21
FROM THE COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS TO TEACHING AND LEARNING IN THE CLASSROOM  •  A SERIES OF RESOURCES FOR TEACHERS
ForMAtiVe AssessMent
Formative assessment is the pr
10
Below is a synopsis of the 
formative assessment process:
e they understand what 
goals and criteria entail;
, do, make 
or write);
(4)   Interpr
about where students are in relation to the lesson Learning Goals;
(5)   Deciding on appred goal;
(6)   Involving students in the process through peer and self-assessment.
In close reading, student responses to text-dependent questions are the primary source of evidence teachers use to 
gauge how students are engaging with the text and the degree to which they are accomplishing the reading goals.  
For example, to gain information about where students are in relation to one of the goals for close reading of the text 
“Eleven”understand the narrator’s emotions and why she has those feelingsteachers will pay attention to student 
responses to the questions: Why doesn’t the narrator feel like she’s 11? What makes the narrator feel like she’s still 10?  
What makes the narrator feel like she’s 5? How does the narrator feel about turning 11? Interpreting responses will 
provide teachers with an indication of students’ current learning status with respect to the goal. With this information, 
teachers can decide on what deliberate act of teaching
11
to employ so as to move students closer to the goal. For 
example, modeling through a think-aloud, providing feedback, and prompting are some of the deliberate acts of 
teaching that teachers can use in response to evidence of student learning. 
When students are aware of the learning goals, they can also assess how well they are meeting the goal or provide 
feedback to their peers about their r
taught how to engage in both self-assessment and peer feedback. 
10 The formative assessment process and its inclusion in lesson planning are introduced and explained in detail in earlier resources from of this series.
11  The deliberate acts of teaching are addressed in more detail in an earlier resource of this series. 
Pdf to tiff converter - Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
change pdf to tiff; convert pdf images to tiff
Pdf to tiff converter - VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
pdf to tiff quality; pdf to tiff converter open source
SUPPORTING STUDENTS IN CLOSE READING  •  CSAI
22
tools And eXeMPlArs
esource. It is organized into three 
parts: guides, templates, and completed examples. 
guides
CCSS THREE-PART MODEL FOR MEASURING TEXT COMPLEXITY 
This handout provides more detailed information about the three aspects of the CCSS model for measuring text 
complexity.
TEXT ANNOTATION PROTOCOL
This handout preparation for 
close reading.
TEXT STUDY GUIDE FOR TEACHERS
This handout provides more information about the levels of text structures (from word to discourse level).  Included in 
MORE ON PLANNING FOR CLOSE READING & TEXT-DEPENDENT QUESTIONS 
This handout provides more detailed information on planning for close reading and text-dependent questions. 
TEXT-DEPENDENT QUESTIONS GUIDE
This handout preating their own 
text-depended questions about the text they select for close reading.
teMPlAtes
SELECTING TEXT TOOL
The purpose of this tool is to determine if a particular text is appropriate to use with a particular set of students for 
the close reading process.
TEXT COVER SHEET 
This cover sheet provides a template to record information about the selected text during a teacher’s study of it. The 
information recorded here prText 
Cover Sheet should be used in conjunction with the Text Annotation Protocol.
TEXT-DEPENDENT QUESTIONS COVER SHEET
This cover sheet provides a template for recording text-dependent questions based on the text cover sheet (including 
goals and Standards) and the text annotations.
Online Convert PDF file to Tiff. Best free online PDF Tif
Online PDF to Tiff Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to Tiff. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button
convert pdf file to tiff file; convert pdf file to tiff online
C#: How to Use SDK to Convert Document and Image Using XDoc.
Sample Code. Here's a snippet of sample code for converting Tiff to PDF file using XDoc.Converter for .NET in C# .NET program. Six
pdf to tiff converter without watermark; file converter pdf to tiff
23
FROM THE COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS TO TEACHING AND LEARNING IN THE CLASSROOM  •  A SERIES OF RESOURCES FOR TEACHERS
CoMPleted eXAMPles
INFORMATIONAL TEXT EXAMPLES
The tools described in this resource were applied to Where Do Polar Bears Live? by Sarah Thomson (2010), an 
informational text appropriate for students in grades 2-3.  They are placed together to show teachers the complete 
set of templates to use when planning for close reading.
Following the Text Annotation Protocol for Where Do Polar Bears Live?, this teacher recorded her annotations for 
steps 3 and 4 on two separate pages.  Also, this teacher chose to record the text-dependent questions she wrote on 
the Text-Dependent Questions Cover Sheet (instead of writing them in the margins of the text). Note that Where Do 
Polar Bears Live? is a picturctic 
C# Tiff Convert: How to Convert PDF to Tiff Using C#
|. Home ›› XDoc.Converter ›› C# Converter: PDF to Tiff. using RasterEdge.XDoc.Converter; How to Convert PDF to Tiff Using C#.
convert pdf to tiff; pdf to tiff conversion online
XDoc.Converter for .NET, Support Documents and Images Conversion
converter SDK supports various commonly used document and image file formats, including Microsoft Office (2003 and 2007) Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF, Tiff,
change pdf to tiff for; convert pdf to tiff online
SUPPORTING STUDENTS IN CLOSE READING  •  CSAI
24
CCss three-Part Model for Measuring text Complexity
12
Organized by CRESST, UCLA, 2014
i.   Qualitative dimension: (best determined through human judgment)
13
•  Levels of meaning (literary texts) or purpose (informational texts): 
 Single to multiple levels of meaning
 Explicit to implicit purpose, which may be hidden or obscure
•  Structure
 Simple to complex
 Explicit to implicit
 Conventional to unconventional (chiefly literary texts)
 Events related in or out of chronological order (chiefly literary texts)
 Traits of a common genre or subgenre to traits specific to a particular discipline (chiefly informational texts) 
 Simple to sophisticated graphics 
 Graphics unnecessary or merely supplementary to understanding the text to graphics essential to 
understanding the text and may provide information not otherwise conveyed in the text
•  Language conventionality and clarity
 Literal to figurative or ironic
 Clear to ambiguous or purposefully misleading
 Contemporary, familiar to archaic or otherwise unfamiliar
 Conversational to general academic and domain-specific
•  Knowledge demands: cultural/literary knowledge (chiefly literary texts)
 Everyday knowledge and familiarity with genre conventions required to cultural and literary knowledge useful
 Low intertextuality (few if any references/allusions to other texts) to high intertextuality (many references/
allusions to other texts)
•  Knowledge demands: content/disciplinary knowledge (chiefly informational texts)
 Everyday knowledge and familiarity with genre conventions required to extensive, perhaps specialized disci-
pline-specific content knowledge required
 Low intertextuality (few if any references to/citations of other texts) to high intertextuality (many references 
to/citations of other texts)
ii.  Quantitative: (typically measured by computer software)
14
•  Word length or frequency
•  Sentence length
•  Text cohesion (the linking of ideas within a text)
12 For more detailed explanations of this model, please refer to Appendix A of the ELA & Literacy CCSS document.
13  The following information on the qualitative dimension comes directly from Figure 2: Qualitative Dimensions of Text Complexity in Appendix A of the ELA & 
Literacy CCSS (p. 6). The CCSS adapted this information from several sources.
14  Softwary MetaMetrics, Inc. (www.
lexile.com).
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Best and free C# tiff to adobe PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. .NET component for batch converting tiff images to PDF documents in C# class.
how to convert pdf to tiff file; to tiff
VB.NET Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF
C#.NET: View Tiff in WPF. XDoc.Converter for C#; XDoc.PDF for C#▶: C#: ASP.NET PDF Viewer; Best tiff to adobe PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET.
pdf to tiff converters; c# convert pdf to tiff
25
FROM THE COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS TO TEACHING AND LEARNING IN THE CLASSROOM  •  A SERIES OF RESOURCES FOR TEACHERS
III. Reader and Task Considerations: (best assessed by teachers using their professional judgment, experience, and 
knowledge of their students and the subject)
•  Reader motivation: self-efficacy as a reader, reading purpose, and level of interest in the content
•  Reader knowledge: knowledge of vocabulary, topic, language, discourse, and comprehension strategies
•  Reader experiences: translatable experiences for meaning making
•  Task purpose: type of reading to be done related to intended outcome; e.g., skimming, reading to learn (e.g., 
studying), reading for enjoyment, following directions, etc.)
•  Task complexity: level of cognitive demand
•  Task-related question complexity: level of critical and creative thinking 
RasterEdge XDoc.Tiff for .NET - SDK for Tiff Document Imaging
Able to view and edit Tiff rapidly. Convert. Convert Tiff to PDF. Convert Tiff to Jpeg Images. Convert PDF to Tiff. Convert Jpeg Images to Tiff. Tiff File Process
how to convert pdf file to tiff for; how to save pdf to tiff
VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
PDF converter component plug-in embeds several image compression mechanisms, it can be used for multiple PDF to image converting applications, like PDF to tiff
convert multipage pdf to multipage tiff; how to convert pdf to tiff in
SUPPORTING STUDENTS IN CLOSE READING  •  CSAI
26
text Annotation Protocol
Created by CRESST, UCLA, 2014
1)    First, read to get the “big picture” of the text. Get a general sense of what the text is about, being sure to 
note aspects of the text that catch your attention.
2) Next, read through the text to note its major themes or ideas, levels of meaning, as well as the author’s 
purpose (some of these concepts are more relevant to either literary or informational texts). 
3) On your third reading, annotate the text for types of language that the author uses, such as key words, 
types of sentence structures, visual components, and text cohesion strategies. Note the reasons why 
the author uses these features in relation to the text’s purpose or theme. Also annotate any images, or 
other forms of visual representation included with the text (e.g., data charts and diagrams accompanying 
science or social studies texts), noting the information they contain and the ways they may augment 
student understanding of the text.  Look for the devices and features that stand out or are used repeatedly 
by the author.
4) Finally, read through the text a few more times with your students in mind. Based on what you have 
already noted and annotated, determine which aspects of the text you want your students to pay attention 
to. Also, make annotations about which aspects of the text may be challenging for specific individual 
students or groups of students (e.g., English learners). The annotations made in your final reading may end 
up being a synthesis of your earlier annotations of the text where you noted the author’s use of language 
and sentence structure.
27
FROM THE COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS TO TEACHING AND LEARNING IN THE CLASSROOM  •  A SERIES OF RESOURCES FOR TEACHERS
text study guide for teachers
Created by CRESST, UCLA, 2014
When annotating text or filling out the cover sheet, teachers pay attention to language demands of the text and text 
features. Paying attention to the text's language demands is important for all students and it is essential for English 
learners.
Below is a list of questions that teachers can ask themselves as they annotate text in preparation for close reading 
with students. The list is not exhaustive, but it should provide teachers with ideas about which features make the 
text complex and challenging to the reader.  Once teachers have identified areas of the text that are challenging to 
the intended group(s) of students, they will need to think of strategies that support students in understanding these 
features in relation to students’ reading, comprehending, and learning from text. 
teXt FeAtures
Vocabulary & Expanded Word Groups
£   What words may be unfamiliar to students?
£   Academic (general, content-specific, specialized/technical)
£   Figurative
£   Antiquated
£   Multiple meaning
£   Derived words (e.g., nominalizations)
£   Other
£   What phrases may be unfamiliar to students?
£   Noun phrases
£   Adverbial phrases
£   Prepositional phrases
£   Other
£   Are literary devices (mainly for literary texts) used?
sentence structure
£   Which sentences might pose comprehension problems to students?  Why?
£   Are the sentences long because of complex syntax?
      (Complex syntax can include embedded clauses, gerunds, and other clause or phrase structures; see above     
      section on phrases.)
£ Are there nominalizations in the sentences? 
      (Nominalizations—converting a verb into a noun, e.g., “instruct” to “instruction”—allow for more information 
      to be packed into seemingly simple sentences.)
£   What are the connections made in and between sentences? 
      (e.g., causal connectors like “because” or “however”; conjunctions such as “and” or “yet”)
£  What cohesive devices are used to connect ideas?  
(e.g., references like "it" or "they"; temporal connectors like "when" or "first")  
£ Are the cohesive devices complex and/or unclear?
£ Are cohesive devices used to connect ideas within a sentence, between sentences, and/or across
 paragraphs?  
SUPPORTING STUDENTS IN CLOSE READING  •  CSAI
28
Paragraph structure & Purpose
£   Do paragraphs have a “standard” organization?
£ If so, does each paragraph contain a topic sentence (usually for informational text)?
£   If not, how are the paragraph(s) written and how are the sentences organized within the 
 paragraph(s)?
£   What are the functions of the paragraph (e.g., to introduce, to support, to conclude)?
text structure, organization, & Purpose
£   How is the text organized?  
 (e.g., chronologically, cause and effect, compare and contrast, etc.)
£ What is the genre of the text? 
      (Text organizational structures are related to certain genres of text. See examples below.)
£   For informational text, is there an introduction, thesis statement, and/or conclusion?
£   For literary text, what is the plot structure (e.g., rising action, climax, falling action)?
£   For literary text, is the plot chronological?  Or does it jump around?
£ Do visual texts (e.g., graphs, tables, diagrams, illustrations, etc.) accompany the written text?
£   To what degree do the visual texts aid comprehension of the written text?
£   To what degree do the visual texts correspond with the written text?
Functions, design, & Context
£ What are the functions of the text?  
 (e.g., to explain, to describe, to tell a story (narrative), to argue or persuade, etc.)
£ What is the author’s purpose for writing the text?  
 (e.g., Is there a theme, an argument, or point of view exposed by the author?)
£ What is the author’s tone in the text?  
 (e.g., authoritative, exploratory, humorous, etc.)
£ Is the text presented in a “considerate” (i.e., reader friendly) or “inconsiderate” manner?  
 (“Considerate text” is well-written, well-organized, visually presented in a clear manner (e.g., use of white 
space), all of which aid readers in comprehension. “Inconsiderate text” is poorly written and organized 
and presented visually in a manner that is difficult to read, all of which require more work from readers to 
comprehend the text.)
£ How complex are the ideas and the content found in the text?
Knowledge 
£ What is students’ prior knowledge of the content?  Prior knowledge includes students’:
£   Life experience (which may be helpful to connect to in literary texts)
£   Cultural/literary knowledge (mostly relevant for literary texts)
£   Content-area/disciplinary knowledge (mostly relevant for informational texts)
29
FROM THE COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS TO TEACHING AND LEARNING IN THE CLASSROOM  •  A SERIES OF RESOURCES FOR TEACHERS
More on Planning for Close reading & text-dependent Questions
Organized by CRESST, UCLA, 2014
Timothy Shanahan recommends at least three readings of a text, in which the main purpose for each reading is 
aligned with the three main categories of the ELA Anchor Standards for Reading: Key Ideas and Details, Craft and 
Structure, and Integration of Knowledge and Ideas.  The table below provides a synopsis of Shanahan’s approach.  
reAding
PurPose
teACher ACtiVities
Pre-Reading
Exploring students' prior knowledge; 
setting teachers’ purpose with 
using the text; previewing and 
contextualizing the text
•    Make pre-reading activities brief
•    Give students some information to 
promote interest and enthusiasm 
about reading the text without 
giving away too much about it
1
st
Reading 
What the text says
(Key Ideas and Details)
Comprehending the main gist of 
the text (e.g., retelling the plot, 
answering questions on the key 
ideas and details of the text)
• Through text-dependent questions, 
guide students to consider important  
key ideas and details from the text
• Work to clarify any confusions 
students may have about the text's 
content/message
• Use text-dependent questions to 
frame student discussions around 
the text in order for students to gain 
a firm understanding of the content/
message
2
nd
Reading 
How the text is worked
(Craft and Structure)
Understanding how the author wrote 
the text to convey specific ideas 
and emotions (e.g., organization of 
text, literary devices, quality of the 
evidence, data/visual presentation, 
word choice)
• Through text-dependent questions, 
guide students to think about how 
the text works to communicate ideas 
and the author’s purpose  
• Student discussions resulting from 
these questions should lead to 
students’ understanding of how the 
text works, which will inform the 
deeper implications of text (e.g., 
purpose and theme; see below)
3
rd
Reading 
What the text means
(Integration of Knowledge and 
Ideas)
Going further/deeper with the text 
from the information gleaned from 
earlier readings (e.g., meaning/
purpose/theme, author’s point, 
readers’ evaluations, comparisons 
with other texts, judgments about 
the text)
• Through text-dependent questions, 
guide students to think about what 
this text means to them and how it 
connects to other texts or events
• Students need to evaluate the 
quality of the text and to connect 
their experiences to the text 
See www.shanahanonliteracy.com/2012/07/planning-for-close-reading.html. Also see “Additional Resources” for information and a link to Shanahan’s blog.
SUPPORTING STUDENTS IN CLOSE READING  •  CSAI
30
text-dependent Questions guide
Organized by CRESST, UCLA, 2014
1
st
reading: 
What is says. 
•  What is the text saying?
2
nd
reading: 
How it says it.
•  How did the author organize it? 
•  What literary devices were used and how effective were they? 
•  What was the quality of the evidence? 
•  If data were presented, how was that done? 
•  If any visual texts (e.g., diagrams, tables, illustrations) were presented, how 
was that done?
•  Why did the author choose this word or that word? Was the meaning of a 
key term consistent or did it change across the text?
3
rd
reading: 
What it means.
•  What does this text mean? 
•  What was the author’s point? 
•  What does it have to say to me about my life or my world? How do I 
evaluate the quality of this work—aesthetically, substantively? 
•  How does this text connect to other texts I know? 
General follow-up questions for 
any of the text-dependent 
questions are:
•  How do you know?
•  What in the text tells you that?
•  What’s the evidence?
See www.shanahanonliteracy.com/2012/07/planning-for-close-reading.html. Also see “Additional Resources” for information and a link to Shanahan’s blog.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested