SPEENHAMLAND AND VIENNA 
287 
ipality were incompatible with the mechanism of a market economy. 
But purely economic arguments did not exhaust an issue which was 
primarily social, not economic. 
The  main  facts  about  Vienna  were  these.  During  most  of the 
fifteen years following the Great War, 1914-18, unemployment insur-
ance in Austria was heavily subsidized from public funds, thus extend-
ing outdoor relief indefinitely;  rents were fixed at a minute fraction 
of their former level, and the municipality of Vienna built large tene-
ment houses on a nonprofit basis, raising the required capital by taxa-
tion.  While no aid-in-wages was given,  all-round provision of social 
services, modest though they were, might have actually allowed wages 
to drop excessively, but for a developed trade union movement which 
found,  of course,  strong support in  extended unemployment benefit. 
Economically, such a system was certainly anomalous. Rents, restricted 
to a quite  unremunerative level, were incompatible with the existing 
system of private enterprise, notably in the building trade. Also, during 
the earlier years, social protection in the impoverished country inter-
fered with the stability of the currency—inflationist and interventionist 
policies had gone hand in hand. 
Eventually  Vienna,  like  Speenhamland,  succumbed  under  the 
attack of political forces powerfully sustained by the purely economic 
arguments.  The political upheavals in 1832  in England and 1934  in 
Austria  were  designed  to  free  the  labor  market  from  protectionist 
intervention.  Neither  the  squire's  village  nor  working-class  Vienna 
could indefinitely isolate itself from its environment. 
Yet  obviously  there  was  a  very  big  difference  between  the  two 
interventionist  periods.  The  English  village,  in 1795,  had  to  be 
sheltered  from  a  dislocation  caused  by  economic  progress—a  tre-
mendous advance of urban manufactures; the industrial laboring class 
of Vienna, in 1918, had to be protected against the effects of economic 
retrogression, resulting from war, defeat, and industrial chaos. Eventu-
ally, Speenhamland led to a crisis of the organization of labor which 
opened up the road to a new era of prosperity;
while
the
Heimwehr 
victory in Austria formed part of a total catastrophe of the national 
and social system. 
What we wash to stress here is the enormous difference in the cul-
tural and moral effect of the two types of intervention:  the attempt 
of Speenhamland to prevent the coming of market economy and the 
experiment of Vienna trying to transcend such an economy altogether. 
Pdf converter to tiff online - software Library dll:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
www.rasteredge.com
Pdf converter to tiff online - software Library dll:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
288 
NOTES  ON  SOURCES 
While Speenhamland caused a veritable disaster of the common people, 
Vienna  achieved  one  of  the  most  spectacular  cultural  triumphs  of 
Western history.  The year 1795  led to an unprecedented  debasement 
of the laboring classes,  which were  prevented from  attaining the new 
status  of  industrial  workers; 1918   initiated  an  equally  unexampled 
moral and intellectual rise in the condition of a highly developed indus-
trial working  class  which,  protected  by  the  Vienna system,  withstood 
the  degrading  effects  of  grave  economic  dislocation  and  achieved  a 
level  never  surpassed  by  the  masses  of  the  people  in  any  industrial 
society. 
Clearly,  this was due to  the social,  as distinct from  the  economic, 
aspects of the matter.  But did the  orthodox economists have a proper 
grasp of the economics of interventionism ?  The economic liberals were, 
in effect, arguing that the Vienna regime was another "maladministra-
tion of the Poor Law," another "allowance system/
5
which needed  the 
iron  broom  of  the  classical  economists.  But  were  not  these  thinkers 
themselves  misled  by  the  comparatively  lasting  conditions  created  by 
Speenhamland ?  They were often correct about the future, which their 
deep  insight  helped  to  shape,  but  utterly  mistaken  about  their  own 
time.  Modern research has proved their reputation for sound practical 
judgment to have been undeserved.  Malthus misread the needs of his 
time completely; had his tendentious warnings of overpopulation been 
effective  with  the  brides to  whom  he  delivered  them  personally,  this 
"might  have  shot  economic  progress  dead  in  its  tracks,"  says  T.  H. 
Marshall.  Ricardo  misstated  the  facts  of  the  currency  controversy  as 
well as the role of the Bank  of England,  and  failed to  grasp  the true 
causes  of  currency  depreciation  which,  as  we  know  today,  consisted 
primarily  in  political  payments  and  difficulties  of  transfer.  Had  his 
advice  on  the  Bullion  Report  been  followed,  Britain  would  have  lost 
the Napoleonic War, and "the Empire would not exist today." 
Thus the Vienna experience  and  its similarities to  Speenhamland, 
which sent some back to the classical economists, turned others doubt-
ful of them. 
software Library dll:Online Convert PDF file to Tiff. Best free online PDF Tif
Online PDF to Tiff Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to Tiff. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button
www.rasteredge.com
software Library dll:XDoc.Converter for .NET, Support Documents and Images Conversion
Tiff to image. Convert Dicom to image. Convert Word, Excel and PDF to image. Next Steps. Download Free Trial Download and try Converter for .NET with online support
www.rasteredge.com
WHY 
NOT 
WHITBREAD'S 
BILL?  289 
To Chap. 
10 
WHY  NOT  WHITBREAD'S  BILL? 
THE ONLY ALTERNATIVE
to the  Speenhamland policy seemed to have 
been  Whitbread's Bill, brought in in the winter of 1795- I demanded 
extension  of  the  Statute  of  Artificers  of 1563,  so  as  to  include  the 
fixing  of  minimum  wages  by  yearly  assessment.  Such  a  measure,  its 
author  argued,  would  maintain  the  Elizabethan  rule  of  wage  assess-
ment,  while extending it from maximum to minimum wages,  and thus 
prevent starvation in the countryside.  Undoubtedly, it would have met 
the  needs  of  the  emergency,  and  it  is  worth noting that members  for 
Suffolk,  for  instance,  supported  Whitbread's  Bill,  while  their  magis-
trates  had  also  endorsed  the  Speenhamland  principle in  a  meeting  at 
which Arthur  Young  himself  was present;  to  the lay mind  the  differ-
ence  between  the  two  measures  could  not  have  been  strikingly  great. 
This  is  not  surprising.  One  hundred  and  thirty  years  later when the 
Mond Plan (1926)  proposed to use the unemployment fund to supple-
ment  wages  in  industry,  the  public  still  found  it  difficult  to  compre-
hend  the  decisive  economic  difference  between  aid to  the  unemployed 
and  aid-in-wages  to  the employed. 
However,  the  choice,  in 1795,  was between  minimum wages  and 
aid-in-wages.  The  difference  between  the  two  policies  can  be  best 
discerned  by  relating  them  to  the  simultaneous  repeal  of  the  Act  of 
Settlement of 1662.  The repeal  of this Act created the possibility of a 
national  labor market,  the main  purpose of which was to  allow wages 
"to  find  their  own  level."  The  tendency  of  Whitbread's  Minimum 
Wage  Bill was  contrary to  that  of the repeal  of the Act  of Settlement, 
while  the  tendency  of the  Speenhamland  Law was  not.  By  extending 
the application of the  Poor Law of 1601   instead of that of the Statute 
of  Artificers  of 1563   (as  Whitbread  suggested),  the  squires  reverted 
to paternalism primarily in respect to the village only and in such forms 
as  involved  a  minimum  of  interference  with  the  play  of  the  market 
while  actually  making  its  wage-fixing  mechanism  inoperative. 
That 
this  so-called  application  of  the  Poor  Law  was  in  reality  a  complete 
overthrow  of  the  Elizabethan  principle  of  enforced  labor  was  never 
openly  admitted. 
software Library dll:C#: How to Use SDK to Convert Document and Image Using XDoc.
This online C# tutorial will tell you how to implement conversion to Tiff file from PDF, Word You may use our converter SDK to easily convert PDF, Word, Excel
www.rasteredge.com
software Library dll:VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
An advanced PDF converter tool, which supports to be integrated in .NET project, and compatible Export multiple pages PDF document to multi-page Tiff file.
www.rasteredge.com
290 
NOTES  ON  SOURCES 
With the sponsors of the Speenhamland Law pragmatic considera-
tions were paramount.  The Rev.  Edward  Wilson, Canon of Windsor, 
and J. P. for Berkshire, who may have been the proponent, set out his 
views in a pamphlet in which he declared categorically for laissez-faire. 
"Labor,  like  everything  else  brought  to  the  market,  had  in  all  ages 
found  its  level,  without  the  interference  of  law,"  he  said.  It  might 
have been more  appropriate for an English magistrate to say, that,  on 
the  contrary,  never  in  all  the  ages  had  labor  found  its level, without 
the intervention of law.  However, figures showed,  Canon Wilson went 
on, that wages did not increase as fast as the price of corn, whereupon 
he  proceeded  respectfully  to  submit  to  the  consideration  of  the 
magistracy  "A  Measure  for the quantum   of relief to  be  granted  to  the 
poor."  The  relief  added  up  to  five  shillings  a  week  for  a  family  of 
man,  wife,  and  child.  An  "Advertisement"  to  his booklet ran:  "The 
substance of the following Tract was suggested  at the  County Meeting 
at Newbury, on sixth of last May.'*  The magistracy,  as we know, went 
further than the Canon:  it unanimously allowed a scale of five shillings 
and sixpence. 
To 
Chap. 
13 
DISRAELI'S  "TWO  NATIONS"  AND  THE  PROBLEM 
OF  COLORED  RACES 
SEVERAL AUTHORS
have  insisted  on  the  similarity  between  colonial 
problems  and  those  of  early  capitalism.  But  they  failed  to  follow  up 
the analogy the  other way,  that  is,  to  throw  light  on  the  condition  of 
the poorer classes of England a century ago by picturing them  as what 
they  were—the  detribalized,  degraded natives  of  their time. 
The  reason  why  this  obvious  resemblance  was  missed  lay  in  our 
belief in the liberalistic prejudice which gave undue prominence to the 
economic  aspects of what were essentially noneconomic processes.  For 
neither  racial  degradation  in  some  colonial  areas  today  nor  the 
analogous  dehumanization  of  the  laboring  people  a  century  ago  was 
economic in essence. 
software Library dll:Online Convert PDF file to Word. Best free online PDF Conversion
Online Tiff to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a Tiff/Tif File to PDF. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button
www.rasteredge.com
software Library dll:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
An advanced PDF converter tool, which supports to be integrated in .NET project, and compatible Export multiple pages PDF document to multi-page Tiff file.
www.rasteredge.com
DISRAELI'S  "TWO  NATIONS" 
291 
a) Destructive culture contact is not primarily an economic phenom-
enon. 
Most native societies are now undergoing a process of rapid and 
forcible  transformation  comparable  only  to  the violent changes of a 
revolution, says L. P. Mair.  Although the invaders
5
motives are defi-
nitely economic, and the collapse of primitive society is certainly often 
caused by the destruction  of its economic institutions,  the salient fact 
is that the new economic institutions fail to be assimilated by the native 
culture which consequently disintegrates without being replaced by any 
other coherent value system. 
First among the destructive tendencies inherent in Western institu-
tions  stands  "peace  over  a  vast  area,"  which  shatters  "clan  life, 
patriarchal authority, the military training of the youth; it is almost 
prohibitive to  migration  of  clans or tribes"  (Thurnwald, Black and 
White  in  East  Africa;  The  Fabric  of  a  New  Civilization, 1935, p. 
394). "War must have given a keenness to native life which is sadly 
lacking in  these times  of  peace.  .  .  ."  The  abolition  of  fighting  de-
creases population, since war resulted in very few casualties, while its 
absence  means  the  loss  of  vitalizing  customs  and  ceremonies  and  a 
consequent  unwholesome  dullness  and  apathy  of  village  life  (F.  E. 
Williams, Depopulation of the Suan District, 1933,  "Anthropology" 
Report, No. 13, p. 43).  Compare with this the "lusty, animated, ex-
cited  existence"  of the  native in his traditional cultural environment 
(Goldenweiser, Loose Ends,  p. 99). 
The  real  danger,  in  Goldenweiser's words,  is that of a "cultural 
in-between"  (Goldenweiser, Anthropology, 1937,  p. 429).  On  this 
point there  is practical unanimity.  "The  old barriers  are  dwindling 
and no kind of new guiding lines are offered"  (Thurnwald, Black and 
White, p. 111). "To maintain a community in which the accumula-
tion of goods is regarded as anti-social and integrate the same with con-
temporary  white  culture  is  to  try  to  harmonize  two  incompatible 
institutional systems"  (Wissel in Introduction to M. Mead, The Chang-
ing
Culture
of an
Indian  Tribe,
1932). "Immigrant culture-bearers 
may succeed in extinguishing an aboriginal culture, but yet fail either 
to extinguish or to assimilate its bearers"  (Pitt-Rivers, "The Effect on 
Native Races of Contact with European Civilization."  In Man, Vol. 
XXVII,
1927).
Or, in Lesser's pungent phrase of yet another victim 
of  industrial  civilization:  "From  cultural  maturity  as  Pawnee  they 
were reduced to cultural infancy as white men" (The Pawnee Ghost 
Dance  Hand  Game, p. 44). 
software Library dll:RasterEdge XDoc.Tiff for .NET - SDK for Tiff Document Imaging
VB.NET developers and end-users have quick evaluation on our product, we provide comprehensive .NET sample codings online for reference. Convert Tiff to PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
software Library dll:C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Best and free C# tiff to adobe PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. Selection of turning tiff into searchable PDF or scanned PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
292 
NOTES  ON  SOURCES 
This condition of living death is not due to economic exploitation 
in  the  accepted  sense  in  which  exploitation  means  an  economic 
advantage of one partner at the cost of the other, though it is certainly 
intimately linked  with  changes in  the economic conditions connected 
with land tenure, war, marriage, and so on, each of which affects a 
vast number of social habits, customs, and traditions of all descriptions. 
When a money economy is forcibly introduced into sparsely populated 
regions of  Western Africa,  it is not the insufficiency of wages  which 
results in the fact that the natives "cannot buy food to replace that 
which  has not been grown,  for nobody else has grown  a surplus of 
food  to sell to  them"  (Mair,
An  African  People  in  the
Twentieth
Cen-
tury,
1934, p.  5). Their institutions imply a different value scale; 
they are both thrifty and at the same time non-market-minded.  "They 
will ask the same price when the market is glutted as prevailed when 
there  was  great  scarcity,  and  yet  they  will  travel  long  distances  at 
considerable  cost  of  time  and  energy  to  save  a small  sum  on  their 
purchases"  (Mary H.  Kingsley,
West
African Studies,
p. 339).  A rise 
in wages often leads to absenteeism.  Zapotec Indians in Tehuantepec 
were said to work half as well at 50  centavos as at 25  centavos a day. 
This paradox was fairly general during the early days of the Industrial 
Revolution in England. 
The  economic index of population rates serves us no better than 
wages.  Goldenweiser confirms the famous observation Rivers made in 
Melanesia that culturally destitute natives may be "dying of boredom." 
F.  E.  Williams,  himself  a missionary  working in that  region,  writes 
that the  "influence  of the psychological factor on the  death rate" is 
easily understood.  "Many observers have drawn attention to the re-
markable  ease  or  readiness  with  which  a  native  may  die."  "The 
restriction of former interests and activities seems fatal to his spirits. 
The result is that the native's power of resistance is impaired, and he 
easily goes under to any kind of sickness" (op. cit., p. 4 3 ) .  This has 
nothing to do with the pressure of economic want.  "Thus an extremely 
high rate of  natural increase  may be  a  symptom  either of  cultural 
vitality or cultural  degradation"
(Frank
Lorimer,
Observations  on  the 
Trend  of  Indian  Population  in  the  United  States, p. n). 
Cultural  degradation  can  be  stopped  only  by  social  measures, 
incommensurable with economic standards of life, such as the restora-
tion of tribal land tenure or the isolation of the community from the 
influence of capitalistic market methods.  "Separation  of the  Indian 
from his land was the
ONE
death
blow"
writes John Collier in 1942. 
DISRAELI'S  "TWO NATIONS" 
The General Allotment Act of 1887 "individualized" the Indian's land; 
the  disintegration  of his culture  which  resulted  lost  him  some three-
quarters, or ninety million acres, of this land.  The Indian Reorganiza-
tion Act  of  1934  reintegrated  tribal  holdings,  and  saved the Indian 
community, by revitalizing his culture. 
The same story comes from Africa.  Forms of land tenure occupy 
the  center of interest,  because  it is  on  them  that  social  organization 
most directly depends.  What appear as economic conflicts—high taxes 
and rents, low wages—are almost exclusively veiled forms of pressure 
to  induce  the  natives  to  give  up  their  traditional  culture  and  thus 
compel them to adjust to the methods of market economy, i.e., to work 
for wages and procure their goods on the market.  It was in this process 
that  some  of  the  native  tribes  like  the  Kaffirs  and  those  who  had 
migrated  to  town  lost  their  ancestral  virtues  and  became  a  shiftless 
crowd, "semidomesticated animals," among them loafers, thieves, and 
prostitutes—an institution unknown  amongst them before—resembling 
nothing more than the mass of the pauperized population of England 
about 1795-1834. 
(b)) The human degradation of the laboring classes under early cap-
italism  was  the  result  of  a  social  catastrophe  not  measurable  in 
economic  terms. 
Robert  Owen  observed  of  his  laborers  as  early  as  1816  that 
"whatever  wage  they  received  the  mass  of  them  must  be 
wretched.  .  .  ." (To the British Master Manufacturers,  p.  146).  It 
will  be  remembered  that  Adam  Smith  expected  the  land-divorced 
laborer to lose all intellectual interest.  And M'Farlane expected "that 
the  knowledge  of writing  and  accounts  will  every  day  become  less 
frequent  among  the  common  people" (Enquiries Concerning the 
Poor, 1782, p. 249-50). A generation later Owen put down the 
laborers'  degradation  to  "neglect  in  infancy"  and  "overwork,"  thus 
rendering them "incompetent from ignorance to make a good  use of 
high wages when they can procure them."  He himself paid them low 
wages and raised their status by creating for them artificially an entirely 
new  cultural  environment.  The vices  developed by the  mass  of  the 
people were on the whole the same as characterized  colored popula-
tions debased  by disintegrating  culture  contact:  dissipation,  prostitu-
tion,  thievishness,  lack  of  thrift  and  providence,  slovenliness,  low 
productivity of labor, lack of self-respect and stamina.  The spreading 
of market economy was destroying the  traditional fabric of the rural 
293 
294 
NOTES  ON  SOURCES 
society, the village community, the family, the old form of land tenure, 
the customs and standards that supported life within a cultural frame-
work.  The protection afforded by Speenhamland had made matters 
only worse.  By the 1830 's the social catastrophe of the common people 
was as complete  as that of the  Kaffir is today.  One  and  alone,  an 
eminent Negro sociologist,  Charles  S.  Johnson,  reversed  the  analogy 
between  racial  debasement  and  class  degradation,  applying  it  this 
time to the  latter:  "In  England,  where,  incidentally,  the  Industrial 
Revolution was more advanced than in the rest of Europe, the social 
chaos which  followed  the  drastic  economic  reorganization  converted 
impoverished  children into  the  'pieces'  that the  African  slaves were, 
later, to become.  .  .  .  The  apologies for the  child  serf  system  were 
almost identical with those of the slave trade"  ("Race Relations and 
Social  Change."  In  E.  Thompson,
Race  Relations  and  the  Race  Prob-
lem, i939> P- 274). 
Additional 
Note 
12 
POOR LAW AND THE  ORGANIZATION OF  LABOR 
No inquiry has yet been  made  into  the wider implications  of the 
Speenhamland system, its orgins, its effects and the reasons of its abrupt 
discontinuance.  Here are a few of the points involved. 
1. To what extent was Speenhamland a war measure? 
From the strictly economic  point of view,  Speenhamland  can  not 
truly be said to have been a war measure, as has often been asserted. 
Contemporaries  hardly  connected  the  wages  position  with  the  war 
emergency.  In so far as there was a noticeable rise in wages,
the move-
ment
had  started  before  the  war.
Arthur  Young's
Circular  Letter
of 
1795, designed to ascertain the effects of the failure of crops on the 
price of corn contained (point IV)  this question:  "What has been the 
rise  (if any)  in the pay of the  agricultural  laborers,  on  comparison 
with  the  preceding  period?"  Characteristically,  his  correspondents 
failed to attach any definite meaning to the phrase "preceding period." 
References ranged from three to fifty years.  They included the follow-
ing stretches of time: 
POOR  LAW  AND  THE  ORGANIZATION  OF  LABOR 295 
 years 
3-4 
10 
10-15 
10-15 
20 
30-40 
50 
J. Boys, p. 97. 
J. Boys, p. 90. 
Reports from  Shropshire, 
Middlesex, Cambridgeshire.  • 
Sussex  and  Hampshire. 
E.  Harris. 
J. Boys, p. 86. 
William  Pitt. 
Rev.  J.  Howlett. 
No one set the  period  at two  years,  the  term  of the  French  War, 
which had started  in  February, 1793.  In  effect,  no  correspondent  as 
much as mentioned the war. 
Incidentally,  the usual  way of dealing with the increase in pauper-
ism caused by  a bad harvest  and  adverse  weather  conditions resulting 
in  unemployment  consisted  (1)  in  local  subscriptions  involving  doles 
and  distribution  of  food  and  fuel  free  or  at  reduced  cost; (2)  in  the 
providing of employment.  Wages remained  usually unaffected;  during 
a  similar  emergency,  in 1788-9   additional  employment  was  actually 
provided  locally  at lower  than  the  normal  rates.  (Cf.  J. Harvey, 
"Worcestershire,"  in Ann. of Agr.,  v,  XII,  p. 132, 1789.  Also 
E. Holmes, "Cruckton," I.e., p. 196.)' 
Nevertheless,  it  has  been  assumed  with  good  cause  that  the  war 
had, at least, an indirect bearing on the adoption of the  Speenhamland 
expedient.  Actually,  two  weaknesses  of the  rapidly  spreading  market 
system were being aggravated  by the war and  contributed  to the  situ-
ation  out  of  which  Speenhamland  arose:  (1)  the  tendency  of  corn 
prices to  fluctuate,  (2)  the  most  deleterious effect  of  rioting  on  these 
fluctuations. The cornmarket,  only recently  freed,  could hardly be ex-
pected to stand up to the strain  of war and  threats of  blockade.  Nor 
w^s the  cornmarket  proof  against  the  panics  caused  by  the  habit  of 
rioting  which  now  took  on  an  ominous  import.  Under  the  so-called 
regulative system, "orderly rioting"  had been  regarded  by the  central 
authorities more  or less  as  an indicator of  local  scarcity  which  should 
be handled leniently; now it was denounced as a cause  of scarcity and 
an economic  danger to  the  community  at large,  not  least  to  the  poor 
themselves.  Arthur Young published a warning on the "Consequences 
of  rioting  on  account  of  the  high  prices  of  food  provisions"  and 
Hannah More helped to broadcast similar views in one of her didactic 
poems called  "The Riot,  or,  Half a loaf is  better than  no  bread"  (to 
296 
NOTES  ON  SOURCES 
be  sung  to  the  tune  of  "A  Cobbler  there  was").  Her  answer  to  the 
housewives merely  set  in  rhymes  what  Young  in  a  fictitious  dialogue 
had expressed thus:  I 'Are we to be quiet till starved?'  Most assuredly 
you  are not—you ought to  complain;  but  complain  and  act  in such  a 
manner as shall not aggravate the very evil that is felt."  There was, he 
insisted,  not  the  slightest  danger  of  a  famine "prowded we are free of 
riots" There was good reason for concern, the supply of com being 
highly sensitive to panic.  Moreover, the French Revolution was giving 
a threatening  connotation  even  to  orderly riots.  Though  fear of  a  rise 
in  wages  was  undoubtedly  the  economic  cause  of  Speenhamland,  it 
may be said that,  as far as the war was  concerned,  the  implications of 
the situation were far more social  and  political than economic. 
2. 
Sir  William  Young  and  the  relaxation  of  the  Act  of  Settlement. 
Two incisive  Poor  Law  measures  date from 1795:  Speenhamland 
and the  relaxation  of  "parish  serfdom."  It  is  difficult  to  believe  that 
this was a mere coincidence.  On  the mobility  of  labor their effect  was 
up to a point opposite.  While the latter made it more attractive for the 
laborer  to  wander  in  search  of  employment,  the  former  made  it  less 
imperative  for  him  to  do  so.  In  the  convenient  terms  of  "push"  and 
"pull" sometimes used in studies on migration, while the  "pull"  of the 
place of destination was increased, the "push"  of the home village was 
diminished.  The  danger of a large-scale  unsettlement of  rural labor  as 
a result of the revision  of the  Act  of 1662   was thus certainly mitigated 
by  Speenhamland.  From  the  angle  of  Poor  Law  administration,  the 
two  measures  were  frankly  complementary.  For  the  loosening  of  the 
Act  of 1662   involved  the  risk  which  that  Act  was  designed  to  avoid, 
namely  the  flooding  of  the  "better"  parishes  by  the  poor.  But  for 
Speenhamland,  this  might  have  actually  happened.  Contemporaries 
made but little  mention  of this  connection,  which  is  hardly  surprising 
once one remembers that even the Act of 1662   itself was  carried  prac-
tically  without  public  discussion.  Yet  the  conviction  must  have  been 
present  in  the  mind  of  Sir  William  Young,  who  twice  sponsored  the 
two  measures  conjointly.  In 1795,  he  advocated  the  amendment  of 
the Act of Settlement while he was also the mover of the 1796   Bill by 
which  the  Speenhamland  principle  was  incorporated  in  law.  Once 
before, in 1788, he had in vain sponsored the same  two  measures.  He 
had moved the repeal of the Act of Settlement almost in the same terms 
as in 1795, sponsoring at the same time a measure of relief of the poor 
which proposed to establish a living wage, two-thirds of which were to 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested