Implementing XBRL Formulas 
Implementing XBRL Formulas 
Abstract 
To ensure the consistency of reported financial data and provide quality assurance of these data to 
stakeholders, U.S. banking regulators required the standardization of formulas using the eXtensible 
Business Reporting Language (XBRL). This paper presents the Federal Deposit Insurance 
Corporation’s (FDIC) findings on expressing and implementing XBRL formulas for use with the 
FFIEC Reports of Condition and Income (“Call Reports”).
1
Formulas are applied to data reported by 
approximately 7,900 FDIC-insured financial institutions to check quality and identify anomalies. This 
paper
2
discusses (1) the groups of regulatory reporting formulas, as well as their management and 
exchange between regulatory entities and stakeholders; (2) the need to express formula groups in 
XBRL syntax; and (3) the implementation of XBRL formulas in advance of an official specification 
from XBRL International, Inc. (XII).
3
More information about the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council is available at http://www.ffiec.gov
. A Call 
Report is used to collect financial information in the form of a balance sheet, an income statement, and supporting 
schedules. A Call Report is a primary source of financial data used for the supervision and regulation of banks and is relied 
on as an editing benchmark for many other reports. 
2
This white paper is a draft release and is provided for review and evaluation only. 
3
A formula specification is being developed by XBRL International; see: http://www.xbrl.org
How to convert pdf file to tiff format - control SDK system:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
www.rasteredge.com
How to convert pdf file to tiff format - control SDK system:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
Implementing XBRL Formulas 
Table of Contents 
Table of Contents......................................................................................................................................2 
1  Introduction.......................................................................................................................................3 
1.1  A Standard to Define and Exchange Metadata............................................................................4 
2  The Need for XBRL-Based Formulas..............................................................................................5 
3  Formulas...........................................................................................................................................7 
3.1 Consistency Formulas.....................................................................................................................7 
3.2 Characteristic Formulas..................................................................................................................7 
3.3  Functions....................................................................................................................................10 
3.4  Dependencies.............................................................................................................................11 
3.5  Processing..................................................................................................................................11 
3.5.1 
Pre-Submission Processing Model..................................................................................12 
3.5.2 
Post-Submission Processing Model................................................................................12 
3.6  Processing Reduction.................................................................................................................13 
4  Implementing XBRL Formulas......................................................................................................13 
4.1  Vision.........................................................................................................................................14 
4.2  Development..............................................................................................................................14 
4.3  Advancement.............................................................................................................................15 
4.4  Software Vendors.......................................................................................................................15 
5  Discussion.......................................................................................................................................15 
5.1 Performance..................................................................................................................................16 
5.2 Taxonomy Design.........................................................................................................................16 
5.3 Migrating to a New Formula Specification...................................................................................17 
6  Conclusions.....................................................................................................................................18 
6.1 Future Direction............................................................................................................................19 
7  Acknowledgements.........................................................................................................................19 
8  References.......................................................................................................................................20 
control SDK system:How to C#: File Format Support
Concept. File Format Supported. Load, Save Document. Preview Document. Conversion. Convert PowerPoint to PDF. Convert PowerPoint to HTML5. Convert PowerPoint to
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
forms, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET load a program with an incorrect format", please check use this sample code to convert PDF file to Png
www.rasteredge.com
Implementing XBRL Formulas 
 Introduction 
The exchange and validation of financial data are common practices in many industries, and the 
banking industry is no exception. In fact, FDIC-insured financial institutions (financial institutions or 
FIs) in the United States and federal banking regulatory agencies (agencies) have been exchanging and 
validating financial data since the 1800s. Historically, the agencies published data series metadata that 
included forms and instructions; however, formulas applied by the agencies to check for mathematical 
and logical relationships were not regularly or systematically provided to the FIs.  The agencies 
experimented with providing formula metadata in text files, PDF files, and spreadsheets.  However, the 
agencies’ ability to express precise formulas that described critical relationships within a data series 
was limited with these formats. 
Within the U.S. commercial banking sector, a Call Report is a well known data series that represents a 
structured and well defined set of quarterly financial data submitted to federal regulators by the 
majority of institutions. Timely, accurate, and high quality data are critical to regulators and are used in 
off-site monitoring systems, examination processes, and policymaking.  The publication of these data 
on the Internet promotes financial transparency and helps the FDIC achieve its mission of “preserving 
and promoting public confidence in the U.S. financial system.”  The agencies’ ability to express 
formulas that ensure mathematical and logical consistency is critical. 
The creation and use of these formulas have evolved over the years.  Even though the agencies shared 
the same common forms and instructions, no common way to communicate and exchange these 
complex formulas among the agencies, vendors and FIs existed. Eventually each agency developed its 
own proprietary set of formulas and processing systems, and over time the agencies developed an 
elaborate process flow that was opaque, inefficient, and labor intensive.  The Federal Financial 
Institutions Examination Council (FFIEC) took the first step toward achieving federal financial 
regulatory data transparency through the Call Report Modernization project.  This effort developed and 
implemented the Central Data Repository (CDR) which makes use of an international financial 
reporting standard to define metadata, publish taxonomies, exchange information, and receive and 
process data reported by federally regulated financial institutions.
4
The agencies selected XBRL as the non-proprietary, open standard to define and exchange financial 
reporting data.  The use of XBRL would allow FFIEC analysts to define regulatory reporting metadata, 
such as the concept name (the data element to be collected), data type, instructions, and calculations.  
However, the functionality to express complex validation formulas was lacking.  Alternative solutions 
to expressing these formulas (such as SQL, Java, and MathML) were considered, but the ultimate 
solution was to provide an XML layer that would define and publish a formula, provide transparency, 
encourage re-use, and remain within the bounds of the XBRL specification.  The technology needed to 
include any language that could express a mathematical equation and allow for the “transformation” 
into another other language, such as SQL, Java, or C#.  XPath was selected as a basis for the new 
XBRL extension because xPath was an XML specification and would provide a way to define “the 
pointers” to variables that participate in a given formula. 
This paper demonstrates the use of XBRL to define and express Call Report formulas with these key 
findings:  
CDR is a new federal financial regulatory reporting collection system developed by the FFIEC. For more information, see: 
http://www.ffiec.gov/find
control SDK system:How to C#: File Format Support
to Start. Basic SDK Concept. File Format Supported. Load, Save Document. Preview Document. Conversion. Convert Word to PDF. Convert Word to HTML5. Convert Word
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
to convert PDF document into SVG image format. Here is a brief introduction to SVG image. SVG, short for scalable vector graphics, is a XML-based file format
www.rasteredge.com
Implementing XBRL Formulas 
The XBRL specification can support financial regulatory reporting with the inclusion of a 
formula specification. XBRL formulas can be successfully exchanged and provide re-use with 
agencies and other stakeholders. 
Taxonomy design is of high importance and greatly affects the processing and consuming of 
XBRL formulas.  
The contributions of this paper include discussions regarding: (1) groups of regulatory reporting 
formulas, as well as their management and exchange between regulatory entities and stakeholders; 
(2) the need to express formula groups in an XBRL syntax; and (3) the implementation of XBRL 
formulas in advance of an official specification from XBRL International Inc. (XII).
5
The findings 
provide insight into managing formulas among three regulatory entities, seven software vendors, and 
7,900 reporting institutions, and the successful application of XBRL formulas without an official 
specification from XII. It is important to note that the agencies’ implementation of XBRL could not 
have been successful without the collaborative efforts and business decisions of multiple participants 
whose primary concern was the management and exchange of financial regulatory data between federal 
regulatory agencies and report vendors.  
1.1  A Standard to Define and Exchange Metadata  
Financial regulatory report metadata are classified into four components: financial variables, financial 
report presentation, financial reporting instructions, and formulas. Prior to Call modernization and the 
development of the CDR, this information was developed, maintained, and distributed in a variety of 
formats, including Adobe PDF (for financial report presentation and instructions), Microsoft Word (for 
financial reporting instructions and formulas), and Microsoft Excel (for financial reporting formulas). 
XBRL enabled the agencies to create a consistent framework to capture all four components of 
financial regulatory reporting.  
Essential to the FFIEC report framework is a common data dictionary of financial variables, called the 
Micro Data Reference Manual, or MDRM. Each financial variable defined in the MDRM is defined 
using a unique number which is used to identify a financial variable on a regulatory report. Multiple 
reports either make use of or share an MDRM identifier; for this reason, all taxonomy metadata (labels, 
presentations and formulas) reference the MDRM dictionary. The MDRM dictionary is the foundation 
to all financial regulatory reporting forms. The MDRM is the ‘universe’ with instances of the MDRM 
defined in report taxonomies. 
Within the FFIEC report framework, two types of taxonomies exist: 
1. Report taxonomies are “mapping” schemas that link MDRM numbers with report definitions, 
such as labels and presentation. In addition, a report taxonomy will contain metadata not found 
in the MDRM, such as report-specific identifiers, versioning information, and formula message 
enumerations. Report taxonomies, such as the Call or Y9 series, are “time sensitive” and apply 
to a specific period of time. 
5
A formula specification is being developed by XBRL International; see: http://www.xbrl.org
 
control SDK system:C#: How to Determine the Display Format for Web Doucment Viewing
VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET C# HTML5 Viewer: Choose File Display Mode on Web web document viewer for .NET can convert PDF, Word, Excel
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified zoom value and save it zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size. filePath, The output file path
www.rasteredge.com
Implementing XBRL Formulas 
2. Characteristic taxonomies capture a financial institution’s “reportability” which is defined by 
reporting requirements found explicitly throughout an FFIEC financial report form and 
implicitly in FFIEC report instructions.  These taxonomies do not include presentation or 
instruction definitions. A characteristic taxonomy is published with each report taxonomy, such 
as the FFIEC Call or the Federal Reserve Board (FRB) Y9 series. The formulas defined in a 
characteristic taxonomy are not time sensitive; that is, they are not set to a certain time 
schedule. A characteristic taxonomy is based on “patterns” found in financial data submissions. 
These patterns include financial characteristics or events, such as a merger or loss of foreign 
offices.  
The FFIEC report framework was designed with extensibility to other data series. As Figure 1 
illustrates, the framework uses a common dictionary which each report and characteristic taxonomy 
imports. This model provides a modular approach to taxonomy design that can be duplicated and 
extended to include additional regulatory reports, such as the FRB Y9 series. The FFIEC report 
framework reflects the CDR data model which uses formulas in both taxonomies to process and 
validate data received by financial institutions. The same formulas used by the CDR system are used in 
Call Report vendor software to ensure the transparency of formula results. If a formula processes 
incorrectly, both the CDR and vendor software should produce an identical result. This approach to 
pre-validation helps to proactively resolve issues during the report creation and submission process.  
Figure 1 FFIEC Report Framework (conceptual) 
 The Need for XBRL-Based Formulas 
The XBRL 2.1 specification provides a data model that successfully captures a large percentage of 
federal regulatory reporting information, such as terms, data types, presentation information, and report 
instructions. A majority of the data received by the agencies are validated for consistency and 
characteristic events, a requirement that the XBRL 2.1 specification only partially fulfilled through its 
calculation model. XBRL provides a basic validation model that defines calculation relationships 
among financial variables. Following the XBRL 2.1 specification, a calculation must be true or produce 
an error, but federal financial reporting rules allow financial data to be reported within tolerance levels. 
Federal Financial Regulatory Variables 
(Micro Data Reference Manual) 
Report 
Taxonomy 
Presentation 
Instructions 
Formula 
Characteristic 
Taxonomy
Formula 
Other Report 
Taxonomies 
Presentation 
Instructions 
Formula 
control SDK system:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Why do we need to convert PDF document to HTML webpage using VB.NET programming code? But if you want to publish a PDF document file in web site
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
How to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to HTML5 Files in using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Note: When you get the error "Could not load file or assembly
www.rasteredge.com
Implementing XBRL Formulas 
For example, balance sheet items are allowed to grow or contract within defined percentage ranges. If 
growth rates fall outside of those ranges, the formula(s) will produce an error. The calculation model 
defined by the 2.1 specification provides a level of simplicity that could not be applied to FFIEC 
financial data as these data required more complex calculations. The XBRL 2.1 specification does not 
provide guidance on the use of additional mathematical operands or functions for financial data 
validation. However, the lack of a formula specification and guidance from XII did not prohibit the 
agencies from leveraging the current XBRL 2.1 data model.  
Early agency pilots produced versions of the FFIEC report framework that included a formula 
taxonomy. Pilot results successfully demonstrated that financial data could be validated and produce a 
pass/fail result by processing XBRL-based formulas. The agencies proceeded to develop XBRL 
formulas for use with the Call Report Modernization project and established these requirements:  
1.  Formulas must be defined in an XML-based language for data exchange. 
The agencies’ decision to use XBRL as the data exchange standard for Call Report 
Modernization satisfied the XML-based language requirement as the XBRL data model was 
developed from other XML specifications. What XBRL did not explicitly address was a 
type of XML language to use in defining a formula. Agency pilot projects defined formulas 
using XPath syntax which proved limited during our implementation-testing phase.
6
2.  Formulas must include variables and functions. 
Agency formulas can reference data in the current period as well as multiple prior periods. 
Agency formulas include attributes such as “-P1Q” or “-P1Y/6-end,” which define “prior 
year” and “prior year and end of June,” respectively, which allow references to the same 
variable across many time periods. Agency formulas include pre-binding functions such as 
“ExistingNonNil,” which returns a result (1) based on the pre-binding value of a reported 
item or (2) only if the item has a reported value regardless of the XBRL nillable attribute. 
3.  Formula process model must execute only with reported data. 
The agencies discovered that expressing formulas with mathematical attributes provided 
only a partial solution. A formula process model needed to be developed to process formula 
attributes and functions with reported data. Prior to CDR,  formula processing would 
operate in “batch mode.” This process executed all 2,500 formulas regardless of whether 
they applied to the reported data. The agencies developed a process model that executes 
formulas only when a financial variable is present in the reported data. The formula will not 
execute if a financial variable participating in the formula expression is not present in the 
reported data. 
4.  Formula process model must support cascading data. 
Agency formulas capture the reportability aspect of a financial institution in a formula type 
called “characteristic.” Characteristic formulas reference multiple data inputs and provide 
systematic results of the referenced data. That is, data processed with characteristic formulas 
are “cascaded” to produce a known result. Prior to CDR, FFIEC reporting requirements for 
financial institutions were implicitly defined in a Call Report instruction booklet. The 
agencies developed a process model that explicitly defines reportability and ensures that all 
required financial variables are reported.
6
xPATH is a language to match and extract parts of a XML document; see: http://www.w3.org/TR/xpath
. Also see “Section 
4 – Implementing XBRL Formulas.” 
Implementing XBRL Formulas 
 Formulas 
Call Report formulas are a shared set of mathematical expressions that check for logical inconsistencies 
in data received by financial institutions. Formulas can be grouped in two ways -- by consistency or by 
characteristic. Consistency formulas check for basic accounting errors, such as math, yield, or 
fluctuations that affect current or multiple periods of reported data. Characteristic formulas, “event 
driven formula[s] that create a characteristic,” include which variables should be reported by a financial 
institution based on a current event or a prior characteristic, such as “Participated in a Merger” or 
“$300 Million in Assets.”  
3.1 Consistency Formulas 
The FFIEC Call Report consists of two primary data collections: a Domestic/Foreign collection and a 
Domestic-Only collection. Each collection has an associated calendar quarter date, such as March 
2006. Each collection consists of one or more report contexts, such as “Changes in Equity Capital.” 
Certain report contexts are required during specific quarters, such as “December Only” or “Financial 
Variables Reported in June Only.” Consistency formulas are expressed to validate financial variables in 
a single context, such as “Changes in Equity Capital,” or across multiple contexts, such as “Net Income 
from Changes in Equity Capital Must Equal Net Income on the Income Statement.”  
Table 1 Consistency Formula (relational) 
Table 1 shows an example of two consistency formulas categorized as “Relational.” A relational 
formula compares a financial variable with peer variables within or across different report contexts and 
must either equal, be greater than, or less than the compared item. Relational formulas will include one 
or more periods of data. The agencies have categorized Consistency formulas into eight groups: 
Actual/Null, Relational, Equalities, Itemization, Yield, Ratio, Zero-Value Testing, and Text/Non-
Financial. (For more explanation of each of these groups, see “Appendix - Consistency Formula 
Detail.”) 
3.2 Characteristic Formulas 
Federally regulated financial institutions follow a set of reporting requirements as defined by the 
FFIEC. FFIEC reporting requirements are summarized into four categories: who must report, what 
must be reported, where the report must be filed, and when the report must be received. These 
Implementing XBRL Formulas 
categories or ‘patterns’ are captured and expressed in characteristic formulas to ensure that a financial 
institution is reporting the correct data based on previously captured bank attributes, such as asset size, 
or based on current or prior period events, such as a merger/acquisition.  
A financial institution falls into two primary patterns, either Domestic-Foreign-Base or Foreign-Only-
Base. Additional patterns are possible depending on the institution’s characteristics for a given 
reporting cycle (see Table 2 for a sample list of Call Report patterns).  
Call Reporting Patterns 
Domestic-Foreign-Base  
Foreign-Only-Base 
Foreign-Only-Reporting-Status-Medium  
Foreign-Only-Reporting-Status-Large  
Domestic-Foreign-March-Always-Only  
Foreign-Only-March-Always-Only  
December-Always-Only  
June-Always-Only 
Table 2 Call Report Patterns 
Call Report patterns are applied to financial institution data using a unique process called a cascading 
formula pipeline 
7
. In this process, characteristic formulas have two parts: (1) patterns are defined as 
reportability rules and (2) ‘filter’ formulas called reportability edits are applied to various stages of 
submitted financial data. The first step in this process occurs when a financial institution applies 
reportability rules to a set of data or reportability instance. These data are the result of a set of questions 
which requests information on prior quarter assets, bank characteristics, and current period events from 
a financial institution. The data contained in a reportability instance are not an FFIEC reporting 
requirement and are not submitted by financial institutions in the Call Report. However, in a cascading 
formula pipeline, reportability instances are required and must be available for processing by 
reportability rules (see Table 3 for a sample set of reportability questions and answers). 
Table 3 Reportability Questions 
7
Cascading formula pipeline is a set of sequential processes a formula processor follows in order to present a desired result. 
Each subsequent result can be input for the next process, until the desired result is reached. Formulae act as a filter to 
constrain data through the pipeline. 
Implementing XBRL Formulas 
Characteristic formulas are designed to execute sequentially with instance data. The first step in the 
sequential processing is to provide an input document. A set of formulas is then applied to the data and 
a validation process produces an intermediate result. A second set of formulas is then applied to the 
intermediate result, and a second validation process produces another result. Figure 2 illustrates a 
financial institution’s reportability data (the input document) producing an intermediate result. In this 
example, the processing of reportability rules has produced an intermediate result that matches a 
medium-sized financial institution reporting for domestic offices only. 
Figure 2 Sequential Processing, Step 1 – Formula to Data and Result 
The result of processing reportability rules with data is considered “intermediate” because additional 
variables must be processed in order to produce the desired result - what financial variables are 
required to be reported by a financial institution. A second set of characteristic formulas called 
reportability edits or ‘filters’ are applied to the intermediate result. Reportability edits contain 
references to every financial variable in a given financial report, as well as each reportability rule. 
When processed with the intermediate result, these ‘filters’ perform a check to determine which 
financial variable is required to be reported by the financial institution. Figure 3 illustrates processing 
of reportability edits and the intermediate result to produce a second final result. 
Figure 3 Sequential Processing, Step 2 – Edits to Data and Result 
To better understand how a list of required financial variables is provided using characteristic formulas 
and reportability data, we must understand the meanings used by convention for the value “False” (no) 
Implementing XBRL Formulas 
10 
in different kinds of formulas. Figures 2 and 3 not only illustrate the sequential nature of processing 
characteristic formulas, but also that reportability rules and edits respond differently to data that are 
“False.” When reportability input data contain “False” (no) and rules are applied, the result is captured 
in the intermediate data output  and provided for edit processing. If the intermediate data contain a 
“True” (yes) value when edits are applied, the result is considered “passed” and the formula processor 
continues on to the next formula. When the intermediate data contain a “False” and edits are applied, 
the result returns an error message that states: “Variable xxxx is required.” Figure 4 show the decision 
made by a reportability edit depends on the state of the intermediate data. 
Figure 4 Reportability Edit Decision Logic 
3.3  Functions  
Explicit validation rules that cannot be defined as an XML data type are captured in special functions 
referenced in consistency and characteristic expressions.  
Table 4 explains two functions used in FFIEC formulas. The ExistingOf function in Example A will 
result to “True” if all variables return a value. If some or no values are returned, the formula processor 
will not process the formula and will proceed to the next formula. In business terms, Example A states: 
“Did the bank, at any time during the calendar year, have an international banking facility or an 
Agreement Corporation or any foreign offices, Yes or No?” The ExistingNonEmpty function in 
example B will return “True” if the financial variable exists in the submitted data for the report and is 
not nil. In business terms, Example B states: “If bank is reporting with Domestic Offices Only then 
Current balance from Foreign or Central Banks must be reported.” ExistingOf and ExistingNonEmpty 
are two functions from a larger set of functions expressed in FFIEC formulas.
8
8
See Section 2.10 of the CDR Interchange Specification 1.3 for a complete list of custom FFIEC functions. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested