Streaming and online access to content and services  
PE 492.435 
29 
3.
KEY  ENABLING  FACTORS  AND  CHALLENGES  FOR  THE 
CURRENT DEVELOPMENT OF STREAMING AND ON-LINE 
ACCESS TO CONTENT 
Effective  development  of  streaming  and  online  access  to  content  is  at  the  same  time 
enabled  and  restrained  by  three  main  factors:  cloud  computing,  mobile  Internet 
connectivity and payment systems. The significant impact of these factors can be illustrated 
by the fact that mobile Internet and cloud computing are considered to be among the top 
five disruptive technologies with the biggest potential economic impact, including consumer 
surplus
92
 
3.1.
Cloud computing 
Cloud computing is a model for enabling ubiquitous on-demand network access to a 
shared  pool  of  computing  resources  such  as  infrastructure,  platforms  and 
software
93
 
The  impact  of  cloud  computing  on  information  dissemination  is  enabled  by  the 
collaborative and ubiquitous character of cloud-based data centres. These allow for 
information  to  be  fed  into  databases,  shared  and  actively  distributed  to  the  targeted 
audience for numerous purposes according to pre-established criteria. Information can be 
collected  from  and  distributed  to  multiple  platforms  and  devices,  in  particular  mobile 
devices, based on e-identification serving as a principal instrument for the management of 
access  rights.  This  means  that  information  is  instantly  shared  by  many  users,  being 
attributed  by  means  of  electronic  identification  to  predefined  individuals,  groups  or 
communities, and made available regardless of location.  
The right of access in terms of contributing, sharing and receiving information is 
at the heart of cloud computing based services, constituting the key element both 
from a technological and legal standpoint. 
The main benefit delivered by cloud computing is that it allows consumers and businesses 
scaling  access  -  both  through  their  individual  devices  and  via  fixed  or  mobile  data 
connectivity  (confronted  with  roaming  barriers)  -  to  an  unprecedented  concentration  of 
computing power and databases, and a collaborative sharing of a constantly-evolving flow 
of information available on cloud services.  
Cloud  technology  primarily has potential to change patterns of consumption, create new 
products  and  services,  and  drive  economic  growth  or  productivity.  It  can  also  shift 
surpluses  from  producers  to  consumers,  but  this  poses  new  regulatory  and  legal 
challenges
94
. Among underappreciated effects of cloud computing is its potential to change 
the quality of life, health  and  environment, and  to  change the nature of  work  and 
comparative advantage for nations
95
Although predominantly positive in its impact, cloud computing generates risks that need to 
be tackled such as: threat of lock-in and monopolisation of platforms; non-transparent 
protocols  for  allocating  computing  resources  and  storing  information  within  the  Cloud; 
threats  to  data  confidentiality  due  to  the  concentration  of  data  on  common  cloud 
92  McKinsey Global Institute, Disruptive technologies: Advances that will transform life, business, and the global 
economy,  p. 12, http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/business_technology/disruptive_technologies.  
93
Fielder  A.  et  al.,  Cloud  computing,  Study  prepared  for  the  European  Parliament's  Committee  on 
Internal Market and Consumer Protection, 2012, p. 8, http://www.europarl.europa.eu/committees/en/studiesd
ownload.html?languageDocument=EN&file=73411.   
94  McKinsey Global Institute, Disruptive technologies: Advances that will transform life, business, and the global 
economy,  p. 20. 
95
Idem, ibidem. 
Pdf converter to tiff - control application platform:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File
www.rasteredge.com
Pdf converter to tiff - control application platform:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
Policy Department A: Economic and Scientific Policy 
30 
PE 492.435 
infrastructure; the loss of IT control and governance of cloud services; an increased risk of 
data  interception  in  authentication  and  transmission  procedures;  as  well  as  risks  of 
technical  failures  in  cloud  centres
96
,  or  loss  of  data  due  to  commercial  conditions.  For 
European consumers these vulnerabilities are particularly important since the majority of 
consumer-oriented cloud services are US-based. This means that data traffic and storage is 
directed to the US territory and contractually many of the services fall under US law and 
jurisdiction; adding to the concern that Internet governance in general is principally US-
based (restricted definition of Internet governance). By consequence, vulnerabilities need 
to be carefully addressed through provisions on data portability; differentiation of the level 
of security needed depending on the sensitivity level of data or the use of a 'private cloud'; 
standardisation; systematic auditing and certification of cloud services; as well as consumer 
protection  (broad  definition  of  Internet  governance).  In  addition,  successful  Internet 
platforms  have  a  strong  tendency  towards  monopolisation,  due  to  the  convenience  of 
coming back to the same window.  
On  a  European  level,  cloud  computing  was  addressed  in  the  European  Commission’s 
Communication on ‘Unleashing Potential of Cloud Computing in Europe’
97
indicating three 
key actions: 1) cutting through the jungle of standards; 2) safe and fair contract terms and 
conditions; and 3) promoting common public-sector leadership through the European Cloud 
Partnership.  Cloud  computing  has  also  been  examined  in  the  extensive  work  of  the  E-
Commerce and Digital Single Market Working Group of the Internal Market and Consumer 
Protection  (IMCO)  Committee  of  the  European  Parliament,  both  in  Parliamentary 
resolutions
98
and  studies
99
 Their  findings  also  highlight  governmental  and  commercial 
developments  towards ubiquitous society and a need for  a ubiquity  test for all  areas  of 
European policy making, in order to assure efficiency and coordination of policy making and 
to prevent further partitioning of the Digital Single Market. Particular focus should be placed 
on  such  areas  as  e-identification  and  authentication  schemes,  e-health,  e-VAT  and  
e-Customs, as well as on e-learning and smart cities
100
  
3.2.
Ubiquitous Internet connectivity 
Mobile  Internet  connectivity  is  a  relatively new phenomenon that evolved through rapid 
deployment  into  a  'connect  everything'  concept
101
 Mobile  Internet  primarily  has  the 
potential to change patterns of consumption, create new products and services, and drive 
economic  growth  or  productivity.  It  can  also  change  the  nature  of  work,  change 
96  New York Times (1 July, 2012). Amazon's cloud service is disrupted by a summer storm. 
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/02/technology/amazons-cloud-service is disrupted by a summer-storm.html 
(accessed 2 July, 2012). 
97
Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and 
Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions, Unleashing the Potential of Cloud Computing in Europe , 
27/9/2012, COM (2012) 529 final.   
98  The European Parliament Resolution of 11 December 2012 on completing the Digital Single Market 
(2012/2030(INI)) recognises the major potential of cloud computing, and calls on the Commission to propose 
without  delay a  European strategy  on the matter  (point 40).  Also the European Parliament  Resolution of  
4  July  2013 on  completing  the digital single market (2013/2655(RSP))  emphasises the  importance of  the 
European  cloud  computing  strategy,  given  its  potential  for EU  competitiveness,  growth  and job  creation. 
Furthermore, it stresses that cloud computing, since it involves minimal entry costs and low infrastructure 
requirements, represents an opportunity for the EU IT industry, and especially for SMEs, to take the lead in 
areas such as outsourcing, new digital services and data centres (point 4).   
99
See: Fielder A. et al., Cloud computing, Study prepared for the European Parliament’s Committee on Internal 
Market and Consumer Protection, 2012.   
100  See: Fleur van Veenstra A. et al., Ubiquitous Developments of the Digital Single Market, Study prepared for 
the European Parliament’s Committee on Internal Market and Consumer Protection, 2013.   
101
Connecting everything: A conversation with Cisco’s Padmasree Warrior, http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/hi
gh_tech_telecoms_internet/connecting_everything_a_conversation_with_ciscos_padmasree_warrior.  
control application platform:Online Convert PDF file to Tiff. Best free online PDF Tif
Online PDF to Tiff Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to Tiff. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button
www.rasteredge.com
control application platform:C#: How to Use SDK to Convert Document and Image Using XDoc.
Sample Code. Here's a snippet of sample code for converting Tiff to PDF file using XDoc.Converter for .NET in C# .NET program. Six
www.rasteredge.com
Streaming and online access to content and services  
PE 492.435 
31 
organisational  structures  and  shift  surplus  from  producers  to  consumers
102
 Among 
underappreciated effects of mobile Internet connectivity is its potential to change quality 
of life, health and environment
103
Streaming  and  state-of-the-art  online  access  to  content  services  has  been  enabled  by 
significant progress in connectivity speeds allowing distant servers to store and offer 
immediate access, and real-time transfer of data. Progress first occurred in fixed Internet 
connectivity  with  commercially-deployed  offers  currently  reaching  1000  Mb/s.
104
Most 
remarkably, the development of Long-Term Evolution (LTE) in the area of mobile Internet 
connectivity allows for speeds reaching 300 Mb/s, and soon this will rise to 1 Gb/s in LTE 
Advanced solutions. In South Korea, these technological achievements correspond to  10 
Gb/s  for  the  fixed  network  and  1Gb/s  for  the  mobile network  targets  for  2020, 
coupled with research on 5G networks and increased processing speeds designed to deliver 
next  generation  immersive  content  as  part  of  the  Giga  Korea  strategy
105
 Important 
Internet traffic generated by  streaming  needs  to  be subject to  consistent  net  neutrality 
policy that guarantees non-discriminatory treatment of the traffic. 
At these speeds, today's Internet is evolving from a myriad of distant, largely stand-alone 
computing devices with low connectivity capacity, into a global supercomputer composed of 
highly  interactive,  constantly  connected  and  easily  extendable  sensors,  processors  and 
storage  units.  This  facilitates  an  intense  and  interdependent  data  exchange,  involving 
administrations, businesses and citizens, and offers a platform for efficient information and 
content distribution
106
. Improved mobile  connectivity  is a  game-changer, turning  mobile 
computing devices into  life hubs, and personal knowledge and entertainment centres.  It 
also  enables  ubiquitous  access  to  databases  rich in  information and content,  as well as 
mobile information dispatching
107
While,  by  its  nature,  such  a  highly-responsive  Web  is global,  it  should have at least  a 
European  dimension  offering  European  consumers,  businesses  and  administrations  the 
benefits of an improved access to information Europe-wide. Indeed, when a European is 
travelling, his or her need for data is likely to be greater, not less, than when at home
108
A recent Global Mobile Data Traffic Forecast published by Cisco indicates that global mobile 
data traffic will increase 13-fold between 2012 and 2017. Mobile data traffic will grow at a 
102
McKinsey Global Institute, Disruptive technologies: Advances that will transform life, business, and the global 
economy, p. 20. 
103  Idem, ibidem. 
104
See: Google Fibre project at http://fiber.google.com/about/
105
http://www.computerweekly.com/news/2240183948/Samsung-unveils-5G-technology (20/12/2013). 
106
According  to  Cisco  Visual  Networking  Index:  Global  Mobile  Data  Traffic  Forecast  Update,  2011–2016 
"[c]urrently,  a  4G  connection  generates  28  times more  traffic  than a  non-4G connection.  There  are  two 
reasons for this. The first is that many of the 4G connections today are for residential broadband routers and 
laptops, which have a higher average usage. The second is that higher speeds encourage the adoption and 
usage of high-bandwidth applications, so that a smartphone on a 4G network is likely to generate 50 percent 
more traffic than the same model smartphone on a 3G or 3.5G network.".  
See: http://www.cisco.com/en/US/solutions/collateral/ns341/ns525/ns537/ns705/ns827/white_paper_c11-52
0862.html 
107
Little  A.D.,  LTE  Network  and  Spectrum  Strategies,  Strategic  Options  for  Mobile  Operators  in  4G  Mobile 
Networks, 2012,http://www.adlittle.com/downloads/tx_adlreports/ADL_LTE_Spectrum_Network_Strategies.pdf 
108  Marcus J.S., Nooren P., Philbeck I., State of the Art Mobile Internet Connectivity and its Impact on e-
-
Commerce,  Study  prepared  for  the  European  Parliament’s  Committee  on  Internal  Market  and  Consumer 
Protection, 2012, p. 7. Examples of current use of mobile applications in the briefing note are: navigation 
applications with pointers  to  local facilities and services; information on public transport; on-line check in 
services; restaurant, shopping, art, music, hotel, culture and city guide applications; radio and TV applications; 
on-line  translation  tools;  Internet banking.  Future  applications will  encompass  advanced e-Health and  e-
Government services. 
control application platform:C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to PDF File
Tiff to PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.Converter ›› C# Converter: Tiff to PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
control application platform:XDoc.Converter for .NET, Support Documents and Images Conversion
converter SDK supports various commonly used document and image file formats, including Microsoft Office (2003 and 2007) Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF, Tiff,
www.rasteredge.com
Policy Department A: Economic and Scientific Policy 
32 
PE 492.435 
compound  annual  growth  rate  (CAGR)  of  66  percent  from  2012  to  2017,  reaching  
11.2 exabytes per month by 2017
109
.  
However, the Single Market for connectivity is fragmented along national borders and does 
not  match accelerated technological  capability.  European  consumers  and businesses are 
exposed to high roaming charges that deprive them of the possibility to use cross-border 
mobile data connectivity in a meaningful way. The EU connectivity  target for 2020 with 
download rates of 30 Mbps for all EU citizens and at least 50% of European households 
subscribing  to  Internet  connections  above  100  Mbps  by  2020  lacks  focus  on  mobile 
component. It is not following the global trend towards ultrafast mobile connectivity and is 
particularly striking in a European context.  
According to Cisco, traffic generated by an average smartphone, a 4G smartphone and a 
tablet was respectively 342 Mb, 1.302 Mb and 820 Mb in 2012. Roaming solutions available 
for such data transfer on most Member States' markets are very costly despite substantial 
efforts at European level to reduce them.   
For instance, the cap retail price of such transfers generated entirely while roaming would 
be EUR 239,4 for an average smartphone, EUR 911.4 for a 4G smartphone and EUR 574 for 
a tablet per average monthly usage. These figures reflect the currently binding Roaming III 
Regulation, which for the first time seeks to address high prices for mobile data roaming. 
Table 4:  Costs of roaming - monthly estimate for 2012  
Device 
Average traffic 
generated 
monthly in 2012 
Cap price according 
to EC proposal for 
2012
110
Cap price reduced 
from EUR 0.9 to 0.7 
per Mb after EP 
negotiations
111
Average smartphone 
342 Mb 
EUR 307.8  
EUR 239.4 
4G smartphone 
1,302 Mb 
EUR 1,171.8  
EUR 911.4 
Tablet 
820 Mb 
EUR 738  
EUR 574 
A similar national data package within a Member State could be acquired for between EUR 
5 and EUR 15.  
Undoubtedly, price caps have driven market prices down from previously prohibitive levels 
and Europeans have greatly benefitted from them. The reform was largely welcomed by the 
population  at  large,  as  it  was  broadly  recognised  that  data  roaming  charges  before 
Roaming III Regulation were excessively high. However, ubiquitous connectivity and access 
to  Internet  anywhere  and  anytime  is  still  disrupted  even  with  capped  prices.  Many 
Europeans still turn off their data roaming when they cross national borders into another 
Member State with a resulting loss of access to information at exactly the moment when 
they  need  it  the  most.  The  consumers’  situation is  aggravated  by  the  fact that  mobile 
109
Cisco  Visual  Networking  Index:  Global  Mobile  Data  Traffic  Forecast  Update,  2012–2017,  p.  3, 
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/solutions/collateral/ns341/ns525/ns537/ns705/ns827/white_paper_c11-520862.
pdf. 
110  Proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament and the Council on roaming on public mobile 
communications networks within the Union, COM (2011) 402 final, art. 12. 
111
Regulation  of  the  European  Parliament  and  the  Council  of  13  June  2012  on  roaming  on  public  mobile 
communications networks within the Union recast), Official Journal L 172/10, art. 13(2). 
control application platform:C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Best and free C# tiff to adobe PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. .NET component for batch converting tiff images to PDF documents in C# class.
www.rasteredge.com
control application platform:RasterEdge XDoc.Tiff for .NET - SDK for Tiff Document Imaging
Able to view and edit Tiff rapidly. Convert. Convert Tiff to PDF. Convert Tiff to Jpeg Images. Convert PDF to Tiff. Convert Jpeg Images to Tiff. Tiff File Process
www.rasteredge.com
Streaming and online access to content and services  
PE 492.435 
33 
phones bundled with contracts are often blocked against other SIM cards, excluding the 
possibility to simply replace the SIM card after crossing national borders.  
Importantly, as indicated above, global trends in mobile data traffic foresee very dynamic 
increases in the coming years
112
Figure 6 :   Exabytes per month  
Forecasted  average  traffic  to  be  generated  in  2017  will  be  2 660  Mb  for  an  average 
smartphone, 5 114 Mb for a 4G smartphone and 5 387 for a tablet. Even with a price cap 
reduction  set for  1  July 2014 (valid until 2017) at EUR  0.20 per megabyte, the cost  of 
roaming  would,  under  this  forecast,  double  for  average  smartphones  and  tablets  and 
increase by almost 13% in the case of 4G smartphones. 
Table 5:  Costs of roaming - monthly estimate for 2017  
Device
Average traffic generated 
monthly in 2017 - forecast
Cap price according to Roaming III 
Regulation
Average Smartphone 
2 660 Mb 
EUR 532  
4G Smartphone 
5 114 Mb 
EUR 1 022.8  
Tablet 
5 387 Mb 
EUR 1 077.4  
112
Cisco  Visual  Networking  Index:  Global  Mobile  Data  Traffic  Forecast  Update,  2012–2017,  p.  3, 
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/solutions/collateral/ns341/ns525/ns537/ns705/ns827/white_paper_c11520862.p
df.  
control application platform:VB.NET Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF
C#.NET: View Tiff in WPF. XDoc.Converter for C#; XDoc.PDF for C#▶: C#: ASP.NET PDF Viewer; Best tiff to adobe PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET.
www.rasteredge.com
control application platform:VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
PDF converter component plug-in embeds several image compression mechanisms, it can be used for multiple PDF to image converting applications, like PDF to tiff
www.rasteredge.com
Policy Department A: Economic and Scientific Policy 
34 
PE 492.435 
Figure 7:   Exabytes per month  
In the light of such global trends, current partitioning of mobile data connectivity on 
the  Digital  Single  Market  could  have  important  negative  effects  on  access  to 
information and content in Europe. 
Further developments, putting even more pressure on mobile connectivity, will involve new 
products  generating and receiving content  and  information, such as connected cars  and 
wearables (headsets and glasses, sensor-enabled wristwear, medical devices that transfer 
data and tech-enabled textiles). 
Streaming and online access to content and services  
PE 492.435 
35 
Figure 8:   The Internet of Everything  
Source: Business Insider, available at: http://www.businessinsider.com/the-internet-of-everything
113
While the issue of interstate roaming in the US has been resolved by the market itself, with 
operators voluntarily removing roaming charges, similar developments have not occurred in 
Europe
114
.
The  possibility  of  such  a  solution  offered  through  consolidation  triggered 
concerns by the European Commission, at exactly the moment when relevant technologies 
were  about  to  emerge.
In  2000,  when  considering  a  merger  between  Vodafone  and 
Mannesmann, the European Commission found that “the merged entity via its integrated 
network will be able to provide advanced telecommunication services to all customers on a 
seamless pan-European basis,
at least in those Member States where it was operating. 
The merged entity would have the possibility to provide the advanced services in at least 
those eight Member States where it has sole control. It is also likely that it will be able to 
provide these services in those three Member States where it has joint control, given that 
their partners in these joint ventures would have an incentive to modify their networks to 
allow  them  access  to  a  large  single  seamless  network  which  would  benefit  their  own 
subscribers”
115
. Importantly, the decision concerned new services essentially offering pan-
European mobile Internet services and wireless location services for mobile users. Products 
that could have developed from such services could include corporate local area network 
access,  video  services,  mobile  Internet  access,  mobile  e-commerce  and  unified  media 
conversion to subscribers
116
. The decision has identified a number of opportunities (mainly 
for European corporate clients ) deriving from such services (e.g. accessing the company 
database  while  travelling,  sending  and  receiving  e-mails,  using  business  information 
systems  from  a  mobile  terminal,  emerging  video  services).  In  addition,  these  services 
113  Danova T., The Internet of Everything, available at: http://www.businessinsider.com/the-internet-of-
-
everything-2014-slide-deck-sai-2014-2?op=1.     
114
In most of the Member States, telecom operators sell modest data packages for travelling in Europe either as 
data volumes or as daily lump sums. These packages vary strongly among Member States. Recently T-Mobile 
introduced a roaming-free plan covering over 100 countries, announced as intended to disrupt the market  
115
Case No COMP/ M. 1795 Vodaphone Airtouch/Mannesmann, point 42, emphasis added. 
116
Idem, p 15. 
Policy Department A: Economic and Scientific Policy 
36 
PE 492.435 
would, to a substantial degree, be accessed through Internet and mobile portals, and allow 
users easy access to the desired data in an appropriate form. The decision identified the 
specific demand of corporate customers due  to the international scope of their business 
with sites across Europe,  and  the need for such  services  to  be provided seamlessly. In 
2000, the possibility of such seamless roaming-free pan-European services was a cause of 
concern for the European Commission, as it assumed that other competitors would have 
difficulties in presenting similar seamless pan-European offers.   
In  2012,  a  study  prepared  for  the  European  Parliament’s  IMCO  Committee  clearly 
advocated a 'roam like a native' approach as a tool to eliminate the issue of roaming in 
the case of mobile data, and clearly stressed the importance of an LTE roll-out to enable 
Europe's connectivity  capabilities to be  able to catch up with those of the US  or  South 
Korea
117
 However,  the  2013  study  for  the  Industry,  Research  and  Energy  (ITRE) 
Committee noted that “[i]ssues related to roaming and other cross-border communications 
… require further study and should be dealt with in an integrated way"
118
The recent European Commission’s proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament 
and  of  the  Council  laying  down  measures  concerning  the  European  single  market  for 
electronic communications and to achieve a  Connected Continent
119
aims to remedy  the 
situation  on  both  aspects.  The  proposal  has,  however,  attracted  criticism  due  to  a 
combination  of:  legislative  technique  disrupting  recently-introduced  provisions  of  the 
Roaming  III  Regulation;  significant  complication  of  the  existing  regulatory  framework; 
scarce time left to the legislator to consider the proposal; as well as uncertainty as to the 
market impact of proposed solutions for roaming, largely based on the legal incentive to 
enter into connectivity agreements. It seems that the Commission is trying to re-ignite a 
development  that  could  have  occurred  on  the  market  over  a  decade  ago  when  the 
Vodaphone  Airtouch/Mannesmann  merger  decision  was  taken,  but  this  time  with  less 
concern that the reform could lead to consolidation of  the European telecommunications 
market  or  drive  smaller  operators  out  of  business.  This  indicates  a  need  for  a  more 
coherent  approach  in  policy  making  with  better  integration  of  policy  objectives  and 
synergies among different areas of intervention
120
  
For the Digital Single Market to function properly, mobile data connectivity should be 
homogenous  irrespective  of  national  borders  on  the  territory  of  the  European 
Union. A legislative solution, which is neutral from a technological point of view, should 
introduce such a general requirement in order to prepare the EU for the exponential growth 
in  mobile  data  transfer  signalled  in  forecasts.  From  a  European  perspective,  the  most 
evident solution would be to eliminate data roaming altogether, since it constitutes a form 
of  discrimination  against  customers  from  other  Member  States.  This  could  still  be 
insufficient, as even national mobile data transfers outside predefined data packages may 
still prove to be expensive. 
Importantly, since streaming and online access to content involve significant amounts of 
Internet traffic, it is important to strike the right balance between, on the one side, treating 
117  Marcus J.S., Nooren P., Philbeck I., State of the Art Mobile Internet Connectivity and its Impact on e-
-
Commerce, Briefing note prepared for the European Parliament’s Committee on Internal Market and Consumer 
Protection, 2012, p. 37. 
118
Marcus J.S. et al., How to Build a Ubiquitous EU Digital Society, Study prepared for the European Parliament’s 
Committee on Industry, Research and Energy, 2013, p. 166. 
119  Proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council laying down measures concerning the 
European single market for electronic communications and to achieve a Connected Continent, and amending 
Directives  2002/20/EC,  2002/21/EC  and  2002/22/EC  and  Regulations  (EC)  No  1211/2009  and  (EU)  
No 531/2012. 
120
See: Muller P. et al., Performance-based Full Policy Cycle for the Digital Single Market, Study prepared for the 
European Parliament's Committee on Internal Market and Consumer Protection, 2013, p. 69. 
Streaming and online access to content and services  
PE 492.435 
37 
Internet connectivity as another area of business activity, and, on the other side, as an 
information highway with significant societal and economic importance. In particular, net 
neutrality is a crucial element of this weighing exercise.  
The exponential growth of the Internet into a ubiquitous Internet of Everything will also 
require  stringent cybersecurity  and data  protection policy  in  order  to  safeguard the 
digital environment.
121
These areas are parts of broadly understood Internet governance, 
where  the  European  Parliament has  a special  role  to  play in  ensuring  the  international 
governance balance, thereby safeguarding the European role therein.
122
While regulation of ubiquitous computing, and in particular streaming and online access to 
content  and  services  encompasses  such  important  areas  as  trade  regulation  and 
technological issues (e.g. interoperability or technological standards), fundamental rights 
embedded in European legal culture (e.g. privacy) need to be safeguarded against possible 
threats in this areas. 
3.3.
Intellectual property rights and hypermedia payment systems 
Intellectual property was conceived as a tool to preserve authors’ rights (in Europe) or 
to stimulate creativity and innovation (in the US). It allows for, pecuniary or moral, 
recognition  of  innovation,  and  as  such  creates  an  incentive  to  share  innovation  and 
creativity.  However,  over  time  intellectual  property  rights  have  evolved  as  well  as  a 
business tool enabling price discrimination, market segmentation and tax avoidance.  
The Digital Single Market experiences significant difficulties in providing for comprehensive 
EU-wide services with legal content, or for national services with content available EU-wide. 
The first market failure, incapacity to provide comprehensive EU-wide services with 
legal  content,  is  currently  awaiting  legislative  intervention  aimed  at  setting  up  pan-
European licencing schemes and unlocking access to orphan works
123
. The second market 
failure,  unavailability  of  national  content  for  consumers  from  other  Members 
States, results from discriminatory business practices leading to market fragmentation.  
Established legislation and the settled jurisprudence of the Court of Justice construed on 
the basis of Internal Market principles of the free movement of goods and services, the 
doctrine  of  exhaustion  of  intellectual  property  rights  and  provisions  of  competition law, 
systematically insist that companies cannot refuse sales to customers from other Member 
States, in a situation where a consumer takes the initiative to acquire a product in a shop 
located  in  another  Member  State  (passive  sales).  These  freedoms  allow  EU  citizens  to 
acquire  goods  carrying  copyrights  or  trademarks,  when  visiting  other  Member  States, 
without being discriminated or subject to refusal to sell based on nationality or residence. 
121  Mobile tracking, becoming more sophisticated with development of wearable devices, will be increasingly 
complex and precise, covering such areas as consumption habits and lifestyle. 
122
European Parliament is already extensively involved in these issues working on legislative proposals for  a 
regulation on the protection of individuals with regard to the processing of personal data and on the free 
movement of such data (General Data Protection Regulation) 2012/0011 (COD), a directive on the protection 
of individuals with regard to the processing of personal data by competent authorities for the purposes of 
prevention, investigation, detection or prosecution of criminal offences or the execution of criminal penalties, 
and the free movement of such data 2012/0010 (COD), a  directive concerning measures to ensure a high 
common level of network and information security across the Union 2013/0027 (COD), as well as working on 
its  own regulations, e.g.  European  Parliament's resolution of 12 March 2014  on the US  NSA  surveillance 
programme, surveillance bodies in various Member States and their impact on EU citizens’ fundamental rights 
and on transatlantic cooperation in Justice and Home Affairs (2013/2188(INI)). 
123  The current licencing regulation makes it easier for European distributors to acquire licences for US movies 
than for content from other MSs. As a consequence, "in theatrical distribution the share of non-national EU 
films" was 8% in 2010. For Video-on-demand, this share varied from MS to MS, e.g. share of non-national EU 
films was 9% in Germany and 20% in Spain; see: KEA (October 2010), Multi-Territory Licensing of Audiovisual 
Works  in  the  European  Union,  p. 5, http://www.keanet.eu/docs/mtl%20-%20full%20report%20en.pdf 
(accessed 5 July, 2012). 
Policy Department A: Economic and Scientific Policy 
38 
PE 492.435 
Vertical  agreements  prohibiting  such  sales,  as  well  as  abusing  dominant  position,  are 
contrary to Art. 101 (1) and 102 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union 
(TFEU). 
In  the  case  of  the  Digital  Single  Market,  and  despite  similar  legal  and  economic 
frameworks
124
,  service  providers  select  products  for  a  particular  Member  State  (access 
limited  to  a  Member  State's  particular  territory,  selected  repertoire,  selected  linguistic 
versions) and use technological tools (such as geo-localisation, geo-blocking, IP address, 
Digital Rights Management, and personal data and payment information) to refuse access 
to content designated for another national market. At best, consumers are re-routed to the 
same service in their home Member State with such consequences as different pricing, a 
more  limited  choice,  variations in quantity  and  quality,  or different  payment  options
125
Considering  the  fact  that  56%  of  consumers  buy  across  borders,  because  they 
cannot  source  the  product  in  their  national  market
126
 these  practices  have  a 
significant  impact  on  European  consumers,  effectively  depriving  them  of  products  they 
value and, indeed, of the benefits of the Single Market.  
124
Article 56 TFEU requires the abolition of all restrictions on  the freedom to provide services, even if those 
restrictions apply without distinction to national providers of services and to those from other Member States, 
when  they  are liable to prohibit, impede or  render less advantageous  the activities  of  a service provider 
established in another Member State where it lawfully provides similar services. Moreover, the freedom to 
provide  services  is  for  the  benefit  of  both  providers  and  recipients  of  services  (see  Case  C-42/07  Liga 
Portuguesa de Futebol Profissional and Bwin International [2009] ECR I‑7633, paragraph 51 and the case-law 
cited).  In  addition,  art.  18  of  the  Treaty  on  the  functioning  of  the  European  Union  contains  a  general 
prohibition of direct discrimination on grounds of nationality carefully extended by the ECJ to discrimination on 
grounds  of  residence (as  indirect  discrimination  on  grounds  of  nationality)  and in  some areas to  private 
entities. Further art. 20(2) of the Services Directive prohibits conditions of access to a service that discriminate 
on the basis of nationality or place of residence of service recipient, although allowing discrimination justified 
by objective criteria, which would be easier to identify in case of physical rather than digital trade. The ECJ has 
stated that intellectual property rights are not inviolable and are not subject to absolute protection but rather 
must  be  balanced  against  the  protection  of  other  fundamental  rights,  see  judgement  of  29.1.2008,  
Case C-275/06 Promusicae, ECR 2008 I-271, para 62-68. In Joined Cases C‑403/08 and C‑429/08, Football 
Association Premier League Ltd (C-403/08) and Karen Murphy (C-429/08) ECR 2011 I-09083 in para 93-107 
the ECJ has stated that '[d]erogations from the principle of free movement can be allowed only to the extent to 
which they are justified for the purpose of safeguarding the rights which constitute the specific subject-matter 
of the intellectual property concerned (see, to this effect, Case C‑115/02 Rioglass and Transremar [2003] ECR 
I‑12705, paragraph 23 and the case-law cited). It is clear from settled case-law that the specific subject-
matter of the intellectual property is intended in particular to ensure for the right holders concerned protection 
of the right to exploit commercially the marketing or the making available of the protected subject-matter, by 
the grant of licences in return for payment of remuneration (see, to this effect, Musik-Vertrieb membran and 
K-tel International, paragraph 12, and Joined Cases C‑92/92 and C‑326/92 Phil Collins and Others [1993] ECR 
I‑5145, paragraph 20). However, the specific subject-matter of the intellectual property does not guarantee 
the right holders concerned the opportunity to demand the highest possible remuneration. Consistently with its 
specific subject-matter, they are ensured – as recital 10 in the preamble to the Copyright Directive and recital 
5 in the preamble to the Related Rights Directive envisage – only appropriate remuneration for each use of the 
protected subject-matter. In order to be appropriate, such remuneration must be reasonable in relation to the 
economic  value  of  the  service  provided.  In  particular,  it  must  be reasonable in  relation  to  the  actual  or 
potential number of persons who enjoy or wish to enjoy the service (see, by analogy, Case C-61/97 FDV 
[1998] ECR I-5171, paragraph 15, and Case C-52/07 Kanal 5 and TV 4 [2008] ECR I-9275, paragraphs 36 to 
38).' However, while applicability  of exhaustion doctrine  including  tangible and intangible goods has been 
clarified for computer software (see: Judgement 3.7.2012 Case 128/11 UsedSoft ECR, para 61, concerning 
computer software) the very clear legal framework for services is complicated in other areas of intellectual 
property by provisions of Copyright Directive awaiting further clarifications from the ECJ or a modification of 
the Directive. 
125  Schulte-Noelke H. et al., Discrimination of Consumers on the Digital Single Market, Study prepared for the 
European  Parliament's  Committee  on Internal Market  and  Consumer  Protection, 2013; expanding on  data 
protection concerns triggered by DRM see: Roig Antoni, Privacy-Preserving Digital Rights Management, in in 
Bourcier  Danièle  and  others  (eds.),  Intelligent  Multimedia.  Managing  Creative  Works  in  a  Digital  World, 
European Press Academic Publishing, 2010,   p. 277- 288. 
126
Consumer market study on the functioning of e-commerce and the Internet marketing and selling techniques 
in the retail of goods, Final Report, Part 1: Synthesis Report, 2011, http://ec.europa.eu/consumers/consumer_
research/market_studies/docs/study_ecommerce_goods_en.pdf
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested