18 
Effect: The court rejected the admission of the survey in this case because of a lack of 
relevance. However, it recognized the admissibility of market surveys stating that that the 
general principle is that the admissibility and probative value of a survey is dependent on 
its  relevance  to  the issues before the court and  the manner in  which the poll was 
conducted; for example, the time period over which the survey took place, the questions 
asked, where they were asked and the method of selecting the participants. 
Opus Building Corp. v. Opus Corp. 
Circumstances: Opus Building Corp. applied for an order to expunge Op
us Corp‟s 
registered trademark on the ground that it was not distinctive of its services and on the 
ground that it had abandoned use of the mark. The court admitted the results of a survey 
which showed the distinctiv
eness of Opus Building Corp‟s mark in comparison to that of 
Opus Corp‟s.
Effect: The court found the survey admissible for the following reasons: 
(1) it was conducted by an expert in the field of public opinion research;  
(2) the sampling was from the app
ropriate “universe”; 
(3) it was designed and conducted, and the resulting data was processed, in a professional 
manner, independent of both the applicant and its counsel;  
(4) it was not geographically restricted;  
(5) it was conducted in both official languages and involved both male and female 
respondents;  
(6) it was put forward as the basis on which the expert assessed the 'recognisability' of the 
word OPUS in the survey “universe.”
Mattel, Inc. v. 3894207 Canada Inc. 2006 SCC 22. 
Circumstances: Matt
el opposed the applicant‟s registration of the mark “Barbie‟s” in 
association with restaurant services arguing a likelihood of confusion.  
Effects: While the Court rejected the survey evidence in this case, it recognized that 
recent practice is to admit evidence of a survey of public opinion, presented through a 
qualified expert, provided its findings are relevant to the issues and the survey was 
properly designed and conducted in an impartial manner. With respect to the issue of 
relevance, the Court held that the survey evidence must be both reliable and valid in order 
to be admitted. Survey evidence can be used on issues of confusion and distinctiveness.  
Hyperlinkhttp://scc.lexum.org/en/2006/2006scc22/2006scc22.pdf
Masterpiece Inc. v. Alavida Lifestyles Inc. 2011 SCC 27. 
Circumstances: 
Masterpiece Inc‟s application to expunge Alavida‟s registration was 
dismissed by the trial judge who concluded that no likelihood of confusion existed. The 
decision was upheld on appeal but the SCC held that Alavida‟s registration should be 
Pdf to tiff batch conversion - control Library system:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
www.rasteredge.com
Pdf to tiff batch conversion - control Library system:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
19 
expunged. Both parties had submitted survey evidence but the Court found both surveys 
to be unnecessary. 
Effects: The Court held that for expert evidence to be accepted it must meet the 4 
requirements of the Mohan test (citing R v. Mohan, (1994) 2 S.C.R. 9). These four 
requirements are  
(1) relevance;  
(2) necessity in assisting the trier of fact;  
(3) the absence of any exclusionary rule; and 
(4) a properly qualified expert.  
The Court stated that surveys can be properly admitted to provide evidence on the issue 
of  confusion  and  put  particular  emphasis 
on  the  “necessary”  and  “relevancy” 
requirements of the Mohan test. The Court found that where the “casual consumer” is not 
expected to be particularly skilled or knowledgeable, and there is a resemblance between 
the marks, expert evidence which simply assesses that resemblance will not generally be 
necessary. However, surveys have the potential to provide empirical evidence which 
demonstrates consumer reactions in the marketplace. This evidence is not something 
which would be generally known to a trial judge, and thus unlike other expert evidence, it 
would not run afoul of the “necessary” requirement. The Court stated that the use of 
survey evidence should still be applied with caution. 
Hyperlink: http://scc.lexum.org/en/2011/2011scc27/2011scc27.pdf  
Weighing probative value of survey evidence 
A court will only consider expert evidence, including interpretations of market survey evidence, 
in any context if it is (1) relevant; (2) necessary in assisting the trier of fact; (3) is not excluded 
by any exclusionary rule; and (4) comes from a properly qualified expert. 
Reliability, validity and relevance are the three useful criteria by which the probative value of 
survey evidence may be weighed
2156
6
.  Organizations in Canada have published standards for 
producing reliable surveys
2167
7
.  The Canadian Market Research industry has introduced an 
audited  “Gold  Seal”  certification  process  to  identify  those  organizations  that  consistently 
implement the published national standards. 
Reliability 
Sample Size 
Using a large sample size will not necessarily change the “best estimate” obtained by the 
survey of the true population parameter; it will only change the precision 
the size of the 
15
26
Mattel, Inc. v. 3894207 Canada Inc., [2006] S.C.J. No. 23, [2006] 1 S.C.R. 772 (S.C.C.).
16
27
The Canadian national professional society has published recommended best practices online at: < http://www.mria-
arim.ca/STANDARDS/PublishResultsENG.asp>.
control Library system:Convert Images, Batch Conversion in .NET Winfroms| Online
in property editor: Click "Batch Conversion", if you want to process batch conversion; Multi-page Tiff Processing; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode
www.rasteredge.com
control Library system:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
project. Professional .NET library supports batch conversion in VB.NET. .NET control to export Word from multiple PDF files in VB.
www.rasteredge.com
20 
margin of error surrounding the estimate.  Advertising Standards Canada has published 
guidelines recommending a minimum sample size of 300 for large populations
2178
8
.
Choice of Pertinent Population 
The choice of survey universe depends on the population considered pertinent to the 
study.  The universe should include only those people whose views are relevant to a 
determination of the legal issue.   
The identification of the “pertinent population” for a survey has proven to be one of the 
most critical aspects affecting the weight that courts have accorded a survey.  Surveys 
have been excluded where the population from which the sample was drawn was not 
considered to be the pertinent population
2189
9
.
The Survey Sample Should be Representative of the Pertinent Population 
Perfect random sampling of the Canadian population by telephone is impossible.  Mall surveys 
have been criticized as unrepresentative
3190
0
.  At the time of writing, the Standards Committee of 
the Canadian Market Research and Intelligence Association expresses particular reservations 
about internet surveys based on large “sign
-
up” panels that offer incentives for continuing 
participation
3201
1
.  There is an  emerging trend toward  “hybrid”  methods of combining two 
sampling techniques if one technique is feared to exclude too important a segment of the 
pertinent population. 
Geographic Representativeness 
Whether results from major geographic groups in Canada can generally be applied to all of 
Canada is a  matter  for expert judgment and judicial  discretion.  Trademark law does not 
necessarily require the whole of the pertinent population to be addressed for a survey to produce 
a relevant determination of a material part of the fact situation. 
Formulation of Questions 
The very act of asking the question can put an idea in consumers‟ minds that they may not have 
previously contemplated. A research designer must avoid leaping to a single direct closed-ended 
question on the main issue.  A research designer should establish whether the issue is even part 
of the consumer‟s impression.  Three ways of achieving this are as follows: asking a graduated 
series  of questions which  first  establish whether the issue is even part of  the  consumer‟s 
impression, assuring in the introduction to the questionnaire that respondents are free to say that 
17
28
Online at: <http://www.adstandards.com/en/Resources/guidelinesCompAdvertising-en.pdf> (last accessed March 18, 
2008).
18
29
Joseph E. Seagram & Sons v. Canada (Registrar of Trade Marks), [1990] F.C.J. No. 909, 33 C.P.R. (3d) 454 (F.C.T.D.); 
New Balance Athletic Shoes, Inc. v. Mathews, [1992] T.M.O.B. No. 358, 45 C.P.R. (3d) 140 (T.M.O.B.); National Hockey 
League v. Pepsi-Cola Canada Ltd., [1992] B.C.J. No. 1221, 42 C.P.R. (3d) 390,. at 405 (B.C.S.C.); 
McDonald‘s Corp. v. 
Coffee Hut Stores Ltd., [1994] F.C.J. No. 638, 55 C.P.R. (3d) 463, at 475 (F.C.T.D.).
19
30
Joseph E. Seagram & Sons Ltd. v. Canada (Registrar of Trade Marks), [1990] F.C.J. No. 909, 33 C.P.R. (3d) 454, at 473 
(F.C.T.D.); National Hockey League v. Pepsi-Cola Canada Ltd., [1992] B.C.J. No. 1221, 42 C.P.R. (3d) 390, at 403 
(B.C.S.C.).
20
31
Draft Canadian industry guidelines for professional conduct, posted online at: <http://www.mria-
arim.ca/INDMEMBERSONLY/PDF/ProposedQualityStandard.pdf> (last accessed March 18, 2008).
control Library system:TIFF to PDF Converter | Convert TIFF to PDF, Convert PDF to TIFF
How to Start Batch TIFF Conversion to PDF. How to Start Batch TIFF Conversion to PDF; Load TIF images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer;
www.rasteredge.com
control Library system:C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Professional .NET PDF converter control for batch conversion. C# demo code for Excel2003(.xls) to PDF conversion. Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF and save it
www.rasteredge.com
21 
they have no opinion on any given question, or offering an explicit “don‟t know” option in the 
list of possible responses offered to survey participants. 
Courts have expressed preference for open-ended questions as they tend to be less leading
3212
2
.  
However, the risks of the suggestive nature of closed-ended questions can be mitigated by 
suitable control conditions, order rotations, and carefully managed question wording. 
Control of Non-Sampling Error 
Non-sampling error refers to the variability in the survey process that may naturally arise from 
the differences among interviewers and data analysts, or from different levels of diligence 
exercised  over  every  aspect  of  controllable  quality.    Some  aspects  of  generally  expected 
standards of quality control: interviewers should be well-trained, but should have no knowledge 
of the litigation or purpose of the survey; questionnaires should be pre-tested to confirm clarity 
and ease of administration; effort should be invested to optimize response rates; a portion of 
interviews should be monitored or verified for consistency; the expert should be involved hands-
on for credibility; the time period for the survey should not be biased by seasonality or changing 
markets
3223
3
; and a portion of data entry, if applicable, should be verified to guard against human 
error. 
The Special Case of Coding Reliability 
It is necessary to categorize answers or parts of answers to open-ended questions into common 
themes or content through content analysis.  Coding involves some element of subjectivity, no 
matter how well-trained or experienced the coder.  Market research industry guidelines require a 
minimum of ten (10) percent of each coder‟s work to be verified.  Coding should be 
recognized 
as a summarization process for the benefit of the non-technical reader.   
Full Disclosure 
According to international professional standards, marketing research must always be carried out 
objectively, and in accordance with established scientific principles.  The assurance of reliability 
requires full disclosure of all procedures and results, or access upon request to all raw data, so 
that another scientist can attempt to replicate the results. 
Validity 
Validity is about the extent to which the su
rvey captures a person‟s true opinions or behaviour.  
To maximize validity, surveys should: avoid inducements to response biases; avoid ambiguous 
wording and undue complexity; avoid distortions out-of-context
3234
4
; control against irrelevant 
reasons for  responses
3245
5
; avoid order  bias  in  the  choice  options; avoid open-ended word 
21
32
S.S. Diamond, “Part II. Science and the Scientific Method: Chapter 7. Survey Research” (2005) 1. mod. Sci. Evidence § 7 
2.1, at § 7.4.0.
22
33
R. v. R. Hammer Ltd., [1987] F.C.J. No. 148, 87 D.T.C. 5139 (F.C.T.D.) (giving little weight to survey evidence gathered 
outside of the relevant season).
23
34
Joseph E. Seagram & Sons Ltd. v. Canada (Registrar of Trade Marks), [1990] F.C.J. No. 909, 38 F.T.R. 96 (F.C.T.D.) 
(stating that the court was not persuaded by the survey, expressing concern “that the questions and responses were given in a
artificial environment which can hardly be described as reflective of reality”).
24
35
Labatt Brewing Co. v. Molson Breweries
, [1996] B.C.J. No. 2191, 73 C.P.R. (3d) 544 (B.C.S.C.) (ruling Labatt‟s survey 
evidence inadmissible for the absence of a control condition, among other weaknesses).
control Library system:TIFF to GIF Converter | Convert TIFF to GIF, Convert GIF to TIFF
How to Start Batch TIFF Conversion to GIF. Open TIFF to GIF Converter your computer. How to Start Batch GIF Conversion to TIFF. Open TIFF to
www.rasteredge.com
control Library system:TIFF to WORD Converter | Convert TIFF to Word, Convert Word to
How to Start Batch TIFF Conversion to Word. Open TIFF to Word your computer. How to Start Batch Word Conversion to TIFF. Open TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
22 
associations
3256
6
; pre-test questionnaires to ensure that respondents understand them in the way 
they were intended; avoid drawing conclusions from the null hypothesis, which has no bearing 
on confusion
3267
7
; make alternatives explicit, with the possible exception of “don‟t know;” and 
permit  appropriate  freedom  of  expression,  combining  open-ended  and  closed-ended 
questions
3278
8
.  
Relevance 
Relevance is the lawyer‟s responsibility, in setting 
a mandate for evidence to be collected, to 
ensure that a sound and defensible connection exists between the burden in law and his or her 
instruction to his or her experts.  Relevance depends on that connection. 
Standard of admissibility for survey evidence 
Courts have imposed high standards of admissibility for survey evidence
3289
9
.  In Canada, they 
include the requirement to disclose, among other things, the method of recording data, the raw 
data itself, the questions asked, how they were asked
4290
0
, the instructions to the interviewer, and 
arguably the instructions to the survey expert
4301
1
 In short, a party who tenders a survey must 
disclose a great deal about how the survey was conducted, much of which will come out of 
otherwise privileged material.  It is a practical requirement that makes privilege a somewhat 
superfluous issue. 
Trademark Proceedings  
Likelihood of Confusion and Survey Evidence 
The likelihood  of confusion as  to  the  economic origin  of  the  goods  is  determined by an 
assessment based on the likely public reaction to the two marks.  Surveys may be used to 
determine this assessment by reference to the average consumer.  Specifically, survey evidence 
can be helpful with respect to the extent to which trademark has become known, the degree of 
resemblance between the trademarks or trademark names in appearance or sound or in the ideas 
suggested by them, and whether confusion is likely to occur in the marketplace.   
25
36
Walt Disney Productions v. Fantasyland Hotel Inc., [1994] A.J. No. 484, 20 Alta. L.R. (3d) 146 (Alta. Q.B.), affd. [1996] 
A.J. No. 415, 38 Alta. L.R. (3d) 441 (Alta. C.A.) (holding that the survey evidence showing an association between the hotel 
and plaintiff did not by itself lead to a conclusion of confusion).
26
37
Kirkbi A.G. v. Ritvik Holdings Inc., [2002] F.C.J. No. 793 (F.C.T.D.) (deciding that a named source survey was evidence 
of non-confusion with no expert report to explain the error to the court).
27
38
New Balance Athletic Shoes Inc. v. Matthews, [1992] T.M.O.B. No. 358, 45 C.P.R. (3d) 140, at 147 (T.M.O.B.).
28
39
In the leading case on the admissibility of survey evidence, 
Canadian Schenley Distilleries Ltd. v. Canada‘s Manitoba 
Distillery Ltd. (1975) 25 C.P.R. (2d) 1 (F.C.T.D.), Cattanach J. established a set of criteria to 
consider, saying at 9: “In my 
view the admissibility of survey evidence and the probative value of that evidence when admitted is dependent on how the 
poll was conducted, the questions asked, how they were asked and how they were framed and what purpose the evidence is to 
be used for.”
29
40
Salada Foods Ltd. v. W.K. Buckley Ltd., [1973] F.C.J. No. 17, [1973] F.C. 120 (F.C.T.D.).
30
41
Joseph E. Seagram & Sons Ltd. v. Canada (Registrar of Trade Marks) (sub nom. Joseph E. Seagram & Sons Ltd. v. 
Seagram Real Estate Ltd.), [1990] F.C.J. No. 909, 38 F.T.R. 96 (F.C.T.D.). See also Walt Disney Productions v. Fantasyland 
Hotel Inc., [1994] A.J. No. 484, 20 Alta. L.R. (3d) 146 (Alta. Q.B.), affd. [1996] A.J. No. 415, 38 Alta. L.R. (3d) 441 (Alta. 
C.A.).  One of the crit
icisms of the procedure was that the interviewer knew the client‟s identity.  This
suggests a need for 
independence between the front-line interview team and the client, in order to avoid even inadvertent bias in the tone of 
questioning survey respondents.
control Library system:TIFF to JBIG2 Converter | Convert TIFF to JBIG2, Convert JBIG2 to
How to Start Batch TIFF Conversion to JBIG2. Open TIFF to JBIG2 your computer. How to Start Batch JBIG2 Conversion to TIFF. Open TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
control Library system:Convert Image & Documents Formats in Web Viewer| Online Tutorials
Go to the toolbar: Select "Batch Conversion"; Select "Input Barcodes from Your Documents. Multi-page Tiff Processing; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode
www.rasteredge.com
23 
Resemblance 
A survey should be designed to elicit a consumer‟s first impression by the use of open
-ended 
questions, in other words, see what the stimulus would evoke in the mind of the person to which 
it is exposed
4312
2
 For ex
ample, the question “What first comes to mind when you see this?” may 
be asked.  After the respondent has provided an answer to the open-ended question, a probing 
question as to the respondent‟s first answer should be introduced. This probing question can 
provide insight  into why the respondent did,  or did  not, mention the plaintiff‟s mark.   In 
summary, an inference of resemblance or other form of linkage from a word-association question 
should be reinforced by additional evidence of respondents‟ states of 
mind.   
Confusion 
A likelihood of confusion survey, based on the named-source test (the hypothesis being that the 
owner of the senior mark will be named) is only effective if the manufacturer/owner source is a 
recognized name.  The named-source design would not be effective in the situation where the 
consumer is still likely to be confused as to the source, but where the name of the source is 
unknown.   
In addition, a likelihood of confusion survey must be designed such that a true cause and effect 
inference can be drawn.  For example, in Cartier Inc. v. Cartier Optical Ltd. 
4323
3
, the defendant 
operated and advertised using the mark “Lunettes Cartier” in a
ssociation with eyeglasses.  The 
plaintiff, a well-known jewelry company, provided a survey in which respondents were shown 
actual advertisements with the impugned  mark.   The respondents were asked to name the 
manufacturing company behind the product shown in the advertisement.   More than half of the 
respondents had the opinion that the company was named “Cartier.”  However, in this survey, 
the expert must be able to rule out the possibility that when people were asked to name the 
manufacturing company, they were not simply repeating the name on the advertisement.  Thus, 
surveys must be designed so that it can be unambiguously concluded that respondents answering 
a question meant the company rather than the name on the advertisement.  A further “probe” 
question may be used to mitigate this problem and to ensure an understanding of what the 
respondents meant. 
Surrounding Circumstances 
The  trier  of  fact  in  a  trademark  dispute  is  required  to  take  into  consideration  any  other 
surrounding circumstances that may be relevant to determining whether there is a likelihood of 
confusion. 
Doctrine of Foreign Equivalents 
Under United States trademark law,  the  doctrine  of foreign  equivalents holds that  foreign 
language word marks must be translated into the English language as part of the comparison of 
meaning.  The Federal Court of Canada has to date rejected this doctrine‟s application in 
Canada
4334
4
, as has the Trademarks Opposition Board
4345
5
.  Although not significantly altering the 
31
42
Canada Post Corp. v. Mail Boxes Etc. USA Inc. [1996] T.M.O.B. No. 238, 77 C.P.R. (3d) 93, at 103 (T.M.O.B.).   
32
43
[1988] F.C.J. No. 266, 20 C.P.R. (3d) 68, at 77-78 (F.C.T.D.)
33
44
Krazy Glue Inc. v. Group Cyanomex S.A. de C. V., [1992] F.C.J. No. 957, 45 C.P.R. (3d) 161, at 173 (sub nom. Jadow 
(B.) & Sons Inc. v. Grupo Cyanomex, S.A. de C. V.) (F.C.T.D.).
control Library system:TIFF to BMP Converter | Convert TIFF to Bitmap, Convert Bitmap to
Easily to convert TIFF to Bitmap; Simple to convert Bitmap to TIFF; Support TIFF-Bitmap batch conversion; How to Start Batch TIFF Conversion to Bitmap.
www.rasteredge.com
control Library system:TIFF to JPEG Converter | Convert TIFF to JPEG, Convert JPEG to
How to Start Batch TIFF Conversion to JPEG. Open TIFF to JPEG your computer. How to Start Batch JPEG Conversion to TIFF. Open TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
24 
state of law with respect to the applicability of the doctrine of foreign equivalency, the holding of 
the Federal Court in the decision of Cheung Kong (Holdings) Ltd. v. Living Realty Inc
4356
6
. is 
worth making note of, as this decision appears to narrow the holding of the court in Krazy Glue.  
The court in Cheung interpreted the Krazy Glue decision to not categorically rule out the 
possibility that, on the appropriate evidence, the existence of a substantial number of speakers of 
a particular language among the consumers of the wares could not have displaced the linguistic 
knowledge that can be attributed to the population as a whole.  In effect, by selecting a group of 
consumers who were able to translate both marks into a common language, the court arrived at 
the same conclusion that they would have with respect to confusion, had they applied the 
doctrine of foreign equivalents and assessed confusion amongst the population as a whole. 
Historic Terms 
The average Canadian is  not assumed to know the historic meaning of some words.  For 
example, when deciding whether there was a likelihood of confusion between Iron Duke and 
Grand Duke, a Canadian court noted that Iron Duke was historically applied to the Duke of 
Wellington, who lived some 180 years ago.  It was not “
obvious. . . that Canadian consumers 
would associate the term ‗IRON DUKE‘ with the Duke of Wellington.”
4367
7
.  The issue of 
meaning attributed to possibly historic terms is an area well suited to survey evidence. 
Two Official Languages 
Because Canada is a bilingual nation and the Trademarks Act creates a national register of 
trademarks, the criteria of section 6(5) of the Trademarks Act must be analyzed with respect to 
both the English and French languages.  If an English-speaking individual would be confused, 
but a French-speaking consumer would not because of a difference in pronunciation or meaning 
attributed to the word mark in the two languages, this should be sufficient for a finding of a 
likelihood of confusion overall
4378
8
.   
Bilingual Version Test 
Aside from assessing if the average anglophone or francophone would find two marks confusing, 
the court should consider whether or not the average bilingual person would be confused
4389
9
.  
However, the bilingual version test is not determinative in deciding the question of confusion as 
the criteria laid down in s. 6(5) must also be applied before arriving at the ultimate or final 
34
45
Krazy Glue Inc. v. Group Cyanomex S.A. de C. V., [1989] T.M.O.B. No. 241, 27 C.P.R. (3d) 28, at 37 (T.M.O.B.), affd. 
[1992] F.C.J. No. 957, 45 C.P.R. (3d) 161 (sub nom. Jadow (B.) & Sons Inc. v. Grupo Cyanomex, S.A. de C. V.) (F.C.T.D.).
35
46
[1999] F.C.J. No. 1966, [2000] F.C. 501 (F.C.T.D.).
36
47 Corby Distilleries Ltd. v. Wellington County Brewery Ltd., [1995] F.C.J. No. 264, 59 C.P.R. (3d) 357 (sub nom. 
Wellington County Brewery Ltd. v. Corby Distilleries Ltd.) (F.C.T.D.).
37
48
See 
Assessoires d‘auto Nordiques Inc. v. Canadian Tire Corp.
, [2005] T.M.O.B. No. 43 (T.M.O.B.), quoting Smithkline 
Beecham Corp v. Pierre Fabre Medicament, [2001] F.C.J. No. 225, 11 C.P.R. (4th) 1 (F.C.A.).
38
49
For e.g.Gilbey Canada Inc. v. Joseph E. Seagram & Sons Inc., [1986] T.M.O.B. No. 69, 8 C.P.R. (3d) 571, at 572 
(T.M.O.B.); Vins La Salle Inc. v. Vignobles Chantecler Ltée (1985), 6 C.P.R. (3d) 533 (T.M.O.B.); Ferrero S.p.A. v. Produits 
Preddy Inc., [1986] F.C.J. No. 964, 20 C.P.R. (3d) 61, at 65 (F.C.T.D.), affd. (1988), 22 C.P.R. (3d) 346, 24 C.I.P.R. 189 
(F.C.A.); Au Petit Goret (1979) Inc. v. Courtex Courtier en Alimentation, [2000] T.M.O.B. No. 7, 5 C.P.R. (4th) 250 
(T.M.O.B.); SmithKline Beecham Corp. v. Pierre Fabre Medicament, [2001] F.C.J. No. 225, 11 C.P.R. (4th) 1, at paras. 7-8 
(F.C.A.); see also 
Accessoires d‘auto Nordiques Inc. v. Canadian Tire Corp.
, [2005] T.M.O.B. No. 43, at para. 27 (T.M.O.B.).
25 
determination
5390
0
.   Survey  evidence  may  be  particularly  helpful  in showing  whether the 
bilingual version test has been satisfied. 
Family of Marks Doctrine 
When trademarks that have a common component or characteristic are all registered in the name 
of one owner, the situation gives rise to the presumption that these marks form a family of marks 
used by the one owner, and that the registration of such  marks is  tantamount to a single 
registration combined of those several marks
5401
1
 The existence of a family of marks has been 
held  to  be  a  most  material  consideration  when  determining  likelihood  of  confusion
5412
2
.  
Generally, when there exists a family of marks, the owner is entitled to a broader ambit of 
protection for the common characteristic than would otherwise be the case if there existed only 
one registration
5423
3
.A party seeking to take advantage of the wider scope of protection accorded 
to a family of trademarks must first establish use of the trademarks that comprise the family.  
Survey evidence may be particularly well suited for examining the issue of whether a family of 
marks does in fact exist. 
Reputation, Distinctiveness and Secondary Meaning 
Establishment of reputation, distinctiveness, or secondary meaning in a name or mark determines 
the owner‟s latitude in protecting it.  
Survey Approaches 
Reputation and Distinctiveness 
Survey  evidence  may  be  used  to  establish  either  remarkably  high  or  relatively  small, 
geographically limited awareness of a name or mark
5434
4
Survey Approaches 
Secondary Meaning 
Surveys in disputes regarding secondary meaning of a word or term must test whether the 
relevant  population  associates the terms with a  particular source.   For example,  in 
Carling Breweries Ltd. v. Molson Cos. Ltd.,
5445
5
, Molson sought to register CANADIAN 
as a trademark for use in association with beer.  Molson had been using CANADIAN in 
association with beer products since 1959.  Carling Breweries opposed the registration on 
the ground that the word “Canadian” is a word in common use by manufacturers of beers, 
serves to distinguish the place of origin of the product, and is not distinctive of wares of 
any particular entity. 
39
50
Ferrero S.p.A. v. Produits Freddy Inc., [1986] F.C.J. No. 964, 20 C.P.R. (3d) 61, at 65 (F.C.T.D.), affd. (1988), 22 C.P.R. 
(3d) 346, 24 C.I.P.R. 189 (F.C.A.).
40
51
Aciers v. Registrar of Trade Marks, [1977] F.C.J. No. 179, 39 C.P.R. (2d) 284, at 287 (F.C.T.D.); Stiefel Laboratories 
(Can.) Ltd. v. I.C.N. Canada Ltd., [1977] Q.J. No. 101, 38 C.P.R. (2d) 182 (Que. S.C.); 
McDonald‘s Corp. v. Yogi Yogurt 
Ltd., [1982] F.C.J. No. 701, 66 C.P.R. (2d) 101, at 112-13 (F.C.T.D.); Kimberly-Clark of Canada Ltd. v. Molnlycke AB
[1982] F.C.J. No. 4, 61 C.P.R. (2d) 42, at 47-48 (F.C.T.D.).
41
52
McDonald‘s Corp. v. Yogi Yogurt Ltd.
, [1982] F.C.J. No. 701, 66 C.P.R. (2d) 101, at 112-13 (F.C.T.D.).
42
53
See, e.g., Panavision Inc. v. Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., [1992] F.C.J. No. 19, 40 C.P.R. (3d) 486, at 496 (sub 
nom. Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. v. Panavision Inc.) (F.C.T.D.).
43
54
R
UTH 
C
ORBIN 
&
A.
K
ELLY 
G
ILL
,
S
URVEY 
E
VIDENCE AND THE 
L
AW 
W
ORLDWIDE
182 (2008).
44
55
[1984] F.C.J. No. 186, 1 C.P.R. (3d) 191 (F.C.T.D.), affd. [1988] F.C.J. No. 10, 93 N.R. 25 (F.C.A.).
26 
In response to Carling‟s opposition to its proposed registration of “Canadian,” Molson 
filed  survey  evidence  seeking  to  establish  that  the  word  “Canadian”  had  become 
distinctive of its beer product by reason of its extensive use and advertising.  The survey 
evidence entailed having interviewers pose as restaurant and bar customers, who asked 
the servers for “a Canadian.”  In the majority of cases, they were served a Molson‟s beer 
of the brand.  The opposition was initially decided in Molson‟s 
favor. 
On appeal to the Federal Court, 
Carling successfully overturned the Opposition Board‟s 
decision.  Justice Strayer raised doubts about the value of the survey research, and put 
more stock in criticisms of the research raised by the opponent‟s expert.  One of the more 
significant criticisms was that the restaurant servers are used to deciphering limited cues 
about what people want when they order, and so are an inappropriate population for 
distinctiveness.  Another criticism was that the request for a “Canadian” was made in the 
context of requests by other people at the table for other brands of beer.  This context of 
ordering by brand was thought to give too significant a clue to the servers about the 
nature of the product being ordered.  What Molson‟s ought to have done, suggested 
Strayer J., was to survey the actual consumer who used the product in order to determine 
whether “Canadian” had become distinctive of Molson
5456
6
45
56
[1984] F.C.J. No. 186, 1 C.P.R. (3d) 191, at 197-98 (F.C.T.D.), affd. [1988] F.C.J. No. 10, 93 N.R. 25 (F.C.A.).
27 
APPENDIX 3: MEXICO 
Jurisdiction:    
Mexico 
Summary: 
Survey  evidence  is  permissible  under  Mexican  Industrial 
Property Law. 
Official guidance: 
None available  
Relevant case law: 
No specific guidance but some limited examples of where it 
has been used successfully are available. 
Approximate costs to produce 
survey: 
No information available. 
Overview 
Mexican Industrial Property Law allows a party to rely on market survey evidence.  Instances are 
rare but have been known in the context of: 
an application for a Declaration of Notoriety or Fame; 
prosecution of a trademark application; 
cancellation actions; 
brand valuation; 
infringement litigation; and 
enforcement actions. 
Case law 
In respect of the Declaration of  Notoriety or  Fame, the petitioner  must file  the following 
information: 
1.  market research indicating a sector of the public, i.e. actual or potential consumers, who 
recognize the well-known or famous mark in connection with those products or services 
to which it is applied; 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested