15 
3.  How to use the ICD 
This  section  contains  practical  information  which  all  users  need to  know  in order  to  exploit  the 
classification to its full advantage. Knowledge and understanding of the purpose and structure of the 
ICD are vital for statisticians and analysts of health information as well as for coders. Accurate and 
consistent use of the ICD depends on the correct application of all three volumes. 
3.1  How to use Volume 1 
3.1.1  Introduction 
Volume 1 of the ICD contains the classification itself. It indicates the categories into which diagnoses 
are to be allocated, facilitating their sorting and counting for statistical purposes. It also provides those 
using statistics with a definition of the content of the categories, subcategories and tabulation list items 
they may find included in statistical tables. 
Although it is theoretically possible for a coder to arrive at the correct code by the use of Volume 1 
alone, this would be time-consuming and could lead to errors in assignment. An Alphabetical Index as 
 guide  to  the  classification  is  contained  in  Volume  3.  The  Introduction  to  the  Index  provides 
important information about its relationship with Volume 1. 
Most routine statistical uses of the ICD involve the selection of a single condition from a certificate or 
record  where  more  than  one  is  entered.  The  rules  for  this  selection  in  relation  to  mortality  and 
morbidity are contained in Section 4 of this Volume. 
A detailed description of the tabular list is given in Section 2.4. 
3.1.2  Use of the tabular list of inclusions and four-character subcategories 
Inclusion terms 
Within the three- and four-character rubrics
1
, there are usually listed a number of other diagnostic 
terms. These are known as “inclusion terms” and are given, in addition to the title, as examples of the 
diagnostic statements  to  be classified to that  rubric.  They may refer to different conditions  or be 
synonyms. They are not a subclassification of the rubric. 
Inclusion terms are listed primarily as a guide to the content of the rubrics. Many of the items listed 
relate to important or common terms belonging to the rubric. Others are borderline conditions or sites 
listed to distinguish the boundary between one subcategory and another. The lists of inclusion terms 
are  by  no  means  exhaustive  and  alternative  names  of  diagnostic  entities  are  included  in  the 
Alphabetical Index, which should be referred to first when coding a given diagnostic statement. 
It is sometimes necessary to read inclusion terms in conjunction with titles. This usually occurs when 
the inclusion terms are elaborating lists of sites or pharmaceutical products, where appropriate words 
from  the  title  (e.g.  “malignant  neoplasm  of  ...”,  “injury  to  ...”,  “poisoning  by  ...”)  need  to  be 
understood. 
General diagnostic descriptions  common to a  range  of categories, or  to all the  subcategories  in  a 
three-character category, are to be found in notes headed “Includes”, immediately following a chapter, 
block or category title. 
1
In the context of the ICD, “rubric” denotes either a three-character category or a four-character subcategory. 
Convert pdf to multipage tiff - software application cloud:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to multipage tiff - software application cloud:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFICATION OF DISEASES 
16 
Exclusion terms 
Certain rubrics contain lists of conditions preceded by the word “Excludes”. These are terms which, 
although the  rubric title  might suggest  that they were to  be classified there, are  in  fact classified 
elsewhere.  An  example  of  this  is  in  category  A46,  “Erysipelas”,  where  postpartum  or  puerperal 
erysipelas is excluded. Following each excluded term, in parentheses, is the category or subcategory 
code elsewhere in the classification to which the excluded term should be allocated. 
General exclusions for a range of categories or for all subcategories in a three-character category are to 
be found in notes headed “Excludes”, immediately following a chapter, block or category title. 
Glossary descriptions 
In  addition  to  inclusion  and  exclusion  terms,  Chapter  V,  Mental  and  behavioural  disorders,  uses 
glossary descriptions to indicate the content of rubrics. This device is used because the terminology of 
mental disorders varies greatly, particularly between different countries, and the same name may be 
used to describe quite different conditions. The glossary is not intended for use by coding staff. 
Similar types of definition are given elsewhere in the ICD, for example, Chapter XXI, to clarify the 
intended content of a rubric. 
3.1.3  Two codes for certain conditions  
The “dagger and asterisk” system 
ICD-9  introduced  a  system,  continued  in  ICD-10,  whereby  there  are  two  codes  for  diagnostic 
statements containing information about both an underlying generalized disease and a manifestation in 
a particular organ or site which is a clinical problem in its own right. 
The primary code is for the underlying disease and is marked with a dagger (†); an optional additional 
code  for the  manifestation  is marked with an asterisk  (*).  This convention was provided  because 
coding  to  underlying  disease  alone  was  often  unsatisfactory  for  compiling  statistics  relating  to 
particular specialties, where there was a desire to see the condition classified to the relevant chapter for 
the manifestation when it was the reason for medical care. 
While  the  dagger  and  asterisk  system  provides  alternative  classifications  for  the  presentation  of 
statistics, it is a principle of the ICD that the dagger code is the primary code and must always be used. 
Provision should be made for the asterisk code to be used in addition  if the alternative method of 
presentation may also be required. For coding, the asterisk code must never be used alone. Statistics 
incorporating  the  dagger  codes  conform  with  the  traditional  classification  for  presenting  data  on 
mortality and morbidity and other aspects of medical care. 
Asterisk  codes  appear  as  three-character  categories.  There  are  separate  categories  for  the  same 
conditions occurring when a particular disease is not specified as the underlying cause. For example, 
categories G20 and G21 are for forms of Parkinsonism that are not manifestations of other diseases 
assigned  elsewhere,  while  category  G22
*
is  for  “Parkinsonism  in  diseases  classified  elsewhere”. 
Corresponding dagger codes are given for conditions mentioned in asterisk categories; for example, 
for Syphilitic parkinsonism in G22
*
, the dagger code is A52.1†. 
Some dagger codes appear in special dagger categories. More often, however, the dagger code for 
dual-element diagnoses and unmarked codes for single-element conditions may be derived from the 
same category or subcategory. 
The areas of the classification where the dagger and asterisk system operates are limited; there are 83 
special asterisk categories throughout the classification, which are listed at the start of the relevant 
chapters. 
software application cloud:C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Split Multipage TIFF File
XDoc.Tiff ›› C# Tiff: Split Tiff. C# TIFF - Split Multi-page TIFF File in C#.NET. C# Guide for How to Use TIFF Processing DLL to Split Multi-page TIFF File.
www.rasteredge.com
software application cloud:.NET Multipage TIFF SDK| Process Multipage TIFF Files
to work with .NET development environments, this Multipage TIFF Processing SDK on the Web, open and view TIFF files on to SharePoint and save to PDF documents.
www.rasteredge.com
HOW TO USE THE ICD 
17 
Rubrics in which dagger-marked terms appear may take one of three different forms: 
(i) 
If the symbol (†) and the alternative asterisk code both appear in the rubric heading, all terms 
classifiable to that rubric are subject to dual classification and all have the same alternative 
code, e.g. 
A17.0† Tuberculous meningitis (G01
*
Tuberculosis of meninges (cerebral) (spinal) 
Tuberculous leptomeningitis 
(ii) 
If the symbol appears in the rubric heading but the alternative asterisk code does not, all terms 
classifiable to that rubric are subject to dual classification but they have different alternative 
codes (which are listed for each term), e.g. 
A18.1† Tuberculosis of genitourinary system 
Tuberculosis of: 
bladder (N33.0
*
cervix (N74.0
*
kidney (N29.1
*
male genital organs (N51.-
*
ureter (N29.1
*
Tuberculous female pelvic inflammatory disease (N74.1
*
(iii)  If neither the symbol nor the alternative code appear in the title, the rubric as a whole is not 
subject to dual classification but individual inclusion terms may be; if so, these terms will be 
marked with the symbol and their alternative codes given, e.g. 
A54.8  Other gonococcal infections 
Gonococcal: 
... 
peritonitis† (K67.1
*
pneumonia† (J17.0
*
septicaemia 
skin lesions 
Other optional dual coding 
There are certain situations, other than in the dagger and asterisk system, that permit two ICD codes to 
be used to describe fully a person’s condition. The note in the tabular list, “Use additional code, if 
desired ...”, identifies many of these situations. The additional codes would be used only in special 
tabulations. 
These are: 
(i) 
for local infections, classifiable to the “body systems” chapters, codes from Chapter I may be 
added to identify the infecting organism, where this information does not appear in the title of 
the rubric. A block of categories, B95-B97, is provided for this purpose in Chapter I. 
(ii) 
for  neoplasms  with  functional  activity.  To  the  code  from  Chapter  II  may  be  added  the 
appropriate code from Chapter IV to indicate the type of functional activity. 
(iii)  for neoplasms, the morphology code from Volume 1, although not part of the main ICD, may 
be added to the Chapter II code to identify the morphological type of the tumour. 
(iv) 
for conditions classifiable to F00-F09 (Organic, including symptomatic, mental disorders) in 
Chapter V, where a code from another chapter may be added to indicate the cause, i.e. the 
underlying disease, injury or other insult to the brain. 
software application cloud:C# TIFF: C# Code for Multi-page TIFF Processing Using RasterEdge .
process, convert, annotate, and save various image and document file formats. Most commonly, images and documents like Tiff, Jpeg, Bmp, Png, Gif, PDF, Word
www.rasteredge.com
software application cloud:VB.NET Image: Multi-page TIFF Editor SDK; Process TIFF in VB.NET
imaging SDK owns rich APIs, using which developers can easily load, save, view, edit, annotate, manipulate, convert and compress source TIFF document image
www.rasteredge.com
INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFICATION OF DISEASES 
18 
(v) 
where a condition  is caused by a toxic agent,  a  code  from  Chapter XX  may be added  to 
identify that agent. 
(vi) 
where two codes can be used to describe an injury, poisoning or other adverse effect: a code 
from Chapter XIX, which describes the nature of the injury, and a code from Chapter XX, 
which describes the cause. The choice as to which code should be the additional code depends 
upon the purpose for which the data are being collected. (See introduction to Chapter XX, of 
Volume 1.) 
3.1.4  Conventions used in the tabular list 
In listing inclusion and exclusion terms in the tabular list, the ICD employs some special conventions 
relating to the use of parentheses, square brackets, colons, braces, the abbreviation “NOS”, the phrase 
“not elsewhere classified” (NEC), and the word “and” in titles. These need to be clearly understood 
both by coders and by anyone wishing to interpret statistics based on the ICD. 
Parentheses (   ) 
Parentheses are used in Volume 1 in four important situations. 
(a) 
Parentheses are used to enclose supplementary words, which may follow a diagnostic term 
without  affecting  the  code  number  to  which  the  words outside  the parentheses  would  be 
assigned. For example, in I10 the inclusion term, “Hypertension (arterial) (benign) (essential) 
(malignant)  (primary)  (systemic)”,  implies  that  I10  is  the  code  number  for  the  word 
“Hypertension”  alone  or  when  qualified  by  any,  or  any  combination,  of  the  words  in 
parentheses. 
(b) 
Parentheses are also used to enclose the code to which an exclusion term refers. For example,  
H01.0  Blepharitis 
Excludes: blepharoconjunctivitis (H10.5). 
(c) 
Another  use  of  parentheses  is  in  the  block  titles,  to  enclose  the  three-character  codes  of 
categories included in that block. 
(d) 
The last use of parentheses was incorporated in the Ninth Revision and is related to the dagger 
and asterisk system. Parentheses are used to enclose the dagger code in an asterisk category or 
the asterisk code following a dagger term. 
Square brackets [    ] 
Square brackets are used: 
(a) 
for enclosing synonyms, alternative words or explanatory phrases; for example,  
A30 Leprosy [Hansen’s disease]; 
(b) 
for referring to previous notes; for example,  
C00.8 Overlapping lesion of lip [See note 5 at the beginning of this chapter]; 
(c) 
for referring to a previously stated set of fourth character subdivisions common to a number of 
categories; for example,  
K27 Peptic ulcer, site unspecified [See before K25 for subdivisions]. 
Colon : 
A colon is used in listings of inclusion and exclusion terms when the words that precede it are not 
complete terms for assignment to that rubric. They require one or more of the modifying or qualifying 
words indented under them before they can be assigned to the rubric. For example, in K36, “Other 
software application cloud:Process Multipage TIFF Images in Web Image Viewer| Online
Convert TIFF to other30+ formats supported by .NET imaging page TIFF image to a PDF; More image viewing & displaying functions. Multipage TIFF Processing.
www.rasteredge.com
software application cloud:Process Multipage TIFF Images in .NET Winforms | Online Tutorials
Convert multipage TIFF files into other 30+ formats supported by Swap a Page in a Multipage TIFF Image. Tiff Processing; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode
www.rasteredge.com
HOW TO USE THE ICD 
19 
appendicitis”, the  diagnosis  “appendicitis”  is to be classified there only  if qualified  by the words 
“chronic” or “recurrent”. 
Brace } 
A brace is used in listings of inclusion and exclusion terms to indicate that neither the words that 
precede it nor the words after it are complete terms. Any of the terms before the brace should be 
qualified by one or more of the terms that follow it. For example:  
O71.6  Obstetric damage to pelvic joints and ligaments 
Avulsion of inner symphyseal cartilage 
Damage to coccyx 
obstetric 
Traumatic separation o
f symphysis (pubis) 
“NOS” 
The  letters  NOS  are  an  abbreviation  for  “not  otherwise  specified”,  implying  “unspecified”  or 
“unqualified”. 
Sometimes an unqualified term is nevertheless classified to a rubric for a more specific type of the 
condition. This is because, in medical terminology, the most common form of a condition is often 
known by the name of the condition itself and only the less common types are qualified. For example, 
“mitral stenosis” is commonly used to mean “rheumatic mitral stenosis”. These inbuilt assumptions 
have to be taken into account in order to avoid incorrect classification. Careful inspection of inclusion 
terms will reveal where an assumption of cause has been made; coders should be careful not to code a 
term as unqualified unless it is quite clear that no information is available that would permit a more 
specific assignment elsewhere. Similarly, in interpreting statistics based on the ICD, some conditions 
assigned to an apparently specified category will not have been so specified on the record that was 
coded. When comparing trends over time and interpreting statistics, it is important to be aware that 
assumptions may change from one revision of the ICD to another. For example, before the Eighth 
Revision, an unqualified aortic aneurysm was assumed to be due to syphilis. 
“Not elsewhere classified” 
The words “not elsewhere classified”, when used in a three-character category title, serve as a warning 
that certain specified variants of the listed conditions may appear in other parts of the classification. 
For example: 
J16 
Pneumonia due to other infectious organisms, not elsewhere classified 
This category  includes J16.0 Chlamydial  pneumonia and  J16.8  Pneumonia  due to other specified 
infectious organisms. Many other categories are provided in Chapter X  (for example, J10-J15) and 
other chapters (for example, P23.- Congenital pneumonia) for pneumonias due to specified infectious 
organisms. J18 Pneumonia, organism unspecified, accommodates pneumonias for which the infectious 
agent is not stated. 
“And” in titles 
“And” stands for “and/or”. For example, in the rubric A18.0, Tuberculosis of bones and joints, are to 
be classified cases of “tuberculosis of bones”, “tuberculosis of joints” and “tuberculosis of bones and 
joints”. 
software application cloud:.NET PDF SDK | Read & Processing PDF files
Able to convert PDF documents into other formats (multipage TIFF, JPEG, etc); Multiple font types support, including TrueType, Type0, Type1, Type3 & OpenType;
www.rasteredge.com
software application cloud:C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
NET control able to batch convert PDF documents to image Create image files including all PDF contents, like Turn multipage PDF file into single image files
www.rasteredge.com
INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFICATION OF DISEASES 
20 
Point dash.- 
In some cases, the fourth character of a subcategory code is replaced by a dash, e.g. 
G03  Meningitis due to other and unspecified causes, 
Excludes: meningoencephalitis (G04.-) 
This indicates  to  the  coder that a fourth  character  exists  and  should be  sought in the appropriate 
category. This convention is used in both the tabular list and the alphabetical index. 
3.1.5  Categories with common characteristics 
For  quality  control  it  is  useful  to  introduce  programmed  checks  into  the  computer  system.  The 
following  groups  of  categories  are  provided  as  a  basis  for  such  checks  on  internal  consistency, 
grouped according to the special characteristic that unites them. 
Asterisk categories 
The following asterisk categories are not to be used alone; they must always be used in addition to a 
dagger code: 
D63
*
, D77
*
, E35
*
, E90
*
, F00
*
, F02
*
, G01
*
, G02
*
, G05
*
, G07
*
, G13
*
, G22
*
, G26
*
, G32
*
, G46
*
, G53
*
G55
*
, G59
*
, G63
*
, G73
*
, G94
*
, G99
*
, H03
*
, H06
*
, H13
*
, H19
*
, H22
*
, H28
*
, H32
*
, H36
*
, H42
*
, H45
*
H48
*
, H58
*
, H62
*
, H67
*
, H75
*
, H82
*
, H94
*
, I32
*
, I39
*
, I41
*
, I43
*
, I52
*
, I68
*
, I79
*
, I98
*
, J17
*
, J91
*
J99
*
, K23
*
, K67
*
, K77
*
, K87
*
, K93
*
, L14
*
, L45
*
, L54
*
, L62
*
, L86
*
, L99
*
, M01
*
, M03
*
, M07
*
, M09
*
M14
*
, M36
*
, M49
*
, M63
*
, M68
*
, M73
*
, M82
*
, M90
*
, N08
*
, N16
*
, N22
*
, N29
*
, N33
*
, N37
*
, N51
*
N74
*
, N77
*
, P75
*
Categories limited to one sex 
The following categories apply only to males: 
B26.0, C60-C63, D07.4-D07.6, D17.6, D29.-, D40.-, E29.-, E89.5, F52.4, I86.1,  L29.1, N40-N51, 
Q53-Q55, R86, S31.2-S31.3, Z12.5. 
The following categories apply only to females: 
A34,  B37.3,  C51-C58,  C79.6,  D06.-,  D07.0-D07.3,  D25-D28,  D39.-,  E28.-,  E89.4,  F52.5,  F53.-, 
I86.3, L29.2, L70.5, M80.0-M80.1, M81.0-M81.1, M83.0, N70-N98, N99.2-N99.3, O00-O99, P54.6, 
Q50-Q52, R87, S31.4, S37.4-S37.6, T19.2-T19.3, T83.3, Y76.-, Z01.4, Z12.4, Z30.1, Z30.3, Z30.5, 
Z31.1, Z31.2, Z32-Z36, Z39.-, Z43.7, Z87.5, Z97.5. 
Guidance for handling inconsistencies between conditions and sex is given at 4.2.5. 
Sequelae categories 
The following categories are provided for sequelae of conditions that are no longer in an active phase: 
B90-B94, E64.-, E68, G09, I69.-, O97, T90-T98, Y85-Y89. 
Guidance for coding sequelae for both mortality and morbidity purposes can be found at 4.2.4 and 
4.4.2. 
Postprocedural disorders 
The following categories are not to be used for underlying-cause mortality coding. Guidance for their 
use in morbidity coding is found at 4.4.2. 
E89.-, G97.-, H59.-, H95.-, I97.-, J95.-, K91.-, M96.-, N99.-. 
HOW TO USE THE ICD 
21 
3.2  How to use Volume 3  
The Introduction to Volume 3, the Alphabetical Index to ICD-10, gives instructions on how to use it. 
These instructions  should  be  studied  carefully  before  starting  to  code. A  brief description  of the 
structure and use of the Index is given below. 
3.2.1  Arrangement of the Alphabetical Index 
Volume 3 is divided into three sections as follows: 
Section I lists all the terms classifiable to Chapters I-XIX and Chapter XXI, except drugs and other 
chemicals. 
Section II is the index  of external causes of morbidity and mortality and contains all the terms 
classifiable to Chapter XX, except drugs and other chemicals. 
Section III, the Table of Drugs and Chemicals, lists for each substance the codes for poisonings and 
adverse  effects  of  drugs  classifiable  to  Chapter  XIX,  and  the  Chapter  XX  codes  that  indicate 
whether the poisoning was accidental,  deliberate (self-harm), undetermined, or an adverse effect of 
a correct substance properly administered. 
3.2.2  Structure 
The  Index  contains  “lead  terms”,  positioned  to  the  far  left  of  the  column,  with  other  words 
(“modifiers” or “qualifiers”) at different levels of indentation under them. In Section I, these indented 
modifiers or qualifiers are usually varieties, sites or circumstances that affect coding; in Section II they 
indicate different types of accident or occurrence, vehicles involved, etc. Modifiers that do not affect 
coding appear in parentheses after the condition. 
3.2.3  Code numbers 
The code numbers that follow the terms refer to the categories and subcategories to which the terms 
should be classified. If the code has only three characters, it can be assumed that the category has not 
been subdivided. In most instances where the category has been subdivided, the code number in the 
Index will give the fourth character. A dash in the fourth position (e.g. O03.-) means that the category 
has been subdivided and that the fourth character can be found by referring to the tabular list. If the 
dagger and asterisk system applies to the term, both codes are given. 
3.2.4  Conventions 
Parentheses 
Parentheses are used in the Index in the same way as in Volume 1, i.e. to enclose modifiers. 
“NEC” 
NEC (not elsewhere classified) indicates that specified variants of the listed condition are classified 
elsewhere, and that, where appropriate, a more precise term should be looked for in the Index. 
Cross-references 
Cross-references are used to avoid unnecessary duplication of terms in the Index. The word “see” 
requires the coder to refer to the other term; “see also” directs the coder to refer elsewhere in the Index 
if the statement being coded contains other information that is not found indented under the term to 
which “see also” is attached. 
3.3  Basic coding guidelines 
The Alphabetical Index contains many terms not included in Volume 1, and coding requires that both 
the Index and the Tabular List should be consulted before a code is assigned. 
INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFICATION OF DISEASES 
22 
Before attempting to code, the coder needs to know the principles of classification and coding and to 
have carried out practical exercises. 
The following is a simple guide intended to assist the occasional user of the ICD. 
1.  Identify the type of statement to be coded and refer to the appropriate section of the Alphabetical 
Index. (If the statement is a disease or injury or other condition classifiable to Chapters I - XIX or 
XXI, consult Section I of the Index. If the statement is the external cause of an injury or other 
event classifiable to Chapter XX, consult Section II.) 
2.  Locate  the  lead  term.  For  diseases  and  injuries  this  is  usually  a  noun  for  the  pathological 
condition. However,  some  conditions  expressed as adjectives  or  eponyms are  included  in the 
Index as lead terms. 
3.  Read and be guided by any note that appears under the lead term. 
4.  Read any terms enclosed in parentheses after the lead term (these modifiers do not affect the code 
number), as well as any terms indented under the lead term (these modifiers may affect the code 
number), until all the words in the diagnostic expression have been accounted for. 
5.  Follow carefully any cross-references (“see” and “see also”) found in the Index. 
6.  Refer  to  the  tabular  list  to  verify  the  suitability  of  the  code  number  selected.  Note  that  a 
three-character code in the Index with a dash in the fourth position means that there is a fourth 
character to be found in Volume 1. Further subdivisions to be used in a supplementary character 
position are not indexed and, if used, must be located in Volume 1. 
7.  Be guided by any inclusion or exclusion terms under the selected code or under the chapter, block 
or category heading. 
8.  Assign the code. 
Specific guidelines for the selection of the cause or condition to be coded, and for coding the condition 
selected, are given in Section 4. 
23 
4.  Rules and guidelines for mortality and morbidity 
coding 
This section concerns the rules and guidelines adopted by the World Health Assembly regarding the 
selection of a single cause or condition for routine tabulation from death certificates and morbidity 
records. Guidelines are also provided for the application of the rules and for coding of the condition 
selected for tabulation. 
4.1  Mortality: guidelines for certification and rules for coding 
Mortality statistics are one of the principal sources of health information and in many countries they 
are the most reliable type of health data. 
4.1.1  Causes of death 
In 1967,  the Twentieth  World  Health Assembly defined  the  causes of death to  be entered on the 
medical certificate of cause of death as “all those diseases, morbid conditions or injuries which either 
resulted in or contributed to death and the circumstances of the accident or violence which produced 
any such  injuries”.  The purpose of the  definition is  to  ensure  that all the  relevant  information is 
recorded  and  that  the  certifier  does  not  select  some  conditions  for  entry  and  reject  others.  The 
definition does not include symptoms and modes of dying, such as heart failure or respiratory failure. 
When only one cause of death is recorded, this cause is selected for tabulation. When more than one 
cause of death is recorded, selection should be made in accordance with the rules given in section 
4.1.5. The rules are based on the concept of the underlying cause of death. 
4.1.2  Underlying cause of death 
It was agreed by the Sixth Decennial International Revision Conference that the cause of death for 
primary tabulation should be designated the underlying cause of death. 
From the standpoint of prevention of death, it is necessary to break the chain of events or to effect a 
cure at some point. The most effective public health objective is to prevent the precipitating cause 
from operating. For this purpose, the underlying cause has been defined as “(a) the disease or injury 
which initiated the train of morbid events leading directly to death, or (b) the circumstances of the 
accident or violence which produced the fatal injury”. 
4.1.3  International form of medical certificate of cause of death 
The above principle can be applied uniformly by using the medical certification form recommended 
by the World Health Assembly. It is the responsibility of the medical practitioner signing the death 
certificate  to  indicate  which  morbid  conditions  led  directly  to  death  and  to  state  any  antecedent 
conditions giving rise to this cause. 
The medical certificate shown below is designed to facilitate the selection of the underlying cause of 
death when two or more causes are recorded. Part I of the form is for diseases related to the train of 
events leading directly to death, and Part II is for unrelated but contributory conditions. 
INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFICATION OF DISEASES 
24 
The  medical  practitioner  or  other  qualified  certifier  should  use  his  or  her  clinical  judgement  in 
completing the medical certificate of cause of death. Automated systems must not include lists or other 
prompts to guide the certifier as these necessarily limit the range of diagnoses and therefore have an 
adverse effect on the accuracy and usefulness of the report. 
In 1990, the Forty-third World Health Assembly adopted a recommendation that, where a need had 
been identified, countries should consider the possibility of an additional line, (d), in Part I of the 
certificate. However, countries may adopt, or continue to use, a certificate with only three lines in Part 
I where a fourth line is unnecessary, or where there are legal or other impediments to the adoption of 
the certificate shown above. 
The condition recorded on the lowest used line of Part I of the certificate is usually the underlying 
cause of death used for tabulation. However, the procedures described in sections 4.1.4-4.1.5 may 
result in the selection of another condition as the underlying cause of death. To differentiate between 
these two possibilities, the expression originating antecedent cause (originating cause) will be used to 
refer  to  the  condition  proper  to  the  last  used line  of  Part I  of  the certificate, and  the  expression 
underlying cause of death will be used to identify the cause selected for tabulation. 
If there is only one step in the chain of events, an entry at line I(a) is sufficient. If there is more than 
one step, the direct cause is entered at (a) and the originating antecedent cause is entered last, with any 
intervening cause entered on line (b) or on lines (b) and (c). An example of a death certificate with 
four steps in the chain of events leading directly to death is: 
(a)  Pulmonary embolism 
(b)  Pathological fracture 
(c)  Secondary carcinoma of femur 
(d)  Carcinoma of breast 
Part II is for any other significant condition that contributed to the fatal outcome, but was not related 
to the disease or condition directly causing death. 
After the words “due to (or as a consequence of)”, which appear on the certificate, should be included 
not  only  the direct  cause or  pathological  process, but  also  indirect  causes, for example where an 
antecedent  condition  has  predisposed  to  the  direct  cause  by  damage  to  tissues  or  impairment  of 
function, even after a long interval. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested