11
FROM THE COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS TO TEACHING AND LEARNING IN THE CLASSROOM  •  A SERIES OF RESOURCES FOR TEACHERS
Because the way you grow old is kind of like an onion or like the rings in-
side a tree trunk or like my little wooden dolls that fit one inside the other, 
each year inside the next one. That’s how being eleven years old is.
You don’t feel eleven. Not right away. It takes a few days, weeks even, 
sometimes even months before you say Eleven when they ask you. And 
you don’t feel smart eleven, not until you’re almost twelve. That’s the way it 
is.
The use of "like" 
here is to signal the 
rhetorical device 
of similes (note 
the different uses 
of "like" in this 
excerpt; see first 
word in Para. 2)
Use of short 
sentences and 
fragments is stylistic 
use of sentence 
structure to help 
convey tone and 
emphasis
First 3 paragraphs 
lead up to one 
theme of the story 
(although theme 
may be obscured 
by analogies)
Variation in 
sentence structure 
in the paragraph 
makes it more 
(stylistically) 
interesting to read
Excerpt from “Eleven”
by Sandra Cisneros (1991)
(from CCSS Appendix B)
What they don’t understand about birthdays and what they never tell 
you is that when you’re eleven, you’re also ten, and nine, and eight, and 
seven, and six, and five, and four, and three, and two, and one. And when 
don’t. You open your eyes and everything’s just like yesterday, only it’s 
today. And you don’t feel eleven at all. You feel like you’re still ten. And you 
are — underneath the year that makes you eleven. 
Like some days you might say something stupid, and that’s the part of you 
that’s still ten. Or maybe some days you might need to sit on your mama’s 
lap because you’re scared, and that’s the part of you that’s five. 
And maybe one day when you’re all grown up maybe you will need to cry 
like if you’re three, and that’s okay. That’s what I tell Mama when she’s sad 
and needs to cry. Maybe she’s feeling three.
Ambiguous 
pronoun use (which 
refers to people); 
use of ambiguous 
pronoun adds to 
tone of passage
Repeated use of 
“and” is stylistic (e.g., 
written to mimic oral 
language); conveys 
informal tone and 
pace – as though 
character is speaking 
quickly
Use of 2nd 
person point of 
view conveys an 
informal tone. 
Also, there is some 
ambiguity with its 
use: is the narrator 
addressing the 
reader, or is the 
narrator using 
"you" to talk about 
herself?
Use of "like" 
here signals that 
narrator is giving 
(another) example 
regarding one of 
the main themes 
of the story (note 
the different use of 
"like" in Para. 5)
Use of 1st person 
reveals narrator 
for the first time
Complex 
sentence 
structure that 
contains several 
pieces of 
information
Sentences in this 
paragraph support 
the details written 
in Para. 1 – that a 
person is and acts 
all the years below 
her current age
File conversion pdf to tiff - Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
.net convert pdf to tiff; convert pdf to tiff file online
File conversion pdf to tiff - VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
how to convert pdf to tiff format online; convert multiple page pdf to tiff
SUPPORTING STUDENTS IN CLOSE READING  •  CSAI
12
teXt CoVer sheet
The Text Cover Sheet provides a space for teachers to identify and record for instructional purposes: (1) the standards 
addressed; (2) reachers 
concurrently fill out the Text Cover Sheet while annotating the text (using the process delineated above). After 
their first reading, teachers begin to fill in some fields of the Text Cover Sheet. It will likely take multiple readings to 
complete the Text Cover Sheet in order to come to a full understanding of the ideas or text structures presented in 
eady completed the Selecting 
Text tool, this can also provide a valuable source of information for completing the Text Cover Sheet. 
An eXAMPle oF the teXt CoVer sheet
To illustrate what a completed Text Cover Sheet might look like, an example is provided below from the narrative 
text, “Eleven” (Cisneros, 1991).  Detailed descriptions of the fields included in the Text Cover Sheet follow the 
example. Available in the “T
example for an informational text.
Title of text:  
"Eleven" by Sandra Cisner                      
elA & literacy standards
CCss 7th grade 
Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the 
text. (CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.1)
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective 
summary of the text. (CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.2)
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings. 
(CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.4)
Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.              
(CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5)
•    Use the relationship between particular words (e.g., synonym/antonym, analogy) to better understand each of 
the words. (CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5b)
•    Distinguish among the connotations (associations) of words with similar denotations (definitions) (e.g., 
refined, respectful, polite, diplomatic, condescending). (CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5c)
other Content-related standards
Not Applicable
reading Purpose and text Content
goals
•    Understand the author’s point – the central idea of the text
• Analyze how the author structured the text and the effect of the text structure on conveying her point
• Analyze how the author communicates the point through imagery
• Understand the narrator’s emotions and why she has those feelings
• Participate in collaborative discussions about text
Online Convert PDF file to Word. Best free online PDF Conversion
area. Then just wait until the conversion from Tiff/Tif to PDF is complete and download the file. The perfect conversion tool. Your
pdf to tiff batch conversion; program convert pdf to tiff
Online Convert PDF file to Tiff. Best free online PDF Tif
area. Then just wait until the conversion from PDF to Tiff is complete and download the file. The perfect conversion tool. Your Tiff
pdf to multipage tiff; reader convert pdf to tiff
13
FROM THE COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS TO TEACHING AND LEARNING IN THE CLASSROOM  •  A SERIES OF RESOURCES FOR TEACHERS
Big Picture/gist of text
• The narrator is a girl who just turned 11, but she doesn’t feel 11 (or a year older). The excerpt describes the narrator’s 
feelings about turning 11 and reflects on growing up. For the most part, the tone of the text is slightly melancholy, which 
may be somewhat surprising to a reader who may have a perception that birthdays are happy occasions.
• (Note: If students read the full text, the big picture will change slightly.)
text Purpose / levels of Meaning
• Themes: 
(1)  A person is and acts all the years below her current age
(2)  Reflections on growing up
• Birthdays are usually a happy/special day for people, but the narrator doesn’t feel happy about her birthday as she 
should perhaps be; instead, she is reflective and a bit melancholy.
• The age of 11 has some meaning/significance in the story. It’s the first year of a person’s second decade of life, but it’s 
still an age in which adults/society think is young (and somewhat not meaningful in terms of overall age). The narrator 
has feelings of being misunderstood, powerless, and not smart enough to be 11.
• (Note: If students read the full text, there will be more themes, main ideas, and levels of meaning to list in this section.)
text and language Challenges and Connections
Vocabulary
Given that there are almost no academic words or technical words in this story, no vocabulary words need to be taught before 
students read the text. However, text-dependent questions should query students’ knowledge about the following words/
phrases: 
(Words/phrases that may be unfamiliar to ELs are noted with an *)
Possible unfamiliar or unique phrases:
•  “little wooden dolls that fit one inside the other”*
•  “rings inside a tree trunk”*
Stylistic use of familiar words (e.g., to convey uncertainty):
•  “maybe” (repeatedly used)
•  “one day,” “some days”
Figurative language use:
•  The simile “like”*
text Features and structure
Unconventional or stylistic use of varied sentence types conveys narrator’s personality and voice and overall personal tone of 
the story, including:
• Short sentences or fragments, sometimes grouped together, such as:
-    “And you don’t feel eleven at all. You feel like you’re still ten.”
-    “You don’t feel eleven. Not right away."
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert TIFF Image File
Online C# tutorial for high-fidelity Tiff image file conversion from MS Office Word, Excel, and PowerPoint document. Convert PDF to Tiff Using C#.
convert pdf into tiff; vb.net convert pdf to tiff
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
a quick evaluation of our XDoc.PDF file conversion functionality tif"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; // Load a TIFF file.
export pdf to tiff; convert pdf to grayscale tiff
SUPPORTING STUDENTS IN CLOSE READING  •  CSAI
14
• Some complex sentences, including those: 
-    Using “and” and “or” repeatedly for emphasis on the theme (i.e., a person is all the years below her current age), 
for example, “…when you’re eleven, you’re also ten, and nine, and eight, and seven, and six, and five, and four, and 
three, and two, and one.”
-    Using “like” to extend a point by giving an example, such as “…you will need to cry like if you’re three…”
• Related to complex sentences, words that extend sentence length, including:
-    Linking words “like,” “because”
-    “what they,” “that’s what”
• Adverbial clauses, especially words that convey time, including:
-    “when you wake up on your eleventh birthday”
-    “everything’s just like yesterday, only it’s today”
-    “underneath the year that makes you eleven”
-    “it takes a few day, weeks even, sometimes even months”
Discourse/text structure may seem informal and unconventional, but it can be typical of narrative texts, including:
• No clear paragraph structure or paragraphs that consist of only 1 sentence
• Plot structure 
specific Knowledge required
Prior knowledge that will support the use of this text includes:
• Personal experiences: growing up/change
text Connections
Texts related to content of the story:
• Birthdays (maybe a fictional narrative/memoir on happy memories of being a child around the age of 11 or a story 
about a child who is excited about her birthday)
Texts related to the theme of the story:
• Growing up
Texts related to style of writing found in the story:
• First-person narration (fictional and non-fictional [memoir]) vs. third-person narration
Online Convert Excel to PDF file. Best free online export xlsx
The perfect conversion tool. Your Excel file is converted to look just the same as it does in your office software. Creating a PDF from xlsx/xls has never been
convert pdf to tiff multiple pages; pdf to tiff converter open source c#
C# TIFF: TIFF Editor SDK to Read & Manipulate TIFF File Using C#.
1. Tiff to PDF/Jpeg conversion. 2. Word/Excel/PPT/PDF/Jpeg to Tiff conversion. Tiff File Processing in C#. Refer to this online tutorial page, you will see:
pdf to tiff open source c#; compare pdf to tiff
15
FROM THE COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS TO TEACHING AND LEARNING IN THE CLASSROOM  •  A SERIES OF RESOURCES FOR TEACHERS
detAiled desCriPtions For the teXt CoVer sheet Fields
ELA & Literacy CCSS
The ELA & Literacy CCSS that will be addressed in the lesson using this text are recorded in this field. Recording the 
standards her
the standards listed in this field. (Another resource in this series describes in detail the standard selection process.)
Other Content-Related Standards
There may also be content goals for the close reading lesson that are drawn from other standards. For example, 
teachers may want students to r
curreates will be guided 
by the science content standards. In this field, particular content standards that are addressed through the process of 
close reading would be included.  
Goals
Reading and literacy goals for the close reading lesson are listed in this field. Lesson-level reading and literacy goals 
are derived from the ELA & Literacy CCSS. They address aspects of the Standards, define the close reading learning 
focus for the lesson, and, because they address goals at the lesson level, they are of a smaller grain size than the 
standards. For example, when reading a persuasive text, the reading goals may be to analyze the argument structure 
the author uses and how she uses evidence to support the argument; when reading a literary text, the goals may 
include examining paragraph structures and the role each paragraph plays in advancing the narrative. (Another 
resource in this series provides a detailed description of developing learning goals from standards.)
In instances where a teacher has also identified other content-related standards for the lesson, she would also want 
Big Picture/Gist of Text
, the 
information written heromote their 
interest and enthusiasm about reading the text without giving away too much information.  
Text Purpose(s)/Levels of Meaning
The information included in this field will be a helpful resource in creating text-dependent questions (see page 17 
for information on text-dependent questions). The author’s purpose(s) in informational texts may be explicitly stated 
or may be implicit, hidden, or obscured in the text.  Literary texts can range from having a single meaning to having 
multiple levels of meaning. 
Vocabulary
Teachers record the wor
understanding the text. Teachers may want to categorize words/phrases in ways that inform their lesson, such as by 
words that: (1) are 
important and ards after a 
reading; (3) might be understood from context (another good questioning opportunity where teachers could ask why 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF to images, like Tiff. Convert image files to PDF. File & Page Process. Create new file, load PDF from existing files.
how to change pdf to tiff; pdf to tiff multipage
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
in C#, you can easily perform file conversion from PDF document to image or document, or from PDF document to other file formats, like multi-page TIFF file.
converting pdf to tiff format; pdf to tiff
SUPPORTING STUDENTS IN CLOSE READING  •  CSAI
16
these words were treated differently by the author); and (4) might be problematic for English learners. For literary texts 
specificallyds and figurative 
language.
Text Features and Structure
Language features related to sentence and text structure (e.g., types of sentence structures, visual components, 
e features that are critical for 
understanding the text are recorded here. Teachers can note the reasons why the author uses these sentence and text 
structure features in relation to the text’s purpose or theme. Understanding the sentence and text structure features 
may be critical to students’ comprehension of certain aspects of the text. See the Text Study Guide for Teachers for 
additional guidance.
Specific Knowledge Required
In this field, teachers can record specific knowledge that may be required of students to comprehend the text, such 
text fre may be some information they need 
prior to, or during, reading to help them make better sense of the text and/or to increase their motivation to re-read 
the text.
Text Connections 
Teachers’ ideas on how this text might connect with or relate to other texts that the students have read or will read 
later are recorded her 
schema (e.g., prior and/or background knowledge), and generate rich discussions among students.
As mentioned earlier, the Text Annotation Protocol and Text Cover Sheet should be used in tandem so that together 
they inform teachers about the content and structure of the text and the purposes for using the text with students for 
close reading. The examples of these two tools in this resource show their interwoven nature.  
VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
a VB.NET solution, which users may quickly render and convert TIFF image file to PDF document. Please click to see demo code for this kind of PDF conversion.
how to convert pdf into tiff format; online convert pdf to tiff
17
FROM THE COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS TO TEACHING AND LEARNING IN THE CLASSROOM  •  A SERIES OF RESOURCES FOR TEACHERS
teXt-dePendent Questions
Text-dependent questions are a central component of close reading. When developing text-dependent questions, 
teachers should draw on the knowledge they have gained from completing the previous tools in this resource: 
Selecting Text, Text Annotation Protocol, and Text Cover Sheet. 
s important in the text 
in the message/information, in the style and structure, and how the text connects to other texts. Text-dependent 
questions are not simply literal questions about information and facts from the text. While these questions should 
be asked to ascertain students’ basic comprehension, text-dependent questions go beyond just asking about the 
surface ideas and details by also tapping into the craft, structure, and theme/purpose of the text as well as students’ 
evaluation and judgments of the text. Text-dependent questions require students to draw inferences from and make 
connections among the details and ideas of the text. Furthermore, it is important that text-dependent questions 
are based on important, not trivial, ideas from the text. According to the NEA (2013, p. 19), typical text-dependent 
questions will ask students to engage in the following tasks:
•   Analyze paragraphs on a sentence-by-sentence basis and sentences on a word-by-word basis to 
determine the role played by individual paragraphs, sentences, phrases, or words 
• Investigate how meaning can be altered by changing key words and why an author may have chosen 
one word over another 
• Probe each argument in persuasive text, each idea in informational text, each key detail in literary text, 
and observe how these build to a whole 
• Examine how shifts in the direction of an argument or explanation are achieved and the impact of 
those shifts 
• Question why authors choose to begin and end as they do 
• Note and assess patterns of writing and what they achieve 
• Consider what the text leaves uncertain or unstated 
As therocess that 
works for their purposes and contexts. The next section describes one process that can help teachers think about and 
create text-dependent questions for any given text.   
teXt-dePendent Questions guide
There are various types of text-dependent questions that are aligned to different purposes in the close reading 
process. Here is an example of general text-dependent questions from Timothy Shanahan’s What is Close Reading? 
article.
8
These questions can help guide teachers in creating more specific text-dependent questions for students to 
use during their close reading of a particular text.
9
A printable handout of these questions is available in the “Tools 
and Exemplars” section.
8 See www.shanahanonliteracy.com/2012/06/what-is-close-reading.html.
 For more detailed information, see the handout More on Planning for Close Reading & Text Dependent Questions in the “Tools and Exemplars” section. 
SUPPORTING STUDENTS IN CLOSE READING  •  CSAI
18
1
st
reading: 
What is says. 
•  What is the text saying?
2
nd
reading: 
How it says it.
•  How did the author organize it? 
•  What literary devices were used and how effective were they? 
•  What was the quality of the evidence? 
•  If data were presented, how was that done? 
•  If any visual texts (e.g., diagrams, tables, illustrations) were presented, how 
was that done?
•  Why did the author choose this word or that word? Was the meaning of a 
key term consistent or did it change across the text?
3
rd
reading: 
What it means.
•  What does this text mean? 
•  What was the author’s point? 
•  What does it have to say to me about my life or my world? How do I 
evaluate the quality of this work—aesthetically, substantively? 
•  How does this text connect to other texts I know? 
General follow-up questions for 
any of the text-dependent 
questions are:
•  How do you know?
•  What in the text tells you that?
•  What’s the evidence?
As noted earlier, when creating text-dependent questions, teachers should refer to their previously completed tools 
from this resource. The goals of the lesson (from the Text Cover Sheet) should guide teachers in creating a coherent 
set or sequence of effective questions that facilitate students’ close reading.  
An eXAMPle
To illustrate the use of the Text-Dependent Questions Guide, an example is provided below with the narrative text, 
“Eleven” (Cisneros, 1991). Text-dependent questions for the first reading are based on key ideas and details of the 
text. For the second reading, the questions focus on the style and structure of the text. Lastly, in the third reading, the 
questions arote down 
e evidence of 
student thinking, she should ask one or more of the follow up questions listed above.
19
FROM THE COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS TO TEACHING AND LEARNING IN THE CLASSROOM  •  A SERIES OF RESOURCES FOR TEACHERS
Text-Dependent Questions – 1st Reading
What they don’t understand about birthdays and what they never tell you is 
that when you’re eleven, you’re also ten, and nine, and eight, and seven, and 
six, and five, and four, and three, and two, and one. And when you wake up 
on your eleventh birthday you expect to feel eleven, but you don’t. You open 
your eyes and everything’s just like yesterday, only it’s today. And you don’t 
feel eleven at all. You feel like you’re still ten. And you are — underneath the 
year that makes you eleven.
Like some days you might say something stupid, and that’s the part of you 
that’s still ten. Or maybe some days you might need to sit on your mama’s lap 
because you’re scared, and that’s the part of you that’s five.
And maybe one day when you’re all grown up maybe you will need to cry like 
if you’re three, and that’s okay. That’s what I tell Mama when she’s sad and 
needs to cry. Maybe she’s feeling three.
Because the way you grow old is kind of like an onion or like the rings inside a 
tree trunk or like my little wooden dolls that fit one inside the other, each year 
inside the next one. That’s how being eleven years old is.
You don’t feel eleven. Not right away. It takes a few days, weeks even, 
sometimes even months before you say Eleven when they ask you. And you 
don’t feel smart eleven, not until you’re almost twelve. That’s the way it is. 
Who are they?
Who does "you" refer to?
Why doesn’t the narrator 
feel like she’s 11?
What makes the narrator 
feel like she’s still 10?
What makes the narrator 
feel like she’s 5?
When does the narrator 
think that you act like you’re 
3?
What does the narrator 
think being 11 is like?
When does the narrator feel 
like she’s really 11?
How does the narrator feel 
about turning 11?
Text-Dependent Questions – 2nd Reading
What they don’t understand about birthdays and what they never tell you is 
that when you’re eleven, you’re also ten, and nine, and eight, and seven, and 
six, and five, and four, and three, and two, and one. And when you wake up 
on your eleventh birthday you expect to feel eleven, but you don’t. You open 
your eyes and everything’s just like yesterday, only it’s today. And you don’t 
feel eleven at all. You feel like you’re still ten. And you areunderneath the 
year that makes you eleven.
Like some days you might say something stupid, and that’s the part of you 
that’s still ten. Or maybe some days you might need to sit on your mama’s lap 
because you’re scared, and that’s the part of you that’s five.
And maybe one day when you’re all grown up maybe you will need to cry like 
if you’re three, and that’s okay. That’s what I tell Mama when she’s sad and 
needs to cry. Maybe she’s feeling three.
Because the way you grow old is kind of like an onion or like the rings inside a 
tree trunk or like my little wooden dolls that fit one inside the other, each year 
inside the next one. That’s how being eleven years old is.
You don’t feel eleven. Not right away. It takes a few days, weeks even, 
sometimes even months before you say Eleven when they ask you. And you 
don’t feel smart eleven, not until you’re almost twelve. That’s the way it is.
Why does the author use 
“they” without telling you 
exactly who “they” are?
Why does the author use 
"you" throughout the text?
Why does the author use 
the word “and” to begin 
these sentences?
Why is “and” used so many 
times?
What’s the purpose of using 
this “like” at the beginning 
of the sentence?
How is the word “like” 
being used in Para. 4?
What’s the author’s purpose 
in using “tree trunk” and 
“wooden dolls”?
Why does the author 
sometimes write short 
sentences here (and 
elsewhere in the passage), 
then sometimes write really 
long sentences?
SUPPORTING STUDENTS IN CLOSE READING  •  CSAI
20
Text-Dependent Questions – 3rd Reading
What they don’t understand about birthdays and what they never tell you is 
that when you’re eleven, you’re also ten, and nine, and eight, and seven, and 
six, and five, and four, and three, and two, and one. And when you wake up 
on your eleventh birthday you expect to feel eleven, but you don’t. You open 
your eyes and everything’s just like yesterday, only it’s today. And you don’t 
feel eleven at all. You feel like you’re still ten. And you are — underneath the 
year that makes you eleven.
Like some days you might say something stupid, and that’s the part of you 
that’s still ten. Or maybe some days you might need to sit on your mama’s lap 
because you’re scared, and that’s the part of you that’s five.
And maybe one day when you’re all grown up maybe you will need to cry like 
if you’re three, and that’s okay. That’s what I tell Mama when she’s sad and 
needs to cry. Maybe she’s feeling three.
Because the way you grow old is kind of like an onion or like the rings inside a 
tree trunk or like my little wooden dolls that fit one inside the other, each year 
inside the next one. That’s how being eleven years old is.
You don’t feel eleven. Not right away. It takes a few days, weeks even, 
sometimes even months before you say Eleven when they ask you. And you 
don’t feel smart eleven, not until you’re almost twelve. That’s the way it is.
What are the themes of this 
text?
What does this last 
sentence mean?  How do 
you know that?
How does this paragraph 
support the themes?
How does the use of similes 
support the themes?
What does being “smart” 
or “stupid” have to do with 
growing up?
Do you agree with this 
point that the author 
makes?
teXt-dePendent Questions CoVer sheet
ganized together, they can write their 
questions on the Text-Dependent Questions Cover Sheet. A printable template of the cover sheet is provided in the 
“TText-Dependent Questions Cover 
Sheet is also provided in that section.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested