embed pdf in mvc view : Attach pdf to html Library SDK class asp.net .net web page ajax eTextbook2012report4-part1245

34 
Barnes & Noble
43
provides access to eTextbooks, with their NOOK Study app to download the 
material to the student͛s computer.  A one week free trial is available.  Where arnes & Noble 
operate on campus stores, students have rental options. 
Bridgepoint Education
44
is a company that has established accredited education institutions 
(Ashford University and University of the Rockies) that provide online platforms as well as traditional 
campuses.  Around 95,000 students are enrolled in Bridgepoint programs.  In January 2012, 
Bridgepoint launched a new cloud-based learning platform, Thuze, with McGraw-Hill Education and 
Pearson as partners to supply eTextbooks. 
CafeScribe
45
is a ͞digital textbook and study tool all in one͟ supported by Follett Higher Education 
Group.  The platform has a social networking component to help students form virtual study groups 
and share notes. It fosters collaboration through students sharing  documents and searching the 
notes of others across the world.  CafeScribe currently has a minimal presence in Australia. 
Courseload
46
is a fast growing software company that provides students with the functionality to 
print, use social annotation with classmates and lecturers, and access their eTexts on any HTML5-
capable tablet, smartphone, or computer (Intenet2, 2012).  It is currently facing the double 
challenge of intense growth and operating in a highly competitive market. Its involvement in a 
national pilot project coordinated by the academic consortium Internet2 and involving publishers 
like McGraw-Hill and Pearson will see the number of universities using its software triple to 75 in the 
Fall semester (Wall, 2012). 
Inkling
47
makes an app available for the iPad to download eTextbooks from the CourseSmart site
48
Pearson and McGraw-Hill have invested in Inkling, a company that repurposes textbooks for the 
iPad.  The content is made media rich and interactive, and there are social networking features. 
Kno
49
has developed a digital learning environment for students to read textbooks, take notes, and 
share materials with friends and teachers, using the Web, iPad or Facebook.  There is a Textbooks 
for iPad app which allows students to extract selected text and media from the textbook and 
transfer it to a single digital notebook for easy review.  The Kno Flashcard functionality converts key 
terms in the textbook to interactive flashcards, allowing students to test their understanding.  Kno 
currently offers access to almost 200,000 titles and is also promising a dual screen tablet that folds 
like a book. The philosophy behind Kno is that students interact differently in the digital medium and 
the interactive features can help students learn (Kno, 2011).  
Macmillan DynamicBooks
50
is a platform for interactive eTextbooks which allows lecturers to 
customize existing textbook content and combine course materials with interactive components 
(video, images, web links and open educational resources) to suit the needs of their students. This 
can be done dynamically, or DynamicBooks can create the eTextbook.   
43
Barnes & Noble www.barnesandnoble.com/u/etextbooks-digital-textbooks/379002516/
44
Bridgepoint Education www.bridgepointeducation.com
45
CafeScribe www.cafescribe.com
46
Courseload  www.courseload.com/
47
Inkling https://www.inkling.com/
48
CourseSmart iPad app http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/etextbooks-for-the-ipad/id364903557?mt=8
49
Kno  www.kno.com
50
Macmillan DynamicBooks http://dynamicbooks.com
Attach pdf to html - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
convert pdf to html; how to convert pdf to html
Attach pdf to html - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
convert pdf form to web form; convert pdf to web
35 
National Association of College Stores (NACS) Media Solutions (NMS)  The NMS Grow Custom
51
initiative supports customised publishing through a partnership of faculty, publishers and college 
bookstores.  Key sponsors of the NMS initiative include Cengage, McGraw-Hill, Pearson Higher 
Education, John Wiley & Sons, and Flat World Knowledge. 
Xplana
52
is a digital content and social learning platform that provides academic publishers with a 
way to create and distribute leaning and teaching content, for example by converting existing 
content to eBook formats, managing digital rights and permissions and even offering an individually 
branded marketing and sales space.  Students can use Xplana as a learning space where they can 
find and manage relevant learning resources, communicate with their fellow students to share their 
learning experiences. 
6.2.2  Open textbook publishers 
Boundless Learning
53
offers ͚free substitutes͛ for traditional textbook material.  It has raised US$9.7 
million through venture capital (Wall, 2012). Content is pulled from an array of open-education 
sources to develop a new resource.  In April 2012, Pearson, Cengage Learning and Macmillan Higher 
Education sued Boundless Learning with allegations that the intellectual property rights of their 
authors had been violated.  It has been claimed that the ͚replacement textbooks͛ are created from, 
based on and have a layout that is overwhelmingly similar to the copyrighted materials (DeSantis, 
2012).  
Connexions
54
is an open platform to support the development and distribution of eTextbooks and 
digital learning materials.  It describes itself as ͞a new paradigm͟ for the creation, use and 
distribution of educational content.  It is free and modularised, allowing academics to customise the 
content, swap chapters in and out, correct errors, add new examples or new contexts, in order to 
create the optimum text for their course, rather than an off-the-rack learning experience (Cherry, 
2012).  Connexions books are being used in 2,000 colleges in 44 countries. 
Flat World Knowledge
55
is an digital-first, open publisher, working with authors and scholars to 
write, review and publish eTextbooks under a Creative Commons licence. Using the Flat World 
Knowledge platform, users can edit, rearrange and add links to any of the resources, although some 
core texts do remain static. Access options include free online access, downloadable eTextbooks for 
any eReader, PDF versions, MP3 audiobooks, and a Study Pass (US$19.95) to add features such as 
highlighting, annotations, quizzes and flashcards.  Alternatively students can order a printed 
textbook that will be delivered to them.  Academics can adopt a title, edit it as required using the 
Make It Your Own (MIYO) platform and make it available to students as a course text via a 
personalised URL.  US$12.5 million has been raised through venture capital (Wall, 2012). Earlier this 
year Flat World Knowledge teamed up with MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) to provide free high 
quality textbooks to learners.  This is seen to be the first collaboration between an open courseware 
publisher and an open textbook publisher. 
51
NMS Grow Custom  www.nacsmediasolutions.com/Home/GrowCustomInitiative.aspx
52
Xplana  www.xplana.com
53
Boundless Learning www.boundless.com
54
Connexions http://cnx.org
55
Flat World Knowledge www.flatworldknowledge.com/
VB.NET Word: VB Tutorial to Convert Word to Other Formats in .NET
is created by Microsoft Word 2007 or later versions into PDF, tiff, bmp introduce diverse VB.NET Word converting functions but also attach detailed programming
embed pdf into web page; pdf to html conversion
VB.NET Image: Image Drawing SDK, Draw Text & Graphics on Image
the text writing function and graphics drawing function, we attach links to dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
embed pdf into website; converting pdf to html email
36 
OpenStax College
56
is a not-for-profit organisation that seeks to improve student access to higher 
education, especially through quality learning materials.  As an initiative of Rice University, funding is 
provided through philanthropy, eg through foundations such as the Bill and Melinda Gates 
Foundation.  There is no cost to students to access and use the eTextbooks. 
6.2.3   Other initiatives in the United States 
Daytona State College completed a two year comparative study of four textbook distribution 
models: print purchase, print rental, eText rental and eText rental with an eReader device.  Issues 
that arose included problems with online access (wifi overload and technical issues with the 
publishers͛s sites), the lack of basic computing skills (eg to use the eText functionality), the absence 
of clear responsibility for technical instruction (faculty, IT staff, publishers?) and the need to adapt 
teaching practices to incorporate the eText into the learning activities (Graydon, Ulrich-Buholz & 
Kohen, 2011).  
Indiana University (IU) sought to dramatically reduce the costs of digital textbooks for students on 
all of its campuses.  In a pilot project in 2009-2011, IU entered into an agreement with five 
publishers to provide students with substantial cost savings, the ability to access digital or printed 
hard copies, and uninterrupted access to all of their eTexts while they were enrolled. McGraw-Hill 
Higher Education also joined in an institution-wide partnership with IU. The subscription model for 
these agreements meant that all students purchased materials, so that publishers achieved a strong 
revenue through the 100% sell through, which in turn allowed for a major discount on the list price 
of text. Publishers were required to sell digital versions of their textbooks for no more than 35% of 
the print list prices (Wall, 2012). The fact that all students have access to a digital resource fosters 
greater opportunities for collaborative learning.  In the pilot, students did not have to pay anything, 
but normally students would be charged for course materials and tools as part of their tuition fees.  
The Internet2 eTextbook pilot builds on the Indiana University eText study.  In the Spring 2012 
semester, five Internet2 (an advanced networking consortium of research and education 
communities) institutions, the University of Virginia, University of California at Berkley, Cornell 
University, University of Minnesota and University of Wisconsin, embarked on a trial of eTextbooks, 
in partnership with McGraw-Hill and the Courseload reader and annotation platform that is 
integrated with the LMS.  The eTexts were supplied to the students at no cost.  The project, 
supported financially from special project funds, provided a secure revenue stream for the publisher.   
A range of institutional stakeholders were involved in the pilot, for example at the University of 
Virginia: the Vice Provost for IT, the Chief Information Officer, the campus bookstore, the office of 
student affairs, IT support, Faculty Senate, the Office of the General Counsel, disability services and 
the library (Jackson, 2012).  
For the Fall Semester 2012, the project has expanded into a larger pilot led by Internet2 and 
EDUCAUSE, involving a diverse group of 25 universities and colleges, with more publishers.  In this 
pilot, the model moves to site licences, with institutions paying a flat fee to Internet2, which is then 
transferred to the publishers.  The institutional flat fee is ͞all inclusive͟ and covers the Courseload e-
reader platform, publisher-provided content, external integration to the LMS, and support (Jackson, 
2012).  The pilot will be evaluated to consider the extent to which the model supports lower costs 
56
OpenStax College http://openstaxcollege.org/
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Rectangle Annotation Imaging Control
Able to attach a user-defined shadow to created rectangle annotation using are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
convert pdf to html code c#; to html
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Sample Code to Draw EAN-13 Barcode on Image
AddFloatingItem(item) rePage.MergeItemsToPage() REFile.SaveDocumentFile(doc, "c:/ean13.pdf", New PDFEncoder How to Attach EAN-13 Barcode Image to Word in VB.NET.
convert pdf into html file; convert from pdf to html
37 
for educational materials, the extent of scalability of the model and the overall appeal of the 
eTextbook environment. 
Ohio Digital Bookshelf
57
The University System of Ohio has run a pilot study involving 70,000 
students in the state of Ohio who are enrolled in the subject Introduction to Psychology.  Five 
publishers were involved in the trial, with 24 textbook titles made available in digital format.  
Teaching staff had autonomy in selecting their preferred prescribed text.  Students were given 
licences for 180 to 360 days.  A community of practice was established to share ideas about their use 
of digital learning materials, and the publishers agreed to share sales data. The pilot has since 
expanded into the disciplines of engineering and construction. 
In California, the public school system has launched the Digital Textbook Initiative which aims to 
see all textbooks in digital format by 2020. The financial argument is that the ease of updating digital 
texts will reduce the capital cost of acquiring new editions of school textbooks, but there are also 
concerns that the school districts do not have the infrastructure – devices, interactive whiteboards 
and bandwidth – to leverage the new formats.  The economic crisis in the US is undoubtedly 
curtailing the investment in new hardware for schools, although school districts in San Diego, 
California, and McAllen, Texas, are making widespread purchases of iPads.  The states of Texas and 
Georgia have also been exploring the opportunities for the widespread introduction of eTextbooks 
into schools, while Florida has passed legislation requiring school districts to spend half of their 
instructional materials budget on digital content by 2016.   
It should also be noted that South Korea announced plans in 2011 to roll out national digital 
textbooks in schools by 2015.  However, educators challenged the plans, arguing that it would make 
students too dependent on technology (Good Education, 2012). 
6.3  Business models 
The move to eBooks has been disruptive to the publishing industry.  In the US, the Department of 
Justice has accused five publishers of colluding with Apple over the price of eBooks. Printed books 
are sold via the wholesale model, whereby a fixed price is charged to the seller and the retailer 
determines the price the customer will be willing to pay.  When Apple entered the market in 2010 
with the iBook platform, the agency model was adopted, rather than the wholesale model, in 
response to publishers͛ concerns that the price of eBooks was too low.  Under the agency model, the 
publishers set the price of a book and the agent selling the titles receives a 30% cut.  Competition in 
the marketplace means that Amazon has also now moved to the agency model, even though the US 
Department of Justice alleges that the agency model restricts competition between retailers.  While 
three of the five publishers are settling out of court (BBC, 2012), the National Association of College 
Stores (NACS) is seeking clarification over the definitions of eBooks and eTextbooks, in an attempt to 
have eTextbooks exempted from the settlement (Digital Book World, 2012). 
The standard model for print textbook purchasing is the ͚student pays͛ model.  In comparison to the 
overall student numbers, academic libraries only acquire a relatively small number of textbooks for 
the collection.  There are trends that indicate that students are now buying fewer textbooks for 
themselves, with the expectation that the library will provide copies.  It is not currently common for 
the library to fund institution-wide access to eTextbooks (as opposed to the licences for eBooks).   
57
Ohio Digital Bookshelf http://drc.ohiolink.edu/handle/2374.OX/181280
VB.NET TIFF: VB.NET Code to Scan Document into TIFF Image File
In general, people often generate those scanned documents in TIFF or PDF file format Here we attach a link which can lead you to find a detailed Visual C# .NET
convert pdf to website; how to convert pdf into html code
38 
The JISC study in the UK reported that ͞libraries are keen to provide institution-wide online access to 
textbooks on an unlimited simultaneous user basis͟ ( ( ontent omplete & Only y onnect onsultancy, 
2009), particularly in distance education programs, but funding models did not accommodate such 
strategies.  The preferred business model in the UK study was to select resources at the individual 
title level and to purchase through an aggregator service on an unlimited concurrent user basis, in 
perpetuity. The value of perpetual access was questioned for textbooks, given the frequency of new 
editions (although it should be noted that as digital resources, eTextbooks may actually be updated 
dynamically).  Due to the devolved textbook distribution channels, eg campus bookstores, Amazon 
and other online booksellers, publishers reported that it was difficult to determine the appropriate 
price per institution for an unlimited user licence. The meant that, given the lack of consistency in 
textbook adoptions across diverse universities, it was not possible to determine a standard pricing 
model. 
Any proposals to make eTextbooks more widely available through the university library are received 
warily by publishers.  Some publishers were making some eTextbooks available to libraries as part of 
their subject collections and/or aggregated collections, regarding it as a potential new revenue 
stream, but others were not willing to risk a decline in sales with their textbook titles.  A major 
change to the traditional economic model of textbook publishing, with disruption to the publisher͛s 
revenue stream, would be inevitable if libraries were to become the principal provider of access to 
eTextbooks.  Nevertheless, UK librarians felt that publishers should be thinking about partnering 
with libraries as part of their strategy to secure future revenue streams, believing that making 
eTextbooks available on a limited access basis could potentially improve sell through to students.   
Academic libraries can play a valuable role in influencing the use and acceptance of eResources 
through the development and enhancement of digital literacies and information skills amongst 
students and academics. 
Publishers believe that a move away from the current paper textbook sale model to a subscription 
based model will enable publishers to build a repeated and closer engagement with their customers.  
Efforts are being made to dispel publishers͛ beliefs that libraries are blocking sales of eTexts, with 
the promise of ͞an air of détente in library-publisher relations͟ (Hadro, 2011). Other models of 
access proposed by librarians in the JISC study included the option to purchase textbook content for 
institution-wide use at the chapter level.  It was noted that libraries are able to extract content from 
printed and digital materials under the LA͛s omprehensive HE Licence (cf the statutory education 
licence provisions in the Copyright Act 1968 in Australia) to make it available in the library͛s eReserve 
collection or VLE.   
Students are faced with the question of how to best acquire access to the eTextbook they need.  As 
some titles are tied to a specific platform and format, there may be little choice in terms of the 
hardware and software required.  At this point in time, there is no single device that supports the 
entire digital textbook market.  If the title is available in more than one marketplace, students will 
need to consider the price, whether to rent or own the text, what devices are appropriate for access, 
and which eReader application best suits their study habits. While the risk exists that students may 
require more than one device, there is a strong industry push for common ePublishing standards 
that will allow flexibility and choice.  Nevertheless, students do need to take the hardware costs into 
account: the potentially lower prices for digital content needs to be offset by the hardware costs.   
The actual availability of eTextbook titles is also a factor, as it is likely that students will to have to 
39 
purchase the eReader (in whatever format) and some eTextbooks, yet additionally have to purchase 
some traditional print textbooks, so that there may be very little saving overall.  In the US, 
CampusBooks.com
58
compares prices from over 40 online textbook vendors, including the digital 
offerings from Barnes & Noble, CourseSmart, Textbooks.com, Kno, Cengage Brain, Amazon Kindle, 
Boundless Learning and eBooks.com.  A similar price comparison service for eTextbooks and 
eChapters is provided by Cengage in partnership with Verba Software
59
 These companies stress 
that students need to be very aware of the different formats and features of the available titles and 
they highlight the fact that the lowest price is always changing (CampusBooks.com, 2011). 
6.3.1  Commercial eTextbooks 
There are clear tensions between what consumers wish to pay for textbooks and what the 
publishers state they need to recoup.  The costs incurred by textbook publishers have traditionally 
included the work involved in typesetting, permissions, art and design, manuscript preparation, 
marketing, warehousing and distribution; digital delivery and customisation efforts impact further 
on the publishers͛ workflows.   On top of these traditional print textbook costs, the incumbent 
development costs of eTextbooks and digital learning resources have been outlined by Pasquini 
(2011):  
Needs analysis 
Technical analysis 
Instructional design 
o Content design and development 
o Interface design and development 
Development 
o Coding/testing 
o Graphic design and development 
o Media development 
Implementation 
o LMS integration 
Evaluation 
o Reaction 
o Usability 
o Behaviour 
o Results – overall learning benefit? 
Staff training 
Digital conversion 
eCommerce technologies. 
E.O. Wilson͛s enhanced digital resource Life on Earth, presented at the Apple iBooks2 launch in 
January 2012 has been highlighted as an example of what the future textbook might look like. The 
production team included educators, video crews, 3D animation artists trained in science and 
cinema, programmers and textbook professionals; notably philanthropic funding supported this 
ambitious initiative (E.O.Wilson Biodiversity Foundation, 2012). From May 2011, Pearson has 
supplied its products on a ͚net price basis͛, which has effectively removed the recommended retail 
price (RRP) and forced bookshops to determine their own margins on textbooks.  Campus 
58
CampusBooks.com www.campusbooks.com
59
Verba Software www.verbasoftware.com
40 
booksellers are concerned that the distribution model of eTextbooks supplied directly to students 
will mean that the book store will be dropped from the supply chain (Lindsay, 2011).  
One strategy used by publishers has been to increase the cost of print textbooks to subside the cost 
of developing digital content.  They are anxious that they may not get a fair return on their 
investment (Lee, 2010) unless they protect themselves against the danger of lost sales through 
͞rampant piracy͟ as occurred in the music industry ( ( hesser, 2011, p.29), with indiscriminate access 
to, downloading of and printing digital content. The challenge is ͞to develop business models that 
provide for the survival of content development without making the products unsustainably 
expensive for learners͟ ( ( hesser, 2011, p.29).  Students are seeking higher value products at a lower 
cost and pricing models should mirror the real value to students.  With a move to digital content, 
distribution costs will be minimal: the ͚hidden͛ costs of shipping, warehousing and unsold printed 
copies can be forgotten. ͞If business models can now emerge that make it economically 
advantageous to purchase eContent instead of print, the eTextbook is on course to outsell print 
within the decade, and possible much sooner͟ ( ( hesser, 2011, p.29).   
In the trade eBook market, the normal model is the Business to Consumer (B2C) model, whereby the 
publishers sell their products to individual consumers, eg Amazon, Barnes & Noble etc.  In the 
eTextbook market we often see a Business to Business (B2B) model, with the publishers negotiating 
with the university or the faculty to have their platforms integrated into existing institutional 
learning systems.  In the US, McGraw-Hill has very recently announced that it has identified a new 
business model by making its LearnSmart platform available to be purchased directly by students (or 
by parents for their children).  ͞This marks the first time that McGraw-Hill Higher Education, 
traditionally a business-to-business company (B2B) that sells to instructors and institutions, has 
marketed and sold its technology resources directly to students (B2C)͟ (EdNet, 2012).   This move 
reflects the marketing argument that as channels of distribution become wider and more diversified, 
the consumer becomes more powerful (Reynolds, 2011a). 
In some US universities, students are paying a required eText fee in lieu of buying their own text 
books.  It was mooted in the JISC study that in high cost courses, such as business and professional 
programs, it may be acceptable to provide core learning materials as part of the course fee.  In 
Australia, however, such proposals carry with them a high degree of risk in terms of non-compliance 
with the HESA/HEP Guidelines. 
Technology is disrupting the traditional economic models in publishing.  On average, the price of 
eTextbooks is around 30% lower than the print equivalent, which means that publishers are facing 
the challenge of lost revenue, especially with titles that have smaller print runs.  Publishers 
operating in the limited Australian market are particularly vulnerable.   If there is not a great deal of 
uniqueness in the content of a first year foundation subject in a specific discipline area, competing 
publishers will need to differentiate the delivery of the content, with features and functionality of 
the learning platform driving brand recognition. 
6.3.2   Licence models 
An useful overview of the licensing models and lending practices commonly used in the US to make 
general eBooks available in libraries is presented in the briefing document E-books in libraries 
41 
(O͛ rien, Gasser & Palfrey, 2012).  The following list presents the range of licence models for 
eTextbooks currently on offer: 
Hybrid market 
o Print or digital options 
o Print with access key 
Digital only 
o Requires access key 
Institutional discount for 100% student purchase 
Direct to consumer: publishers market directly to students 
o GAMSAT 
o Amazon 
o CourseSmart 
o Kno 
Purchase of individual chapters 
͚Just-in-time͛ access 
o A premium to be paid for additional access just prior to test periods and 
examinations 
Try before you buy 
o CafeScribe, CourseSmart and Kno offer two-week free trials for all titles 
Discount codes and coupons 
o Available on publisher websites 
Generous return policies 
o When students drop a course 
Site licences 
o University wide, modelled on software licensing, eg Microsoft, Adobe 
o Faculty responsibility 
o Library managed 
Multi-institutional licenses 
o Consortium arrangements 
Textbook purchase plus subscription for updates 
Subscription fee for the device plus access to eResources 
Nature: Principles of Biology 
o $49 for  lifetime access to a regularly updated textbook 
There has been discussion in the media and on education blogs about the problems associated with 
textbook access codes, with students airing their frustrations about the arrangements imposed on 
them.  Despite the fact that publishers say that it is standard practice to separate the textbook and 
the supplementary materials, there is ample anecdotal evidence to dispute this claim.  Publishers 
argue that the code allows students to access the digital version of the complete content as well as 
the online features, ͞so those who chose to a digital only option get quite a discount over buying a 
printed book͟ (Young, 2012b).   Students are constrained by the time limits imposed on access to the 
online resources and by the fact that they cannot share or on-sell the activated code.  These 
conditions make the acquisition and management of eTextbooks by libraries immensely 
complicated. 
Nevertheless, suggestions have been made that the digital licences for eTextbooks should be 
procured and managed by libraries.  This would inevitably require a new model of funding, with a 
mix of institutional and/or faculty support and the reallocation of existing library collection budgets.  
The shift of emphasis from collection to user access requires new costing models.  It is perhaps 
42 
timely to embark on some experimentation with pricing models based on user-need, with some pilot 
projects that can be closely analysed from all stakeholder perspectives.  
Rental 
In the US, the number of campus bookstores offering textbook rental programs has grown rapidly, 
with figures for Penn State University reaching 25,000 in 2011-12.  Rental arrangements for printed 
textbooks can secure a discount of 40%-70% off the recommended retail price.  Interestingly, it was 
reported at Penn State that the print textbook rental option halted the student interest in 
eTextbooks (US Fed News Service, 2012). 
Amazon  offers eTextbook rental options for their Kindle device, with rental periods between 30 and 
360 days; students pay only for the exact time the book is needed, or they can convert their plan to 
purchase the eTextbook. 
Chegg
60
began offering eTextbook titles at the end of 2011.  In addition to textbook rentals, Chegg 
offers access to digital services including homework help, course selection and class notes.  The 
company acquired an online tutoring site, Student of Fortune Inc, which had been sued by the major 
publishers for infringement of copyright through the uploading of unauthorised digital copies of 
textbooks and instructor solution manuals.  Chegg has cooperated with the publishers to rectify the 
DRM issues. 
CourseSmart uses a rental model for access to its eTextbook titles.  Students pay a fee to permit 
access for a specified period of time (usually 180 days), after which it expires.  There is a saving to 
students of about 60% over the retail price of the print title (Mulvihill, 2011) although as there is 
arguably no resale value for a used text, the digital price point is only marginally better than the 
print one 
California State University Monterey Bay responded to the demand for textbook rentals by 
launching a technology rental program.  Students can rent technology devices (tablet computers, 
calculators, digital cameras, pocket projectors, smart pens) by the week, month or semester. The 
loan arrangements mirror the library lending model, with fees for late or unreturned items linked to 
the student͛s academic record (US Fed News Service, 2011).  
7. eTextbook practice in Australian universities 
The adoption of eTextbooks in Australian universities is embryonic.  The concept is not new, and has 
been discussed at professional meetings for a couple of years, but the market has moved very 
slowly.  Views expressed in the stakeholder interviews mirrored the picture painted in the 
environmental scan.   There has been a steep rise in the adoption of iPads and tablets, with many 
students and staff utilising multiple devices such as laptop, iPad and smartphone.   However, this 
constant access to online information is resulting in concerns about how students actually locate and 
use relevant digital study materials.   Many stakeholders noted that print textbook sales have been 
progressively dropping and librarians have anecdotally noted an increase in demand for library 
copies, particularly during periods of intense assessment.  Last minute sales are also common in the 
bookstores, even during exam weeks.   
60
Chegg www.chegg.com/etextbooks
43 
Textbook titles in specific disciplines – eg science, business, law – tend to be the market leaders.  The 
level of sales of different titles is very much determined by the lecturers͛ use of the textbook in their 
teaching.  In their first semester, a number of students will buy all the required readings, but they 
then become more selective in their purchasing once they realise that the materials are not essential 
to their study.  Students are time poor, however, and they are increasingly looking for convenience 
in their lives; as they get used to the idea of eBooks being available through the library, student 
expectations are likely to change.  They will ultimately assume that their textbooks will also be 
available in digital format.   
Flexibility and choice are important factors for students: they want eTexts to be device agnostic, to 
be used with both tethered and untethered devices, and resources being both web-based and 
downloadable.  There is an awareness of the changing student demographic profile, particularly as a 
result of policies about widened participation, which is directly linked to respect for the principles of 
equity and accessibility in Australia.  While precise knowledge of the provisions of the HESA/HEP 
Guidelines is not widespread, there is general understanding that ͚you can͛t insist that a student 
buys a textbook͛. 
With academics ultimately being the decision makers in terms of textbook title selection, there is a 
clear sense that they wish to make autonomous decisions that reflect their individual subject 
expertise.  This means that there is a distributed, rather than centralised, market which one 
interviewee described as resembling ͚a cottage industry͛.  Academics tend to fall into four 
categories: those who are trail blazers and keen to be innovative in their teaching (15%); those who 
watch with interest and follow when there is evidence that innovative ideas can work (35%); those 
who are more traditional and may follow the lead of others if and when they have to (35%); and 
those who remain traditionalist and who are resistant to change (15%).  This means that while not all 
lecturers are aware of developments in the textbook market, some are beginning to rethink how 
they select and use textbooks and some are exploring the customisation of content with major 
publishers.   
Lecturers realise that it is important to understand the depth, breadth and quality of the wealth of 
resources that are included in the digital ͚package͛ to be able to consider how to best use them in 
their teaching.  To fully exploit the potential of eLearning resources, academics will also need to 
embrace new pedagogies and new modes of teaching; this in turn means that that new digital 
resources will bring with them the need for professional development to introduce new pedagogies 
into teaching.  These pedagogies should be further supported by peer professional learning activities 
and by communities of practice.  There is an emerging, although as yet narrow, interest in the open 
textbook model, with some academics expressing concerns about the quality of open resources.  
There is also some degree of uncertainty about the strategies that are required to effectively 
participate in the open movement.   
Critically, contemporary academics are time poor and subject to the very real tensions of the 
research vs teaching debate, which frequently led to ͚second class decisions͛ about their teaching 
responsibilities.  There is a sense that the lack of quality time for teaching may become a potential 
Achilles heel, with lecturers prepared to adopt third party learning solutions as a strategy to reduce 
their teaching load. It has been found that lecturers have little detailed understanding of the 
HESA/HEP Guidelines associated with the restrictions on the compulsory purchase of textbooks or 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested