious.  More 
and more it was recognized that the international gold standard could 
be made self-regulating only if the single countries relinquished central 
banking.  The one consistent  adherent of the  pure gold standard who 
actually  advocated  this  desperate  step  was  Ludwig  von  Mises;  his 
advice, had it been heeded, would have transformed national economies 
into a heap of ruins. 
Most of the confusion existing in monetary theory was due to the 
separation of politics and economics, this outstanding characteristic of 
market society.  For more than a century, money was regarded as a 
purely economic category, a commodity used for the purpose of indirect 
exchange.  If gold was the commodity so preferred,  a gold standard 
was in being.  (The attribute "international" in connection with that 
standard was meaningless, since for the economist, no nations existed; 
transactions were carried on not between nations but between individ-
How to change pdf to tiff - application Library utility:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
www.rasteredge.com
How to change pdf to tiff - application Library utility:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
RISE  AND  FALL  OF  MARKET  ECONOMY 
[Ch. 16 
uals,  whose political allegiance was as irrelevant as the color of their 
hair.)  Ricardo  indoctrinated  nineteenth  century  England  with  the 
conviction that the term  "money" meant a medium of exchange, that 
bank notes were a mere matter of convenience, their utility consisting 
in their being easier to handle than gold, but that their value derived 
from the certainty that their possession provided us with the means of 
possessing ourselves at any time of the commodity itself, gold.  It fol-
lowed that the national characer of currencies was of no consequence, 
since they were but different tokens representing the same commodity. 
And if it was injudicious for a government to make any effort to possess 
itself of gold  (since the distribution of that commodity regulated itself 
on  the  world  market  just  as  that  of  any  other),  it  was  even  more 
injudicious to imagine that the nationally different tokens were of  any 
relevance to the welfare and prosperity of the countries concerned. 
Now  the  institutional  separation  of  the  political  and  economic 
spheres had never been complete, and it was precisely in the matter of 
currency  that  it  was  necessarily  incomplete;  the  state,  whose  Mint 
seemed merely to certify the weight of coins, was in fact the guarantor 
of the value of token  money,  which it accepted in payment for taxes 
and  otherwise.  This money was not  a  means  of  exchange,  it was  a 
means of payment; it was not a commodity, it was purchasing power; 
far  from  having  utility  itself,  it  was  merely  a  counter  embodying  a 
quantified claim to things that might be purchased.  Clearly,  a society 
in which  distribution depended upon the possession of such tokens  of 
purchasing  power  was  a  construction  entirely  different  from  market 
economy. 
We are riot dealing here, of course, with pictures of actuality, but 
with  conceptual  patterns  used  for  the  purposes  of  clarification.  No 
market economy separated from the political sphere is possible;  yet it 
was such a construction which underlay classical economics since David 
Ricardo and  apart from which its concepts and assumptions were in-
comprehensible.  Society, according to this "lay-out," consisted of bar-
tering  individuals  possessing  an  outfit  of  commodities—goods,  land, 
labor, and their composites.  Money was simply one of the commodities 
bartered more often than another and, hence, acquired for the purpose 
of use in exchange.  Such a  "society" may be unreal; yet it contains the 
bare  bones  of  the  construction  from  which  the  classical  economists 
started. 
An even less complete picture of actuality is offered by a  purchas-
196 
application Library utility:Online Convert PDF file to Tiff. Best free online PDF Tif
Online PDF to Tiff Converter. Download Free Trial. Then just wait until the conversion from PDF to Tiff is complete and download the file.
www.rasteredge.com
application Library utility:Online Convert PDF file to Word. Best free online PDF Conversion
Creating a PDF from Tiff/Tif has never been so easy! Web Security. Your PDF and Tiff/Tif files will be deleted from our servers an hour after the conversion.
www.rasteredge.com
Ch. 16]  MARKET  AND  PRODUCTIVE  ORGANIZATION 
197 
ing-power  economy.
1
Yet  some  of  its  features  resemble  our  actual 
society much more closely than the paradigm of market economy.  Let 
us try to imagine a "society" in which every individual is endowed with 
a definite amount  of purchasing power,  enabling him to claim goods 
each item of which is provided with a price tag.  Money in such  an 
economy is not a commodity; it has no usefulness in itself; its only use 
is to purchase goods to which price tags are attached, very much as they 
are in our shops today. 
While the commodity money theorem was far superior to its rival 
in the nineteenth century, when institutions conformed in many essen-
tials to the market pattern, since the beginning of the twentieth century 
the conception of purchasing power gained steadily.  With the disinte-
gration  of the gold standard,  commodity  money practically  ceased  to 
exist,  and  it was  only natural  that  the  purchasing power  concept  of 
money should replace it. 
To turn from mechanisms and concepts to the social forces in play, 
it is important  to realize that the  ruling  classes  themselves  lent  their 
support to the management of the currency through the central bank. 
Such management was not, of course, regarded as an interference with 
the institution of the gold standard;  on the contrary, it was part of the 
rules  of  the  game  under  which  the  gold  standard  was  supposed  to 
function.  Since maintenance of the gold standard was axiomatic  and 
the central banking mechanism was never allowed to act in such a way 
as to make a country go off gold,  but,  on  the  contrary,  the supreme 
directive of the bank was always and  under all  conditions to stay on 
gold, no question of principle seemed to be involved.  But this was so 
only as long as the movements of the price level involved were the pal-
try 2-3  per cent, at the most,  that separated the so-called gold points. 
As soon as the movement of the internal price level necessary to keep 
the exchanges stable was much larger, when it jumped to  1o per cent 
or 30  per cent, the situation was  entirely  changed.  Such  downward 
movements of the price level would spread misery and destruction.  The 
fact that currencies were managed became of prime importance, since 
it meant  that  central  banking  methods  were  a  matter  of  policy i.e., 
something the body politic might have to  decide  about.  Indeed,  the 
great institutional significance of central  banking lay in  the fact  that 
4
The  underlying  theory  has  been  elaborated  by  F.  Schafer,  Wellington,  New 
Zealand. 
application Library utility:C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Create PDF from Tiff. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Create PDF from Tiff. C#.NET PDF - .NET PDF Library for Creating PDF from Tiff in C#.
www.rasteredge.com
application Library utility:Online Convert Excel to PDF file. Best free online export xlsx
Online Excel to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a Excel File to PDF. Drag and drop your excel file into the box or
www.rasteredge.com
198 
RISE  AND  FALL  OF  MARKET  ECONOMY 
[Ch. 16 
monetary policy was thereby  drawn into the sphere  of politics.  The 
consequences could not be other than far reaching. 
They were twofold.  In the domestic field, monetary policy was only 
another form of interventionism, and clashes of economic classes tended 
to crystallize around this issue so intimately linked with the gold stand-
ard and balanced budgets.  Internal conflicts in the thirties, as we will 
see, often centered on this issue which played an important part in the 
growth of the antidemocratic movement. 
In  the  foreign  field,  the  role  of  national  currencies  was  of  over-
whelming importance, though this fact was but little recognized at the 
time.  The ruling philosophy of the nineteenth century was pacifist and 
internationalist;  "in  principle"  all  educated  people were free  traders, 
and,  with  qualifications  which  appear  ironically  modest  today,  they 
were no less so in practice.  The source of this outlook was, of course, 
economic;  much  genuine  idealism  sprang  from  the  sphere  of  barter 
and trade—by a supreme paradox man's selfish wants were validating 
his most generous impulses.  But since the 1870's an emotional change 
was noticeable though there was no corresponding break in the domi-
nant  ideas.  The  world  continued  to  believe  in  internationalism  and 
interdependence,  while acting on the impulses of nationalism and self-
sufficiency.  Liberal nationalism was developing into national liberal-
ism, with its marked  leanings towards protectionism  and imperialism 
abroad, monopolistic conservatism at home.  Nowhere was the contra-
diction as sharp and yet as little conscious as in the monetary realm. 
For  dogmatic  belief  in  the  international  gold  standard  continued  to 
enlist men's stintless loyalties, while at the same time token currencies 
were established, based on the sovereignty of the various central bank-
ing systems.  Under the aegis of international principles,  impregnable 
bastions of a new nationalism were being unconsciously erected in the 
shape of the central banks of issue. 
In truth, the new  nationalism was the  corollary of the new  inter-
nationalism.  The international gold standard could not be borne by the 
nations whom it was supposed to serve, unless they were secured against 
the dangers with which it threatened the communities  adhering to it. 
Completely monetarized communities could not have stood the ruinous 
effects of abrupt changes in the price level necessitated by the main-
tenance  of  stable  exchanges  unless  the  shock  was  cushioned  by  the 
means of an independent central banking policy.  The national token 
currency  was the  certain  safeguard  of  this  relative  security  since  it 
allowed the central  bank  to  act  as a buffer between  the internal and 
application Library utility:VB.NET Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF
Convert PDF to Word; Convert PDF to Tiff; Convert PDF to HTML; PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings
www.rasteredge.com
application Library utility:RasterEdge XDoc.Tiff for .NET - SDK for Tiff Document Imaging
Able to view and edit Tiff rapidly. Convert. Convert Tiff to PDF. Convert Tiff to Jpeg Images. Convert PDF to Tiff. Convert Jpeg Images to Tiff. Tiff File Process
www.rasteredge.com
Ch. 16]  MARKET  AND  PRODUCTIVE  ORGANIZATION 
199 
the external economy.  If the balance of payment was threatened with 
illiquidity, reserves and foreign loans would tide over the difficulty; if 
an altogether new economic balance had to be created involving a fall 
in the domestic price level, the restriction of credit could be spread in 
the most rational fashion, eliminating the inefficient,  and putting the 
burden  on  the  efficient.  Absence  of such  a mechanism would  have 
made it impossible for any advanced country to stay on gold without 
devastating effects as to its welfare, whether in terms of production, in-
come, or employment. 
If the trading  class was the  protagonist of market  economy,  the 
banker was the born leader of that class.  Employment and earnings 
depended  upon  the  profitability  of business,  but the  profitability  of 
business depended upon stable exchanges and sound credit conditions, 
both of which were under the care of the banker.  It was part of his 
creed that the two were inseparable.  A sound budget  and stable in-
ternal  credit  conditions  presupposed  stable  foreign  exchanges;  also 
exchanges could not be stable unless domestic credit was safe and the 
financial household  of the state  in  equilibrium.  Briefly,  the banker's 
twin trust comprised sound domestic finance and external stability of 
the currency.  That is why bankers as a class were the last to notice it 
when both had lost their meaning.  There is indeed nothing surprising 
either  in  the  dominating  influence  of  international  bankers  in  the 
twenties, nor in their eclipse in the thirties.  In the twenties, the gold 
standard was still regarded as the precondition of a return to stability 
and prosperity, and consequently no demand raised by its professional 
guardians, the bankers, was deemed too burdensome, if only it promised 
to secure stable exchange rates; when, after 1929, this proved impos-
sible, the imperative need was for a stable internal currency and nobody 
was as little qualified to provide it as the banker. 
In no field was the breakdown of market economy as abrupt as in 
that of money.  Agrarian tariffs interfering with the importing of the 
produce of foreign lands broke up free trade; the narrowing and regu-
lating of the labor market restricted bargaining to that which the law 
left to the parties to decide.  But neither in the case of labor nor in that 
of land was  there  a formal sudden and complete rift in  the market 
mechanism such as happened in the field of money.  There was nothing 
comparable in the other markets to the relinquishing of the gold stand-
ard by Great Britain on September 21, 1931 ; nor even to the subsidiary 
event of America's similar action, in June, 1933.  Though by that time 
the Great Depression which began in 1929 had swept away the major 
application Library utility:C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Tiff
Convert PDF to Word; Convert PDF to Tiff; Convert PDF to HTML; PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings
www.rasteredge.com
application Library utility:C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Tiff
Convert PDF to Word; Convert PDF to Tiff; Convert PDF to HTML; PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings
www.rasteredge.com
200 
RISE  AND  FALL  OF  MARKET  ECONOMY 
[Ch. 16 
part of world trade, this meant no change in methods, nor did it affect 
the ruling ideas.  But  final failure of the gold standard was the final 
failure of market economy. 
Economic liberalism had started a hundred years before, and had 
been  met by  a  protectionist countermove,  which now broke into  the 
last bastion of market economy.  A new set of ruling ideas superseded 
the world of the self-regulating market.  To the stupefaction of the vast 
majority of contemporaries,  unsuspected forces of charismatic leader-
ship  and  autarchist  isolationism  broke  forth  and  fused  societies  into 
new forms. 
17 
201 
SELF-REGULATION 
IMPAIRED 
IN THE
HALF CENTURY
1879—1929,
Western societies  developed into 
closely knit units, in which powerful disruptive strains were latent.  The 
•more immediate source of this development was the impaired self-regu-
lation of market economy.  Since society was made to  conform to the 
needs  of the  market  mechanism,  imperfections  in  the  functioning  of 
that mechanism created cumulative strains in the body social. 
Impaired self-regulation was an effect of protectionism.  There is a 
sense, of course, in which markets are always self-regulating, since they 
tend to produce a price which clears the market; this, however, is true 
of all markets, whether free or not.  But as we  have already shown, a 
self-regulating market
system
implies something very different,  namely, 
markets for the elements of production—labor, land, and money.  Since 
the  working  of  such  markets  threatens  to  destroy  society,  the  self-
preserving action of the community was meant  to prevent their estab-
lishment or to interfere with their free functioning, once established. 
America has been adduced by economic liberals as conclusive proof 
of the ability of a market economy to  function.  For a century, labor, 
land, and money were traded in the States with complete freedom, yet no 
measures of social  protection  were  allegedly  needed,  and  apart  from 
customs  tariffs,  industrial life  continued  unhampered  by  government 
interference. 
The  explanation,  of course,  is simple:  it  is  free  labor,  land,  and 
money.  Up to the 1890 's the frontier was open and  free land lasted; 
up to the Great War the supply of low standard labor flowed freely;
and  up  to  the turn of  the  century there  was  no  commitment  to  keep 
foreign  exchanges stable.  A  free  supply  of  land,  labor,  and  money 
continued  to  be  available;  consequently  no  self-regulating  market 
system was in existence.  As long as these conditions prevailed, neither 
man,  nor  nature,  nor  business organization  needed  protection  of the 
kind that  only government intervention  can  provide. 
1
Penrose, E. F., op. cit.  The Malthusian law is valid only under the assumption 
that the supply of land is limited. 
202 
RISE  AND  FALL  OF  MARKET  ECONOMY 
[Ch. 17 
As soon as these conditions ceased to exist, social protection set in. 
As the lower ranges of labor could not any more be freely replaced from 
an inexhaustible reservoir of immigrants, while its higher ranges were 
unable to settle freely on the land;  as the soil  and natural resources 
became  scarce  and  had  to  be  husbanded;  as  the gold  standard  was 
introduced in order to remove the currency  from politics  and to link 
domestic  trade  with  that  of the  world,  the  United  States  caught  up 
with a century of European development:  protection of the soil and its 
cultivators, social security for labor through unionism and legislation, 
and central banking—all on the largest scale—made their appearance. 
Monetary  protectionism  came  first:  the  establishment  of  the  Federal 
Reserve System was intended to harmonize the needs of the gold stand-
ard with regional requirements;  protectionism in respect to labor  and 
land followed.  A decade of prosperity in the twenties sufficed to bring 
on a depression so fierce that in its course the New Deal started to build 
 moat  around  labor  and  land,  wider  than  any  Europe  had  known. 
Thus America offered striking proof, both positive and negative, of our 
thesis that social  protection  was  the  accompaniment  of  a supposedly 
self-regulating market. 
At the same time protectionism everywhere was producing the hard 
shell of the emerging unit of social life.  The new entity was cast in the 
national  mold,  but  had  otherwise  only  little  resemblance  to  its  pred-
ecessors,  the easygoing nations of the past.  The  new crustacean  type 
of nation expressed its identity through national token currencies safe-
guarded by a type of sovereignty more jealous and absolute than any-
thing known before.  These currencies were also spodighted from out-
side,  since  it  was  of  them  that  the  international  gold  standard  (the 
chief instrument of world economy)  was  constructed.  If money now 
avowedly  ruled  the  world,  that money  was stamped  with  a  national 
die. 
Such emphasis on nations and currencies would have been incom-
prehensible to liberals, whose minds habitually missed the true charac-
teristics of the world they were living in.  If the nation was deemed by 
them  an  anachronism,  national  currencies  were  reckoned  not  even 
worthy  of  attention.  No  self-respecting  economist  of  the  liberal  age 
doubted the irrelevance of the fact that different pieces of paper were 
called differently on different sides of political frontiers.  Nothing was 
simpler than to change one denomination for another by the use of the 
exchange market, an institution which could not fail to function since, 
luckily,  it  was  not  under  the  control  of  the  state  or  the  politician 
203 
Ch.17] 
SELF-REGULATION  IMPAIRED 
Western Europe was passing through a new Enlightenment and high 
amongst its bugbears ranked the "tribalistic"  concept of the nation, 
whose  alleged  sovereignty  was  to  liberals  an  outcrop  of  parochial 
thinking.  Up to the 1930's the economic Baedeker included the cer-
tain information that money was only an instrument of exchange and 
thus inessential by definition.  The blind spot of the marketing mind 
was equally insensitive to the phenomena of the nation and  of money. 
The free trader was a nominalist in regard to both. 
This connection was highly significant, yet it passed unnoticed at 
the time.  Off and on, critics of free-trade doctrines as well as critics of 
orthodox doctrines on money arose, but there was hardly anyone who 
recognized that these two sets of doctrines were stating the same case in 
different terms and that if one was false the other was equally so.  Wil-
liam Cunningham or Adolph  Wagner showed up cosmopolitan free-
trade fallacies, but did not link them with money; on the other hand, 
Macleod or Gesell attacked classical money theories while adhering to a 
cosmopolitan trading system.  The constitutive importance of the cur-
rency in establishing the nation as the decisive economic and political 
unit of the time was as thoroughly overlooked by the writers of liberal 
Enlightenment as the existence of history had been by their eighteenth 
century predecessors.  Such was the position upheld by the most bril-
liant economic thinkers from Ricardo to Wieser, from John Stuart Mill 
to Marshall and Wicksell, while the common run of the educated were 
brought up to believe that preoccupation with the economic problem of 
the nation or of the currency marked a person with the stigma of in-
feriority.  To combine these fallacies in the monstrous proposition that 
national currencies played a vital part in the institutional mechanism of 
our civilization would have been judged a pointless paradox, devoid of 
sense and meaning. 
Actually, the new national unit and the new national currency were 
inseparable.  It was currency which provided national and international 
systems  with  their  mechanics  and  introduced  into  the  picture  those 
features which resulted in the abruptness of the break.  The monetary 
system  on  which  credit  was based had  become the life line of both 
national and international economy. 
Protectionism was a three-pronged drive.  Land, labor, and money, 
each played their part, but while land and labor were linked to definite 
even though broad social strata, such as the workers or the peasantry, 
monetary protectionism was, to a greater extent, a national factor, often 
fusing  diverse  interests  into  a  collective  whole.  Though  monetary 
204 
RISE  AND  FALL  OF  MARKET  ECONOMY 
[Ch. 17 
policy, too,  could divide  as well as unite,  objectively the monetary 
system was the strongest among the economic forces integrating the 
nation. 
Labor and land accounted, primarily, for social legislation and corn 
duties, respectively.  Farmers would protest against burdens that bene-
fited the laborer and raised wages, while laborers would object to any 
increase in food prices.  But once corn laws and labor laws were in 
force—in Germany since the early eighties—it would become difficult 
to remove the one without removing the other.  Between agricultural 
and industrial tariffs, the relationship was even closer.  Since the idea 
of all-round protectionism had been popularized by Bismarck (1879), 
the political alliance of landowners and industrialists for the reciprocal 
safeguarding of tariffs had been a feature of German politics; tariff 
logrolling was as common as the setting up of cartels in order to secure 
private benefits from tariffs. 
Internal and external, social and national protectionism tended to 
fuse.
2
The rising cost of living induced by corn laws invited the manu-
facturer's demand for protective tariffs, which he rarely failed to utilize 
as an implement of cartel policy.  Trade unions naturally insisted on 
higher wages to compensate for increased costs of living, and could not 
well object to such customs tariffs as permitted the employer to meet 
an inflated wage bill.  But once the accountancy of social legislation had 
been based on a wage level conditioned by tariffs, employers could not 
in fairness be expected to carry the burden of such legislation unless 
they were assured of continued protection.  Incidentally, this was the 
slender factual basis of the charge of collectivist conspiracy allegedly 
responsible for the protectionist movement.  But this mistakes effect for 
cause. The origins of the movement were spontaneous and widely dis-
persed, but once started it could not, of course, fail to create parallel 
interests which were committed to its continuation. 
More important than similarity of interests was the uniform spread 
of actual conditions created by the combined effects of such measures. 
If life in different countries was different, as had always been the case, 
the disparity could now be traced to definite legislative and administra-
tive acts of a protective intent, since conditions of production and labor 
were now mainly dependent on tariffs, taxation, and social laws.  Even 
before the United States and the British dominions restricted immigra-
tion, the number of emigrants from the United Kingdom dwindled, in 
spite of severe unemployment, admittedly on account of the much im-
proved social climate of the mother country. 
a
Carr,
E. H., The Twenty Tears* Crisis,
1919—1939,
1940. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested