20 
237 
HISTORY 
IN 
THE 
GEAR 
OF 
SOCIAL 
CHANGE 
IF
EVER
THERE WAS
a
political movement that responded
to the
needs 
of an objective situation and was not a result of fortuitous causes it was 
fascism.  At the same time,  the degenerative  character of the  fascist 
solution was evident..  It offered an escape from an institutional dead-
lock which  was  essentially  alike in a large number of countries,  and 
yet,  if the remedy  were  tried,  it would  everywhere  produce  sickness 
unto death.  That is the manner in which civilizations perish. 
The fascist solution of the impasse reached by liberal capitalism can 
be described as a reform of market economy achieved at the price of 
the extirpation of all democratic institutions, both in the industrial and 
in the political realm.  The economic system which was in peril of dis-
ruption  would  thus be  revitalized,  while  the people  themselves  were 
subjected  to  a  re-education  designed  to  denaturalize  the  individual 
and make him unable to function as the responsible unit of the body 
politic
1
This re-education, comprising the tenets of a: political religion 
that denied the idea of the brotherhood of man in all its forms, was 
achieved through  an act of mass conversion  enforced  against recalci-
trants by scientific methods of torture. 
The appearance of such a movement in the industrial countries of 
the globe, and even in a number of only slightly industrialized ones, 
should never have been ascribed to local causes, national mentalities, or 
historical backgrounds as was so consistently done by contemporaries. 
Fascism had as little to: do with the Great War as with the Versailles 
Treaty, with Junker militarism as with the Italian temperament.  The 
movement  appeared  in  defeated  countries like  Bulgaria  and  in  vic-
torious  ones  like  Jugoslavia,  in  countries  of  Northern  temperament 
like Finland and Norway and of Southern temperament like Italy and 
Spain, in countries of Aryan  race like England,  Ireland,  or Belgium 
and non-Aryan race like Japan, Hungary or Palestine, in countries of 
a
Polanyi, K. "The Essence of Fascism." In Christianity and the Social Revolutlon, 1933. 
Pdf to tiff quality - SDK control service:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
www.rasteredge.com
Pdf to tiff quality - SDK control service:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
238 
TRANSFORMATION  IN  PROGRESS 
[Ch.
20 
Catholic traditions like Portugal and in Protestant ones like Holland, in 
soldierly  communities  like  Prussia  and  civilian  ones like Austria,  in 
old cultures like France and new ones like the United States and the 
Latin-American countries.  In fact, there was no type of background— 
of religious, cultural, or national tradition—that made a country im-
mune to fascism, once the conditions for its emergence were given. 
Moreover,  there  was  a  striking  lack  of  relationship  between  its 
material  and  numerical  strength  and  its  political  effectiveness.  The 
very term "movement" was misleading since it implied some kind of 
enrollment  or  personal  participation  of  large  numbers.  If  anything 
was characteristic of fascism it was its independence of such popular 
manifestations.  Though usually aiming at a mass following, its poten-
tial strength was reckoned not by the numbers of its adherents but by 
the influence of the persons in high position whose good will the fascist 
leaders  possessed,  and  whose  influence  in  the  community  could  be 
counted  upon to shelter them from  the  consequences of  an  abortive 
revolt, thus taking the risks out of revolution. 
A country approaching the fascist phase showed symptoms among 
which the existence of  a fascist movement  proper was not necessarily 
one.  At  least  as  important signs  were  the  spread  of  irrationalistic 
philosophies,  racialist  esthetics,  anticapitalistic  demagogy,  heterodox 
currency views, criticism of the party system, widespread disparagement 
of the "regime," or whatever was the name given to the existing demo-
cratic  set-up.  In  Austria  the  so-called  universalist  philosophy  of 
Othmar Spann, in Germany the poetry of Stephan George and the cos-
mogonic romanticism of Ludwig Klages, in England D. H. Lawrence's 
erotic vitalism, in France Georges SorePs cult of the political myth were 
among its extremely diverse forerunners.  Hitler was eventually put in 
power by the  feudalist  clique  around  President Hindenburg,  just  as 
Mussolini  and  Primo  de  Rivera  were  ushered  into  office  by  their 
respective sovereigns.  Yet Hitler had a vast movement to support him; 
Mussolini had a small one; Primo de Rivera had none.  In no case was 
an  actual  revolution  against  constituted  authority  launched;  fascist 
tactics  were  invariably  those of a  sham  rebellion  arranged  with  the 
tacit  approval  of  the  authorities  who  pretended  to  have  been  over-
whelmed by force.  These are the bare outlines of a complex picture in 
which room would have to be made for figures as diverse as the Catho-
lic free-lance demagogue in industrial Detroit, the "Kingfish" in back-
ward Louisiana, Japanese army conspirators, and Ukrainian anti-Soviet 
saboteurs.  Fascism was an ever given political possibility,  an almost 
SDK control service:C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
easily and quickly complete a high-quality PDF document compression compressing & decompression method, TIFF files compression C#.NET PDF Document Optimization.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:Online Convert PDF file to Tiff. Best free online PDF Tif
Using this .NET PDF to TIFF conversion control, C# developers can render and convert PDF document to TIFF image file with no loss in original file quality.
www.rasteredge.com
Ch. 
2o] 
HISTORY AND SOCIAL CHANGE 
239 
instantaneous emotional reaction in every industrial community since 
the 1930's.  One may call it  a  "move"  in  preference to  a  "move-
ment/* to indicate the impersonal nature of the crisis the symptoms of 
which were frequently vague and ambiguous.  People often did not feel 
sure whether a political speech or a play, a sermon or a public parade, 
a metaphysics or an artistic fashion, a poem or a party program was 
fascist or not.  There were no accepted criteria of fascism, nor did it 
possess  conventional  tenets.  Yet  one  significant  feature  of  all  its 
organized forms was  the abruptness with  which they  appeared  and 
faded out again, only to burst forth with violence after an indefinite 
period of latency.  All this fits into the picture of a social force that 
waxed and waned according to the objective situation. 
What we termed, for short, "fascist situation" was no other than 
the typical occasion of easy and complete fascist victories.  All at once, 
the
tremendous industrial
and
political organizations
of
labor
and of 
other devoted  upholders of constitutional freedom would melt away, 
and minute fascist forces would brush  aside what seemed until then 
the overwhelming strength of democratic governments, parties, trade 
unions.  If  a  "revolutionary situation"  is  characterized  by  the  psy-
chological and moral disintegration of all forces of resistance to the 
point where a handful of scantily armed rebels were enabled to storm 
the supposedly impregnable strongholds of reaction,  then  the  "fascist 
situation" was its complete parallel except for the fact that here the bul-
warks of democracy and constitutional liberties  were  stormed  and  their 
defenses found wanting in the same spectacular fashion.  In Prussia, in 
July, 1932, the legal government of the Social Democrats, entrenched 
in the seat of legitimate power, capitulated to the mere threat of un-
constitutional  violence  on  the  part  of  Herr  von  Papen.  Some  six 
months later Hitler possessed himself peacefully of the highest positions 
of power, whence he at once launched a revolutionary attack of whole-
sale destruction against the institutions of the Weimar Republic and 
the constitutional parties.  To imagine that it was the strength of the 
movement which created situations such as these, and not to see that it 
was the situation that gave birth in this case to the movement, is to 
miss the outstanding lesson of the last decades. 
Fascism, like socialism, was rooted in a market society that refused 
to function.  Hence, it was world-wide, catholic in scope, universal in 
application; the issues transcended the economic sphere and begot a 
general transformation of a distinctively social kind.  It radiated into 
almost every field of human activity  whether political  or economic, 
SDK control service:VB.NET Image: Robust OCR Recognition SDK for VB.NET, .NET Image
Once images and documents are loaded in VB.NET project, input quality will be enhanced with Images exported can be Png, Jpeg, Tiff, image-only PDF or Bmp.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
library component toolkit, C# developers can easily and quickly convert a large-size multi-page PDF document to a group of high-quality separate JPEG image
www.rasteredge.com
240 
TRANSFORMATION  IN  PROGRESS 
[Ch. 20 
cultural,  philosophic, artistic, or religious.  And up to a point it co-
alesced with local  and  topical tendencies.  No  understanding of the 
history of the period is possible unless we distinguish between the under-
lying fascist move and the ephemeral tendencies with which that move 
fused in different countries. 
In the Europe of the twenties two such tendencies figured promi-
nently and overlay the fainter but vastly more comprehensive pattern 
of fascism: counterrevolution and nationalist revisionism.  Their imme-
diate  starting  point  was  the  Treaties  and  the  postwar  revolutions. 
Though strictly conditioned,  and limited  to their specific  objectives, 
they were easily confounded with fascism. 
Counterrevolutions were the usual backswing of the political pen-
dulum towards  a  state  of  affairs  that had  been violently  disturbed. 
Such moves have been  typical in  Europe  at least since  the  English 
Commonwealth, and had but limited connection with the social proc-
esses of their time.  In the twenties numerous situations of this kind 
developed,  since  the  upheavals  that  destroyed  more  than  a  dozen 
thrones in Central and Eastern Europe were partly due to the backwash 
of defeat, not to the forward move of democracy.  The job of counter-
revolution was mainly political and fell as a matter of course to the 
dispossessed classes and groups such as dynasties, aristocracies, churches, 
heavy industries, and the parties affiliated with them.  The alliances 
and clashes of conservatives and fascists during this period concerned 
mainly the share that should go to the fascists in the counterrevolution-
ary undertaking.  Now, fascism was a revolutionary tendency directed as 
much  against  conservatism  as  against  the  competing  revolutionary 
force of socialism.  That  did  not  preclude  the  fascists  from  seeking 
power in the political field by offering their services to the counterrevo-
lution.  On the contrary, they claimed ascendency chiefly by virtue of 
the alleged impotence of conservatism to accomplish that job, which 
was unavoidable  if socialism  was  to  be  barred.  The  conservatives, 
naturally, tried to monopolize the honors of the counterrevolution and, 
actually,  as in Germany,  accomplished it alone.  They deprived the 
working-class parties of influence and power, without giving in to the 
Nazi.  Similarly,  in Austria,  the  Christian  Socialists—a conservative 
party—largely  disarmed  the  workers (1927)  without  making  any 
concession  to the  "revolution  from  the  right."  Even  where  fascist 
participation in the counterrevolution was unavoidable, "strong" gov-
ernments were established which relegated fascism to the limbo.  This 
happened in Esthonia in 1929, in Finland in 1932, in Latvia in 1934. 
Pseudo-liberal  regimes broke the  power of fascism for  the time,  in 
SDK control service:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Able to Convert PDF to JPEG file in .NET WinForms Export high quality jpeg file from PDF in .NET framework.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; 'create optimizing Compression = PDFCompression.DCTDecode 'set quality level, only
www.rasteredge.com
Ch.
20] 
HISTORY  AND  SOCIAL  CHANGE 
Hungary in 1922, and in Bulgaria in  1926.  In Italy alone were the 
conservatives  unable  to  restore  work-discipline  in  industry  without 
providing the fascists with a chance of gaining power. 
In the militarily defeated  countries, but also in the "psychologi-
cally" defeated Italy, the national problem loomed large.  Here a task 
was set the stringency of which could not be denied.  Deeper than all 
other issues cut the permanent disarmament of the defeated countries; 
in a world in which the only existing organization of international law, 
international order,  and international peace rested on the balance of 
power, a number of countries had been made powerless without any 
intimation  of the kind  of system  that would  replace  the  old.  The 
League  of Nations  represented,  at the best,  an improved system of 
balance of power, but was actually not even on the level of the late 
Concert of  Europe,  since  the  prerequisite  of a general  diffusion  of 
power  was  now  lacking.  The  nascent  fascist  movement  put  itself 
almost everywhere into the service of the national issue; it could hardly 
have survived without this "pick-up" job. 
Yet, it used this issue only as a stepping stone; at other times it 
struck the pacifist and isolationist note.  In England and the United 
States it was allied with appeasement;  in Austria the Heimwehr co-
operated with sundry Catholic pacifists; and Catholic fascism was anti-
nationalist, on principle.  Huey Long needed no border conflict with 
Mississippi or Texas to launch his fascist movement from Baton Rouge. 
Similar movements in Holland and Norway were nonnationalist to the 
point of treason—Quisling may have been a name for a good fascist, 
but was certainly not one for a good patriot. 
In its struggle for political power fascism is entirely free to disregard 
or to use local issues, at will.  Its aim transcends the political and eco-
nomic framework: it is social.  It puts a political religion into the service 
of a degenerative process.  In its rise it excludes only a very few emo-
tions  from its  orchestra;  yet once  victorious it  bars from  the  band 
wagon all but a very small group of motivations, though again ex-
tremely characteristic ones.  Unless we distinguish closely between this 
pseudo intolerance on the road to power and the genuine intolerance 
in power, we can hardly hope to understand the subtle but decisive 
difference between the sham-nationalism  of some  fascist movements 
during the revolution, and the specifically imperialistic nonnationalism 
which they developed after the revolution.
While conservatives were as a rule successful in carrying the domes-
a
Heymann, H., Plan for Permanent Peace, 1
9
4
1
. Cf. Briining's letter of Janu-
ary 8th, 1 1 9 4 4 0 
241 
SDK control service:VB.NET Image: RasterEdge JBIG2 Codec Image Control for VB.NET
control in VB.NET is capable of embedding compressed bitonal images into PDF files and decompress images from PDF files quickly with the smallest quality loss.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
PDF files are created from tiff with high quality using .NET PDF SDK for C#.NET. Support to combine multiple page tiffs into one PDF file.
www.rasteredge.com
242 
TRANSFORMATION  IN  PROGRESS 
[Ch.
20 
tic counterrevolutions alone, they were but rarely able to bring the 
national-international problem of their countries to an issue.  Briining 
maintained in 1940 that German reparations and disarmament had 
been solved by him before the "clique around Hindenburg" decided to 
put him out of office and to hand over power to the Nazis, the reason 
for their action being that they did not want the honors to go to him.
Whether, in a very limited sense, this was so or not seems immaterial, 
since the question of Germany's equality of status was not restricted to 
technical disarmament, as Briining implied, but included the equally 
vital question of demilitarization; also, it was not really possible to dis-
regard the strength which German diplomacy drew from the existence 
of Nazi masses sworn to radical nationalist policies.  Events proved 
conclusively that Germany's equality of status could not have been 
attained without a revolutionary departure, and it is in this light that 
the awful responsibility of Nazism, which committed a free and equal 
Germany
to a
career
of
crime,
 becomes
apparent.
Both
in
Germany and 
in Italy fascism could seize power only because it was able to use as its 
lever unsolved national issues, while in France as in Great Britain 
fascism was decisively weakened by its antipatriotism.  Only in small 
and naturally dependent countries could the spirit of subservience to a 
foreign power prove an asset to fascism. 
By accident only, as we see, was European fascism in the twenties 
connected with national and counterrevolutionary tendencies.  It was 
a case of symbiosis between movements of independent origin, which 
reinforced one another and created the impression of essential simi-
larity, while being actually unrelated. 
In reality, the part played by fascism was determined by one factor: 
the condition of the market system. 
During the period 1917-23 governments occasionally sought fascist 
help to restore law and order: no more was needed to set the market 
system going.  Fascism remained undeveloped. 
In the period 1924-29, when the restoration of the market system 
seemed ensured, fascism faded out as a political force altogether. 
After 1930 market economy was in a general crisis.  Within a few 
years fascism was a world power. 
The first period 1917-23 produced hardly more than the term. In 
a number of European countries—such as Finland, Lithuania, Es-
thonia, Latvia, Poland, Roumania, Bulgaria, Greece, and Hungary— 
agrarian or socialist revolutions had taken place, while in others— 
•Rauschning, H., The Voice of .Destruction, 1940. 
Ch. 20] 
HISTORY  AND  SOCIAL  CHANGE 
243 
among  them  Italy,  Germany,  and  Austria—the  industrial  working 
class  had  gained  political  influence.  Eventually  counterrevolutions 
restored the domestic balance of power.  In the majority of countries 
the peasantry turned  against the  urban  workers;  in some  countries 
fascist movements were started by officers and gentry, who gave a lead 
to the peasantry; in others, as in Italy, the unemployed and the petite 
bourgeoisie formed into fascist troops.  Nowhere was any other issue 
than that of law and order mooted, no question of radical reform was 
raised; in other words, no sign of a fascist revolution was apparent. 
These movements were fascist only in form, that is to say only in so 
far  as  civilian  bands,  so-called  irresponsible  elements,  made  use  of 
force and violence with the connivance of persons in authority.  The 
antidemocratic philosophy of fascism was already born, but was not 
as yet a political factor.  Trotsky gave a voluminous report on the situ-
ation in Italy on the eve of the Second Congress of the Comintern, in 
1920, but did not even mention fascism, although fasci had been in 
existence  for  some  time.  It  took  another  ten  years  or  more  be-
fore Italian fascism, long since established in the government of the 
country,  developed  anything  in  the  nature  of  a  distinctive  social 
system. 
In 1924 and after, Europe and the United States were the scene of 
a boisterous boom that drowned all concern for the soundness of the 
market system.  Capitalism was proclaimed restored.  Both Bolshevism 
and fascism were liquidated except in peripheric regions.  The Comin-
tern declared the consolidation of capitalism a fact; Mussolini eulogized 
liberal capitalism; all important countries except Great Britain were on 
the upgrade.  The United States enjoyed a legendary prosperity, and 
the  Continent  was  doing  almost  as  well.  Hitler's putsch  had  been 
quashed;  France had  evacuated the Ruhr;  the Reichsmark  was  re-
stored as by miracle; the Dawes Plan had taken politics out of repara-
tions ; Locarno was in the offing; and Germany was starting out on 
seven fat years.  Before the end of 1926 the gold standard ruled again 
from Moscow to Lisbon. 
It was in the third period—after 1929—that the true significance 
of fascism became apparent.  The deadlock of the market system was 
evident.  Until  then fascism had  been  hardly more  than  a trait in 
Italy's  authoritarian government,  which otherwise differed but little 
from those of a more traditional type.  It now emerged as an alterna-
tive solution of the problem of an industrial society.  Germany took the 
lead in a revolution of European scope and the fascist alignment pro-
244 
TRANSFORMATION  IN  PROGRESS 
[Ch. 20 
An adventitious but by no means accidental event started the de-
struction of the international system.  A Wall Street slump grew to 
huge dimensions and was followed by Great Britain's decision to go 
off gold and, another two years later, by a similar move on the part 
of the United States.  Concurrently, the Disarmament  Conference 
ceased to meet, and, in 1934, Germany left the League of Nations. 
These symbolic events ushered in an epoch of spectacular change 
in the organization of the world. Three powers, Japan, Germany, and 
Italy, rebelled against the
status
quo
and sabotaged the crumbling in-
stitutions of peace. At the same time the factual organization of world 
economy refused to function.  The gold standard was at least tempo-
rarily put out of action by its Anglo-Saxon creators; under the guise of 
default, foreign debts were repudiated;  capital markets and world 
trade dwindled away.  The political and the economic system of the 
planet disintegrated conjointly. 
Within the nations themselves the change was no less thorough. 
Two-party systems were superseded by one-party governments, some-
times by national governments.  However, external similarities between 
dictatorship countries and countries which retained a democratic public 
opinion merely served to emphasize the superlative importance of free 
institutions of discussion and decision. Russia turned to socialism under 
dictatorial forms. Liberal capitalism disappeared in the countries pre-
paring for war like Germany, Japan, and Italy, and, to a lesser extent, 
also in the United States and Great Britain. But the emerging regimes 
of fascism, socialism, and the New Deal were similar only in discarding 
laissez-faire
principles. 
While history was thus started on its course by an event external to 
all, the single nations reacted to the challenge according to whither they 
were bound.  Some were averse to change; some went a long way to 
meet it when it came; some were indifferent.  Also, they sought for 
solutions in various directions.  Yet from the point of view of market 
economy these often radically different solutions merely represented 
given alternatives. 
Among those determined to make use of a general dislocation to 
further their own interests was a group of dissatisfied Powers for whom 
the passing of the balance-of-power system, even in its weakened form 
of the League, appeared to offer a rare chance.  Germany was now 
vided her struggle for power with a dynamics which soon embraced five 
continents.  History was in the gear of social change. 
Ch.
20] 
HISTORY  AND  SOCIAL  CHANGE 
245 
eager to hasten the downfall of traditional world economy, which still 
provided international order with a foothold, and she anticipated the 
collapse of that economy, so as to have the start of her opponents.  She 
deliberately cut loose from the international system of capital, com-
modity, and currency so as to lessen the hold of the outer world upon 
her when she would deem it convenient to repudiate her political obli-
gations.  She fostered economic  autarchy to ensure the freedom re-
quired for her far-reaching plans.  She squandered her gold reserves, 
destroyed her foreign credit by gratuitous repudiation of her obligations 
and even, for a time, wiped out her favorable foreign trade balance. 
She  easily managed to  camouflage  her true intentions since  neither 
Wall Street nor the City of London nor Geneva suspected that the Nazis 
were actually banking on the final dissolution of nineteenth century 
economy.  Sir John Simon and Montagu Norman firmly believed that 
eventually  Schacht  would  restore  orthodox  economics  in  Germany, 
which was acting under duress and which would return to the fold, if 
she were only assisted  financially.  Illusions such as these survived in 
Downing Street up to the time of Munich and after.  While Germany 
was thus greatly  assisted in  her conspirative plans by her ability to 
adjust to the dissolution of the traditional system, Great Britain found 
herself severely handicapped by her adherence to that system. 
Although England had temporarily gone off gold, her economy and 
finance continued to be based on the principles of stable exchanges and 
sound currency.  Hence, the limitations under which she found herself 
in respect to rearmament.  Just as German autarchy was an outcome 
of military ana political considerations that sprang from her intent to 
forestall a general transformation, Britain's strategy and foreign policy 
were constricted by her conservative financial outlook.  The strategy of 
limited warfare reflected the view of an island emporium, which re-
gards itself safe as long as its Navy is strong enough to secure the sup-
plies that its sound  money  can buy in  the  Seven  Seas.  Hitler was 
already in power when, in 1933, Duff Cooper, a die-hard, defended 
the cuts in the army budget of 1932 as made "in the face of the national 
bankruptcy, which was then thought to be an even greater danger than 
having an inefficient fighting service."  More than three years later 
Lord Halifax maintained that peace could be had by economic adjust-
ments and that there should be no interference with trade since this 
would  make such  adjustments  more  difficult.  In  the very year of 
Munich, Halifax and Chamberlain still formulated Britain's policy in 
terms of "silver bullets" and the traditional American loans for Ger-
246 
TRANSFORMATION  IN  PROGRESS 
[Ch. 20 
many.  Indeed, even after Hitler had crossed the Rubicon and had 
occupied Prague, Lord Simon approved in the House of Commons of 
Montagu Norman's part in the handing over of the Czech gold re-
serves to Hitler.  It was Simon's conviction that the integrity of the gold 
standard, to the restoration of which his statesmanship was dedicated, 
outweighed  all  other  considerations.  Contemporaries  believed  that 
Simon's action was the result of a determined policy of appeasement. 
Actually, it was an homage to the spirit of the gold standard, which 
continued to govern the outlook of the leading men of the City of 
London on strategic as well as on political matters.  In the very week of 
the outbreak of the war the Foreign Office, in answer to a verbal com-
munication of Hitler to Chamberlain, formulated Britain's policy in 
terms of the traditional American loans for Germany.
4
England's mili-
tary unpreparedness was mainly the result of her adherence to gold 
standard economics. 
Germany at first reaped the advantages of those who kill that which 
is doomed to die.  Her start lasted as long as the liquidation of the 
outworn system of the nineteenth century permitted her to keep in the 
lead.  The destruction of liberal capitalism, of the gold standard, and 
of absolute sovereignties was the incidental result of her marauding 
raids.  In adjusting to an isolation sought by herself and, later, in the 
course of her slave dealer's expeditions, she developed tentative solutions 
to some problems of the transformation. 
Her greatest political asset, however, lay in her ability to compel the 
countries of the world into an alignment against Bolshevism.  She made 
herself the foremost beneficiary of the transformation by taking the 
lead in that solution of the problem of market economy which for a 
long time appeared to enlist the unconditional allegiance of the proper-
tied classes, and indeed not always of these alone.  Under the liberal 
and Marxist assumption of the primacy of economic class interests, 
Hitler was bound to win.  But the social unit of the nation proved, in 
the long run, even more relevant than the economic unit of class. 
Russia's rise also was linked with her role in the transformation. 
From 1917 to 1929 the fear of Bolshevism was no more than the fear 
of disorder which might fatally hamper the restoration of a market 
economy which could not function except in an atmosphere of unquali-
fied confidence.  In the following decade socialism became a reality in 
Russia.  The collectivization of the farms meant the supersession of 
market economy by co-operative methods in  regard to the decisive 
4
British Blue Book, No. 74, Cmd. 6106, 1939. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested