in the fields beyond the wall, and not a soul
bewailing him, for the great wrong he committed.
While we were hard-pressed in the war at Troy
he stayed safe inland in the grazing country,
making light talk to win Agamémnon’s queen.
280
But the Lady Klytaimnéstra, in the first days,
rebuffed him, being faithful still;
then, too, she had at hand as her companion
a minstrel Agamémnon left attending her,
charged with her care, when he took ship for Troy.
Then came the fated hour when she gave in.
15
Her lover tricked the poet and marooned him
on a bare island for the seabirds’ picking,
and took her home, as he and she desired.
Many thighbones he burned on the gods’ altars
290
and many a woven and golden ornament
hung to bedeck them, in his satisfaction;
he had not thought life held such glory for him.
Now Meneláos and I sailed home together
on friendly terms, from Troy,
but when we came off Sunion Point16 in Attika,
the ships still running free, Onêtor’s son
Phrontis, the steersman of Meneláos’ ship,
fell over with a death grip on the tiller:
some unseen arrow from Apollo hit him.
300
No man handled a ship better than he did
in a high wind and sea, so Meneláos
put down his longing to get on, and landed
to give this man full honor in funeral.
His own luck turned then. Out on the winedark sea
in the murmuring hulls again, he made Cape Malea,
17
but Zeus who views the wide world sent a gloom
over the ocean, and a howling gale
came on with seas increasing, mountainous,
parting the ships and driving half toward Krete
310
where the Kydonians live by Iardanos river,
Off Gortyn’s coastline in the misty sea there
a reef, a razorback, cuts through the water,
and every westerly piles up a pounding
surf along the left side, going toward Phaistos—
big seas buffeted back by the narrow stone.
15
This passage presents both Klytaimnéstra and her paramour Aigísthos as frivolous and
irresponsible dalliers; in other versions of the story, notably in Aeschylus’ Oresteia, both these
adulterers are given an understandable, if not necessarily justifiable, motive for revenge against
Agamémnon.
16
The tip of a promontory, near Athens, in southeastern Greece. The fleet is trying to sail
westward around the southern coast.
17
Located at the extreme southern point of the Greek mainland, directly north of the west-
ern end of the island of Krete.
H
OMER
The Odyssey, Book Three
303
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 303
Convert pdf images to tiff - Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
batch pdf to tiff converter; print pdf to tiff
Convert pdf images to tiff - VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
pdf to grayscale tiff; convert pdf to tiff online
They were blown here, and fought in vain for sea room;
the ships kept going in to their destruction,
slammed on the reef. The crews were saved. But now
those five that weathered it got off to southward,
320
taken by wind and current on to Egypt;
and there Meneláos stayed. He made a fortune
in sea traffic among those distant races,
but while he did so, the foul crime was planned
and carried out in Argos by Aigísthos,
who ruled over golden Mykênai18 seven years.
Seven long years, with Agamémnon dead,
he held the people down, before the vengeance.
But in the eighth year, back from exile in Attika,
Orestês killed the snake who killed his father.
330
He gave his hateful mother and her soft man
a tomb together, and proclaimed the funeral day
a festal day for all the Argive people.
That day Lord Meneláos of the great war cry
made port with all the gold his ships could carry.
And this should give you pause, my son:
don’t stay too long away from home, leaving
your treasure there, and brazen suitors near;
they’ll squander all you have or take it from you,
and then how will your journey serve?
340
I urge you, though, to call on Meneláos,
he being but lately home from distant parts
in the wide world. A man could well despair
of getting home at all, if the winds blew him
over the Great South Sea—that weary waste,
even the wintering birds delay
one winter more before the northward crossing.
Well, take your ship and crew and go by water,
or if you’d rather go by land, here are
horses, a car, and my own sons for company
350
as far as the ancient land of Lakedaimon
19
and Meneláos, the red-haired captain there.
Ask him with courtesy, and in his wisdom
he will tell you history and no lies.”
While Nestor talked, the sun went down the sky
and gloom came on the land,
and now the grey-eyed goddess Athena said:
“Sir, this is all most welcome and to the point,
but why not slice the bulls’ tongues now, and mix
libations for Poseidon and the gods?
360
18
The capital city of the plain of Argos, ruled over by Agamémnon. Also spelled Mycenae.
19
Sparta; in the far south of Greece. Also spelled Lacedaemon.
304
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 304
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
NET component for batch converting tiff images to PDF documents in C# class. Description: Convert to PDF and save it on the disk. Parameters:
pdf to multipage tiff; compare pdf to tiff
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Following demo code will show how to convert all PDF pages to Jpeg images with C# .NET. // Load a PDF file. String inputFilePath
online convert pdf to tiff; save pdf to tiff
Then we can all retire; high time we did;
the light is going under the dark world’s rim,
better not linger at the sacred feast.”
When Zeus’s daughter spoke, they turned to listen
and soon the squires brought water for their hands,
while stewards filled the winebowls and poured out
a fresh cup full for every man. The company
stood up to fling the tongues and a shower of wine
over the flames, then drank their thirst away.
Now finally Telémakhos and Athena
370
bestirred themselves, turning away to the ship,
but Nestor put a hand on each, and said:
“Now Zeus forbid, and the other gods as well,
that you should spend the night on board, and leave me
as though I were some pauper without a stitch,
no blankets in his house, no piles of rugs,
no sleeping soft for host or guest! Far from it!
I have all these, blankets and deep-piled rugs,
and while I live the only son of Odysseus
will never make his bed on a ship’s deck—
380
no, not while sons of mine are left at home
to welcome any guest who comes to us.”
The grey-eyed goddess Athena answered him:
“You are very kind, sir, and Telémakhos
should do as you ask. That is the best thing.
He will go with you, and will spend the night
under your roof. But I must join our ship
and talk to the crew, to keep their spirits up,
since I’m the only senior in the company.
The rest are boys who shipped for friendship’s sake,
390
no older than Telémakhos, any of them.
Let me sleep out, then, by the black hull’s side,
this night at least. At daybreak I’ll be off
to see the Kaukonians20about a debt they owe me,
an old one and no trifle. As for your guest,
send him off in a car, with one of your sons,
and give him thoroughbreds, a racing team.”
Even as she spoke, Athena left them—seeming
a seahawk, in a clap of wings,—and all
the Akhaians of Pylos town looked up astounded.
400
Awed then by what his eyes had seen, the old man
took Telémakhos’ hand and said warmly:
20
A people who lived near Pylos.
H
OMER
The Odyssey, Book Three
305
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 305
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and Create PDF from images in both
convert pdf images to tiff; how to convert pdf to tiff online
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
PDF from Tiff. Create PDF from Images. Create PDF from OpenOffice. Create PDF from CSV. Create PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word
how to convert pdf file to tiff; how to convert pdf into tiff format
“My dear child, I can have no fears for you,
no doubt about your conduct or your heart,
if, at your age, the gods are your companions.
Here we had someone from Olympos—clearly
the glorious daughter of Zeus, his third child,
who held your father dear among the Argives.
O, Lady, hear me! Grant an illustrious name
to me and to my children and my dear wife!
410
A noble heifer shall be yours in sacrifice,
one that no man has ever yoked or driven;
my gift to you—her horns all sheathed in gold.”
So he ended, praying; and Athena heard him.
Then Nestor of Gerênia led them all,
his sons and sons-in-law, to his great house;
and in they went to the famous hall of Nestor,
taking their seats on thrones and easy chairs,
while the old man mixed water in a wine bowl
with sweet red wine, mellowed eleven years
420
before his housekeeper uncapped the jar.
He mixed and poured his offering, repeating
prayers to Athena, daughter of royal Zeus.
The others made libation, and drank deep,
then all the company went to their quarters,
and Nestor of Gerênia showed Telémakhos
under the echoing eastern entrance hall
to a fine bed near the bed of Peisístratos,
captain of spearmen, his unmarried son.
Then he lay down in his own inner chamber
430
where his dear faithful wife had smoothed his bed.
When Dawn spread out her finger tips of rose,
Lord Nestor of Gerênia, charioteer,
left his room for a throne of polished stone,
white and gleaming as though with oil, that stood
before the main gate of the palace; Neleus here
had sat before him—masterful in kingship,
Neleus, long ago a prey to death, gone down
to the night of the underworld.
So Nestor held his throne and scepter now,
440
lord of the western approaches to Akhaia.
And presently his sons came out to join him,
leaving the palace: Ekhéphron and Stratíos,
Perseus and Arêtós and Thrasymêdês,
and after them the prince Peisístratos,
bringing Telémakhos along with him.
Seeing all present, the old lord Nestor said:
“Dear sons, here is my wish, and do it briskly
to please the gods, Athena first of all,
306
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 306
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
NET DLLs for converting PDF to images in both NET control able to batch convert PDF documents to Support exporting PDF to multiple image forms, including Jpg
convert pdf file to tiff file; how to convert pdf into tiff file
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
raster images through VB.NET programming. In addition, our PDF document conversion library also enables developers to render and convert PDF document to TIFF
pdf to tiff conversion online; pdf to tiff file
my guest in daylight at our holy feast.
450
One of you must go for a young heifer
and have the cowherd lead her from the pasture.
Another call on Lord Telémakhos’ ship
to invite his crewmen, leaving two behind;
and someone else again send for the goldsmith,
Laerkês, to gild the horns.
The rest stay here together. Tell the servants
a ritual feast will be prepared in hall.
Tell them to bring seats, firewood and fresh water.”
Before he finished, they were about these errands.
460
The heifer came from pasture,
the crewmen of Telémakhos from the ship,
the smith arrived, bearing the tools of his trade—
hammer and anvil, and the precision tongs
he handled fiery gold with,—and Athena
came as a god comes, numinous, to the rites.
The smith now gloved each horn in a pure foil
beaten out of the gold that Nestor gave him—
a glory and delight for the goddess’ eyes—
while Ekhéphron and Stratíos held the horns.
470
Arêtós brought clear lustral water
in a bowl quivering with fresh-cut flowers,
a basket of barley in his other hand.
Thrasymêdês, who could stand his ground in war,
stood ready, with a sharp two-bladed axe,
for the stroke of sacrifice, and Perseus
held a bowl for the blood. And now Nestor,
strewing the barley grains, and water drops,
pronounced his invocation to Athena
and burned a pinch of bristles from the victim.
480
When prayers were said and all the grain was scattered
great-hearted Thrasymêdês in a flash
swung the axe, at one blow cutting through
the neck tendons. The heifer’s spirit failed.
Then all the women gave a wail of joy—
daughters, daughters-in-law, and the Lady Eurydíkê,
Klyménos’ eldest daughter. But the men
still held the heifer, shored her up
from the wide earth where the living go their ways,
until Peisístratos cut her throat across,
490
the black blood ran, and life ebbed from her marrow.
The carcass now sank down, and they disjointed
shoulder and thigh bone, wrapping them in fat,
two layers, folded, with raw strips of flesh.
These offerings Nestor burned on the split-wood fire
and moistened with red wine. His sons took up
five-tined forks in their hands, while the altar flame
H
OMER
The Odyssey, Book Three
307
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 307
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
Convert Jpeg Images to Tiff. |. Home ›› XDoc.Tiff ›› C# Tiff: Images to Tiff. C# TIFF - Convert Raster Images to TIFF in C#.NET.
vb.net convert pdf to tiff; reader convert pdf to tiff
VB.NET Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF
PDF from Tiff. Create PDF from Images. Create PDF from OpenOffice. Create PDF from CSV. Create PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word
convert pdf file to tiff online; multipage pdf to multipage tiff
ate through the bones, and bits of tripe went round.
Then came the carving of the quarters, and they spitted
morsels of lean meat on the long sharp tines
500
and broiled them at arm’s length upon the fire.
Polykástê, a fair girl, Nestor’s youngest,
had meanwhile given a bath to Telémakhos—
bathing him first, then rubbing him with oil.
She held fine clothes and a cloak to put around him
when he came godlike from the bathing place;
then out he went to take his place with Nestor.
When the best cuts were broiled and off the spits,
they all sat down to banquet. Gentle squires
kept every golden wine cup brimming full.
510
And so they feasted to their heart’s content,
until the prince of charioteers commanded:
“Sons, harness the blood mares for Telémakhos;
hitch up the car, and let him take the road.”
They swung out smartly to do the work, and hooked
the handsome horses to a chariot shaft.
The mistress of the stores brought up provisions
of bread and wine, with victuals fit for kings,
and Telémakhos stepped up on the painted car.
Just at his elbow stood Peisístratos,
520
captain of spearmen, reins in hand. He gave
a flick to the horses, and with streaming manes
they ran for the open country. The tall town
of Pylos sank behind them in the distance,
as all day long they kept the harness shaking.
The sun was low and shadows crossed the lanes
when they arrived at Phêrai.
21
There Dióklês,
son of Ortílokhos whom Alpheios fathered,
welcomed the young men, and they slept the night.
But up when the young Dawn’s finger tips of rose
530
opened in the east, they hitched the team
once more to the painted car,
and steered out eastward through the echoing gate,
whipping their fresh horses into a run.
That day they made the grainlands of Lakedaimon,
where, as the horses held to a fast clip,
they kept on to their journey’s end. Behind them
the sun went down and all the roads grew dark.
21A stopping place on the eastward route from Pylos to Lakedaimon.
308
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 308
BOOK FOUR: THE RED-HAIRED
KING AND HIS S LADY
By vales and sharp ravines in Lakedaimon
the travellers drove to Meneláos’ mansion,
and found him at a double wedding feast
for son and daughter.
Long ago at Troy
he pledged her to the heir of great Akhilleus,
breaker of men—a match the gods had ripened;
so he must send her with a chariot train
to the town and glory of the Myrmidons.
And that day, too, he brought Alektor’s daughter
to marry his tall scion,Megapénthês,
10
born of a slave girl during the long war—
for the gods had never after granted Helen
a child to bring into the sunlit world
after the first, rose-lipped Hermionê,
a girl like the pale-gold goddess Aphroditê.
2
Down the great hall in happiness they feasted,
neighbors of Meneláos, and his kin,
for whom a holy minstrel harped and sang;
and two lithe tumblers moved out on the song
with spins and handsprings through the company.
20
Now when Telémakhos and Nestor’s son
pulled up their horses at the main gate,
one of the king’s companions in arms, Eteóneus,
going outside, caught sight of them. He turned
and passed through court and hall to tell the master,
stepping up close to get his ear. Said he:
“Two men are here—two strangers,Meneláos,
but nobly born Akhaians, they appear.
What do you say, shall we unhitch their team,
or send them on to someone free to receive them?”
30
The red-haired captain answered him in anger:
“You were no idiot before, Eteóneus,
but here you are talking like a child of ten.
Could we have made it home again—and Zeus
give us no more hard roving!—if other men
had never fed us, given us lodging?
Bring
these men to be our guests: unhitch their team!”
1Descendant; son.
2Goddess of love and beauty.
3The near-breach of hospitality by Eteóneus, which angers Meneláos, is probably explained
by wariness; another guest, Paris, had once abducted Helen and thus set off the war.
H
OMER
The Odyssey, Book Four
309
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 309
Eteóneus left the long room like an arrow,
calling equerries
4
after him, on the run.
Outside, they freed the sweating team from harness,
40
stabled the horses, tied them up, and showered
bushels of wheat and barley in the feed box;
then leaned the chariot pole
against the gleaming entry wall of stone
and took the guests in. What a brilliant place
that mansion of the great prince seemed to them!
A-glitter everywhere, as though with fiery
points of sunlight, lusters of the moon.
The young men gazed in joy before they entered
into a room of polished tubs to bathe.
50
Maidservants gave them baths, anointed them,
held out fresh tunics, cloaked them warm; and soon
they took tall thrones beside the son of Atreus.
Here a maid tipped out water for their hands
from a golden pitcher into a silver bowl,
and set a polished table near at hand;
the larder mistress with her tray of loaves
and savories came, dispensing all her best,
and then a carver heaped their platters high
with various meats, and put down cups of gold.
60
Now said the red-haired captain, Meneláos,
gesturing:
“Welcome; and fall to; in time,
when you have supped, we hope to hear your names,
forbears and families—in your case, it seems,
no anonymities, but lordly men.
Lads like yourselves are not base born.”
At this,
he lifted in his own hands the king’s portion,
a chine of beef, and set it down before them.
Seeing all ready then, they took their dinner;
but when they had feasted well,
70
Telémakhos could not keep still, but whispered,
his head bent close, so the others might not hear:
“My dear friend, can you believe your eyes?—
the murmuring hall, how luminous it is
with bronze, gold, amber, silver, and ivory!
This is the way the court of Zeus must be,
inside, upon Olympos. What a wonder!”
4
Men who tended to the horses.
310
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 310
But splendid Meneláos had overheard him
and spoke out on the instant to them both:
“Young friends, no mortal man can vie with Zeus.
80
His home and all his treasures are for ever.
But as for men, it may well be that few
have more than I. How painfully I wandered
before I brought it home! Seven years at sea,
Kypros, Phoinikia, Egypt, and still farther
among the sun-burnt races.
I saw the men of Sidon5and Arabia
and Libya, too, where lambs are horned at birth.
In every year they have three lambing seasons,
so no man, chief or shepherd, ever goes
90
hungry for want of mutton, cheese, or milk—
all year at milking time there are fresh ewes.
But while I made my fortune on those travels
a stranger killed my brother, in cold blood,—
tricked blind, caught in the web of his deadly queen.
What pleasure can I take, then, being lord
over these costly things?
You must have heard your fathers tell my story,
whoever your fathers are; you must know of my life,
the anguish I once had, and the great house
100
full of my treasure, left in desolation.
How gladly I should live one third as rich
to have my friends back safe at home!—my friends
who died on Troy’s wide seaboard, far
from the grazing lands of Argos.
But as things are, nothing but grief is left me
for those companions. While I sit at home
sometimes hot tears come, and I revel in them,
or stop before the surfeit makes me shiver.
And there is one I miss more than the other
110
dead I mourn for; sleep and food alike
grow hateful when I think of him. No soldier
took on so much, went through so much, as Odysseus.
That seems to have been his destiny, and this mine—
to feel each day the emptiness of his absence,
ignorant, even, whether he lived or died.
How his old father and his quiet wife,
Penélopê, must miss him still!
And Telémakhos, whom he left as a new-born child.”
Now hearing these things said, the boy’s heart rose
120
in a long pang for his father, and he wept,
5
An important city in Phoinikia (Phoenicia), an area along the Syrian coast noted for com-
merce and craftsmanship.
H
OMER
The Odyssey, Book Four
311
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 311
holding his purple mantle with both hands
before his eyes. Meneláos knew him now,
and so fell silent with uncertainty
whether to let him speak and name his father
in his own time, or to inquire, and prompt him.
And while he pondered, Helen came
out of her scented chamber, a moving grace
like Artemis,
6
straight as a shaft of gold.
Beside her came Adrastê, to place her armchair,
130
Alkippê, with a rug of downy wool,
and Phylo, bringing a silver basket, once
given by Alkandrê, the wife of Pólybos,
in the treasure city, Thebes of distant Egypt.
He gave two silver bathtubs to Meneláos
and a pair of tripods, with ten pure gold bars,
and she, then, made these beautiful gifts to Helen:
a golden distaff,
7
and the silver basket
rimmed in hammered gold, with wheels to run on.
So Phylo rolled it in to stand beside her,
140
heaped with fine spun stuff, and cradled on it
the distaff swathed in dusky violet wool.
Reclining in her light chair with its footrest,
Helen gazed at her husband and demanded:
“Meneláos, my lord, have we yet heard
our new guests introduce themselves? Shall I
dissemble what I feel? No, I must say it.
Never, anywhere, have I seen so great a likeness
in man or woman—but it is truly strange!
This boy must be the son of Odysseus,
150
Telémakhos, the child he left at home
that year the Akhaian host made war on Troy—
daring all for the wanton that I was.”
And the red-haired captain, Meneláos, answered:
“My dear, I see the likeness as well as you do.
Odysseus’ hands and feet were like this boy’s;
his head, and hair, and the glinting of his eyes.
Not only that, but when I spoke, just now,
of Odysseus’ years of toil on my behalf
and all he had to endure—the boy broke down
160
and wept into his cloak.”
Now Nestor’s son,
Peisístratos, spoke up in answer to him:
“My lord marshal, Meneláos, son of Atreus,
this isthat hero’s son as you surmise,
6
Goddess of the hunt.
7
A staff used in spinning thread.
312
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 312
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested