WWW.LINUXJOURNAL.COM  /  MAY 2013  /  
61
others) to take a serious look at 
where I’m putting my data, plus 
it’s forced me to think outside 
my little box. In all my research, 
however, I still haven’t found a way 
to replicate the obscure Google 
Reader feature that has been my 
sole way to browse the Internet for 
a half decade—the “next unread” 
bookmarklet. I demonstrated the 
feature in a Linux Journal Tech Tip years 
ago: http://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=lLGqEsVDPrQ.
Maybe someone will create a 
Tiny Tiny RSS plugin that does 
this for me. Maybe it will be the 
reason I finally learn to program 
on my own. Nevertheless, this 
seemingly simple feature is one I 
can’t find anywhere else. If anyone 
has recommendations on how to 
replicate that feature, or if there 
are any Tiny Tiny RSS programmers 
out there looking for a weekend 
project, I’d love to hear about it!
Shawn Powers is the Associate Editor for 
L
i
n
u
x
J
o
u
r
n
a
l
. He’s 
also the Gadget Guy for LinuxJournal.com, and he has an 
interesting collection of vintage Garfield coffee mugs. Don’t let 
his silly hairdo fool you, he’s a pretty ordinary guy and can be 
reached via e-mail at shawn@linuxjournal.com. Or, swing by 
the #linuxjournal IRC channel on Freenode.net.
Figure 5. Tiny Tiny RSS is tiny, and it interfaces with plugins and clients alike.
COLUMNS
THE OPEN-SOURCE CLASSROOM
Convert pdf to html email - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
convert pdf to html file; convert pdf into html email
Convert pdf to html email - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
convert pdf into html; convert pdf to html form
NEW PRODUCTS
NeuroSky’s Brainwave  
Starter Kit
Another inch toward a Star Trek reality comes in the 
form of NeuroSky’s Brainwave Starter Kit, a brain-
computer interface package that lets users analyze 
and visualize their own brain waves on Android and 
iOS. Users simply slip on the MindWave Mobile EEG 
headset and view their own brainwaves displayed on 
their handset in the colorful Brainwave Visualizer. 
The brain waves visibly change in real time, as one 
chills out to relaxing music and then does some intensive programming or imagines 
something Marvin Gaye sings about. The MindWave Mobile safely measures and 
outputs the EEG power spectra (alpha waves, beta waves and so on), NeuroSky eSense 
an ear clip and a sensor arm. The headset’s reference and ground electrodes are on the 
ear clip, and the EEG electrode is on the sensor arm, resting on the forehead above the 
eye. Next up: when will someone finally make a transporter?
http://www.neurosky.com
Open-E Data Storage  
Software V7
The model for the Open-E Data Storage Software is 
an all-in-one universal storage system that allows 
businesses of all sizes to leverage off-the-shelf 
servers to build and operate virtualized storage 
infrastructure. The Linux-based Open-E DSS V7 data 
storage software is used for building and managing 
-V Cluster 
Support, as well as the new product Open-E Multiple Storage Server Manager for 
simplified central management of all storage resources. Built-in enterprise-class 
features include active-active failover, active-passive failover, volume replication, 
snapshots and continuous data protection, among others.
http://www.open-e.com
62
/  MAY 2013  /  WWW.LINUXJOURNAL.COM
RasterEdge.com General FAQs for Products
or need additional assistance, please contact us via email (support@rasteredge dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
convert pdf to website html; convert fillable pdf to html form
.NET RasterEdge XDoc.PDF Purchase Details
View, Convert, Edit, Process, Protect, SignPDF Files. PDF Print. Support Plans Each RasterEdge license comes with 1-year dedicated support (email, online chat
how to change pdf to html format; converting pdf to html format
NEW PRODUCTS
WWW.LINUXJOURNAL.COM  /  MAY 2013  /  
63
AdaCore GNAT Pro  
Safety-Critical for  
ARM Processors
In response to the increasing prevalence of low-cost, low-power ARM processors in 
the aerospace, defense and transportation industries, AdaCore has developed the 
GNAT Pro Safety-Critical product for ARM Cortex micro-controllers. This bareboard 
GNAT Pro Safety-Critical product provides a complete Ada development environment 
(or Eclipse plugin) oriented toward systems that are safety-critical or have stringent 
memory constraints. Developers of such systems, says AdaCore, now can exploit 
the software engineering benefits of the Ada language, including reliability, 
maintainability and portability. The ARM platform adds to the GNAT Pro Safety-Critical 
product offering, which already is available for PowerPC and LEON boards, allowing 
easy portability among all three platforms. The technology does not require any 
ds.
http://www.adacore.com
Little Apps’ Little 
Software Stats
The big news from Little Apps is 
Little Software Stats, a new open-
source software package that enables 
software developers to track how 
users are using their software. Little 
Apps says that Little Software Stats 
is the first program for obtaining 
runtime intelligence that is both open 
source and free. Because the program 
is designed and developed using 
MySQL and PHP, most Web servers 
can run it. Information that can be 
gather
http://little-apps.org
About RasterEdge.com - A Professional Image Solution Provider
Email to: support@rasteredge.com. We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and components for
how to convert pdf to html; convert pdf into web page
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Create editable Word file online without email. This VB.NET PDF to Word converter control is a and mature .NET solution which aims to convert PDF document to
create html email from pdf; convert pdf to web
NEW PRODUCTS
David M. Bourg, Kenneith Humphreys 
and Bryan Bywalec’s Physics for 
Game Developers, 2nd edition 
(O’Reilly Media)
Whether or not game development is your vocation, you have to admit 
the material in Physics for Game Developers, 2nd edition, is inherently 
super interesting. In this book, the authors explore the key knowledge  
behind bread-and-butter game physics that go into modern games for Nintendo Wii, PlayStation  
Move, Microsoft’s Kinect and various mobile devices. Readers also learn how to leverage exciting 
interaction gadgets, such as accelerometers, touch screens, GPS receivers, pressure sensors 
and soft bodies, fluids and the physics of sound for incorporating realistic effects, including 
fluid dynamics and the modeling of specific systems based on real-world examples.
http://oreilly.com
64
/  MAY 2013  /  WWW.LINUXJOURNAL.COM
Rakhitha Nimesh Ratnayake’s Building 
Impressive Presentations with 
Impress.js (Packt Publishing)
Impress.js is a classic open-source project. The closed-source world creates 
a slick app—in this case, the Prezi presentation tool—and charges much 
more than free. Next, creative (and cheapskate) open-source developer says “I want that, and I 
want it free”—in this case, Impress.js. Impress.js, not to be confused with OpenOffice.org Impress, 
is a free and open-source JavaScript library inspired by Prezi that utilizes the CSS3 transitions 
found in modern Web browsers. If this sounds interesting, the path to mastery can be found 
with Rakhitha Nimesh Ratnayake’s new book Building Impressive Presentations with Impress.js. 
Ratnayake explores the features of Impress.js, which allows one to create presentations inside 
the infinite canvas of modern Web browsers that work anywhere, any time and on any device. 
Readers will learn how to build dynamic presentations with rotation, scaling, transforms and 
3-D effects. Advanced users will find out how to extract the power of Impress.js core API events 
e library to create 
custom functionalities for different types of applications, such as sliders, portfolios and galleries.
http://www.packtpub.com
RasterEdge Product Refund Policy
send back RasterEdge Software Refund Agreement that we will email to you We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
convert pdf into webpage; pdf to html converter online
XDoc.Converter for .NET Purchase information
Convert PDF to Word. Convert to HTML. Convert to PDF. Convert to Text. Convert MS Office 03 to 07. Convert OpenOffice to MS Office. Other .NET Document Imaging SDK
batch convert pdf to html; convert pdf to html with
NEW PRODUCTS
VanDyke Software SecureFX
VanDyke Software says that many of its customers run 
Windows just so they don’t have to give up the wide range of functionality found on its 
SecureFX secure file transfer client. Now Linux and Mac OS X users can enjoy that same 
functionality natively with the new SecureFX 7.1, which delivers features like multiple 
file transfer protocols, site synchronization and easy recovery of interrupted transfers. 
Secure file transfers can be performed with SFTP, FTP over SSL and SCP; FTP is provided 
for use on legacy systems. Aesthetics also are important for VanDyke, which offers a 
tabbed visual user interface in SecureFX 7.1 allowing for easy learning and organizing 
for optimum productivity. Also new in SecureFX 7.1 is a dependent session option 
connection to a jump host before connecting to other sessions.
http://www.vandyke.com
WWW.LINUXJOURNAL.COM  /  MAY 2013  /  
65
Please send information about releases of Linux-related products to newproducts@linuxjournal.com or 
New Products c/o 
L
i
n
u
x
J
o
u
r
n
a
l
, PO Box 980985, Houston, TX 77098. Submissions are edited for length and content.
Copernica Marketing 
Software’s MailerQ
MailerQ is a high-performance mail transfer agent 
designed to do one thing: deliver e-mail at blazing 
speed. Leveraging RabbitMQ to send up to 10,000 
e-mail messages per minute, MailerQ is targeted 
at users who want the functionality of programs 
like Port25’s PowerMTA but can’t stomach its high 
price. With MailerQ, users are limited only by the ability to process incoming e-mail 
at the r 
rate per receiving domain or IP or the number of delivery attempts. To be as efficient 
as possible, MailerQ stores messages in Couchbase NoSQL, which allows the retrieval 
of content only when an SMTP connection has been established, thus reducing the 
amount of data being passed back and forth in RabbitMQ message queues.
http://www.mailerq.com
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET Purchase information
information. Have a Question Email us at. support@rasteredge.com. More Information Order Process FAQ. Tiff; Online Convert PDF to Html. SUPPORT: Customer
convert pdf table to html; embed pdf into website
XDoc.Windows Viewer for .NET Purchase information
information. Have a Question Email us at. support@rasteredge.com. More Information Order Process FAQ. Tiff; Online Convert PDF to Html. SUPPORT: Customer
convert pdf to html with images; convert pdf to html online
66
/  MAY 2013  /  WWW.LINUXJOURNAL.COM
FEATURE  Raspberry Pi: the Perfect Home Server
Exploit the Raspberry Pi’s unique low-power and 
energy-efficient architecture to build a full-featured 
home backup, multimedia and print server. 
BRIAN TRAPP
RASPBERRY
PI:
THE PERFECT 
HOME SERVER
.NET RasterEdge XDoc.Dicom Purchase Details
information. Have a Question Email us at. support@rasteredge.com. More Information Order Process FAQ. Tiff; Online Convert PDF to Html. SUPPORT: Customer
best website to convert pdf to word; convert pdf form to html form
.NET RasterEdge XImage.Twain Purchase Details
information. Have a Question Email us at. support@rasteredge.com. More Information Order Process FAQ. Tiff; Online Convert PDF to Html. SUPPORT: Customer
convert pdf to url; changing pdf to html
WWW.LINUXJOURNAL.COM  /  MAY 2013  /  
67
E
ver since the 
announcement of the 
Raspberry Pi, sites all 
across the Internet have offered 
lots of interesting and challenging 
uses for this exciting device. Although 
all of those ideas are great, the 
most obvious and perhaps least 
glamorous use for the Raspberry 
Pi (RPi) is creating your perfect 
home server.
If you’ve got several 
different computers in need of 
a consistent and automated 
backup strategy, the RPi can 
do that. If you have music and 
video you’d like to be able to 
access from almost any screen 
in the house, the RPi can make 
that happen too. Maybe you have 
a printer or two you’d like to share 
with everyone easily? The Raspberry 
Pi can fill all those needs with a 
minimal investment in hardware and time.
FEATURE  Raspberry Pi: the Perfect Home Server
68
/  MAY 2013  /  WWW.LINUXJOURNAL.COM
Raspberry Pi Benefits
Low cost: for $35, the RPi model B 
is nearly a complete computer with 
512MB of RAM, 100Mb Ethernet, 
an SD card slot, two USB ports, 
audio out and HDMI or RCA video 
out. I’ve seen HDMI cables that cost 
more than that.
Energy efficient: hardware costs 
are only one component of a 
server’s expense, because you also 
need to consider the energy cost to 
keep the device running constantly. 
The services needed for home use 
aren’t going to tax the CPU much, 
and most of the time it will just 
be idling, waiting for something 
to do. The RPi’s ultra-low power 
components are a perfect fit for this 
workload, which helps keep your 
power bill down. My model B unit 
plus external hard drive consume 
only 8 watts total, while the old 
Athlon-based box it replaced drew 
54 watts at idle. Assuming 10 cents 
per kilowatt hour, that puts the 
yearly power bill for an RPi at $7 vs. 
$47 for an Athlon-based machine. 
The RPi basically pays for itself in 
less than a year!
Low noise: because the RPi 
doesn’t have fans or moving parts, 
the only component in your final 
configuration that generates noise or 
any appreciable heat will be the hard 
disk. If you’re concerned about noise, 
enthusiast sites like Silent PC Review 
(http://www.silentpcreview.com 
often include noise benchmarks 
in their storage reviews. My 
experience is that any modern 
drive is quiet enough to avoid 
detection anywhere there’s 
something else already running 
(such as a media center, gaming 
console or other computer). If 
your home doesn’t provide a lot of 
flexibility for wiring options, the 
RPi’s small size, minimal thermal 
Figure 1. A Compact, but Highly Capable 
Home Server
WWW.LINUXJOURNAL.COM  /  MAY 2013  /  
69
output and low-noise footprint 
may make it possible to sneak in 
a server where it was difficult to 
justify one in the past.
New opportunities: a less tangible 
benefit is the simple joy of trying 
something new! For me, this was 
my first time really working on a 
Debian-based distribution, and it’s 
probably the first time many Linux 
enthusiasts will have a chance to try 
an ARM-based architecture.
Arranging the Hardware
For a home server, you’ll need a 
medium-size SD Flash card for local 
storage. It’s possible to use a USB 
thumbdrive for booting, but that 
would use up one of the two precious 
USB slots. The Flash storage card 
doesn’t need to be large, but the 
faster the better. I chose a name-
brand SD card with an 8GB capacity 
and class 10 speed rating. For backups 
and multimedia files, a large hard 
drive with a USB dock is a must. 
I chose a 1.5TB hard drive and a 
Calvary EN-CAHDD-D 2-bay USB 
2.0 hard drive dock. This dock has a 
feature to run two drives in RAID-0 
mode, which could be useful someday. 
Finally, the RPi doesn’t come with a 
power supply, but most smartphone 
chargers supply the required 
5v-over-micro USB. To see if the RPi 
was fussy about the power source, 
I swapped through three different 
micro-USB cell-phone chargers for 
power supplies. I tried each one for 
about a week, with no issues on any 
of the units.
Installing the Operating System
Installing the RPi operating system 
is covered in extensive detail 
elsewhere, but here are a few 
home-server-specific tips, roughly  
in the order needed.
1) Get the Raspbian “Wheezy” 
install image directly from  
http://www.raspberrypi.org/
downloads, and copy it onto the SD 
card, using the steps listed on the site.
2) When booting the RPi for the 
first time, attach a keyboard, mouse 
and monitor. Don’t forget to turn on 
the monitor before booting the RPi, so 
that it can detect the correct HDMI or 
composite output port.
3) The RPi has a nice “raspi-config” 
screen that you’ll see on first boot. 
For a home server, the following 
selections will be useful:
expand_rootfs: resizes the default 
2GB OS image to fill the rest of the 
Flash card.
change_pass: the default password 
is “raspberry”, but something more 
70
/  MAY 2013  /  WWW.LINUXJOURNAL.COM
FEATURE  Raspberry Pi: the Perfect Home Server
secure than that would be better.
Set your locale and timezone.
memory_split: assign the minimum 
amount possible (16) to the GPU 
to leave as much room as possible 
for services.
SSH: don’t forget to enable the 
SSH server.
boot_behaviour: turn off boot to 
desktop (again, to save memory 
for your services).
When finished, you’ll be at the  
pi@raspberrypi
prompt. The setup 
script can be re-run at any time via 
sudo raspi-config
.
There are just a few more 
configuration items, and then the 
operating system is ready to go.
1) A static IP makes everything 
easier, so switch the network settings 
for eth0:
>> sudo nano -w /etc/network/interfaces
Change the eth0 line 
iface eth0 
inet dhcp
to the following (modify 
to meet your home network setup):
======/etc/network/interfaces====== 
... 
iface eth0 inet static 
address 192.168.1.10 
netmask 255.255.255.0 
gateway 192.168.1.1 
... 
======/etc/network/interfaces======
2) Create a local user, and put it in 
the users and sudo group:
>> sudo adduser YOURUSERIDHERE 
>> sudo usermod -a -G users YOURUSERIDHERE 
>> sudo usermod -a -G sudo YOURUSERIDHERE
3) Update the system to ensure that 
it has the latest and greatest copies of 
all the libraries:
>> sudo apt-get update; sudo apt-get upgrade
4) At this point, you’re ready to go 
headless! Shut down the PI:
>> sudo /sbin/shutdown -h now
Once it’s down (monitor the green 
status LEDs on the RPi circuit board 
to know when it has finished shutting 
down), unplug the monitor, keyboard, 
mouse and power cord. Attach the 
USB storage, then restart the RPi by 
plugging the power back in.
5) Once the RPi starts up (again, 
those green LEDs are the clue to its 
state), you can 
ssh
in to the RPi from 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested