National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing
University of California, Los Angeles
Graduate School of Education & Information Studies
Copyright © 2014 The Regents of the University of California
The work reported her 
and WestEd with a subcontract to the National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing (CRESST).
The findings and opinions expressed in this publication are those of the authors and do not necessarily 
reflect the positions or policies of CRESST, WestEd, or the U.S. Department of Education.
FROM THE COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS 
TO TEACHING AND LEARNING IN THE CLASSROOM:
A SERIES OF RESOURCES FOR TEACHERS
SUppORTING STUDENTS 
IN CLOSE READING 
Authors: 
BArBArA Jones, sAndy ChAng, MArgAret heritAge, And glory toBiAson
Pdf to tiff converter for - Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
how to convert pdf to tiff online; converting pdf to tiff
Pdf to tiff converter for - VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
converting pdf to tiff file; convert pdf to tiff format
orgAniZAtion
introduCtion
Close reAding oF teXt
seleCting teXt
PriMing teXt
teXt-dePendent Questions
ForMAtiVe AssessMent
tools And eXeMPlArs
AdditionAl resourCes
reFerenCes
.............................................................. 3
................................................. 4
............................................................. 6
..................................................................9
......................................... 17
................................................ 21
................................................ 22
............................................... 44
................................................................ 46
Our grateful thanks to Timothy Shanahan, Distinguished Professor Emeritus at the University of Illinois at Chicago, 
for his valuable feedback on an earlier draft of this resource. 
Online Convert PDF file to Tiff. Best free online PDF Tif
Online PDF to Tiff Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to Tiff. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button
how to convert pdf to tiff using; pdf to tiff online converter
C#: How to Use SDK to Convert Document and Image Using XDoc.
Sample Code. Here's a snippet of sample code for converting Tiff to PDF file using XDoc.Converter for .NET in C# .NET program. Six
pdf to grayscale tiff; pdf to tiff converter online
3
FROM THE COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS TO TEACHING AND LEARNING IN THE CLASSROOM  •  A SERIES OF RESOURCES FOR TEACHERS
introduCtion
This resource is one in a series produced by the Center for Standards and Assessment Implementation (CSAI). The 
from the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). This resource guides teachers in the process of instructional 
planning for close reading with students.1 
The ELA & Literacy CCSS call for students to:
undertake the close, attentive reading that is at the heart of understanding and enjoying complex 
works of literatur
informational texts that builds knowledge, enlarges experience, and broadens worldviews…[and] 
reflexively demonstrate the cogent reasoning and use of evidence. (2010, p. 3)
Specifically, through close reading students can accomplish some major interpretive goals of the ELA & 
Literacy CCSS:
• Key Ideas and Details: Understand a text’s key ideas and details expressed and/or implied by 
the author
• Craft and Structure: Understand how the craft and structure of a text reinforces and supports 
the author’s message/purpose
• Integration of Knowledge and Ideas: Recognize how this text connects to others and be able to 
evaluate its quality or value
The emphasis on close rea will need to 
plan lessons that include increading of 
content-area texts.
orgAniZAtion
This resource is organized as a series of steps that teachers can follow as they prepare for close reading. These     
steps include: 
(1)   Gaining an understanding of close reading;
(2)   Selecting appropriate texts to use with students; 
eased 
understanding of the text and (b) extract and record relevant information from the text;
(4) 
(5) Using evidence gathered from the close reading process to inform instructional next steps   
(formative assessment).
1 Although this resource focuses primarily on analytical reading, there are other reading goals that teachers will have for their students, namely, to increase students’ 
capacity for sustained reading level.
C# Tiff Convert: How to Convert PDF to Tiff Using C#
|. Home ›› XDoc.Converter ›› C# Converter: PDF to Tiff. using RasterEdge.XDoc.Converter; How to Convert PDF to Tiff Using C#.
how to convert pdf to tiff image; convert pdf to tiff open source
XDoc.Converter for .NET, Support Documents and Images Conversion
converter SDK supports various commonly used document and image file formats, including Microsoft Office (2003 and 2007) Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF, Tiff,
online pdf to tiff conversion; pdf to tiff online
SUPPORTING STUDENTS IN CLOSE READING  •  CSAI
4
The goal of close r, 
through close reading, students will be able to read increasingly complex text independently, relying only on what 
the author provides in the text to support their comprehension and evaluation of the text.
The CCSS Anchor Standard 1 in Reading states that students:
ences from it; cite 
om the text. (2010, 
p. 10)
Furthermore, according to the National Education Association (NEA, 2013), “80-90 percent of the [CCSS] reading 
Standards in each grade require text-dependent analysis” (p. 18). Therefore, students’ successful and meaningful 
engagement with text necessitates teachers’ careful planning of close reading.  
Teachers and students have specific roles in close reading, which are described below.
teACher roles
student roles
(1) Select challenging and appropriate text
(2)  Analyze the text’s content and language 
ahead of time
(3) Anticipate potential challenges the text 
may present for certain students (e.g., 
English Learners, students reading far 
above or below grade level)
(4) Write text-dependent questions that 
engage students in interpretive tasks 
(5) Lead rich and rigorous conversations 
(through the use of text-dependent 
questions) that keep students engaged 
with the text’s deeper meaning
(6) Ensure reading activities stay closely 
connected to the text
(1) Read the text more than once
(2) Persevere in reading and comprehending 
challenging text
(3) Analyze the text for purpose and/or levels 
of meaning
(4) Use evidence from the text to ask and 
answer text-dependent questions
(5) Increase comprehension of a text through 
multiple re-readings
(6) Participate in rich and rigorous 
conversations about a common text
Close reAding oF teXt
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Best and free C# tiff to adobe PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. .NET component for batch converting tiff images to PDF documents in C# class.
pdf to tiff c#; pdf to tiff open source
VB.NET Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF
C#.NET: View Tiff in WPF. XDoc.Converter for C#; XDoc.PDF for C#▶: C#: ASP.NET PDF Viewer; Best tiff to adobe PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET.
pdf to tiff converter; best pdf to tiff converter
5
FROM THE COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS TO TEACHING AND LEARNING IN THE CLASSROOM  •  A SERIES OF RESOURCES FOR TEACHERS
Lessons based on close reading of text have several distinct characteristics.2  
• Close reading often entails a multi-day commitment to re-reading a text. Each re-reading has a 
different purpose.
• Close reading focuses on short, high-quality text that is appropriate for reading several times (e.g., a 
text with complex ideas and structure). Text can be excerpted from a longer piece of work.
• Instruction for close reading involves scaffolding students’ meaning-making with the text. Students 
need to make sense of the text, engaging in productive struggle when necessary. To support this, 
teachers provide only a minimal amount of background knowledge or explanation to students prior 
to reading the text. For example, teachers might pre-teach some vocabulary that may otherwise block 
e (e.g., that it is a memoir or 
science article).
• A major role for teachers is to ask text-dependent questions. Text-dependent questions can only be 
answered by referring explicitly to the text. Answering these questions does not rely on any particular 
backgretive processes, 
reading and thinking called for by the CCSS. (See section on Text-Dependent Questions on page 17 
for more information.)
• Lessons created for close reading of text usually include a culminating task related to the core 
combination of ELA domains, such as reading, writing, and listening and speaking (e.g., giving an oral 
presentation to the class or writing an exposition about the text). 
Timothy Shanahan, an expert in literacy, teaching, and curriculum, recommends at least three readings of a text, in 
which the main purpose for each reading is aligned with the three main categories of the ELA Anchor Standards 
for Reading: Key Ideas and Details, Craft and Structure, and Integration of Knowledge and Ideas. The guide, More 
on Planning for Close Reading & Text-Dependent Questions, in the “Tools and Exemplars” section of this resource 
provides a synopsis of Shanahan’s approach.
In close reading, teachers minimally introduce the text with the goal that students read and make sense of what the 
text says for themselves. However, Catherine Snow, a leading researcher in the field of literacy, cautions against what 
she calls cold close reading in which students read a text without any introductory activity that warms them to a topic 
selected text is too hard, too long, too full of unknown words or an unknown topic, and the reader “quickly exhausts 
his or her initial willingness to struggle with it…the reality of reading a text too hard is that it often results, not in 
productive struggle, but in destructive frustration” (p. 19). Teachers will need to provide some motivator for students 
and an appreading of 
challenging text. 
2 For more information, visit Timothy Shanahan’s blog at www.shanahanonliteracy.com.
RasterEdge XDoc.Tiff for .NET - SDK for Tiff Document Imaging
Able to view and edit Tiff rapidly. Convert. Convert Tiff to PDF. Convert Tiff to Jpeg Images. Convert PDF to Tiff. Convert Jpeg Images to Tiff. Tiff File Process
pdf to tiff file conversion; convert pdf to 300 dpi tiff
VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
PDF converter component plug-in embeds several image compression mechanisms, it can be used for multiple PDF to image converting applications, like PDF to tiff
program to automatically convert pdf to tiff; print pdf to tiff
SUPPORTING STUDENTS IN CLOSE READING  •  CSAI
6
seleCting teXt
There are many factors to consider when selecting text for close reading, including reading purpose and text type.3 It 
is important to make sure that there is sufeading. 
Students should r
manner required for close reading. Texts not selected for close reading can be used for other reading purposes, 
such as to help students increase reading fluency. Text used specifically for close reading should enable students to 
gain new insight into the text each time they read it, for example, because its structure and/or ideas are complex.  
According to Fisher and Frey (2012), texts that are instructionally worthwhile are those that: 
allow readers to r
the biological, social, or physical world; or solve problems that are timely and important. Texts worthy of 
instruction also allow students to develop their literary prowess and become informed citizens. (p. 2)
seleCting teXt tool
An important step in selecting texts for close reading is to determine the level of challenge the text presents for 
students. The Selecting Text tool assists teachers in this process.
4
Factors to consider when determining the level of 
challenge for students include: age appropriateness of the text and likely interest of students, complexity of ideas, 
text and sentence structure, vocabulary difficulty, and length of the text.
5
A printable Selecting Text template for 
teacher use is included in the section, “Tools and Exemplars.” To illustrate what this tool might look like in use, an 
example from a narrative text “Eleven” (Cisneros, 1991) is provided below. An example of a completed Selecting Text 
tool for an informational text, Where Do Polar Bears Live? (Thomson, 2010), is also included in the section “Tools and 
Exemplars.”
3 The ELA & Literacy CCSS uses the term text type to categorize text into stories, poetry, and informational text.
4 This tool is adapted with permission from the Ministry of Education, New Zealand website, www.nzcurriculum.tki.org.nz/Curriculum-resources/NZC-Updates/Issue-
19-April-2012/Framework-for-estimating-text-difficulty.
5 The writers of the ELA & Literacy CCSS have also developed a researched-based model of key dimensions to determine text complexity and appropriateness for 
students.  For more information on these dimensions, see the “Tools and Exemplars” section of this resource. 
7
FROM THE COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS TO TEACHING AND LEARNING IN THE CLASSROOM  •  A SERIES OF RESOURCES FOR TEACHERS
eXAMPle oF seleCting teXt tool
Title and source:  
"Eleven" (excerpt of the short story fr
Author:  
Sandra Cisneros                                                         
Grade Level and area:  
7th Grade, Reading                                      
Factors Affecting text Challenge
notes
Age appropriateness
Consider:
• word recognition demands (sight words & 
decoding)
• age of the main character(s)
• prior knowledge assumed by the text
• maturity required to deal with the themes 
• familiarity of contexts, settings, and subject matter 
• likely interests, motivation, and experiences of readers
• The story uses mostly every day words, so there should be 
few issues with word recognition demands
• The narrator (main character) just turned 11, which is close 
to the age of the 7
th
 graders who will be reading this text
• Students will have familiarity with the idea of turning older 
(as they all have had birthdays), but they may not have 
considered what being older means as described by the 
narrator in the text
• The themes and content of the story are appropriate for 
7
th
 graders; readers will likely be interested in the story, 
and some may have similar feelings and experiences 
compared to the narrator
Complexity of ideas
Consider:
• accessibility of the themes
• implied information or ideas (requiring readers to 
infer)
• irony or ambiguity
• abstract ideas
• metaphors and other figurative or connotative 
language
• technical information 
• support from illustrations, diagrams, graphs, and so on
• The story’s theme that a person is and can act all the years 
below her current age is an abstract idea; therefore:
- Readers will need to infer what the narrator means 
as she describes her feelings of growing a year older
• Text is highly descriptive: The author uses figurative 
language (i.e., similes) to convey the narrator’s thoughts 
and emotions 
• There is some ambiguity as to who the narrator is and who 
she is speaking to (e.g., “what they never tell you”)
structure and coherence of the text
Consider:
• flashbacks or time shifts
• narrative point of view 
• mixed text types
• connections across the text
• examples and explanations
• competing information
• length of paragraphs
• unattributed dialogue
• use of headings and subheadings
• The excerpted piece is a description of the narrator’s 
thoughts and feelings, so it doesn’t have a timeline of 
events (that will come later in the story) 
• 1st person narrative point of view (i.e., narrator is 
speaking), but narrator occasionally addresses the reader/
audience by using the 2
nd
 person point of view (e.g., 
“you”) 
• The author uses many examples in her descriptions as a 
way to explain the narrator’s thoughts and feelings
• Short paragraph lengths
SUPPORTING STUDENTS IN CLOSE READING  •  CSAI
8
syntactic structure of the text
Consider:
• sentence length
• the balance of simple, compound, complex, or 
incomplete sentences
• use of passive voice or nominalization
• repetition of words or phrases
• changes in verb tense
• There are a variety of sentence lengths found in the text, 
including sentence fragments
• The use/balance of sentence lengths is probably done to 
convey an informal tone (and perhaps to show the real 
time thoughts of the narrator)
• Repetition of words (e.g., "and" or "like") is stylistic 
and used to help set up the tone of the story as well as 
emphasize certain thoughts
Vocabulary difficulty
Consider:
• unfamiliar vocabulary
• technical and academic terms, non-English words, and 
proper nouns
• sentence-level and/or visual support
• contextual clues
• the use of a glossary or footnotes
• Overall, the story uses basic, everyday (social) vocabulary 
that most 7
th
 graders will know (no use of academic/
technical vocabulary, non-English words, or proper nouns)
• Some possible unique phrases (e.g., “little wooden dolls 
that fit one inside the other” or “rings inside a tree trunk”)
• As mentioned, the author employs the use of figurative 
language to describe vividly the narrator’s emotions
Length of the text
• Excerpt is the first 5 paragraphs from the short story; this 
is a good chunk of text to use for close reading because 
the narrator is describing her feelings/emotions and 
reflecting on getting older (after the first 5 paragraphs, 
the story moves to events and dialogue)
estimated reading   
year level: 
7       
notes:
The text is written rather simply—use of everyday vocabulary, relatively easy-to-understand 
sentence structure, and short paragraphs. However, the author employs figurative language 
and some ambiguity (in both the language and the ideas she is trying to convey).  Also, the 
theme found in this excerpt is quite sophisticated. This combination—simply written text with 
complex ideas—makes this excerpt a good text to use for close reading.
9
FROM THE COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS TO TEACHING AND LEARNING IN THE CLASSROOM  •  A SERIES OF RESOURCES FOR TEACHERS
According to Shanahan, the main point of close reading is to situate the text at the center of the reading 
elates to 
other texts (personal communication, January 4, 2014).
purposes/themes, content, structure; and how these may relate to other texts. By priming the text, teachers can 
eading 
experience. 
The following sections present two tools to be used concurrently for priming the text. They are intended to help 
teachers gather information, summarize key features of the text, and identify their students’ abilities and interests 
in relation to the text. These tools are:
•   Text Annotation Protocol
•   Text Cover Sheet
By using these tools, teachers are better able to clarify text meaning and formulate intended reading purposes, 
identify the differferent students), think 
about ways in which to engage students with the important ideas and relationships described or implied by the 
author, and create text-dependent questions.
teXt AnnotAtion ProtoCol
Teachers use the Text Annotation Protocol in tandem with the Text Cover Sheet to gain a deeper understanding 
of the text they have selected to use with students during close reading and to guide their planning of the specific 
close reading process students will undertake during the lesson.
6
Like their students, teachers will need to read a 
text several times in the process of annotating it. This re-reading and annotating process can follow a few different 
procedures. Below is one approach to studying and annotating a text to prepare for students’ close reading. (This 
protocol is included as a handout in the “Tools and Exemplars” section of this resource.) The process delineated 
below is flexible; teachers should adapt it to their needs.
1)    First, read to get the “big picture” of the text. Get a general sense of what the text is about, 
being sure to note aspects of the text that catch your attention.
2) Next, read thr
as the author’s purpose (some of these concepts are more relevant to either literary or 
informational texts). 
PriMing teXt
6 Information gathered in the Selecting Text tool may also be a helpful resource in priming the text. 
SUPPORTING STUDENTS IN CLOSE READING  •  CSAI
10
3) On your third r
key words, types of sentence structures, visual components, and text cohesion strategies.
7
Note the reasons why the author uses these features in relation to the text’s purpose or 
theme. Also annotate any images, or other forms of visual representation included with the 
Look for the devices and features that stand out or are used repeatedly by the author.
4) Finally, read through the text a few more times with your students in mind. Based on what 
you have alr
be challenging for specific individual students or groups of students (e.g., English learners). 
The annotations made in your final reading may end up being a synthesis of your earlier 
annotations of the text where you noted the author’s use of language and sentence structure.
AnnotAtion eXAMPle
To illustrate the Text Annotation Protocol, an example is provided below from an excerpt of the narrative text 
“Eleven” (Cisneros, 1991). The example shows annotations from a teacher’s third reading in which she makes notes 
about the types of language that the author uses, such as key words, types of sentence structures, and text cohesion.  
The teacher also comments on the reasons why the author uses these features. Note that the information gathered 
from the teacher’s first, second, and fourth readings of the text are recorded in the Text Cover Sheet (see page 12).  
Annotated examples (showing steps 3 and 4 from the Text Annotation Protocol) for an informational text, Where Do 
Polar Bears Live? (Thomson, 2010), are available in the “Tools and Exemplars” section.
7 For more information on text features and the annotation process, see the Text Study Guide for Teachers, which is found in the “Tools and Exemplars” section on 
page 27.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested