INTA 
COURTS & TRIBUNALS SUBCOMMITTEE 
REPORT ON BEST PRACTICES IN CONDUCTING SURVEYS  
IN TRADEMARK MATTERS 
All  information  provided  by  the  Courts  &  Tribunals  Subcommittee  of  the  International 
Trademark Association  in this  document is provided to the public as a  source  of general 
information  on  trademark  and  related  intellectual  property  issues.    In  legal  matters,  no 
publication, whether in written or electronic form, can take the place of professional advice given 
with full knowledge of the specific circumstances of each case and proficiency in the laws of the 
relevant countries.  While efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information in 
this document, it should not be treated as the basis for formulating business decisions without 
professional advice.  We emphasize that trademark and related intellectual property laws vary 
from country to country, and between jurisdictions within some countries.  The information 
included in this document will not be relevant or accurate for all countries or states. 
Pdf to tiff file converter - Library software class:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
www.rasteredge.com
Pdf to tiff file converter - Library software class:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY ........................................................................................... 1
SURVEY BEST PRACTICES ....................................................................................................... 2
Examples of when a survey might be useful .............................................................................. 2
Tips for designing a useful survey .............................................................................................. 2
OVERVIEW OF JURISDICTIONS ............................................................................................... 5
APPENDIX 1: USA ........................................................................................................................ 7
APPENDIX 2: CANADA............................................................................................................. 16
APPENDIX 3: MEXICO .............................................................................................................. 27
APPENDIX 4: SOUTH AMERICA 
OVERVIEW.................................................................... 29
APPENDIX 5: ARGENTINA ...................................................................................................... 30
APPENDIX 6: BOLIVIA ............................................................................................................. 31
APPENDIX 7: BRAZIL ............................................................................................................... 32
APPENDIX 8: COLOMBIA ........................................................................................................ 34
APPENDIX 9: PANAMA ............................................................................................................ 36
APPENDIX 10: PERU ................................................................................................................. 37
APPENDIX 11: URUGUAY ........................................................................................................ 38
APPENDIX 12: VENEZUELA .................................................................................................... 39
APPENDIX 13: BELGIUM ......................................................................................................... 40
APPENDIX 14: FRANCE ............................................................................................................ 42
APPENDIX 15: GERMANY ....................................................................................................... 46
APPENDIX 16: ITALY ................................................................................................................ 50
APPENDIX 17: OHIM ................................................................................................................. 52
APPENDIX 18: RUSSIA ............................................................................................................. 63
APPENDIX 19: SPAIN ................................................................................................................ 65
APPENDIX 20: UK (REGISTRY) AND ENGLAND & WALES (COURT)............................. 69
APPENDIX 21: ISRAEL .............................................................................................................. 74
APPENDIX 22: SOUTH AFRICA ............................................................................................... 83
APPENDIX 23: INDIA ................................................................................................................ 85
APPENDIX 24: JAPAN ............................................................................................................... 89
APPENDIX 25: MALAYSIA....................................................................................................... 91
APPENDIX 26: AUSTRALIA ..................................................................................................... 94
Library software class:Online Convert PDF file to Tiff. Best free online PDF Tif
Online PDF to Tiff Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to Tiff. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button
www.rasteredge.com
Library software class:C#: How to Use SDK to Convert Document and Image Using XDoc.
Sample Code. Here's a snippet of sample code for converting Tiff to PDF file using XDoc.Converter for .NET in C# .NET program. Six
www.rasteredge.com
APPENDIX 27: NEW ZEALAND ............................................................................................. 102
APPENDIX 28: OTHER JURISDICTIONS .............................................................................. 106
Sample Questions To Obtain Further Information In Each Jurisdiction .................................... 107
INTA COURTS & TRIBUNALS SUBCOMMITTEE MEMBERS 2008-2009 ....................... 108
INTA COURTS & TRIBUNALS SUBCOMMITTEE MEMBERS TASK FORCE 2 ............. 111
INTA COURTS & TRIBUNALS SUBCOMMITTEE MEMBERS TASK FORCE 2 ............. 113
Acknowledgements ..................................................................................................................... 114
Library software class:C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to PDF File
from MS Office Excel, Word, and PPT, our .NET document converter SDK is also capable of transforming and converting Tiff image file to PDF file in C#
www.rasteredge.com
Library software class:XDoc.Converter for .NET, Support Documents and Images Conversion
converter SDK supports various commonly used document and image file formats, including Microsoft Office (2003 and 2007) Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF, Tiff,
www.rasteredge.com
INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY 
Consumer perception lies at the heart of trademark law, but identifying precisely what that 
perception might be in a form which satisfies judicial inquiry can prove elusive.  Many parties 
turn to market surveys.  By simply asking individuals what is their response to certain stimuli 
and recording the results, the hope is that an understanding can be gained of how a mark is 
perceived by consumers in the marketplace.  Unfortunately however, surveys are often found by 
courts and tribunals to be so poorly designed and lacking in objectivity that they are given little 
weight and rendered useless as evidence.  As a consequence, parties frequently waste significant 
time and money and place an unnecessary burden on the legal infrastructure. 
To try and address this inefficient use of resources, members of the International Trademark 
Association's (INTA) Courts & Tribunals Subcommittee sought details from practitioners across 
the world as to whether any official guidance or useful case law had been published in their 
jurisdiction as to how to properly conduct a survey.  By understanding the best practices adopted 
by courts and tribunals in survey design, execution and presentation, the intention is that a 
framework for authoritative and universal guidance could be developed.  This will allow a 
degree of harmonization and prove a persuasive tool for those countries where guidance is under-
developed or non-existent. 
This report strives to draw together the threads from across the world so that they are all 
contained in a single patchwork document.  It offers examples of when evidence might be used, 
guidelines as to how a useful report might be prepared and an overview of the position in 28 
countries.  Finally, the appendix provides practitioners with detailed guidance and reference to 
case law in specific countries. 
Reassuringly, common themes have emerged.  In particular, it is clear that the approach to the 
design, execution and presentation of an influential trademark survey is reasonably universal, 
perhaps due to its basis upon scientific principles.  In an encouraging sign, there is a definite 
drive from the judiciary in several jurisdictions  to keep costs to  a minimum, for instance 
encouraging co-operation between the parties and the preparation of joint surveys with costs 
sanctions for failure to do so.  The 'Best Practices' in this report follow the distillation of these 
common themes.   
In general, common law jurisdictions such as England & Wales, the United States of America, 
Canada and Australia have substantially greater guidance available, reflecting a well-developed 
practice of using surveys as evidence.  In other countries guidance tends to be fairly limited, if 
indeed there is any at all.  That may change over time as local jurisprudence develops, but the 
issue is likely to be fertile ground for development for some time.  This report has accordingly 
been drafted with a view to being updated periodically. 
Library software class:C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Support to combine multiple page tiffs into one PDF file. Support SharePoint. Selection of turning tiff into searchable PDF or scanned PDF. Online
www.rasteredge.com
Library software class:C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Application. Best and professional adobe PDF file splitting SDK for Visual Studio .NET. outputOps); Divide PDF File into Two Using C#.
www.rasteredge.com
SURVEY BEST PRACTICES 
Examples of when a survey might be useful 
The most common circumstances when survey evidence might be required in trademark matters 
include the following: 
i) 
to overcome registry objections that a sign is descriptive or otherwise non-distinctive 
and cannot function as a trademark because it does not indicate origin; 
ii) 
to support a claim that a trademark has an enhanced degree of recognition among 
consumers and deserves superior protection, for example famous marks; 
iii) 
to support or contest an assertion that a likelihood of confusion exists between certain 
marks, for example during opposition proceedings; or 
iv) 
to support or contest an allegation of infringement, passing off or unfair competition. 
Tips for designing a useful survey 
The following general principles establish the basis on which survey evidence is likely to be 
most useful in trademark matters. 
I. 
Ensure that the survey population has been properly defined and chosen.   
A. 
Factors to address in determining the survey population include:   
1)  
appropriate number or participants (the larger the better, but 300    
participants at minimum; in some jurisdictions, at least 1,000 is needed); 
2) 
appropriate profile, including sex, age, occupation, background (i.e., the  
survey sample should be representative of the pertinent population);  
3)  
appropriate geographic representation; and 
4) 
targeting all actual/prospective purchasers. 
B. 
The method of sampling (probability vs. non-probability) must be justifiable, and  
precautions should be taken to decrease the likelihood of sample bias. 
C. 
A control group should be used in surveys to record consumer impressions. 
II. 
Ensure that questions are properly formulated and presented.   
A. 
Questions should be clear, unambiguous, concise and unbiased.  
B. 
It is acceptable to use “filter” questions to help reduce the likelihood of guessing.    
However, where employed, filter questions must not be too restrictive so as to 
result in  under-
reporting  of  opinions.    “Quasi
-
filter”  questions,  which  adopt 
“don‟t know” or “no opinion” options, are recommended.
C. 
Questions should be appropriately open or closed-ended in nature, depending on  
the circumstances:  
1) 
open-
ended for surveys assessing what comes first to respondents‟ mind; 
Library software class:VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Professional VB.NET PDF file splitting SDK for Visual Studio and .NET framework 2.0. Split PDF file into two or multiple files in ASP.NET webpage online.
www.rasteredge.com
Library software class:RasterEdge XDoc.Tiff for .NET - SDK for Tiff Document Imaging
Convert Word, Excel, PowerPoint to Tiff. Convert PDF to Tiff. Convert Jpeg Images to Tiff. Tiff File Process. Create, Load, and Save Tiff File.
www.rasteredge.com
2) 
close-ended for surveys assessing choices between well-defined options  
or obtaining ratings on a clear set of alternatives.  
At times, combining open and closed-ended questions can maximize appropriate  
freedom of expression.  Leading questions should be avoided. 
D. 
The order of the questions (or answers, if close-ended) should be rotated and  
distributed randomly to avoid artificial inflation of a certain choice due to 
the order of questions or answers. 
E. 
Attorneys should only be involved with survey design to the extent needed to  
ensure that relevant questions are directed to a relevant population. 
F. 
Control questions should be used in surveys to record consumer impressions. 
G. 
Questions should be pre-tested to confirm clarity and ease of use. 
H. 
Each question should only address one variable. 
III.  Ensure that interviews are conducted with the goal of maintaining objectivity.  
A. 
Attorneys should not participate in survey administration.  
B. 
The entities conducting the interviews should be independent and objective and  
not affiliated with the matter in any way. 
C. 
Preventing or minimizing 
the exposure of a survey‟s sponsor, or the purpose of 
the survey, increases the likelihood of objectivity.  
IV.  Ensure that data are properly collected and coded. 
A. 
Procedures should be implemented to ensure data are entered accurately. 
B. 
Detailed instructions delineating the standards for coding answers to open-ended 
questions should be distributed to the scorers.   
C. 
In order to ensure consistency and accuracy, two (2) trained scorers should  
independently score the same responses. 
D. 
All verbal exchanges should be recorded verbatim and all original answers  
should be retained. 
V. 
Ensure that data are properly analyzed. 
A. 
Those individuals who design, conduct and analyze the survey should be   
appropriately trained and qualified.  Some training in general interviewing  
techniques is recommended for most survey interviews.  Training time should  
increase with the complexity of the interviews/difficulty in subject matter. 
B. 
Interviewers should receive detailed written instructions on everything to be said  
to respondents (including when, what, and how they should probe in response to  
an answer, if at all), the materials used in the survey, and how they are to    
complete the interview form.   
C. 
All instructions should be made available to the court and, where the survey 
cannot be instructed jointly, the opposing party. 
D. 
Results must be statistically significant.  
VI.  Ensure that survey reports are appropriately detailed.  
A. 
For presentation to the court or tribunal, the following information should be  
provided:  
1)  
the purpose of the survey;  
2)  
a definition of the target population;  
3) 
a description of the sampled population;  
4)  
a description of the sample design;  
5)  
a description of the results of sample implementation;  
6)  
the exact wording of the questions used;  
7)  
a description of any special scoring methods;  
8)  
estimates of sampling error;  
9)  
clearly labeled statistical tables;  
10)   copies of interviewer instructions, questions, validation results and code  
books; and 
11)  objective criteria on how potential respondents could react. 
Finally, as outlined in the INTA‟s resolution of 22 September 2008, '
Adverse Inference for 
Failure 
to 
Conduct 
Likelihood 
of 
Confusion 
Survey' 
(http://www.inta.org/Advocacy/Pages/BoardResolutions.aspx), the mere fact that a party does 
not produce a survey as evidence should not lead to an adverse inference about likelihood of 
confusion in a dispute.  It is thus important to note that this report does not assert that a party 
MUST produce a survey; rather, it lays out guidelines addressing how, if one is produced, it can 
be achieved most effectively. 
OVERVIEW OF JURISDICTIONS 
Jurisdiction 
Are surveys 
admissible? 
Can surveys be 
influential? 
Approximate survey 
cost 
North America 
USA 
Yes 
Yes 
$25,000 to $150,000 
Canada 
Sometimes 
Yes, if they are 
reliable and relevant 
Unknown 
Mexico 
Yes 
Yes 
Unknown 
South America 
Argentina 
No 
No 
N/a 
Bolivia 
Yes 
Unknown 
Unknown 
Brazil 
Yes 
Yes, if conducted by a 
court expert 
Unknown 
Colombia 
Yes 
Yes 
Unknown 
Panama 
Yes 
Yes, if probative 
Unknown 
Peru 
Yes 
Yes 
Unknown 
Uruguay 
Unknown 
Unknown 
Unknown 
Venezuela 
Unknown 
Unknown 
Unknown 
Europe 
Belgium 
Yes 
Yes 
Unknown 
France 
Yes 
Yes 
Unknown 
Germany 
Sometimes 
Yes 
Unknown 
Italy 
Yes 
Yes, if it is objective  Unknown 
OHIM 
Yes 
Yes 
Unknown 
Russia 
Yes 
Yes, if prepared in 
accordance with 
official guidance 
US$20,000 
Spain 
Yes 
Yes, if it is probative  Unknown 
UK (registry) 
Sometimes 
Yes, if it complies 
with strict guidelines 
Unknown 
England & Wales 
Sometimes, where 
permission is granted 
Yes, if it complies 
with strict guidelines 
Unknown 
Middle East 
Israel 
Yes 
Yes 
Unknown 
Africa 
South Africa 
Yes 
Yes, if it is probative  Unknown 
Asia 
India 
Yes 
Sometimes 
Unknown 
Japan 
Sometimes, under 
very strict conditions 
Yes 
Unknown 
Malaysia 
Yes 
Yes, if it complies 
with strict guidelines 
Unknown 
Oceania 
Australia 
Yes 
Yes, if it is probative 
Unknown 
New Zealand 
Yes 
Yes, if it is probative 
Unknown 
APPENDIX 1: USA 
Jurisdiction:    
United States of America 
Summary: 
Substantial guidance is available to ensure survey evidence 
is admissible. U.S. jurisprudence has dictated that particular 
types of surveys are suitable for particular types of issues 
(e.g. likelihood of confusion, genericness, etc.). Survey costs 
in the U.S. can be substantial. 
Official guidance: 
Manual for Complex Litigation published by the Federal 
Judicial Center 
Relevant caselaw: 
See discussion below. 
Approximate cost to produce 
Costs for a pilot survey, which generally includes less than 
75 respondents, can range from $10,000 to $50,000. While 
pilot surveys are generally not admissible at trial, they can 
be useful in determining the viability of methodology and in 
obtaining  initial 
feedback  on  the  survey‟s  substantive 
results.  
Costs for a complete survey, with expert reports suitable for 
use at trial can range from $25,000 to $150,000. 
Official Guidance 
According to the Federal Judicial Center‟s 
Manual for Complex Litigation 
(“
MCL
”), a survey‟s 
admissibility under Federal Rule of Evidence 703 depends on whether its sampling methods 
conform to generally recognized statistical standards.
1
The MCL identifies the following four 
factors as relevant to assessing a survey‟s admissibil
ity:  
(1) whether the population was properly chosen and defined;  
(2) whether the sample chosen was representative of that population;  
(3) whether the data gathered were accurately reported; and  
(4) whether the data were analyzed in accordance with accepted statistical principles.
2
Additionally, the MCL advises judges to consider the following three factors in assessing a 
survey‟s validity: 
(5) whether the questions asked were clear and not leading;  
1
M
ANUAL FOR 
C
OMPLEX 
L
ITIGATION
§ 11.493 (4th ed. 2004).   
2
Id
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested