12
Powered Human Gait Assistance 
Kevin W. Hollander* and Thomas G. Sugar† 
*Augspurger-Komm Engineering, Inc., Phoenix, Arizona 
†Arizona State University, Mesa, Arizona 
USA
1. Introduction 
Wearable robots are computer-controlled, actuated devices that are worn by a person. The 
purpose of such a device is to enhance the strength or performance of the person that 
wears it, where performance can be speed or coordination or some other desired attribute. 
Potential uses of a wearable robot are in rehabilitation, training, strength augmentation or 
simply as an assistance device for normal daily living. The greatest potential impact that a 
wearable robot could have is in the rehabilitation or assistance of a weak or disabled 
person. 
Within the growing elderly population, 20 to 50% are affected by abnormal gait, i.e. walking 
impairment (Rubenstein & Trueblood, 2004). Abnormal gait in the elderly does not have a 
specific cause; many age related factors can affect normal locomotion. Some examples 
include; 1) muscle weakness, 2) slow reaction times, and 3) impaired tactile sensation from 
the feet. The ability to balance is the first requirement for successful gait. Impaired sensory 
information, long processing times and weak actuation all lead eventually to an unstable 
balance control system. 
Adaptation of powered actuated devices to assist elderly or weak individuals implies 
special design requirements (Hollander & Sugar, 2004). Use of the term `wearable’ implies 
that such a robot be portable, lightweight and safe. In order for such a device to be 
accessible for home use, the additional implications are that the wearable robot be 
economical and easy to operate. In contrast, a factory floor robot is none of these things; 
therefore, simple adaptation of existing technology is not possible. 
The goal of this work is to investigate these design requirements and to develop the 
methodologies necessary for their implementation to human gait assistance. This work will 
focus on the use of a novel spring based actuator, which is powerful, lightweight, energy 
efficient and above all safe to its wearer. 
2. Background 
The prevalence of powered assistance devices for the weak and elderly can be seen almost 
every day. Powered-seated scooters are increasingly popular and are available from a 
variety of commercial sources. Often these scooters require additional modifications to one’s 
home and automobile to accommodate their use. The popularity of the seated scooter is 
testament to the need for powered assistance; however, the use of these devices are in direct 
conflict to the belief that long term health is maintained by the inclusion of “the types of 
Source:RehabilitationRobotics,BookeditedbySashiSKommu,
ISBN978-3-902613-04-2,pp.648,August2007,ItechEducationandPublishing,Vienna,Austria
O
penAccessDatabasewww.i-techonline.co
m
.Net convert pdf to tiff - control SDK system:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
www.rasteredge.com
.Net convert pdf to tiff - control SDK system:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
204 
Rehabilitation Robotics 
activities  that  provide  an  adequate  load-bearing  stimulus”  (ACSM,  1995).  Powered 
assistance  is  required,  but  should  come  in  a  form  that  promotes  and  supports 
standing/walking  activities. To maintain general health and  wellbeing, load-bearing 
walking is essential. 
However, the solution to developing a walking assistance robot is not trivial. It is well 
known that such a system would need the ability to produce large torques and be capable of 
high power. Such requirements raise the threshold for wearable robots to be successful in 
this application. Nevertheless, work in this area has already begun. 
Projects in the area of assisted locomotion are the BLEEX (Berkely Lower Extremity 
Exoskeleton) robot (Kazerooni et al., 2006) and the HAL-3 (Hybrid Assistive Leg) robot 
(Kawamoto et al., 2003; Kawamoto & Sankai, 2002). Both devices are rigidly attached to the 
wearer and are directly driven, i.e. no compliant interface. 
The BLEEX robot uses hybrid hydraulic actuators to drive the system, whereas the HAL-3 
robot uses DC motors and gearboxes to provide power for movement to the user. In both 
projects, the same solution is used, providing both positive and negative forces to the user 
to achieve a desired movement pattern. For example in gait, sometimes the robot needs to 
push the user (positive) and sometimes for support the robot needs to resist the user 
(negative) and in either case the robot is putting power into the system. 
In other work, a robotic powered knee, RoboKnee (Pratt et al., 2004), and an active ankle 
foot orthosis, AAFO (Blaya & Herr, 2004) have been developed to assist with an individual’s 
gait. Each of these devices features the linear Series Elastic Actuator (Robinson et al., 1999) 
as the means of robotic control. The linear series elastic actuator features a helical spring in 
series with a ball screw mechanism, similar to the actuator developed by Sugar and Kumar 
(Sugar & Kumar, 1998) for grasping tasks. For the series elastic device, the inclusion of the 
spring aids greatly in force and impedance control task stability. However, even though the 
device uses a spring between the actuator and the environment (i.e. person), the compliance 
of this system is derived mostly from its controller. Based upon the geometry and length of 
the springs used, very little deflection or compliance would be possible in a passive 
situation and thus is still very nearly a directly driven system. 
Common knowledge in the legged robot community is that inclusion of springs in robotics 
can effectively reduce both the power and energy requirements demanded of an actuator 
(Raibert, 1986; Hurst et al., 2004). This is because a spring can store and release energy 
efficiently during cyclic repetitive tasks and the power released from a spring is limited only 
by the natural frequency and stiffness of the system. In other literature, van den Bogert 
describes a theoretical, passive mechanism that reduces peak power for human gait by more 
than 70% (van den Bogert, 2003). The passive device uses a series of elastic cords and 
pulleys around multiple anatomical joints to accomplish reduced power requirements. As 
written, the specific implementation described would not likely be practical, but the point of 
including springs in the design of wearable robotic systems is beneficial. 
In order to meet the demanding requirements stated above, a wearable robotic device must 
include lightweight, energy conservative, power reducing springs to be both portable and 
inherently safe. 
3. Human Ankle Gait 
A basic understanding of human ankle gait is required before a discussion of actuator 
strategies for ankle gait assistance can begin. Gait is the term used to describe the 
control SDK system:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Our PDF to HTML converter library control is a 100% clean .NET document image solution, which is designed to help .NET developers convert PDF to HTML webpage
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:Online Convert PDF file to Tiff. Best free online PDF Tif
Using this .NET PDF to TIFF conversion control, C# developers can render and convert PDF document to TIFF image file with no loss in original file quality.
www.rasteredge.com
Powered Human Gait Assistance 
205 
locomotion of legged animals. Gait is a reoccurring pattern of leg and foot movements, 
rotations, and torques. The discussion of gait is presented in terms of percentages of a gait 
cycle due to its repetitive nature. The basic description of gait analysis terms is illustrated in 
figure 1. 
Fig. 1. Normal Gait Cycle. 
As can be seen in the figure, a gait cycle is defined for a single leg and begins with the initial 
contact of the foot with the ground or `heel strike’. The conclusion of a cycle occurs as the 
same foot makes a second `heel strike’. The end of one gait cycle is of course the beginning 
of another. 
Other key regions of the gait cycle are indicated in figure 1 as mid stance, push-off, and toe-
off. In this case, the mid stance is shown with the leg perpendicular to the foot at the ankle. 
At this point in the gait cycle the body’s weight is aligned over the primary supporting foot. 
The peak thrust of the push-off phase of gait is diagrammed at 50% of the gait cycle. Push-
off is the propulsive phase of gait, giving the body its continued forward motion. The toe-off 
event begins at the completion of push-off, which is the beginning of leg swing. At toe-off, 
the hip is fully extended and the leg and foot are advanced to prepare for the next step or 
heel strike. To illustrate a typical pattern of gait, consider the kinematics and kinetics of a 
normal ankle (Whittle, 1996), figure 2; notice that the ankle moment (torque) data is 
normalized by body weight (kg). 
In this figure, peak ankle moment occurs at roughly 45% of the gait cycle and at a value of -
1.25 Nm/kg or for an 80 kg person, -100 Nm. The negative sign represents the physiological 
direction for which the moment occurs. In this case, peak moment is acting to move the foot 
in a toes-down direction. Interesting to note, the point at which the peak moment occurs, the 
ankle angle begins a rapid descent to its lowest overall value of -24
o
at 60% of the gait cycle. 
The region of gait approximately between 40% and 60% of the gait cycle is known as `push 
off’ (highlighted on each plot). 
control SDK system:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
Create PDF from PowerPoint; VB.NET: Create PDF from Tiff; VB.NET: Convert PDF to Word; VB.NET: Convert PDF to Tiff; VB.NET: Convert PDF
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to MS Office Word in VB.NET. VB.NET Tutorial for How to Convert PDF to Word (.docx) Document in VB.NET. Best
www.rasteredge.com
206 
Rehabilitation Robotics 
Fig. 2. Normal Ankle Gait: Kinematics and Kinetics. 
This data provides information about the torques and angles required to achieve normal 
ankle gait. In terms of an actuator, these torques and angles can be converted into required 
forces and displacements. An actuator following this linear data will provide normal gait. 
Knowing the forces and positions necessary for gait is the first step. The next step is to 
determine the power requirements, which is used to size the motor for this task. 
In order to determine the power of gait for the human ankle, it is necessary to assume a 
person’s body weight and gait speed. This information, combined with the data for normal 
ankle gait, i.e. figure 2, are used to calculate ankle power for an ideal person who weighs 80 
kg and walks at a frequency of 0.8 Hz, see figure 3. 
Fig. 3. Normal Ankle Gait Power, 80 kg person, 0.8 Hz gait frequency. 
Notice that the ankle requires primarily positive power for the task of `push off’ (i.e. 40%-
60%). For most of the ankle’s power needs the requirements are modest, but during the 
control SDK system:C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Tiff
Create PDF from PowerPoint; VB.NET: Create PDF from Tiff; VB.NET: Convert PDF to Word; VB.NET: Convert PDF to Tiff; VB.NET: Convert PDF
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Tiff
Create PDF from PowerPoint; VB.NET: Create PDF from Tiff; VB.NET: Convert PDF to Word; VB.NET: Convert PDF to Tiff; VB.NET: Convert PDF
www.rasteredge.com
Powered Human Gait Assistance 
207 
push off phase of gait it spikes to 250 W. Considering both the negative and positive 
portions of power, average power for this task is only 15 W. The power required during the 
swing phase of gait is minimal because little torque is needed to reposition the foot for the 
next heel strike. An integration of the power curve yields a total value of energy for each 
ankle to be 19.4 Joules/step. 
Additionally, the primary source for this peak power or propulsion in normal gait is the 
gastrocnemius and soleus muscle groups. These muscle groups are located at on the 
backside of the lower leg and are often referred to as the calf muscles. Flexing these muscles 
produces a downward thrust of the foot or plantar flexion moment about the ankle. 
Experimental recordings of muscle activity are achieved via electromyography or EMG 
instrumentation. During a muscular contraction, positively charged calcium ions flow 
within the muscular tissue. The movement of these charged particles creates a change, or 
flux, in the magnetic field surrounding the muscles, and can be captured or measured by 
electromagnetically sensitive equipment, i.e. EMG electrodes. 
Once captured, an EMG signal can be processed and observed. For the gastroncnemius 
muscle group, a rectified and processed EMG signal is shown for normal gait, see figure 4 
(Hof et al., 2002). 
Fig. 4. Normal Ankle Gait EMG: Gastrocnemius Muscle Group (reprinted with permission 
from Hof et al., 2002). 
Figure 4 shows several processed EMG signals, each for a different gait speed. Logically, the 
data shows higher amplitudes in muscular response for increases in gait speed. The raw 
signals for this data have been filtered for noise, rectified and enveloped as part of the 
processing. The result is the relatively clean looking signals displayed in the figure. EMG 
signal measurements are sensitive to many factors and thus its amplitude can be compared 
only under carefully considered situations. 
control SDK system:C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to SVG in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF DLLs and Demo Code: Convert PDF to SVG in C#.NET. Add necessary references:
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:RasterEdge XDoc.Tiff for .NET - SDK for Tiff Document Imaging
Tiff viewer for .NET. Fully featured HTML5 Tiff Viewer. Fully featured WinForms Tiff Viewer. Able to view and edit Tiff rapidly. Convert. Convert Tiff to PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
208 
Rehabilitation Robotics 
For example, in the displayed data, the measurements were recorded sequentially during 
the same testing session. In this case, it is appropriate to compare the amplitudes of these 
signals. However, these same amplitudes have no real meaning for comparison to another 
subject or even the same subject on a different day. As such, the real usefulness of an EMG 
measure is in capturing the relative shape and timing of muscular activity and not its 
amplitude. From figure 4 it is apparent that peak amplitude of EMG activity of the 
gastrocnemius occurs just prior to the push-off phase of gait. In a later section, the 
significance of this shape and timing will be discussed. 
4. Robotic Tendon Approach 
The Robotic Tendon is the name given to our spring-based actuator (Hollander et al., 2006b). 
Use of the term Robotic Tendon implies an analogy to human physiology. The premise of 
the following development is that the human muscular system uses the advantages inherent 
in its elastic nature. Therefore, similar to a human muscle, the elastic nature of a spring is 
used to minimize both the work and peak power required to perform the task of ankle gait. 
A conceptual model of the Robotic Tendon can be seen in Figure 5. Conceptually, this model 
is same model described by Sugar and Kumar (Sugar & Kumar, 1998; Sugar, 2002) as well as 
the linear series elastic model described by Robinson (Robinson et al., 1999). 
Fig. 5. Robotic Tendon Model: motor and spring in series. 
From figure 5, a development of motor power requirements based upon stiffness K can be 
derived. The position of the environment, x
g
, is given by converting the joint angles of gait 
to linear displacement using a simple lever arm. In the model, the position, the compression 
of the spring and the movement of the motor can achieve x
g
. It is thus a combination of the 
position of the motor, x
m
, and the position of the spring, x
s
, see equation 1. 
s
m
g
x
x
x

(1) 
However, since a spring is a passive device its position is determined by the force, F,
applied to it. The force, F, is calculated by converting the moment needed in gait using a 
simple lever arm. Consider the basic Hookean spring shown in equation 2. 
Powered Human Gait Assistance 
209 
s
x
K
F
ʌ'
ʌ
(2) 
where,
s
o
s
x
d
x

'
.
The free un-deformed length of the spring is represented by d
o
and is simply an offset value. 
Solving equation 2 for x
s
, yields: 
K
F
d
x
o
s

(3) 
The length of the spring is based upon the environmental force and spring stiffness. 
Equation 3 can be substituted into the equation for environmental position, x
g
, and solved 
for the required motor position, x
m
. From this substitution equation 4 is determined, 
o
g
m
d
K
F
x
x


(4) 
and taking its derivative, yields the velocity required. 
K
F
x
x
g
m

(5) 
Knowing the forces, F, required by the gait cycle and knowing the motor’s required velocity, 
m
x
, the relationship for motor power, P
m
, can be obtained. Power is simply force multiplied 
by velocity, thus multiplying F by equation 5 will yield a relationship for motor power. 
 
 
power
spring
power
gait
required
g
m
K
F F
F x
P
ʌ

ʌ
(6) 
Human ankle gait power can be both negative and positive. When it is negative, a resistance 
motion is applied to the ankle, and when it is positive, a propelling motion is applied. A 
motor unit cannot typically provide negative power; therefore, it must provide power to 
both resist and propel human motion. For this reason, an absolute value in equation 6 is 
used. In addition, values for force, F, velocity, 
m
 and F
can all be determined from 
human gait analysis data. Thus, stiffness, K, becomes the only design parameter. 
Consider the case where spring stiffness, K, is nearly infinite (i.e. direct drive). In this 
example the spring power term drops to zero and the motor must provide the absolute 
value of normal gait power. In the opposite case, consider a spring with stiffness near zero. 
In this example, the power requirements tend toward infinity. If a straight line were 
assumed between these two cases, it would appear that a direct drive scenario is the best. 
Fortunately, this simplistic relationship is not the case. On the contrary, if a spring is 
properly selected both energy and peak power for the motor required to perform human 
gait can be drastically reduced compared to the direct drive analogy. 
4.1 Stiffness for Zero Motor Power at Peak Output 
As a first approach to determining stiffness, consider the form of equation 6. In terms of a 
design, the only variable to pick is spring stiffness. The rest of the terms in this equation are 
210 
Rehabilitation Robotics 
dictated by ankle gait kinematics and kinetics. So, what is the best method for choosing 
stiffness? 
One possibility is to try and minimize the motor’s power demand during the most 
demanding portion of the gait cycle. If the peak motor requirement could be driven lower 
than 247 W described earlier, then a smaller and thus lighter motor could be chosen for the 
actuator. So as a first approach, equation 6 can be set equal to zero and solved for K. 
g
x
F
K
(7) 
Evaluating equation 7 for the example gait data, using a 0.12 m lever arm, yields a 
stiffness K
1
= 14,152 N/m. The peak power of gait occurs at 50% of the gait cycle. Using 
this calculated value of stiffness, power of the motor will equal zero during the peak 
power of gait. Initially, this may seem counter intuitive, but consider that a spring can 
store energy over time and yet release it very quickly (i.e. high power). In the case of the 
Robotic Tendon, at this stiffness, the spring is providing 100% of the power needed for 
gait at the instance of peak demand. Figure 6 shows the power profile that results from 
choosing this stiffness. 
Fig. 6. Robotic Tendon Power with K
1
= 14,152 N/m: Zero motor power at peak gait power. 
The figure shows a thick line for the Robotic Tendon power and a thin line for the power 
required for  ankle gait. The resulting power curve for the  Robotic Tendon differs 
significantly from the one developed for a lead screw only or direct drive actuator. In this 
case, the ankle gait curve and motor curve do not seem to match. The difference between 
these two curves is the addition of the spring power. The addition of spring power to the 
motor power will result in the appropriate ankle gait output. 
Noteworthy in this graph is the much lower value of peak power for the motor compared to 
ankle gait. Even with the addition of efficiency of the lead screw, a motor sized below 150 W 
can easily perform this gait task. As an example, the Maxon RE40 DC motor is nominally 
rated for 150 W of continuous power and weighs only 0.48 kg. With a small 6 mm diameter 
lead screw design, the combined weight of the K
1
actuator is still less than 1 kg and would 
Powered Human Gait Assistance 
211 
consume only about 23 J per step. This provides a much better result than the lead screw 
only actuator, which would require a much larger motor and thus a heavier design. 
Consider again the analogy of the Robotic Tendon to human muscle and its response to the 
task of ankle gait. Previously, figure 4 showed the timing and shape of the EMG response of 
gastrocnemius muscle during gait. EMG has often been correlated to muscular force. 
However, consider the shape and timing of the motor power curve for the Robotic Tendon 
compared to EMG signal of the gastrocnemius. Both of these actuators are performing a 
similar function and both use elasticity to minimize power and to conserve energy. For 
convenience, a scaled plot of both of these figures was constructed, see figure 7. 
Fig. 7. Robotic Tendon Power and EMG Comparison: Triangles represent the calculated 
Robotic Tendon power data, scaled to fit the previously referenced EMG data plot of the 
gastrocnemius muscle group (reprinted with permission from Hof et al., 2002). 
The magnitudes for these sets of plots have no meaning in the present comparison. Only the 
shape and timing need to be considered. It is remarkable to see the level of similarity 
between the two sets of plots. Although this is not a conclusive result, it is nonetheless a 
strong indication of relationships. If EMG is more closely related to power of the muscle 
than force, it is still not surprising to see that an EMG/force correlation would exist. 
Consider that power is defined as force multiplied by velocity and so EMG and power 
would each follow force closely. The significance of these similar graphs is that the models 
of a Robotic Tendon could provide a clean and simple explanation as to how the human 
uses his own muscle motors. This topic is a separate discussion to the present analysis, but 
still offers an interesting result to share. 
4.2 Stiffness Optimization 
Using the above method for selecting stiffness yields good results for the Robotic Tendon 
actuator. These results may even indicate that the human’s gastrocnemius muscle group 
could be using a similar strategy. If this is the case, can a better result be obtained? To 
answer this question an exploration of the influence of stiffness, K, on peak motor power is 
required. Based upon equation 6, the relationship between stiffness, K, and ‘peak’ motor 
power is considered in equation 8. 
212 
Rehabilitation Robotics 
K
F F
F x
P
g
peak
m
ʌ
ʌ 
max
(8) 
To run the optimization, a C++ program was written to calculate the maximum motor 
power during a gait cycle for a large range of spring stiffness values. The code was run for 
several iterations to further refine the optimization results. To explain these results, a plot of 
only peak motor power was produced for a successive range of spring stiffness’s. This plot 
can be seen in figure 8. 
Fig. 8. Optimization of Stiffness, K, for an 80kg person. 
Figure 8 reveals an interesting relationship. Extreme stiffness cases can be described by 
this graph and its corresponding equation. At a stiffness value near zero, infinite motor 
power would be required. The analogy is that the spring is absorbing all of the power 
that the motor can provide and is not providing any back to the environment. At the 
opposite extreme is infinite stiffness or direct drive (i.e. lead screw only design). It is 
seen that a high stiffness spring asymptotically approaches peak gait power near 250 W. 
However, rather than being a linear relationship between the two extremes, a minimum 
point or cusp occurs. The odd shape of this graph can be explained as follows. The 
driving profile for this plot is determined by a –1/K relationship with respect to power. 
The cusp is created as a function of the absolute value of this factor and hence a 
minimum is created. For the example problem, an optimal value of stiffness, K
2
, is 
determined to be 20,278 N/m. Figure 9 shows the power profile that results from 
choosing this new stiffness. 
The figure shows a thick line for the Robotic Tendon power and a thin line for the power 
required for ankle gait. The resulting power curve for the Robotic Tendon is very different 
from the one developed for a lead screw only actuator and is different still from the 
previous stiffness choice. The peak power for the motor using this stiffness is lower than 
was seen in the previous stiffness case. Including the effects of friction on this graph, a 
motor sized below 90 W can be used. As an example, the Maxon RE35 DC motor is 
nominally rated for 90 W of continuous power and weighs only 0.34 kg, that is 30% less 
weight than in the previous example. Again, considering the effects of friction, the K
2
actuator would still consume only about 23 J per step. Even though the power results have 
been improved between the K
1
and K
2
stiffness cases, the energy of either approach is the 
same. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested